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Author Topic: Florida Sink Holes  (Read 20345 times)

zorgon

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Re: Florida Sink Holes
« Reply #15 on: March 01, 2013, 09:08:33 PM »
...but i'm still a little weary about the entire sink hole thing...i'd rather come home from work and see a hole then wake up and be in one  8)

These people never knew what hit them. 7 people gone when house disappeared into a sinkhole  hang on just realize thse reports are about TWO  three years apart

Sinkhole in Guatemala: 2010
Giant Could Get Even Bigger
A roughly 30-story-deep sinkhole appeared Sunday in Guatemala City.






Quote
A huge sinkhole in Guatemala City (map), Guatemala, crashed into being on Sunday, reportedly swallowing a three-story building—and echoing a similar, 2007 sinkhole in Guatemala.

The sinkhole has likely been weeks or even years in the making—floodwaters from tropical storm Agatha caused the sinkhole to finally collapse, scientists say.

The sinkhole appears to be about 60 feet (18 meters) wide and about 30 stories deep, said James Currens, a hydrogeologist at the University of Kentucky.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/06/100601-sinkhole-in-guatemala-2010-world-science/
« Last Edit: March 01, 2013, 09:13:36 PM by zorgon »

zorgon

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Re: Florida Sink Holes
« Reply #16 on: March 01, 2013, 09:15:08 PM »
Guatemala Sinkhole, 2007


Photograph by Daniel LeClair, Reuters

In 2007 a similar sinkhole had opened up in Guatemala City—not far from where the 2010 sinkhole appeared. Based on pictures, both sinkholes are thought to have been about 60 feet (18 meters) wide and about 300 feet (100 meters) deep immediately after collapsing.

Typically, officials fill in sinkholes with large rocks and other debris. Over time, erosion by water and the drying effects of air will also cause the sides of a sinkhole to slope inward.

The Winter Park, Florida, sinkhole, seen in the following picture, was once similarly steep and about 100 feet (30 meters) deep. But the sunny Florida weather led to gentler slopes in about 24 hours.

"At the Guatemala City one, I don't think the sides are going to collapse that fast," said Doug Gouzie, a geologist at Missouri State University in Springfield.


National Geographic
« Last Edit: March 01, 2013, 09:22:07 PM by zorgon »

zorgon

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Re: Florida Sink Holes
« Reply #17 on: March 01, 2013, 09:31:27 PM »
Winter Park, Florida, Sinkhole


Photograph from AP

Quote
The sinkhole in Winter Park, Florida (map), opened up in 1981 underneath the city's public swimming pool, Missouri State's Gouzie said.

"I've never seen a final report as to whether the pool was leaking," he said, adding that water can flow into the underlying soil through tiny cracks in the bottom of a pool. Even watering plants at the pool's perimeter could have sent enough runoff through Florida's sandy soil to erode the solid limestone underneath.

Gouzie said the U.S. Geological Survey has mapped the types of bedrock that exist across the country. But studies of the underground cracks and fissures—and the way water travels through them—are still needed to predict where sinkholes could occur.

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

zorgon

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Re: Florida Sink Holes
« Reply #18 on: March 01, 2013, 09:35:57 PM »
Mulberry, Florida, Sinkhole


Photograph from Selbypic/AP

Quote
This 185-foot-deep (56-meter-deep) sinkhole appeared in 1994 in Mulberry, Florida (map), in a pile of waste material dumped by mining company IMC-Agrico. The company was mining rock to extract phosphate, a main ingredient in fertilizers and a chemical used to produce phosphoric acid, added to enhance the taste of soda and various food items.

After phosphate was extracted from the rocks, the gypsum-based waste product was dumped as a slurry. As layer after layer of the stuff dried, it formed cracks, like those that appear in dried mud. Water later made its way through the cracks and carried away subsurface material, setting the stage for a sinkhole.

Regulators said the company was able to manage the sinkhole to prevent any harm to the underground drinking water supply.

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

sky otter

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Re: Florida Sink Holes
« Reply #19 on: March 10, 2013, 11:25:40 AM »
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/10/sinkhole-season-underway-_n_2848466.html?utm_hp_ref=weird-news


'Sinkhole Season' Underway Across Florida
By TAMARA LUSH 03/05/13 03:16 PM ET EST 

SEFFNER, Fla. -- As crews entombed a man who was swallowed by a sinkhole near Tampa, the earth opened up again just a few miles away. On Tuesday, in a neighboring county, officials investigated reports of a home cracking, perhaps due to another sinkhole.

Across Florida this time of year, it's the start of what's unofficially considered the "sinkhole season," State Geologist Jonathan Arthur said. It coincides with the beginning of the state's rainy season and usually lasts until the end of summer.

"Florida is famous for bugs, alligators, pythons, hurricanes and now sinkholes," said Larry McKinnon, a Hillsborough sheriff's office spokesman. "I think our salvation is that for most of the time, our weather is picture-perfect."

But it's also the weather – along with man-made factors – that exacerbate sinkholes, experts said.

Arthur said February is usually when the state is at its driest, but it's also the start of the rainy season. Acidic rain can, over time, eat away the limestone and natural caverns that lie under much of the state, causing sinkholes. Both extremely dry weather and very wet weather can trigger sinkholes, he said.

"An extensive drought can cause soil and sediment over a cavity to be extremely dry and collapse," said Arthur.

On the other hand, following Tropical Storm Debby in 2012, dozens of sinkholes formed in counties north of Tampa because of the rain.

In Hillsborough County, an area particularly susceptible to sinkholes, 37-year-old Jeff Bush was killed last week when a hole opened up underneath his bedroom. Engineering experts have said it is too dangerous to retrieve Bush's body, so they demolished the home and filled the hole with gravel.

Hillsborough County is in a moderate drought, but engineers and county officials don't know exactly why the sinkhole formed in Seffner, and said they will likely never know.

The county has had 1.56 inches of rainfall since Jan. 1; it usually averages about 5.41 inches, according to the National Weather Service.

In Pinellas County, about 30 miles away from Seffner, fire-rescue workers in the community of Palm Harbor said they asked two people to evacuate a home after the residents reported "extensive cracking on the interior and exterior of the home." A county building inspector said the home was safe to live in, but the homeowner was seeking an engineer's opinion.

Arthur said he looked at 50 years of data and found that there is usually an uptick of reported sinkholes in February, with an increase until about July, when activity tapers off. December and January have typically low sinkhole activity.

Florida tracks naturally-occurring sinkholes and other ground collapses following a busted water main, development and groundwater pumping for crops.

In 2010, strawberry farmers in eastern Hillsborough County pumped water from the aquifer onto their crops during cold weather so that the water would freeze on the crops, creating a layer of ice that protects the berries.

So much water was pumped that more than 65 sinkholes opened in the area and wells went dry.

"When they take water out of the ground it's like taking air out of a balloon," said Bill Fernandez, a Florida sinkhole repair expert. "When you suck water out of the ground, you change the hydrostatic pressure underground and that's what can cause sinkholes."

Arthur added that moving a lot of dirt around for development can also trigger sinkholes. On Sunday in Largo, a failure in a pipe in a mall's stormwater control system under the parking lot caused the ground to collapse.

"There are a lot of variables," said Arthur. "Sinkholes are naturally occurring. Regardless of human activity they would occur."


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/10/sinkhole-season-underway-_n_2848466.html?utm_hp_ref=weird-news

21 pics of sinkholes at the link
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spacemaverick

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Re: Florida Sink Holes
« Reply #20 on: March 10, 2013, 01:36:11 PM »
I live in Brevard county in Florida and the water table down here is virtually almost at ground level in some areas.  I don't know if that is a good thing or not.  As far as I know we haven't had any sinkholes that I know of but for all I know Lake Washington in the Melbourne area may be a sinkhole they now call a lake.  We are only 11 ft, above sea level.
From the past into the future any way I can

zorgon

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Re: Florida Sink Holes
« Reply #21 on: March 10, 2013, 02:18:31 PM »
We are only 11 ft, above sea level.

Hmmm 11 Ft?  Wow  "How long can you tread water?" - Bill Cosby
You need a rubber dingy




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« Last Edit: March 10, 2013, 02:27:43 PM by zorgon »

zorgon

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« Last Edit: March 10, 2013, 02:24:55 PM by zorgon »

zorgon

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sky otter

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Re: Florida Sink Holes
« Reply #24 on: March 12, 2013, 11:27:39 AM »

YIKES






http://msn.foxsports.com/golf/story/mark-mihal-survives-mid-round-sinkhole-031213

Updated Mar 12, 2013 1:28 PM ET       
WATERLOO, Ill. (AP)
When it comes to dealing with this divot, score one for golfer Mark Mihal.


 The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the mortgage broker from Creve Coeur, Mo., is recovering after a sinkhole opened up beneath him Friday on the fairway at the 14th hole of a southwestern Illinois golf course.

The pit that swallowed him was 18 feet deep and 10 feet wide.

The 43-year-old Mihal was hoisted to safety with a rope. The encounter at Annbriar Golf Course near Waterloo just southeast of St. Louis left him with a dislocated shoulder.

Although Mihal says he still considers the course one of his favorites, he's having second thoughts about returning there, saying ''it'd be kind of strange playing that hole again, for sure.''

http://msn.foxsports.com/golf/story/mark-mihal-survives-mid-round-sinkhole-031213
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zorgon

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Re: Florida Sink Holes
« Reply #25 on: March 12, 2013, 02:13:14 PM »
WOW!!! puts a whole new image in my head of a "Hole in One"

 :o

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sky otter

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Re: Florida Sink Holes
« Reply #26 on: March 24, 2013, 11:59:21 AM »


we have mine subsidence's insurance here.. i wonder if they have sinkhole insurance in fla..? ::)



New sinkhole in same Fla. town where man was killed

A new sinkhole has been found in Seffner between two houses.

By Brian Hamacher, NBCMiami.com
Just weeks after a sinkhole swallowed a Florida man, killing him in his sleep in his Seffner home, another sinkhole has opened between two houses in the same town.

The latest sinkhole appeared in the 1400 block of Lake Shore Ranch Drive around 7 p.m. Saturday. It's estimated to be about 8 feet in diameter and 10 feet deep, according to WFLA.

Both homes on either side of the hole were evacuated as a precaution.

Seffner is the town where 37-year-old Jeff Bush was swallowed by a sinkhole that completely demolished his bedroom three weeks ago. Five others who were in the house escaped unharmed.

That sinkhole was estimated to be 20 feet wide and 20 feet deep. The house was later demolished


http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/03/24/17441852-new-sinkhole-in-same-fla-town-where-man-was-killed?lite=
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zorgon

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Re: Florida Sink Holes
« Reply #27 on: March 24, 2013, 01:06:21 PM »
we have mine subsidence's insurance here.. i wonder if they have sinkhole insurance in fla..? ::)

Seems the Law Makers have let the insurance companies off the hook. So much for protecting "We the people..."

The Saga of Sinkhole Insurance in Florida

Quote
A new law regarding sinkhole insurance became effective this past January, just in time for one of the worst sinkhole seasons Florida has seen in years. This law will especially impact residents of two particular counties, Pasco and Hernando, because private insurers are no longer required to automatically include sinkhole coverage in homeowner policies. Instead, the policies may protect for more limited circumstances, like those of catastrophic ground cover collapse damage. Sinkhole insurance policies now come with hefty additional fees.

Who is responsible for the repairs caused by sinkholes, which are naturally occurring land-surface depressions typically found in limestone-rich areas? What role do the homeowner's insurance companies operating in Florida and the Florida government have in aiding those impacted by sinkholes? These and other questions may help resolve the debate among many Floridians about whether to drop, add or renew comprehensive sinkhole insurance.

http://www.sinkholelawyer.com/Insurance-Articles/The-Saga-of-Sinkhole-Insurance-in-Florida.shtml

 


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