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Author Topic: Russia - Should We Be Alarmed Yet? :)  (Read 4513 times)

space otter

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Re: Russia - Should We Be Alarmed Yet? :)
« Reply #15 on: October 24, 2015, 09:43:57 AM »


zorgon.. really ! .... putin answers the question..what could be worse than what we have now..geeeeezeeeeee


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/vladimir-putin-russia-news-media_56215944e4b0bce34700b1df


Eline Gordts
Senior World Editor, The Huffington Post
Posted: 10/24/2015 07:02 AM EDT

Putin's Press: How Russia's President Controls The News

Russia may soon lose some of its last free media.


Rossiya 24 via YouTube

A Russian TV reporter on state-owned station Rossiya24 outlines the weather conditions in Syria days after Russia announces bombing campaign.


Every week, The WorldPost asks an expert to shed light on a topic driving headlines around the world. Today, we speak with Nataliya Rostova, a chronicler and critic of the Russian media.

Days after Russian President Vladimir Putin committed his air force to a bombing campaign in Syria in support of President Bashar Assad, a weather forecaster on Russia's state-owned Rossiya24 TV channel positioned herself in front of a massive screen showing Russian fighter planes.

Analyzing wind speeds and cloud formations, the woman reassured viewers that Syria's weather in October was perfect for Russia's aerial assault. "Experts note the time for the start of the air operation [in Syria] is chosen very well," she said, reported Agence France Presse.

The Oct. 5 broadcast was just the latest example of the way the Russian government uses the mass media to sell domestic and international political decisions to the public, a trend exacerbated since the start of the conflict in Crimea last year.

Freedom House, which publishes the annual Freedom of The Press report, noted of the press in the country that:

Russia’s occupation of the Crimean Peninsula and involvement in the conflict in eastern Ukraine helped to drive an increase in propagandistic content in the Russian news media and tighter restrictions on dissenting views in 2014. Media outlets became more firmly incorporated into the Kremlin’s policy efforts, moving from supporting the government with biased news to actively participating in an “information war” with its perceived adversaries. Ongoing insurgencies, corrupt officials, and crime within Russia continued to pose a danger to journalists who reported on them, and the remaining independent media outlets in the country came under growing pressure from the authorities.


The WorldPost spoke with Nataliya Rostova, a visiting scholar at the University of Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism and a senior correspondent at Moscow-based online magazine Slon.ru, about Putin's control of the press. Rostova is also the author of Gorbymedia.com, a research project about the birth of the Russian media in the era of former President Mikhail Gorbachev. 

How has the Russian media portrayed the Russian intervention in Syria?

In general, the Russian media portrays anything going on from the point of view of Vladimir Putin. He has unlimited access to the media and they explain everything that's going on according to his official statement. It doesn't really matter if it's a war in Syria or any other topic.

How does the Russian president manage to control the media with such great success?

After Putin came into power in 2000, he established control over the three main TV stations. In 2001 and 2002, he took control of the two biggest TV channels, ORT (now First Channel) and NTV. The state broadcaster, RTR (now Rossiya 1), was already under his control.

“The Russian media portrays anything going on from the point of view of Vladimir Putin.

During his subsequent year in power, Putin moved more and more outlets under his influence until he controlled most of the major mainstream media. He appoints editors and general directors, either officially or unofficially. The director of VGTRK, the biggest [state] media  holding, which owns Rossiya 1, Rossiya 2 etc., is appointed by presidential decree, for example. When it comes to so-called independent media, which are smaller and not owned by the state, there's often an agreement between the Kremlin, the owner and the editor-in-chief. Even Aleksey Venediktov, the editor-in-chief of Echo Moskvy, which is sometimes called the last remaining independent radio station in Russia but in reality isn't independent, says publicly that Putin is the only person who can fire him.

The editors and directors have so-called weekly meetings with the presidential administration to talk about the upcoming events, what will be significant in the next week, what the administration wants to cover.

Additionally, media outlets are dependent on state funding and the TV advertising market is almost monopolized as well. 

Do Russian citizens in any way ask for more objective coverage?

We all - journalists, the state, and society - failed in terms of media freedom, because when you ask an average Russian if freedom of the press is important to him, he'll say no. In general, they're ok with the idea of censorship. They're ok with the idea of state-owned media.

Until Mikhail Gorbachev opened up the Soviet Union at the end of the 1980s and started to allow TV and newspapers to report critically, Russian media was completely state-controlled. Does that history of censorship help explain the situation today?

In my opinion, it's related to the fact that we got this freedom from above. Because it was given from above, people don't value it. We didn’t really fight for it. We didn’t demand it. It was just given to us and "so what" if it's taken.

Journalists also really failed the people’s trust. It is a complex story, but to keep it simple: In the beginning of the 1990s journalists were considered messiahs, praised for telling the truth. Many of them even became deputies in parliament. But they turned out to be either biased or corrupt. During the oligarchs' information wars under the Yeltsin presidency, entire editorial staffs were taken and bought. Journalists were taking sides in a number of political events. A lot of people just saw that it was easy to buy them.

“We all - journalists, the state and society - failed in terms of media freedom.

Can social media play a role in critiquing the state version of events? 

On a personal level, sometimes, but in general, it’s not a trend. It doesn’t influence anything. The number of readers that receive information from media outlets that are critical to the state is no more than five percent and only a minority receives critical news through social media.

You don't seem very optimistic about the future.

I think that I’m realistic. I've been covering media since 2002 and I saw the landscape change step by step. I didn't want to believe it every time they'd take one more channel, every time another outlet lost its integrity. But I witnessed it anyway.

Now, the last option for editorial integrity has been taken as well. A new law which takes effect next year will restrict foreign ownership of media outlets to no more than 20 percent. It was the last resort for independent journalism in Russia, being owned by foreigners.

For example: Forbes Magazine, which is distributed in Russia by the German company Axel Springer, is a very good source for independent journalism. The magazine was founded in 2004 by Paul Khlebnikov, an American with a Russian background, and he was its first editor-in-chief. He was shot and killed a few months after the launch of the magazine, and the case still hasn't been fully investigated. Forbes remained an excellent media outlet, even after Khlebnikov's death. However, now it has been bought by a Russian owner. A few days ago he admitted publicly in an interview that Forbes readers are not interested in the information of officials running state-owned companies. Where will this situation lead? Most likely, honest journalists will have to quit their positions. I'm sending my deepest condolences to colleagues. They are not the first ones though, they are one of the last ones.

The same fate awaits the best quality newspaper Vedomosti, which comes together with the Wall Street Journal and the Financial Times. Russia is the only place where two competing companies issue one product together. But they won't be able to do that anymore. It means we may lose some of the last free media.




More from The WorldPost's weekly interview series:

- Russia Says Its Airstrikes In Syria Are Perfectly Legal. Are They?
- Was The Libyan Intervention A Mistake?
- What's Behind The Islamic State's Propaganda War
- Inside The Islamic State's Apocalyptic Beliefs



 

Offline Eighthman

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Re: Russia - Should We Be Alarmed Yet? :)
« Reply #16 on: October 24, 2015, 11:06:41 AM »
Take your quoted sentences and apply them to the USA, please:

"How has the US media portrayed the US intervention in Iraq?" (and it's horrific results) Do they ever widely admit that they lost in Vietnam and Iraq - and are losing in Afghanistan, against poorly armed jihadists?

How do the political elite control the US media so well that they keep ignoring evidence that the US, Saudis and Israel are actively supporting terrorists? Or that this constitutes treason?

How can the US media be so solidly controlled that they would allow a man with a wildly sketchy, indefinite, vague past such as Obama to become President? Or that they anoint a successor who lacks truthfulness, is bought by rich contributors,  is a warmonger,  and may have severe health concerns consistent with being elderly?

Who has a greater % of its citizens in prison, Russia or the US?  Who has surrounded the other with countless military bases?  Who seems to have steady, competent leadership?


space otter

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Re: Russia - Should We Be Alarmed Yet? :)
« Reply #17 on: October 25, 2015, 05:07:20 PM »

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/26/world/europe/russian-presence-near-undersea-cables-concerns-us.html?_r=1

By DAVID E. SANGER and ERIC SCHMITTOCT. 25, 2015

Russian Presence Near Undersea Cables Concerns U.S.

WASHINGTON — Russian submarines and spy ships are aggressively operating near the vital undersea cables that carry almost all global Internet communications, raising concerns among some American military and intelligence officials that the Russians might be planning to attack those lines in times of tension or conflict.

The issue goes beyond old Cold War worries that the Russians would tap into the cables — a task American intelligence agencies also mastered decades ago. The alarm today is deeper: The ultimate Russian hack on the United States could involve severing the fiber-optic cables at some of their hardest-to-access locations to halt the instant communications on which the West’s governments, economies and citizens have grown dependent.

While there is no evidence yet of any cable cutting, the concern is part of a growing wariness among senior American and allied military and intelligence officials over the accelerated activity by Russian armed forces around the globe. At the same time, the internal debate in Washington illustrates how the United States is increasingly viewing every Russian move through a lens of deep distrust, reminiscent of the Cold War.

Inside the Pentagon and the nation’s spy agencies, the assessments of Russia’s growing naval activities are highly classified and not publicly discussed in detail. American officials are secretive about what they are doing both to monitor the activity and to find ways to recover quickly if cables are cut. But more than a dozen officials confirmed in broad terms that it had become the source of significant attention in the Pentagon.

“I’m worried every day about what the Russians may be doing,” said Rear Adm. Frederick J. Roegge, commander of the Navy’s submarine fleet in the Pacific, who would not answer questions about possible Russian plans for cutting the undersea cables.

Cmdr. William Marks, a Navy spokesman in Washington, said: “It would be a concern to hear any country was tampering with communication cables; however, due to the classified nature of submarine operations, we do not discuss specifics.”

In private, however, commanders and intelligence officials are far more direct. They report that from the North Sea to Northeast Asia and even in waters closer to American shores, they are monitoring significantly increased Russian activity along the known routes of the cables, which carry the lifeblood of global electronic communications and commerce.

Just last month, the Russian spy ship Yantar, equipped with two self-propelled deep-sea submersible craft, cruised slowly off the East Coast of the United States on its way to Cuba — where one major cable lands near the American naval station at Guantánamo Bay. It was monitored constantly by American spy satellites, ships and planes. Navy officials said the Yantar and the submersible vehicles it can drop off its decks have the capability to cut cables miles down in the sea.

“The level of activity,” a senior European diplomat said, “is comparable to what we saw in the Cold War.”

One NATO ally, Norway, is so concerned that it has asked its neighbors for aid in tracking Russian submarines.

Adm. James Stavridis, formerly NATO’s top military commander and now dean of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, said in an email last week that “this is yet another example of a highly assertive and aggressive regime seemingly reaching backwards for the tools of the Cold War, albeit with a high degree of technical improvement.”

The operations are consistent with Russia’s expanding military operations into places like Crimea, eastern Ukraine and Syria, where President Vladimir V. Putin has sought to demonstrate a much longer reach for Russian ground, air and naval forces.

“The risk here is that any country could cause damage to the system and do it in a way that is completely covert, without having a warship with a cable-cutting equipment right in the area,” said Michael Sechrist, a former project manager for a Harvard-M.I.T. research project funded in part by the Defense Department.

“Cables get cut all the time — by anchors that are dragged, by natural disasters,” said Mr. Sechrist, who published a 2012 study of the vulnerabilities of the undersea cable network. But most of those cuts take place within a few miles from shore, and can be repaired in a matter of days.

What worries Pentagon planners most is that the Russians appear to be looking for vulnerabilities at much greater depths, where the cables are hard to monitor and breaks are hard to find and repair.

Mr. Sechrist noted that the locations of the cables are hardly secret. “Undersea cables tend to follow the similar path since they were laid in the 1860s,” he said, because the operators of the cables want to put them in familiar environments under longstanding agreements.

The exception are special cables, with secret locations, that have been commissioned by the United States for military operations; they do not show up on widely available maps, and it is possible the Russians are hunting for those, officials said.

The role of the cables is more important than ever before. They carry more than $10 trillion a day in global business, including from financial institutions that settle their transactions on them every second. Any significant disruption would cut the flow of capital. The cables also carry more than 95 percent of daily communications.

So important are undersea cables that the Department of Homeland Security lists their landing areas — mostly around New York, Miami and Los Angeles — at the top of its list of “critical infrastructure.”

Attention to underwater cables is not new. In October 1971, the American submarine Halibut entered the Sea of Okhotsk north of Japan, found a telecommunications cable used by Soviet nuclear forces, and succeeded in tapping its secrets. The mission, code-named Ivy Bells, was so secret that a vast majority of the submarine’s sailors had no idea what they had accomplished. The success led to a concealed world of cable tapping.

And a decade ago, the United States Navy launched the submarine Jimmy Carter, which intelligence analysts say is able to tap undersea cables and eavesdrop on communications flowing through them.

Submarines are not the only vessels that are snooping on the undersea cables. American officials closely monitor the Yantar, which Russian officials insist is an oceanographic ship with no ties to espionage.

“The Yantar is equipped with a unique onboard scientific research complex which enables it to collect data on the ocean environment, both in motion and on hold. There are no similar complexes anywhere,” said Alexei Burilichev, the head of the deepwater research department at the Russian Defense Ministry, according to sputniknews.com in May 2015.

American concern over cable cutting is just one aspect of Russia’s modernizing Navy that has drawn new scrutiny.

Adm. Mark Ferguson, commander of American naval forces in Europe, speaking in Washington this month said that the proficiency and operational tempo of the Russian submarine force was increasing.

Citing public remarks by the Russian Navy chief, Adm. Viktor Chirkov, Admiral Ferguson said the intensity of Russian submarine patrols had risen by almost 50 percent over the last year. Russia has increased its operating tempo to levels not seen in over a decade. Russian Arctic bases and their $2.4 billion investment in the Black Sea Fleet expansion by 2020 demonstrate their commitment to develop their military infrastructure on the flanks, he said.

Admiral Ferguson said that as part of Russia’s emerging doctrine of so-called hybrid warfare, it is increasingly using a mix of conventional force, Special Operations mission and new weapons in the 21st-century battlefield.

“This involves the use of space, cyber, information warfare and hybrid warfare designed to cripple the decision-making cycle of the alliance,” Admiral Ferguson said, referring to NATO. “At sea, their focus is disrupting decision cycles.”


Offline zorgon

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Re: Russia - Should We Be Alarmed Yet? :)
« Reply #18 on: October 25, 2015, 09:11:56 PM »
Psychic Edgar Cayce Predicted Putin Would Save World From WW3



Quote
One of the world’s most famous psychics, Edgar Cayce, apparently predicted that Russian President Vladimir Putin would be a “force of light” in preventing World War Three from occurring amid the global turmoil we see today.

His predictions were made over 80 years ago in a series of “World Affairs Readings” about the future of world finance, world leadership, collective spirituality, and the important role Russia would play on the world’s stage.

Wakingtimes.com reports:

Cayce foresaw that future world crises would hinge on finance, and he pointed to Russia as being the thorn in the side of the financial powers that were organizing themselves against the good of humanity in a post WWII world.

When asked in 1932 about political and economic trends in Europe Cayce zeroed in on Russia:

http://yournewswire.com/psychic-edgar-cayce-predicted-putin-would-save-world-from-ww3/

Offline spacemaverick

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Re: Russia - Should We Be Alarmed Yet? :)
« Reply #19 on: October 25, 2015, 10:55:22 PM »
Psychic Edgar Cayce Predicted Putin Would Save World From WW3



http://yournewswire.com/psychic-edgar-cayce-predicted-putin-would-save-world-from-ww3/

Very interesting indeed Zorgon, very interesting......
From the past into the future any way I can...Educating...informing....guiding.

space otter

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space otter

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Re: Russia - Should We Be Alarmed Yet? :)
« Reply #21 on: October 29, 2015, 10:51:16 AM »


http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/russian-jets-buzz-uss-ronald-reagan/ar-BBmzwIi?li=AAa0dzB

International Business Times
Christopher Harress
1 hr ago




Russian Jets Buzz USS Ronald Reagan

Russian bomber warplanes came within one nautical mile of the U.S. Navy aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan earlier this week, prompting the nuclear-powered vessel to scramble fighter jets, according to spokesperson from the U.S. Navy’s 7th Fleet, who spoke with Stars and Stripes Thursday. The giant Tupolev bomber aircraft, also known as the Bear, flew as low as 500 feet as it approached the Reagan, which had been conducting scheduled maneuvers with the South Korean Navy in the Korean Peninsula.

As the two Tupolevs approached, the Reagan launched four F/A-18 Super Hornet fighter jets to intercept and identify, a standard procedure when encountering unidentifiable aircraft, according to 7th Fleet spokeswoman Lt. Lauren Cole.

While the USS Ronald Reagan sent up four combat aircraft to deal with the two bombers, the entire incident took place in international waters, making the approach completely legal if not somewhat provocative and potentially dangerous.
We are advocates of any country being able to operate within international norms,” Cole said. “We do caveat that with the fact that all of these operations need to be conducted in accordance with the rights and regulations of other countries, and within a safe manner.”

Russian aircraft have made a habit over the last year of using its aircraft to test international boundaries by violating the airspace of other countries and approaching U.S. and NATO ships in what the U.S. have previously described as “provocative” action.

During a similar incident in April last year, the USS Donald Cook witnessed a Russian SU-24 fighter jet make 12 “close-range, low-altitude” flybys while the ship was conducting exercises in the Black Sea near Romania, according to the Pentagon. Last month, Turkey accused Russian jets of infiltrating its airspace while it conducted bombing missions inside Syria.

The U.S. has been exercising freedom of international waters this week after its ship the USS Lassen sailed through U.N.-mandated international waters that China had claimed as its sovereign territory.



 

Offline zorgon

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Re: Russia - Should We Be Alarmed Yet? :)
« Reply #22 on: October 29, 2015, 11:10:53 AM »

zorgon.. really ! .... putin answers the question..what could be worse than what we have now..geeeeezeeeeee

Well if Russia ran the US at least we would have a SPACE PROGRAM :P

And all this 'freedom" of speech and the press has gotten to far out of hand...  Sure we are 'free' to say what we want, but look at FB and Twitter... MOST people use that freedom to spread lies, hatred and false news as fact

Sooner or later we need to reach a middle point... or it will all fall apart

So in China and Russia  the State controls the media

In the USA the Rothschilds control the Media (and the Money) :P

space otter

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Re: Russia - Should We Be Alarmed Yet? :)
« Reply #23 on: October 29, 2015, 03:25:27 PM »




Sooner or later we need to reach a middle point... or it will all fall apart

it will all fall apart


isn't that what IS  already happening?

Offline zorgon

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Re: Russia - Should We Be Alarmed Yet? :)
« Reply #24 on: October 30, 2015, 02:02:42 PM »
isn't that what IS  already happening?

Not sure...

According to the internet... YES

According to people I have talked to in other countries?... NO  Just some issolated incidents that are blown up in the media

According to what I see outside here in Vegas?... NO

I see clear blue skies, weather has been awesome accept a bit warmer for longer than normal but its cooled off now. No tanks driving up the street, no cop shootings, no Black or Muslim riots. 

So perhaps its all a hologram and I am in a different one :P

space otter

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Re: Russia - Should We Be Alarmed Yet? :)
« Reply #25 on: November 06, 2016, 09:34:47 AM »
this kinda fits here doesn't deserve a thread of it's own imo


Putin grants action star Steven Seagal Russian citizenship
 AFP AFP
3 days ago


© Provided by AFP Hollywood star Seagal and judo-loving Kremlin tough guy Putin have struck up a bromance in recent years
President Vladimir Putin signed off Thursday on a decree granting Russian citizenship to US action hero actor Steven Seagal, the latest high-profile passport handout to a Western celebrity.

Hollywood star Seagal and judo-loving Kremlin tough guy Putin have struck up a bromance in recent years, with Seagal visiting Russia repeatedly and defending Moscow's 2014 annexation of Crimea from Ukraine.

"He was asking quite insistently and over a lengthy period to be granted citizenship," Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told journalists.

"He is well known for his warm feelings towards our country and has never hidden them."

Seagal is the latest in a string of high-profile Westerners to be granted Russian citizenship after buddying up with Putin.

Veteran French actor Gerard Depardieu was given a Russian passport in 2013 after the star became a tax exile in ire over rate hikes in his native country.

Putin has also handed out citizenship to US boxer Roy Jones Jr after sipping tea with him in Crimea and to American mixed martial artist Jeff Monson.


© Provided by AFP French actor Gerard Depardieu was given a Russian passport in 2013 after he became a tax exile in ire over rate hikes in France
Seagal's fame peaked in the late 1980s and early 1990s with films such as "Under Siege" and "Above the Law", but he remains hugely popular in eastern Europe and was granted Serbian citizenship in January.

Like Depardieu, he has previously hung out with Putin, a fellow martial arts fan, and other strongmen leaders from the former Soviet Union.

After Russia's annexation of Crimea, Seagal called Putin "one of the great living world leaders" and even performed with his blues band in the annexed Black Sea peninsula.

In August, veteran Belarussian leader Alexander Lukashenko made Seagal eat one of his homegrown carrots in an awkward encounter that drew mockery online.

Offline spacemaverick

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Re: Russia - Should We Be Alarmed Yet? :)
« Reply #26 on: November 06, 2016, 12:57:27 PM »
It does fit Space Otter.  People are getting fed up with our supposed leaders are looking for strong leader types.  Putin does fit in.  Here is another American, Charlie Armstrong, (grandson of Louis Armstrong the jazz great)



The Voice Russia and you will find him around Moscow.
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Offline robomont

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Re: Russia - Should We Be Alarmed Yet? :)
« Reply #27 on: November 06, 2016, 01:24:26 PM »
big fan of louis armstrong.
ive never been much for rules.
being me has its priviledges.

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Offline Irene

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Re: Russia - Should We Be Alarmed Yet? :)
« Reply #28 on: November 06, 2016, 01:41:22 PM »
Putin sees our pathetic "leader" for what he is, an idiot who hates the country he runs. All he's doing is poking Obama with a stick for his own amusement because he knows Obama is nothing more than a meatbag full of hot air.

I, too, would find it amusing except that I hate the fact the rest of the planet is laughing at us.
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Offline Eighthman

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Re: Russia - Should We Be Alarmed Yet? :)
« Reply #29 on: November 06, 2016, 02:49:37 PM »
I predict there will be noticeable emigration to Russia from the US and EU.  The fading western culture seems to be led by nihilists. 




 


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