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Author Topic: More Genetic Tampering - Messing with your Bacon and Pets  (Read 8784 times)

Offline zorgon

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More Genetic Tampering - Messing with your Bacon and Pets
« on: September 28, 2011, 12:06:27 AM »
Recent Biotechnology Innovation
Is a Bit Fishy: A Fluorescent Pet


Oh and you thought I was JOKING about the Glofish huh? Well I found these on a whim when I searched for Glofish to go with the article... didn't expect to find genetically altered fish that glow green  :o



Quote
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- In the basement of a building down an alley here floats the future of bioengineered pets, and it is glowing.

In a corner, small fish flit about in a dozen aquariums. Bill Kuo, a manager at Taikong Corp., draws a thick curtain and switches on black lights over the tanks. Suddenly, the fish glow a bright green. "Imagine you come home from work, turn out the lights and look at these," Mr. Kuo says. "It's very relaxing."

Fluorescent fish are just one of the latest off-the-wall innovations to come along in the biotechnology march. American researchers are seeking approval for a super-size salmon, retooled with growth hormones. A Canadian company, Nexia Biotechnologies Inc., is injecting spider genes into goats to produce milk that can be refined and woven into "BioSteel," for use in surgical sutures and "ballistic protection," the company says. Another Canadian group has trademarked the name "EnviroPig" for its genetically modified swine, whose manure contains fewer phosphates, a natural pollutant.

But Taikong's fish, which hit the market in Taiwan last month, may well be the world's first genetically modified house pets -- certainly the first designed to glow in the dark and one of the first leisure-time applications for genetic engineering. Born in a Taiwan biologist's lab in 2001 and written up in a scientific journal, the fish were soon discovered by Taikong, a 20-year-old company that sells aquarium equipment and fish food to shops around the world.

Glowing Fish

Original Source - Wall Street Journal

Frankenstein fish will glow in the bowl
By Thair Shaikh


Quote
A TAIWANESE company has created a genetically modified zebra fish that will glow in the dark, raising fears among environmentalists and the aquarium industry that the fish will start a trend for bio-engineered "Frankenstein pets". The modified fish are expected to be imported into Britain later in the year.

They are the first ornamental fish to be genetically modified. A jellyfish gene has been added to make them glow yellow-green. The GM Medaka or zebra fish - an east Asian freshwater variety - has been developed by Taiwan's Taikong Corporation. It is called the TK-1.

Taikong reported strong interest in Britain, where the aquatic industry is worth £300 million a year. It insisted that the TK-1 was safe, sterile and the fluorescent gene was not harmful. Taikong said it would satisfy European Union rules that genetically modified imports must not threaten health or the environment.

Aquatic industry specialists are worried, however, that the TK-1 is the first of many GM pet fish destined for Britain. Tropical fish are being bio-engineered to tolerate cold and could colonise British waters if they escaped.

Frankenstein fish will glow in the bowl

Love this quote:
"Piranhas that could survive in our waterways would be a major problem," said Derek Lambert, the editor of Today's Fishkeeper magazine, who is urging traders to boycott the TK-1. "We are worried about Frankenstein fish."

Ya think?
 ::)

Fun with Glow-in-the-Dark Pets and Animals

Quote
In 2003 scientists created the ultimate pet: genetically modified fish that glow in the dark. In future, more pets will be added to the list. Take a look at what may be possible...

http://www.glowingpets.com/
« Last Edit: September 28, 2011, 12:16:50 AM by zorgon »

Offline zorgon

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Re: More Genetic Tampering
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2011, 12:13:46 AM »
Enviropig


Image Credit: National Geographic
Genetically altered "Enviropigs" can pass on greener genes to their offspring.

Gene-Altered "Enviropig" to Reduce Dead Zones?
March 30, 2010


Quote
Pigs modified to excrete less phosphorus win limited approval in Canada.
Move over, bacon. Here comes something greener.

A genetically engineered pig recently approved for limited production in Canada makes urine and feces that contain up to 65 percent less phosphorous, officials have announced.

That could be good news for lakes, rivers, and ocean deltas, where phosphorous from animal waste can play a role in causing algal blooms. These outbursts of algae rapidly deplete the water's oxygen, creating vast dead zones for fish and other aquatic life.

Dubbed Enviropig, the genetically altered animal cleared a major hurdle last month, when the government-run Environment Canada approved the animal for production in controlled research settings.

Gene-Altered "Enviropig" to Reduce Dead Zones? - National Geographic

Quote
The Enviropig is the trademark for a genetically modified line of Yorkshire pigs with the capability to digest plant phosphorus more efficiently than ordinary unmodified pigs that was developed at the University of Guelph. Enviropigs produce the enzyme phytase in the salivary glands that is secreted in the saliva. When cereal grains are consumed, the phytase mixes with feed in the pig's mouth, and once swallowed the phytase is active in the acidic environment of the stomach degrading indigestible phytic acid with the release of phosphate that is readily digested by the pig.

Cereal grains including corn, soybean and barley contain 50 to 75% of their phosphorus in the form of phytic acid. Since the Enviropigs can now digest phytic acid, there is no need to include either a mineral phosphate supplement or commercially produced phytase to balance the diet. Because no phosphorus is added to the diet and there is digestion of the phytic acid, the manure is substantially reduced in phosphorus content, ranging from a 20 to 60% decrease depending upon the stage of growth and the diet consumed.

The benefits of the enviropig if commercialized include reduced feed cost and reduced phosphorus pollution as compared to the raising of ordinary pigs.

The Enviropig was developed by the introduction of a transgene construct composed of the promoter segment of the murine parotid secretory protein gene and the E. coli phytase gene. This construct was introduced into a fertilized embryo by pronuclear microinjection, and this embryo along with other embryos was surgically implanted into the reproductive tract of an estrous synchronized sow. After a 114 day gestation period, the sow farrowed and piglets born were checked for the presence of the transgene and for phytase enzyme activity in the saliva. Through breeding, this line of pigs is in the 7th generation, and the phytase trait is stably transmitted in a Mendelian fashion.

An editorial entitled "Genetically engineered meat close to your table" was published with online video and audio explaining the digestive capability of the Enviropig

SOURCE - WIKIPEDIA

GM pigs: Green ham with your eggs?

Quote
The BBC's Jeremy Cooke has had rare access to some genetically modified Enviropigs in Canada

In a small complex of nondescript barns set in the flat, snow-covered fields of Ontario is a scientific project which, some argue, represents the new frontier of a technology that could benefit millions of people around the world.

For others what is happening here is weird, dangerous science.

The pigs they are breeding could be among the first genetically modified farm animal to be approved for human consumption.

The huge controversy over the introduction of genetically modified crops is well documented, but this seems to take that debate a step further, and into even more troubled waters.

    "I am very worried and I think people around the world should be worried about what's happening in North America” - Lucy Sharratt Anti-GM campaigner


GM pigs: Green ham with your eggs? - BBC News

Genetically engineered meal close to your table

Quote
The pigs, pale pink and bristly, trot around the pen, stopping every so often to root in piles of bedding. They grunt and squeal and wag their short curlicue tails. All three like a hard scratch on the rump.

In almost every way, these broad-backed oinkers are just like the other Yorkshire pigs at the opposite end of the barn.

All except for the brackish green muck that oozes from their backsides. And the snippet of mouse DNA that has been slipped into their piggy chromosomes.

These are Enviropigs, developed by researchers at the University of Guelph to poop out more environmentally friendly waste. The trademarked pigs are just one of dozens of genetically engineered animals at research institutions around the world whose genes have been altered for human benefit. And, due to a recent move in the U.S., the Enviropig may be the first to arrive on your dinner plate.

Genetically engineered meal close to your table - Toronto Star

« Last Edit: September 28, 2011, 01:48:50 AM by zorgon »

Offline Somamech

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Re: More Genetic Tampering - Messing with your Bacon and Pets
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2011, 02:29:03 AM »
Yeah Taiwanese companys seemed obsessed with Glow in The Dark  :o


Glow in The Dark Angel Fish
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sN6P6kFjrjM[/youtube]



Offline zorgon

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Re: More Genetic Tampering - Messing with your Bacon and Pets
« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2011, 11:19:37 PM »
Scientists Produce Glow-in-the-Dark Cats

Mayo Clinic Teams with Glowing Cats Against AIDS, Other Diseases

Quote
The Mayo team of physicians, virologists, veterinarians and gene therapy researchers, along with collaborators in Japan, sought to mimic the way evolution normally gives rise over vast time spans to protective protein versions. They devised a way to insert effective monkey versions of them into the cat genome.


credit: Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic Teams with Glowing Cats

Scientists Produce Glow-in-the-Dark Cats

Quote
When scientists insert rhesus macaque genes plus jellyfish genes into unfertilized cat eggs, the cats that result post-fertilization are resistant to feline immunodeficiency virus, which causes feline AIDS. They also glow fluorescent green under "special" lights.


Scientists Produce Glow-in-the-Dark Cats


Green glow the cats - New Scientist

Related Links:

1. Glow cat: fluorescent green felines could help study of HIV
2. Antiviral restriction factor transgenesis in the domestic cat
3. Glow-in-the-Dark Kittens Lend a Paw to AIDS Fight
4. Glowing transgenic cats could boost AIDS research


Here one of the cats that was genetically engineered to have genes that code for a fluorescent jellyfish protein, which produces the green color, as well as an antiviral restriction factor from a rhesus macaque.
CREDIT: Mayo ClinicView full size image


« Last Edit: October 02, 2011, 12:53:12 AM by zorgon »

Offline zorgon

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Re: More Genetic Tampering - Messing with your Bacon and Pets
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2011, 12:08:28 AM »
Quote
Originally posted by ellirium113
[Hypothetical] Glow in the dark tarantula...who would be nervous if you encountered this in the dark?  :o

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MkpIOGPkyAI&feature=related[/youtube]

Dogs...

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j4rwrzz7Kyc[/youtube]

Mice...

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oaVGzy0qB5k[/youtube]

Axolotl...

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uleb3MlZ4JU&feature=related[/youtube]

I imagine before long we'll see people getting some skin augmentation done so they can glow too.  :P
« Last Edit: October 02, 2011, 12:18:54 AM by zorgon »

Offline zorgon

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Re: More Genetic Tampering - Messing with your Bacon and Pets
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2011, 01:02:30 AM »
Glowing monkeys spark genetic engineering debate

Quote
The creation of monkeys that 'glow in the dark' has sparked an ethical storm.

The designer marmosets carry a gene that causes their skin, hair roots and blood to glow green under ultraviolet light.

What makes this a world first is that scientists were able to show that the monkeys can pass on the gene to other generations.


Fluorescent: Monkeys Kei and Kou have been genetically engineered so the soles of his feet glow green in the dark (inset) Credit :AP

Quote
Although much information has been obtained from manipulating mice in this way, it is argued that monkeys would make better models for human diseases.

But others say the experiments leave the door open to a 'brave new world' of designer babies, genetically tweaked to be as perfect as possible. There are also concerns about deliberately inflicting disease on generation after generation of animal.

The researchers, from Central Institute for Experimental Animals in Japan, used viruses to carry a gene for a fluorescent protein into more than 90 marmoset embryos.



Glowing monkeys spark genetic engineering debate - Daily Mail

Offline zorgon

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Re: More Genetic Tampering - Messing with your Bacon and Pets
« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2011, 01:07:49 AM »
Croc snaps a new hue

This one is not genetic tampering... just an odd story from down under...

Quote
The cranky chameleon has no one to blame but himself for his changed colouring - after apparently biting off more than he could chew.

Owner Tracey Sandstrom who runs Roaming Reptiles in Victoria said saltwater croc Snappy made a meal out of the filter in his water tank.

"I think it caused the pH levels in his water to soar, which has led to the change in colour," she said.

Ms Sandstrom said she was stunned when she suddenly realixed her prized pet, and a croc mate he shares his pond with, had both gone from a nice white to bright orange.



Croc snaps a new hue
« Last Edit: October 02, 2011, 01:28:09 AM by zorgon »

Online Ellirium113

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Re: More Genetic Tampering - Messing with your Bacon and Pets
« Reply #7 on: October 02, 2011, 11:15:43 AM »

A prolonged exposure taken in the darkroom, showing the greenish glow of a Motyxia millipede Credit: Paul Marek

Glow-in-the-dark millipede says 'stay away'

September 26, 2011

As night falls in certain mountain regions in California, a strange breed of creepy crawlies emerges from the soil: Millipedes that glow in the dark. The reason behind the glowing secret has stumped biologists until now.

Paul Marek, a research associate in the UA's Department of Entomology and Center for Insect Science, and his team now provide the first evidence gained from field experiments of bioluminescence being used as a warning signal. They discovered that the nightly glow of millipedes belonging to the genus Motyxia helps the multi-legged invertebrates avoid attacks by predators.

The findings will be published in the Sept. 27 print edition of the journal Current Biology.

Biologists have discovered and described more than 12,000 species of millipedes, but the vast majority remains undiscovered and is thought to number around 100,000.

Just like all other millipedes, Motyxia are vegetarians, feeding mostly on decaying plant material, but in the course of adapting to a lifestyle primarily underground, they lost the ability to see.

"They spend the day burrowed beneath the soil and leaf material, but even though they are blind, they somehow sense when night falls, and come to the surface to forage and mate and to go about their millipede business," said Marek, who conducted this work under the NIH Postdoctoral Excellence in Research and Training program in the labs of Wendy Moore, an assistant professor of entomology and curator of the University of Arizona Insect Collection and Dan Papaj, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Arizona.

"When they are disturbed, they ooze toxic cyanide and other foul-tasting chemicals from small pores running along the sides of their bodies as a defense mechanism," Marek explained. "Some millipede species that are active during the day display bright warning colors to announce their defenses to predators, but because Motyxia are out when it's dark, we hypothesized they use their greenish glow in place of a warning coloration."

Known as bioluminescence, the ability to glow in the dark is remarkably widespread in the animal kingdom. The most commonly known examples include fireflies, glowworms –which are in fact beetles – and animals inhabiting the pitch-black darkness of the deep oceans.

In some of those examples, bioluminescence is thought to help attract mates, send messages back and forth among members of the same species, or attract prey like in the case of the deep-sea angler fish, which dangles a glowing lure in front of its gaping mouth. Any small fish or other animal following the beacon's glow is gulped up as it approaches the invisible predator hiding in the darkness.

Marek and his coworkers hypothesized by using bioluminescence as a warning signal, luminescent millipedes would be attacked less than non-luminescent ones.

To test this hypothesis, Charity Hall, Marek's wife and a metalsmith, made a bronze cast of a millipede, which the team used to create molds to cast 300 fake millipedes in clay. Half of those they painted with an artificial, long-lasting glow-in-the-dark paint.

For the field experiment, the group took their clay millipede collection to Giant Sequoia National Monument in California, where they set them on the ground along a transect line, spaced five meters (16 feet) apart. Glowing and non-glowing individuals were distributed in random order to avoid sampling bias.

They then set out to collect real millipedes in the same general area.

"Motyxia are extremely common out there," Marek said. "If you sit there in a moonless night, the ground will look like the starry night sky up above, from all those millipedes glowing in the dark."

The live millipedes were divided into two groups: One was covered with paint to conceal their natural glow, the other was left untreated. Just like with the clay models, the real millipedes were distributed along a different transect line, with glowing and non-glowing animals in random order.

"To make sure they wouldn't walk out of the experiment, we used a fly-fishing knot gently tied around their back segments to tether them to the ground," Marek explained.

The next morning, the researchers went to collect the live and clay millipedes and assess the results.

"It was just – carnage," Marek said. "We were really surprised at the predation rate on these millipedes. Overall, about one-third of them – both real and fake – had been attacked."

Four times as many non-glowing millipedes showed evidence of attacks compared to their glowing peers. Similarly, in the clay group, non-luminescent models were attacked twice as often than those that emitted the glow.

To learn more about what kinds of predators had nibbled on – or devoured - the study subjects, Marek took the clay models and the remains of the real millipedes to the rodent collection at the California Academy of Sciences and matched the strike marks with the teeth in rodent skulls. Combining those data with observations at the study site, the team concluded that the grasshopper mouse (Onychomys torridus) is one of the millipedes' most likely predators.

"Remarkably, most of the predation marks were localized to the head, even in the clay models," Marek said. "So somehow those predators were able to tell the head from the tail end and go for the head first, which is a behavior typically seen in vertebrate predators."

To get a better idea of how the ability to glow in the dark evolved in millipedes, the team sequenced selected gene regions and estimated their evolutionary history to pinpoint the origin of bioluminescence in millipedes. Interestingly, a few of the species in the glowing genus Motyxia can switch their glow on and off. Marek and his co-workers measured glowing intensity of species in the genus using darkroom photography and traced the results on an evolutionary tree. They determined that the ability to glow evolved only once in millipedes and is restricted to a set of closely related species, all in the genus Motyxia.

"There are only three places on the planet where you can see glow-in-the-dark millipedes," Marek said. "The Santa Monica Mountains, the Tehachapi Mountains and the southern Sierra Nevada Mountains, all of which are in California."

The precise biochemical mechanism by which the millipedes achieve this feat is up for future research.

"For now, all that we know is they use a different mechanism than fireflies or glowworms," said Marek, "which use an enzymatic reaction. The millipedes have a photoprotein that is similar to the Green Fluorescent Protein of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. It is thought to be activated by calcium and energy-rich compounds in the cell to create the glow." [/color]

http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-09-glow-in-the-dark-millipede.html



Offline zorgon

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Re: More Genetic Tampering - Messing with your Bacon and Pets
« Reply #8 on: December 31, 2011, 03:57:53 PM »
Genetically Modified Mosquitoes to be Released in the US for the First Time



Mike Barrett
NaturalSociety
December 23, 2011


Quote
To those of you who have been eager to hear the latest news concerning the potential release of genetically modified mosquitoes – here it is. It turns out that the genetically modified mosquitoes could be released into the U.S. environment as early as January of 2012. A private firm plans to initiate the release of the GE mosquitoes in the Florida Keys. Florida will be the first beta testing grounds to determine whether or not the mosquitoes lead to detrimental environmental and genetic impact. Residents in this area will also be subjected — without choice — to these genetically manipulated insects, unless the private firm decides to seek permission.

Genetically Modified Mosquitoes to be Released

Genetically Modified Mosquitoes | An Unknown Dangerous Experiment



Quote
The first mosquito release took place in the Cayman Islands in the Caribbean in 2009. On Sunday, October 27, the release was discussed in a scientific paper by the journal of Nature Biotechnology with the report concluding the releases’ success. A second trial occurred in 2010, where 6,000 mosquitoes were released in Malaysia for further experiments. The mosquitoes are genetically modified with a gene designed to kill them unless given an antibiotic known as tetracycline. Offspring of the GM mosquitoes will receive this same lethal gene which will kill the offspring before it can ever reach adulthood. As more genetically modified mosquitoes mate with wild mosquitoes, the idea is that more and more offspring will be produced with the lethal gene, thereby reducing the mosquito population.

Quote
Of course the risks these mosquitoes pose both on the environment as well as the health of all living creatures are highly unknown, leaving everyone with many more questions than answers. We have already seen how terribly genetic modification can threaten the environment and human health, yet people are still moving toward a genetically modified world. With the release of genetically modified insects could come the downfall of both local and global ecosystems as well as negative consequences concerning the food chain. There is simply no way of knowing what could happen by replacing the naturally born life forms on planet earth with genetically modified creations.

Genetically Modified Mosquitoes to be Released

Quote
Some questions that still remain unanswered:

1. Will Oxitec, the creator of the insects, need to acquire the free and informed consent of residents in Key West for the release of the GM mosquitoes? With the previous release of the mosquitoes in the Cayman Islands there was no public consultation taken on potential risks and informed consent was not given from locals.

2. With 0.5 percent of the released insects being female (the gender which bites humans), what happens to humans if bitten by the female mosquitoes?

3. What could happen to the ecosystem and local food chain with the major decrease in the Aedes aegypti mosquito population?
4. Who will regulate the release, and who will be responsible in the event of complications – to any degree?

If Florida and the US approves Oxitec’s planned release of these genetically modified mosquitoes, we will become that much closer to future genetic modification of living creatures as well as the potential collapse of environmental and human health. Luckily, judging by the widespread opposition of genetically modified foods, it is likely that this experiment won’t turn into a reality without a fight.

Genetically Modified Mosquitoes to be Released


Related Links:

1. Genetically Modified Mosquitoes Unleashed | Concerns Grow
2. Bill Gates’ Foundation Funded Approval of Genetically Modified Mosquitoes
3. Take Action Against Genetically Modified Foods Right Now


Papers:

1. Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes in the U.S.
2. Progress and prospects for the use of genetically modified mosquitoes to inhibit disease transmission
3. Open Letter from Civil Society Organizations in Response to the Field Release of Genetically Modified Mosquitoes in Malaysia
4. Oxitec’s genetically-modified mosquitoes: in the public interest?
« Last Edit: December 31, 2011, 05:02:47 PM by zorgon »

Offline zorgon

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Re: More Genetic Tampering - Messing with your Bacon and Pets
« Reply #9 on: December 31, 2011, 04:03:50 PM »
Genetically Modified Salmon Approval Pushed by USDA with Nearly $500,000 Funding


A genetically engineered AquAdvantage Salmon (background) alongside an Atlantic salmon of the same age (foreground).

Mike Barrett
NaturalSociety
November 14, 2011


Quote
In September of 2010, a new genetically modified animal hybrid sparked mass concern as well as nationwide controversy. The possibility of having genetically modified salmon for dinner did not sit well with many independent scientists, consumer groups, environmental organizations, and especially the healthy consumer. Although the genetically modified salmon, commonly referred to as “frankenfish”, has not yet been approved for consumption, it seems that certain US organizations are determined to place the fish on your plate.

Genetically Modified Salmon Approval

Frankenfish | Funded by the USDA



Quote
It wasn’t until 2010, when the House of Representatives got involved with the approval of genetically modified salmon, was Aquabounty hit with severe critical opposition. When Aquabounty’s genetically modified salmon was in effect struck down by the House, the company was unable to receive funds from the Food and Drug Administration in order to move forward with the approval. Despite the decision made by the House, the United States Department of Agriculture recently decided to help Aquabounty’s quest for the approval of genetically modified salmon by generously funding their cause with nearly $500,000.

One can only wonder why an organization like the USDA would fund research to help the frankenfish’s approval while one part of the legislative branch of government shoots it down. The question is, what could possibly cause the USDA to fund Aquabounty while there is so much controversy surrounding the salmon on a government level? Why would the USDA, an organization which stamps organic products with their seal to indicate no use of genetic modification, give money to a company to research and ultimately sell genetically modified salmon? The answers are unclear, but the actions exhibited by the  USDA could very well reflect the personal goals of the members. Perhaps USDA members could have vested interest in the approval of genetically modified fish.

It may not be long until you find unlabeled genetically modified fish on your dinner plate. With Aquabounty receiving a very generous sum of money from the USDA, who knows the time it will take for them to conduct (or perhaps manipulate) the necessary research for their frankenfish to attain approval.

Genetically Modified Salmon Approval

Congress Bans FDA from Approving Genetically Modified ‘Franken’ Salmon



Anthony Gucciardi
NaturalSociety
June 16, 2011


Quote
The U.S. House of Representatives has passed a law that would effectively block the FDA from approving genetically modified ‘Franken’ salmon. The news came after the FDA declared that the GM salmon would not be labeled, leaving customers in the dark. An advisory panel declared that more studies would be needed on the genetically altered fish before it could be considered to be safe for human consumption.

Congress Bans FDA from Approving Genetically Modified ‘Franken’ Salmon

Related Links:

1. Genetically Modified Salmon Approval Pushed by USDA with Nearly $500,000 Funding
2. Congress Bans FDA from Approving Genetically Modified ‘Franken’ Salmon
3. New Genetically Modified Creation Threatens Health, Environment
4. Troubling Emails Reveal Federal Scientists Fear FDA Approval of Genetically Modified Salmon
5. As Predicted, FDA Will Not Require Labeling of GM Salmon
6. Super salmon or 'Frankenfish'? FDA to decide
7. Story: Does 'super' salmon pass the sniff test?
8. FDA says Genetically-Modified Frankenfish Is Safe to Eat


Vote:
 
Would you eat genetically altered seafood?
« Last Edit: December 31, 2011, 04:31:35 PM by zorgon »

Offline zorgon

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Re: More Genetic Tampering - Messing with your Bacon and Pets
« Reply #10 on: December 31, 2011, 04:42:57 PM »
Genetically Modified Potatoes Emerge as Newest Food Abomination


Giant potatoes
The Chinese, in a daring and innovative way to solve world hunger, launched 2,000 seeds into space where they orbited the Earth before returning again. The result was that the genetic sequence changed (and in some cases was reduced) which would alter how well the crop harvested. This meant that without adding harmful genes, giant crops could be produced and could result in potatoes like this one.  SOURCE


Anthony Gucciardi
NaturalSociety
September 28, 2010


Quote
Just when you thought that genetically modified salmon was the final straw in the genetic manipulation of nature, a new food abomination has been created. Researchers in India have developed a genetically modified potato, filled to the brim with genetically altered amino acids.

It seems as if scientists are aiming to re-create nature entirely. From genetically altered fish threatening the genetic code of fish on a global scale, to genetically modified canola spreading into the wild, it is apparent that a tidal wave of genetic modulation has hit the environment very hard.

These genetically modified potatoes now threaten the purity of potatoes internationally, as it can grow into the wild in a similar manner that the modified canola did. All it takes is a careless farmer to allow his modified crop to be planted elsewhere, without properly identifying the crop as modified. This is how the food supply is thoroughly endangered.

Genetically Modified Potatoes Emerge as Newest Food Abomination


Related Links:

1. Genetically Modified Potatoes Emerge as Newest Food Abomination
2. Genetically Modified Potatoes: Scientists Unleash New Monster
3. Genetically Modified Foods: The Hidden Dangers
4. Killing The Food Supply: The Dangers of Genetically Modified Food
5. Blind Health: Forbes Magazine Declares Monsanto Company of the Year
6. How to Know if Your Food is Conventional, Organic, or Genetically Modified
7. 1999 Investigation Finds Aspartame is Made with Genetically Modified Bacteria
8. Study Proves Three Monsanto GM Corn Varieties Pose Health Hazard
9. Genetically Modified Soy Linked to Sterility and Infant Mortality
« Last Edit: January 01, 2012, 05:46:39 PM by zorgon »

Offline zorgon

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Re: More Genetic Tampering - Messing with your Bacon and Pets
« Reply #11 on: December 31, 2011, 08:42:43 PM »
1999 Investigation Finds Aspartame is Made with Genetically Modified Bacteria



Anthony Gucciardi
NaturalSociety
October 11, 2010


Quote
As early as 1999, aspartame was exposed as a toxic sweetener that was made through a process that involves genetically modified bacteria. An article by The Independent entitled “World’s top sweetener is made with GM bacteria” revealed that two of the largest health threats –artificial sweeteners and genetically modified organisms — were joining forces.

According to The Independent, both a Monsanto source and a Monsanto spokesperson revealed that aspartame creation process did in fact involve genetically modified bacteria.

Quote
“We have two strains of bacteria – one is traditionally modified and one is genetically modified,” said the source. “It’s got a modified enzyme. It has one amino acid different.”

The process of genetic modification is one that leads to unpredictable consequences. When manipulating the very genetic coding of an organism, of which we do not even fully understand, it is foolish to think that there will be no adverse reactions. Genetically modified food has already been linked to sterility, infant mortality, and allergies.

“Increasingly, chemical companies are using genetically engineered bacteria in their manufacturing process without telling the public,” said Dr Erik Millstone, of Sussex University and the National Food Alliance.

Today we see that companies that companies are hiding the fact that their products are genetically modified more than ever before. With the FDA allowing genetically modified salmon to go unlabeled, and new genetically modified potatoes creeping in, the people are under heavy health assault.

It is truly astounding that genetically modified ingredients have found their way into such a wide variety of products over the last few years, despite research highlighting its negative effects. The ultimate way to take a stand against genetically modified food is to simply not purchase it. Non-GMO is the fastest growing retail brand, which is a clear message to food manufacturers. Big brands will have to change their ingredient list if they want to maintain sales.

Aspartame is Made with Genetically Modified Bacteria

Online Ellirium113

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Re: More Genetic Tampering - Messing with your Bacon and Pets
« Reply #12 on: January 01, 2012, 09:42:19 AM »
Glowing Scorpion Exoskeletons May Be Giant Eyes





A scorpion’s entire exoskeleton may act as one giant light receptor, a full-body proto-eye that detects shadows cast by moonlight and starlight.

That’s still just a hypothesis, but it would help explain why they glow so brilliantly under ultraviolet light.

“It might be a sort of alarm that’s always going off until the scorpion finds shelter,” said biologist Douglas Gaffin of the University of Oklahoma. “Shade might turn down the alarm on that part of their body, so they preferentially move in that direction.”


No matter their color in daylight, be it jet-black or translucent, ultraviolet light makes pigments embedded in their exoskeletons emit photons.



http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2011/12/scorpion-fluorescence/

Offline zorgon

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Re: More Genetic Tampering - Messing with your Bacon and Pets
« Reply #13 on: March 10, 2012, 03:36:23 PM »
The Case of the Bad Hives -- Genetically Engineered Honeybees

[youtube]oi7X74c6-7A[/youtube]

 


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