collapse

Author Topic: The U.S. Is Unable To Account For 36k Pounds Of Weapons Grade Uranium And Pluton  (Read 14942 times)

Offline zorgon

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 20295
  • Gold 883
"Complex" material?  :o

Weapons grade mayhaps? Hence all the fuss?
« Last Edit: June 26, 2012, 05:35:07 PM by zorgon »

sky otter

  • Guest


hah hah
think what you want...
the place was torn down long ago and there is just a big field there
..
not much growin there..looked real ordinary till they put a big road in last year
then a fence and then  building and now men with guns..


i sorta laugh when i think about the little restuant called veado's
that was at the edge of one of thir parking lots...
and the dairy ..parks dairy that was right down the road and sold milk forever..

the spooky part is the official men with big guns patrolling...
brings up all the old stories...

you wanna do a map search type in apollo pa and then follow 66 til you hit kiskimere road
that blank spot is the 44 arces......the storage units are right past where the restuarant was
of couse the maps are old so you won;t see any of the current stuff

but we're not that far as the crow flies and my idea of here a safe place has changed
damn


sky otter

  • Guest
and now the white wash/cover up/ avoidance/ it never happened-not a problem..now it starts by whatever name you care to give it
this is the latest newspaper article and if you can read between the lines you will get a sense there is a lot more..and there is..but i have nothing but hearsay about that..yet



Army Corp:  Feds will clean up nuke site
By Mary Ann Thomas

Published: Monday, June 25, 2012, 11:24 p.m.
Updated 14 hours ago


The Army Corps of Engineers announced Monday evening that while the fate of the continued cleanup of the nuclear waste site in Parks Township is unknown, the federal government still plans to remove the radiological contamination from the 44-acre site.

A public meeting is set for 6. p.m. today at the Parks Township Volunteer Fire Department, 1119 Dalmatian Drive, solely to take comments from residents and others about the progress of the cleanup.

Leechburg environmental activist Patty Ameno, who drafted a letter signed by a dozen local elected officials and others demanding that the borps complete the cleanup, was not impressed by the announcement.

"Any other agency put in charge of the cleanup might mandate further delays and further insulate the companies that own the site," she said.

"It's kind of scary that the Washington, D.C., 'beltway shuffle' is trying to be pushed onto this community."

Cleanup operations ceased last year when a contractor allegedly mishandled some nuclear waste and unexpected quantities of "complex" materials were dug up on site.

With the prospect of a more complicated cleanup that could take a decade, costs for the project could soar from $170 million to a range of $250 million to $500 million.

Given the increase in the project scope and cost, officials from the Army Corps headquarters in Washington are deciding what agency and program can best handle the job.

The public meeting was set up by the corps so residents could give comments about the cleanup to submit to corps officials who are reviewing the cleanup program.

"Our primary concern remains safeguarding your community and our workers," said Col. Butch Graham, commander of the corps' Pittsburgh District, in a statement issued yesterday evening. "We recognize the importance of having the community involved in these discussions."

The Parks nuclear waste dump is one of 24 active sites in 10 states in the corps' Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP).

It's a cleanup program for low-level radioactive contamination from the Manhattan Project, the top secret project that produced the world's first atomic bombs, and early Atomic Energy Commission operations.

Ameno and some local elected officials in Parks Township, Leechburg and Gilpin want to stay the course with the corps and the FUSRAP program, which has provisions to recoup cleanup costs from the owners of contaminated properties.

"With over two decades of experience of other agencies involvement, Jack Murtha -- for damn good reason -- legislated that site to the Army Corps of Engineers," Ameno said.

After more than two decades of delays and plans of leaving the waste on site under the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the late U.S. Rep. John Murtha entered legislation in 2002 for site to be cleaned up by the Army Corps' FUSRAP program.

"It's the Pittsburgh District of the Army Corps of Engineers that this community wants and that this community needs," Ameno said. "That is the only agency that we have had any semblance of trust with."

Coming up
Who: Army Corps of Engineers

What: Meeting to accept public comments on the cleanup of the Parks Township nuclear waste dump site

When: 6 p.m. Tuesday

Where: Parks Township Volunteer Fire Department, 1119 Dalmatian Drive, Parks Township

To submit comments:

Army Corps of Engineers, Pittsburgh District, will accept written comments on the future of the nuclear waste dump in Parks Township until 5 p.m. July 6. Residents can send comments to the corps via email: CELRP-PA@usace.army.mil. Or mail: The Army Corps of Engineers Public Affairs Office, 1000 Liberty Ave,, Room 2202, Pittsburgh, PA 15222-4186.

On the Web:
For more on the Shallow Land Disposal Area — Parks Township — cleanup, go to the Army Corps of Engineers web page.
http://www.lrp.usace.army.mil/fusrap/slda.htm

About the Shallow Land Disposal Area:

The waste dump along Route 66, owned by BWX Technologies (Babcock & Wilcox), was active from about 1960 to the early 1970s. It received radioactive and chemical waste from the former Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corp. (NUMEC) in Apollo and Parks, which produced nuclear fuel for submarines and a range of nuclear products for the federal government and private industry.

http://triblive.com/neighborhoods/yourallekiskivalley/2097124-87/corps-cleanup-army-parks-nuclear-site-township-waste-engineers-comments


 :(

here's where the 24 sites are..go to the site and you can click on any for more info

http://www.lm.doe.gov/land/sites/fusrap/fusrapmain2.htm


« Last Edit: June 26, 2012, 04:18:12 PM by sky otter »

sky otter

  • Guest
 :-[ well i screwed up.. i thought today was tuesday..sigh..and missed this meeting last night
but just as an exmaple of how most think
i spoke to a boro sec this morning and her exact words were.. well i am more concerned about the mosquitoes carrying west nile virus than numec..it's been there forever and hasn't been a problem
i just said ok....
now that attitude is scarier to me than anything



Army Corps to decide fate of nuclear cleanup
About Mary Ann Thomas
Gateway Newspapers Staff reporter
 Mary Ann Thomas can be reached via e-mail or at 412-782-2121 x1510.   
By Mary Ann Thomas

Published: Wednesday, June 27, 2012
Updated 12 hours ago


About 150 residents and government officials filled the Parks Township Volunteer Fire Department hall last night to demand that the Army Corps of Engineers continue its cleanup of the nuclear dump along Route 66.

After the Corps started the cleanup last year, digging stopped at the site -- known as the Shallow Land Disposal Area (SLDA) -- after a contractor allegedly mishandled waste and unexpected amounts of "complex" nuclear materials were found.

Corps headquarters in Washington is deciding if the Corps and their cleanup program will finish the job.

And according to local Corps officials, although it's not clear what agency or program will handle the project, the federal government still plans to clean up the site.

"Our primary concern is safeguarding your community," said Col. Butch Graham, commander of the Army Corps of Engineers Pittsburgh District.

"There is a lot of interest in the community, and it's evident by the turnout tonight," he said.

Corps officials had few answers for the crowd, as they had said in announcing the meeting. Residents' comments were recorded to be heard by Corps decision-makers in Washington.

Residents and local officials are concerned about finishing the cleanup, safety and the future of their community.

"Our homes have been devalued, the very existence of our businesses threatened," wrote state Rep. Joe Petrarca, D-Washington Township, in a statement read by his wife, Elise Glenn.

Petrarca's mother, Madeline Petrarca of Vandergrift, grew up in the village of Kiskimere next to the nuclear waste dump currently owned by BWX Technologies (Babcock & Wilcox), Glenn said.

"This site must be cleaned up in such a way as to safeguard our people and restore out economic health," Joe Petrarca wrote.

"If this cannot be accomplished, then the parties responsible must make us whole. These companies made their money at the expense of the health and even the very lives of the people we love who came before us. We should not still be footing the bill, nor should our children."

Residents and local government officials wanted the Corps to keep the project. They slammed the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and site owner BWX Technologies.

A call to BWX following last night's meeting was not immediately returned.

"We're confident in the ability of the Army Corps to do the job safely," said Bob Monheim, a Parks Township supervisor who spoke for all three Parks supervisors in attendance.

Before the Corps was put in the charge of the cleanup by legislation drafted by the late Rep. John Murtha in 2002, the NRC and the BWX Technologies and former site owner the Atlantic Richfield Co. proposed to leave the nuclear waste buried at the 44-acre dump.

As the Corps decides the fate of the cleanup, many residents and Leechburg environmental activist Patty Ameno are afraid that the NRC and the companies could be back in charge and the cleanup could be in jeopardy.

"We have dealt with torturing issues at the hands of the companies and the AEC/NRC, who failed to regulate, especially with safety in mind," Ameno said. She submitted a statement purportedly signed by a dozen local elected officials and others from Parks, Gilpin and Leechburg demanding that the Corps continue the cleanup.

Bob Kossak, who is president of the Roaring Run Watershed Association and manager of the Kiski Valley Water Pollution Control Authority, said, "We don't want any migration from the SLDA going into the Kiski River."

Kossak worked with the NRC to clean up a nuclear contaminated lagoon from operations of Babcock & Wilcox and predecessor companies. "Personally, I'd be a lot more comfortable with the Corps handling the project," he said.

Not everyone agreed that the nuclear waste should be excavated from the site.

Raymond Kramer, of Lower Burrell, a retired chemist from Alcoa, said, "I believe this move will cause more exposure to radiation and radioactivity than leaving it in place in perpetuity at a cost the nation cannot afford."

Zeke Summerhill, who owns about 120 acres of land next to the waste dump, said that he wants to see the cleanup complete but had questions: "How 'hot' (radioactive) is the material? Are there contingency plans? Are there monitors at the fence?

The Corps will be in a position to answer more questions after its headquarters reaches a decision on the cleanup plan.

A Corps spokeswoman from Washington said that her agency wants to resolve the cleanup issues soon.

To submit comments
Army Corps of Engineers, Pittsburgh District, will accept written comments on the future of the nuclear waste dump in Parks Township until 5 p.m. July 6. Residents can send comments to the corps via email: CELRP-PA@usace.army.mil. Or mail: The Army Corps of Engineers Public Affairs Office, 1000 Liberty Ave., Room 2202, Pittsburgh, PA 15222-4186.

On the Web
For more on the Shallow Land Disposal Area -- Parks Township -- cleanup, go to the Army Corps of Engineers web page.

About the Shallow Land Disposal Area
The waste dump along Route 66, owned by BWX Technologies (Babcock & Wilcox), was active from about 1960 to the early 1970s. It received radioactive and chemical waste from the former Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corp. (NUMEC) in Apollo and Parks, which produced nuclear fuel for submarines and a range of nuclear products for the federal government

Offline Iamschist

  • Regular Members
  • *
  • Posts: 31
  • Gold 34
Excuse me if I have this wrong, this meeting did not accomplish anything?  Everyone agreed there is a problem.  Some think the Corp should clean it up.  Some think the original offender. Some think remove, some cap and that is it?

Am I missing something?  I am frustrated.  Is the hope to let it go because no decisions can be made?  Is the Corp going to clean it up?  Is there a schedule?

Where is Erin Brockovich when you need her?

« Last Edit: June 27, 2012, 04:25:15 PM by Iamschist »

sky otter

  • Guest


Am I missing something?  I am frustrated.  Is the hope to let it go because no decisions can be made?  Is the Corp going to clean it up?  Is there a schedule?

Where is Erin Brockovich when you need her?


ditto..ditto.. ditto


i'm kinda in shock but i shouldn't be..this is the way the system seems to work

but really i have to say something about this and the et stuff or ufo stuff
in the 70's this place was a hot bed...almost everybody saw something
then it got quiet..not gone just not as everyday occurance

i'm wondering about all kinds of things now..

just plain ass wild...totally
 ::)
« Last Edit: April 28, 2017, 11:50:36 AM by ArMaP »

sky otter

  • Guest
the saga continues here..and i have to wonder about the other 23 sites like this....underlining is mine





Casey wants nuke cleanup investigated

By Mary Ann Thomas

Published: Thursday, June 28, 2012, 12:58 a.m.
Updated 3 hours ago


U.S. Sen. Bob Casey is calling for an investigation of the federal government's handling of the cleanup of the Parks Township nuclear waste dump along Route 66.

Casey is asking Hubert T. Bell, inspector general of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), to investigate the work stoppage at the nuclear waste dump last fall and whether all the federal agencies are working together to finish the job, according to John Rizzo, Casey's press secretary.

In his letter to Bell, sent Wednesday, Casey said, "I want to ensure that the NRC is cooperating fully, properly and in a timely manner with (the Army Corps of Engineers), particularly because NRC previously oversaw decommissioning of the site."

Casey is requesting the investigation from the NRC inspector general because it's an independent office that investigates Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs and operations.

"That inspector general has basic authority on nuclear issues," Rizzo said.

The waste dump, known as the Shallow Land Disposal Area, is owned by BWX Technologies.

More than a decade ago, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and BWX Technologies proposed not cleaning up the nuclear waste dump, instead keeping the radioactive waste on site next to the village of Kiskimere, the Parks Bend industrial park, Route 66 and the Kiski River.

Disgusted with the prospect of no cleanup and fueled by public outcry, the late U.S. Rep. John Murtha convinced Congress to move jurisdiction of the cleanup from the NRC to the Army Corps of Engineers.

Then last year, digging at the waste dump stopped six weeks into the 10-year excavation project when an Army Corps contractor allegedly mishandled some nuclear waste and greater than expected amounts of "complex" nuclear material was found at the 44-acre site.

After digging up an estimated 10 percent of the waste from the site and finding greater amounts of "complex" nuclear materials, the corps revised its scope of work and budget to increase from $170 million to a range of $250 million to $500 million.

The corps put the project on hold as the brass at its Washington headquarters decide if their agency and cleanup program will finish the job.

About 150 residents attended a public meeting held by corps on Tuesday night to give comments.

Most of the residents and local government officials said they wanted to keep the corps at the helm to complete the cleanup.

"We want to make sure that all of the federal agencies are working together in concert to come up with a game plan to clean up the site," Rizzo said.

Casey's letter to the inspector general focuses on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's current role and history at the Parks waste dump and asked questions including:

• Is NRC fully complying with a 2001 memorandum of understanding between the NRC and the Army Corps of Engineers on the cleanup?

• Has the NRC properly evaluated the Army Corps' work plans to determine if they are meeting regulatory requirements?

Rizzo said that he hopes to hear from the general inspector soon.

"Senator Casey is hopeful that the inspector general will heed the call and do a full investigation," Rizzo said.

"The senator believes there is an urgency in this and it needs to take place as quickly as possible," he said.

About the Shallow Land Disposal Area

The waste dump along Route 66, owned by BWX Technologies (Babcock & Wilcox), was active from about 1960 to the early 1970s.

It received radioactive and chemical waste from the former Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corp. (NUMEC) in Apollo and Parks, which produced nuclear fuel for submarines and a range of nuclear products for the federal government and private industry


http://triblive.com/neighborhoods/yourallekiskivalley/2113695-87/nuclear-waste-corps-casey-nrc-cleanup-dump-general-inspector-army


.................................................

just a side note to this  and the talk of his passing from such an ordinary surgery in a gov facility
i'm not saying it is anything..but some others have



http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/02/08/AR2010020802352.html

REP. JOHN P. MURTHA 1932-2010
John Murtha dies; longtime congressman was master of pork-barrel politics

Gallery
John Murtha dead at 77; Pennsylvania congressman served 19 terms
Pennsylvania congressman John P. Murtha has died after complications from surgery.
» LAUNCH PHOTO GALLERY
 Network NewsX Profile

 
By Carol D. Leonnig and Martin Weil
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, February 9, 2010

Rep. John P. Murtha (D-Pa.), a Vietnam War veteran who staunchly supported military spending and became a master of pork-barrel politics, died Monday at Virginia Hospital Center. The 19-term lawmaker died from complications of gallbladder surgery. He was 77.

This Story
REP. JOHN P. MURTHA 1932-2010: A military hawk skilled in pork-barrel politics
WhoRunsGov: John Murtha -- Why he matters

The Fix: What does this mean for Pennsylvania?
77-year-old Rep. John Murtha dies

Paul Kane discusses Murtha's life and legacy

Lives Remembered on Murtha
John Murtha dead at 77; Pennsylvania congressman served 19 terms
Murtha Quietly Becomes a House Legend, Post, 11/26/1985 (PDF)

View All Items in This Story

View Only Top Items in This Story


Offline Amaterasu

  • The Roundtable
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6646
  • Gold 275
  • Information Will Free Us
    • T.A.P. - You're It
When I worked out on the base at 29 Palms, I worked with a GS worker named "Mary Ann..."  "Thomas" sounds very familiar.  I wonder if She is the Mary Ann I worked with.  Can't remember what the last name was of "Mary Ann" I worked with.
"If the universe is made of mostly Dark Energy...can We use it to run Our cars?"

"If You want peace, take the profit out of war."

sky otter

  • Guest

 ;D

Gateway Newspapers Staff reporter
 Mary Ann Thomas can be reached via e-mail or at 412-782-2121 x1510.   

 ;D

Offline Amaterasu

  • The Roundtable
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6646
  • Gold 275
  • Information Will Free Us
    • T.A.P. - You're It
I'm saving My phone minutes...  Where's that email...?  Is it available at the original?
"If the universe is made of mostly Dark Energy...can We use it to run Our cars?"

"If You want peace, take the profit out of war."

sky otter

  • Guest


..didn't want to leave ya hangin..here's some or the rest of the story


Decades later, nuclear workers' families compensated

By Mary Ann Thomas

Published: Sunday, July 1, 2012, 10:14 p.m.
Updated 11 hours ago


It took eight years of finding paperwork and waiting on government reviews, but Helen Sobotka, 68, of Springdale got a lump-sum, tax-free payment from the federal government for $150,000.

The government paid the money, which went to her late mother, because her father, Paul "Shorty" Pastierik, died of lung cancer that likely was caused by his work around nuclear weapon components at the former C.H. Schnorr Co. in Springdale.

He was a machinist there from about 1935 to 1954.

Like many workers, Pastierik didn't know about the dangers of radiation exposure.

The Department of Labor recently sent fliers alerting Springdale residents to the compensation program.

"They do these mailings regularly in many areas," said Jesse Lawder, a Labor Department spokesman.

C.H. Schnorr provided metal fabrication services for the Manhattan Project -- which produced the United States' atomic bombs during World War II -- and machined uranium for the nuclear reactors at the government's Hanford nuclear research site.

Workers for Schnorr and its successor companies, Conviber, Premier Manufacturing from 1943 to 1994, might be eligible for a $150,000 lump sum, medical expense reimbursement from the federal government if they meet eligibility criteria and have one of 22 cancers or beryllium disease.

Survivors can get benefit

The federal government established the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) program more than a decade ago to pay sick former workers of atomic weapons employers $150,000 and provide coverage of related medical expenses.

A number of businesses, including steel mills, nuclear fuel-processing plants and small manufacturing shops such as C.H. Schnorr, were subcontracted by the federal government to develop and produce the components for nuclear weapons.

The program has paid more than $8 billion to claimants nationwide so far, according to the EEOICPA website.

"I think this is great," Sobotka said.

"Even those guys who are dead -- their families can go after this money," she said. "There is no time limitation."

So far, the EEOICPA program has paid five workers or their families $750,000 from the Schnorr Co.

In the Alle-Kiski Valley, the employees most frequently receiving the money worked at the Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corporation (NUMEC) and its successors, with a total payout plus medical expense of more than $40 million.

According to Springdale Councilman John Molnar, there are few Schnorr workers still around.

C.H. Schnorr was named after Charles Schnorr who started the company, a small tool-and-die shop, in the late 1930s at 643 Railroad St. -- an address that was later changed to 644 Garfield St.

Schnorr was part of the "Little Businessmen's Congress" convened by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1938 and his company grew from there, according to "The History of Springdale, Pennsylvania," published in 2006.

The company helped tool the B-19 and B-26 aircraft at the outbreak of World War II.

During the peak of the war, Schnorr employed about 400 people.

The Schnorr site was cleaned up in 1994 by the Department of Energy after the agency found elevated radiation levels "over a small area" inside the building where uranium was machined, according to the DOE's Legacy Management Department.

Independent surveys detected no residual contamination and the DOE has released the site for unrestricted use.

Cash, benefits paid out
Former workers from these nuclear weapon vendor facilities during the time periods listed could be eligible for federal benefits:

• Aluminum Research Laboratories, New Kensington Works of Alcoa; 1944-1945 ($2.4 million paid out so far).

• C.H. Schnorr, Conviber, Premier Manufacturing; Springdale; 1943-1951; residual radiation 1952-1993; DOE 1994. ($750,000)

• Carnegie Institute of Technology; Pittsburgh; 1942-1946 ($300,300)

• Heppenstall Co., Tippins Inc.; 1955; residual radiation 1956-1989. ($302,000)

• Koppers Co., Inc.; Verona; 1956-1957; residual radiation 1958-1996. ($453,000)

• Nuclear Material and Equipment Corp. (NUMEC), Atlantic Richfield Co., Babcock & Wilcox; Apollo; 1957-1983; residual radiation 1984-1995 (more than $30 million), and Parks Township; 1957-1980; residual radiation 1981-2004 ($9.6 million).

• Shippingport Atomic Power Plant, Shippingport; 1984-1995. ($1.45 million)

• U.S. Steel Co., National Tube Division, McKeesport; 1959-1960. ($1.6 million)

• Westinghouse Atomic Power Development Plant, East Pittsburgh Plant; 1942-1944. ($6.5 million)

• Westinghouse Nuclear Fuels Division, Westinghouse Commercial Manufacturing; Cheswick; 1971-1972; residual radiation 1973-1979. ($2.1 million)

For more information
• Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program help line: 1-800-941-3943.

http://triblive.com/neighborhoods/yourallekiskivalley/2136025-87/schnorr-nuclear-million-radiation-government-residual-workers-program-springdale-federal

Offline Shasta56

  • The Roundtable
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1416
  • Gold 137
For anyone eligible for care and compensation under the EEOICP, my experience, and some of the recipients agree with me, the Dept of Labor seems to just be waiting for these people to die.  The care and compensation for the occupation diseases is not inexpensive.

Shasta
Daughter of Sekhmet

sky otter

  • Guest

well there ya go..pat on the head and the whole thing  being swept under the carpet for who knows how much longer...typical..sad


Toxic waste cleanup in Parks Twp. 'a good while' away

By Mary Ann Thomas

Published: Saturday, July 14, 2012, 8:16 p.m.
Updated: Sunday, July 15, 2012


Don't expect removal of radioactive and chemical toxic waste any time soon at the BWX Technologies dump along Route 66.

U.S. Sen. Bob Casey Jr., who on Wednesday met with Jo-Ellen Darcy, assistant secretary of the Army in Washington, said digging at the site likely will not resume until late next year.

Casey met with Darcy to push for action on Congress' mandated cleanup by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at the 44-acre site, which stalled last fall.

"It's going to take a good while to have a new contractor in place and do the work," Casey said. "The main thing is that they move forward to get started."

Candice Walters, a spokeswoman for the corps, which has headquarters in Washington, said: "It is going to depend upon who the lead agency is for the project and when a contract is awarded. At this point, we are not sure."

Known as the Shallow Land Disposal Area, radioactive and chemical waste from Babcock & Wilcox (now BWX) and formerly from Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corp. (NUMEC) was buried in 10 trenches from 1960 to the early 1970s.

After decades of wrangling, excavating of the buried waste pits began last year but stopped six weeks later because a contractor allegedly mishandled some waste and greater-than-expected quantities of "complex" nuclear material were found.

Federal officials in Washington are trying to decide what to do with the site. As the complexity of the project increases, costs for the cleanup and disposal off site could escalate from the current $170 million to an estimated $500 million.

Who's in charge?

Complicating matters further is the number of federal agencies weighing in on the cleanup.

For example, the National Security Council hosted a June 21 meeting on the status of the Parks dumpsite at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington. The meeting included representatives from the corps, Department of Energy, the CIA and FBI, Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Management and Budget, Department of Justice, the National Security Council and the National Security Administration.

Walters confirmed the meeting, and Casey said he is concerned about whether all of the agencies can work together to allow the project to move forward.

"I'm urging every agency, including the White House itself, to make sure that all the various entities are working together," Casey said. "And we have to make sure that everything is being done to keep a focus on the cleanup and to make sure they are taking precautions to protect public health."

Leechburg environmental activist Patty Ameno is glad to see the waste dump getting "appropriate government attention."

She said, "I think at this point, all of the burners are on the stove."

Last month, Casey called on Hubert T. Bell, inspector general of the NRC, to investigate whether all government agencies involved in the cleanup are cooperating.

The inspector general's office is reviewing Casey's request, according to Joseph McMillan, NRC assistant inspector general for investigations.

In the meantime, more public officials continue to get involved in getting the cleanup resolved.

U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey has been in "constant contact with local and federal officials" about the SLDA, according to Toomey spokeswoman Rebecca Neal.

Toomey has scheduled a meeting to discuss the cleanup project with the corps next week, Neal said.

And local communities, such as Leechburg, are passing resolutions calling for the corps to stay at the helm to continue the cleanup.

Last month, about 150 residents and elected officials attended a corps meeting in Parks Township to give comments to send on to Corps decision-makers in Washington.

http://triblive.com/news/2207208-74/cleanup-casey-corps-waste-meeting-washington-officials-project-site-agencies

Offline Pimander

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4904
  • Gold 366
The U.S. Is Unable To Account For 36k Pounds Of Weapons Grade Uranium And Plutonium

The U.S. Is Unable To Account For 36k Pounds Of Weapons Grade Uranium And Plutonium
Robert Johnson
September 15, 2011|
Maybe the plutonium was siphoned off into a black project with no paper trail?  Someone without the clearance followed up and thinks it went missing?

sky otter

  • Guest
well in today's paper is a little blurpm about  this man speaking about his book at the Vol Fire Dept wherethe  NUMEC problems are..i will definetly go hear his speal on thursday
new one on me to hear about this org..here's the link


http://www.irmep.org/Defaults.asp



Grant F. Smith is director of the Institute for Research: Middle Eastern Policy in Washington DC. He is author of the books Spy Trade, America's Defense Line, Foreign Agents, Deadly Dogma, and Neocon Middle East Policy. Jeff Stein of the Washington Post calls Smith "a Washington, D.C. author who has made a career out of writing critical books on Israeli spying and lobbying." Mondoweiss.com blogger Philip Weiss says "the best investigative work is being done by Grant Smith at IRmep..."


  Divert!: NUMEC, Zalman Shapiro and the diversion of US weapons grade uranium into the Israeli nuclear weapons program
Paperback: $15.11 Kindle Edition: $9.95
 
 a u-tooby on him talking to James Corbett is here if any are interested

http://information-machine.blogspot.com/2012/10/israels-nuclear-smuggling-with-grant-f.html
....................................................

also the senator is still trying to get something done..but no one here seems to think it willhappen in our lifetime



Casey calls for new Parks nuke dump study

Read more: http://triblive.com/neighborhoods/yourallekiskivalley/yourallekiskivalleymore/3341928-74/casey-dump-information#ixzz2JOY81sZt



By Mary Ann Thomas

Published: Wednesday, January 23, 2013, 12:21 a.m.
Updated: Wednesday, January 23, 2013

Sen. Robert Casey is asking for a new federal study on the risk and potential for exposure to radioactive and chemical waste to residents and businesses near the nuclear waste dump in Parks.

Known formally as the Shallow Land Disposal Area, the dump received radioactive and chemical waste from the former Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corp. (NUMEC) in Apollo and Parks. It was later owned and operated by BWX Technologies (also known as Babcock & Wilcox) and its predecessor, Atlantic Richfield Co.

The Parks site, which sits next to the village of Kiskimere, an industrial park, and the Kiski River, which is a major tributary of the Allegheny River, had been active from 1960 into the early ‘70s.

Currently, the Army Corps of Engineers is trying to excavate radiological and chemical contaminants at the 44-acre site and ship the contamination off-site to another state.

Casey has been calling for several government investigations and cooperation among a number of federal agencies on the cleanup, which was halted in 2011 because a contractor allegedly mishandled some nuclear waste.

The project stalled because greater than expected amounts of “complex” nuclear materials were found in the waste trenches and cleanup costs soared.

Now, after a 2012 study on the well water and ground water near the dump by the Environmental Protection Agency, Casey is calling for a new study to address the community‘s concerns of exposure to radiation and contaminants found on the SLDA site.

“Principally, we‘re calling for this because we believe that a larger study needs to take place for the simple reason that there are gaps in the information,” Casey told the Valley News Dispatch in a phone interview Tuesday.

He sent a letter requesting the study on Tuesday to Lisa Jackson, administrator of the EPA; Jo-Ellen Darcy, assistant secretary of the Army; and Christopher Portier, director of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.

Although the 2012 EPA study didn‘t find chemical or radiological contamination above federal standards in ground and surface water near the dump, the agency says it needs more information to ensure that residents and nearby workers aren‘t getting contaminated.

The agency identified “data gaps,” such as lacking information on wells at the SLDA and the need to test in other areas.

Environmental activist Patty Ameno of Leechburg said that she thinks there has been mischaracterization of information in some of the government reports over the years.

For example, a number of federal studies state that since there‘s public water service in Kiskimere, the village of about 50 homes next to the dump, residents there don‘t drink well water, according to Ameno.

“The EPA report made it clear that people are using their well water for drinking and irrigating their gardens,” she said. “And this is one piece of information that can affect public safety.

“I think it‘s striking that the EPA cannot determine at this juncture if people are being exposed, and they need more testing to be able to say that,” Ameno said. “And I am curious to why any public health impact study has not been done up until now, even though there‘s been a push from the public for it over the decades.”

Casey said: “It is hard to pinpoint why there are these (data) gaps.

“Sometimes, it can be lack of coordination, or something as simple as when you did a particular study that you didn‘t get the all the information,” he said.

“I think the most important point is that we‘re asking three agencies to work together to address those questions,” Casey said. “And if they do this, there will be another measure of peace of mind for the residents.”

Dan Jones, spokesman for the Army Corps of Engineers in Pittsburgh, said that they have reviewed the EPA report with the agency.

“We are aware of the request from Senator Casey and we will cooperate with any direction given to us by our senior leadership,” he said.

“No matter what happens,” Jones said, “we‘re going to continue to work with the EPA and (the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry) to ensure that we are all on the same page, sharing information, getting as much information as we can and using that information to safeguard the community.”

The corps, which is looking for a new contractor for the cleanup, is committed to finishing the job.

But it‘s still reviewing the project because the cleanup costs have substantially exceeded its original cost estimate from $45 million in 2007 to up to $500 million now.

Mary Ann Thomas is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at  mthomas@tribweb.com.



« Last Edit: January 29, 2013, 02:12:03 PM by sky otter »

 


Wal-Mart.com USA, LLC
affiliate_link
Free Click Tracking
Wal-Mart.com USA, LLC

* Recent Posts

Re: Another Roswell program making conclusions of what really happened by ArMaP
[Today at 05:23:07 PM]


Another Roswell program making conclusions of what really happened by astr0144
[Today at 05:10:56 PM]


Re: Immaculate Deception by astr0144
[Today at 03:36:01 PM]


Re: Immaculate Deception by astr0144
[Today at 03:15:50 PM]


Re: bigfoot caught on sherrif's dashcam in Georgia by dreb13
[Today at 03:12:53 PM]


Re: bigfoot caught on sherrif's dashcam in Georgia by Shasta56
[Today at 02:26:37 PM]


Re: Trump First President To Protect Electric Grid From EMP, Cyberattacks by ArMaP
[Today at 01:58:14 PM]


Trump First President To Protect Electric Grid From EMP, Cyberattacks by The Seeker
[Today at 01:46:16 PM]


Re: bigfoot caught on sherrif's dashcam in Georgia by zorgon
[Today at 01:25:59 PM]


Re: Immaculate Deception by zorgon
[Today at 01:22:26 PM]


Re: Immaculate Deception by zorgon
[Today at 01:05:03 PM]


George H.W. Bush Hospitalized by The Seeker
[Today at 06:53:44 AM]


Re: Art Bell has passed away by The Seeker
[Today at 06:07:33 AM]


Re: bigfoot caught on sherrif's dashcam in Georgia by The Seeker
[Today at 05:53:43 AM]


Re: Art Bell has passed away by Titan
[Today at 03:00:18 AM]


Re: bigfoot caught on sherrif's dashcam in Georgia by Shasta56
[Today at 12:34:55 AM]


Re: Music You Love by A51Watcher
[April 23, 2018, 07:59:31 PM]


Re: bigfoot caught on sherrif's dashcam in Georgia by The Seeker
[April 23, 2018, 07:30:05 PM]


Re: Immaculate Deception by A51Watcher
[April 23, 2018, 06:29:44 PM]


Re: Immaculate Deception by A51Watcher
[April 23, 2018, 05:23:48 PM]