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Author Topic: they know what you are doing  (Read 126454 times)

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #435 on: December 31, 2013, 09:10:33 AM »


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/31/nsa-iphone-spy_n_4519968.html


The NSA Can Use Your iPhone To Spy On You, Expert Says


AP  |  By By RAPHAEL SATTER
Posted: 12/30/2013 2:04 pm EST


LONDON (AP) — A well-known privacy advocate has given the public an unusually explicit peek into the intelligence world's tool box, pulling back the curtain on the National Security Agency's arsenal of high-tech spy gear.

Independent journalist and security expert Jacob Appelbaum on Monday told a hacker conference in Germany that the NSA could turn iPhones into eavesdropping tools and use radar wave devices to harvest electronic information from computers, even if they weren't online.

Appelbaum told hundreds of computer experts gathered at Hamburg's Chaos Communications Conference that his revelations about the NSA's capabilities "are even worse than your worst nightmares."

"What I am going to show you today is wrist-slittingly depressing," he said.

Even though in the past six months there have been an unprecedented level of public scrutiny of the NSA and its methods, Appelbaum's claims — supported by what appeared to be internal NSA slideshows — still caused a stir.

One of the slides described how the NSA can plant malicious software onto Apple Inc.'s iPhone, giving American intelligence agents the ability to turn the popular smartphone into a pocket-sized spy.






Another slide showcased a futuristic-sounding device described as a "portable continuous wave generator," a remote-controlled device which — when paired with tiny electronic implants — can bounce invisible waves of energy off keyboards and monitors to see what is being typed, even if the target device isn't connected to the Internet.

A third slide showcased a piece of equipment called NIGHTSTAND, which can tamper with wireless Internet connections from up to 8 miles (13 kilometers) away.

An NSA spokeswoman, Vanee Vines, said that she wasn't aware of Appelbaum's presentation, but that in general should would not comment on "alleged foreign intelligence activities."

"As we've said before, NSA's focus is on targeting the communications of valid foreign intelligence targets — not on collecting and exploiting a class of communications or services that would sweep up communications that are not of bona fide foreign intelligence interest to the U.S. government."

The documents included in Appelbaum's presentation were first published by German magazine Der Spiegel on Sunday and Monday.

Appelbaum and Der Spiegel have both played an important role in the disclosures of NSA leaker Edward Snowden, but neither has clarified whether the most recent set of slides came from Snowden.


[youtube]
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sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #436 on: December 31, 2013, 09:24:41 AM »



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/30/aclu-sues-nsa_n_4520948.html



aol vid here..go to link


ACLU Sues NSA For Details Of U.S. Surveillance Under Executive Order

 
Reuters  |  Posted: 12/30/2013 5:51 pm EST  |  Updated: 12/31/2013 11:03 am EST



By Nate Raymond

NEW YORK, Dec 30 (Reuters) - The American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit on Monday, seeking to force the U.S. government to disclose details of its foreign electronic surveillance program and what protections it provides to Americans whose communications are swept up.

The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in New York, came three days after the ACLU lost a bid to block a separate program that collects the phone calls of millions of Americans.

The latest lawsuit seeks information related to the use of Executive Order 12333, which was signed in 1981 and governs surveillance of foreign targets.

Under the order, the National Security Administration is collecting "vast quantities" of data globally under the order's authority, "inevitably" including communications of U.S. citizens, the lawsuit said.

The lawsuit cites "recent revelations," an apparent reference to reports about U.S. spying activities in the wake of leaks by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

"This FOIA request seeks, in part, to determine what protections are afforded to those U.S. persons and whether those protections are consistent with the Constitution," it said.

A Justice Department spokesman said the government would respond to the lawsuit in court.

The lawsuit follows a series of requests to U.S. agencies for the information under the Freedom of Information Act that it said have not resulted in substantive responses.

Alex Abdo, an ACLU staff attorney, said in a blog post that the government was using the order as a way to spy on U.S. citizens' international communications.

"The core of the problem is that the NSA has, for years, relied upon its authority to gather foreign intelligence as permission to conduct sweeping surveillance of Americans' international communications," Abdo wrote.

The lawsuit cites news reports indicating that under the order, the NSA is collecting data on cell phone locations and email contact lists, as well as information from Google Inc and Yahoo Inc user accounts.

Among the records sought by the ACLU are any construing or interpreting the scope of agencies' authority under the executive order.

It also seeks records describing minimization procedures used by the agencies related to intelligence collection and interpretation pursuant to the order.

The lawsuit names as defendants the NSA, Central Intelligence Agency, Defense Department, Justice Department and State Department.

The case is American Civil Liberties Union et al v. National Security Agency et al, U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York, No. 13-9198.

Offline burntheships

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #437 on: January 01, 2014, 09:15:02 PM »
Sky, thank you for keeping the thread up to date!
 :)

Here are a few hot off the press reports. While those
of us who are paranoid might have suspected this,
who really wipes a new computer?  ;)

Dont raise your hands.... ;D



Report: NSA Intercepting Laptops Ordered Online, Installing Spyware

Quote
The latest report, this time via Der Spiegel and based on internal NSA documents, reveals that the NSA, in conjunction with the CIA and FBI, has begun intercepting laptops purchased online in order to install (quite literal) spyware and even hardware on the machines. The NSA terms this “interdiction.” Agents divert shipments to secret warehouses, carefully open the packages, install the software and/or hardware, and send them on their way.

According to the report, this operation is carried out by the NSA’s elite hacking unit, or TAO—not to be confused with the much less imposing Taoism—though there are few details on the scope or targets of the program.

The spy agency reportedly has backdoor access to numerous hardware and software systems from prominent tech companies such as Cisco, Dell, and Western Digital, among others. The NSA can even exploit Microsoft Windows error reports to find weak spots in compromised machines in order to install Trojans and other viruses.

The Der Spiegel report also notes that the NSA has successfully tapped into some of the massive, under-sea fiber-optic cables that connect the global data infrastructure, in particular the “SEA-ME-WE-4? cable system.

“This massive underwater cable bundle connects Europe with North Africa and the Gulf states and then continues on through Pakistan and India,” Der Spiegel reports, ”all the way to Malaysia and Thailand. The cable system originates in southern France, near Marseille. Among the companies that hold ownership stakes in it are France Telecom, now known as Orange and still partly government-owned, and Telecom Italia Sparkle.”

As the aforementioned giant octopus logo proudly proclaims: “Nothing is beyond our reach.” Lately it appears that this is not so much boasting as a simple statement of fact.
 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/erikkain/2013/12/29/report-nsa-intercepting-laptops-ordered-online-installing-spyware/

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sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #438 on: January 01, 2014, 09:27:03 PM »


thanks for jumpin in BTS....privacy is  not in existense anymore  :(

Offline burntheships

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #439 on: January 01, 2014, 09:55:41 PM »

privacy is  not in existense anymore  :(

:(   ....and just what do they have in mind for our
futures pray tell? That, dear peeps is the real question.

Anywho, build your own is looking like the only way,
then keep Gates and Jobs out of it from there out.

As for you phone, well your screwed there peeps.

Happy New Year!
 ;)
"This is the Documentary Channel"
- Zorgon

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #440 on: January 02, 2014, 02:37:54 PM »


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/01/02/edward-snowden-clemency_n_4529563.html


Edward Snowden Clemency:

The New York Times, The Guardian Urge Obama To Help NSA Whistleblower


Posted: 01/02/2014 12:44 am EST  |  Updated: 01/02/2014 10:25 am EST

The editorial boards of The New York Times and The Guardian published editorials on Wednesday, urging the Obama administration to treat Edward Snowden as a whistleblower and offer him some form of clemency.

Seven months ago, the former National Security Administration contractor stole as many as 1.7 million highly classified documents about the U.S. government's surveillance program and released the information to the press. The files revealed how the NSA forced American technology companies to reveal customer information, often without individual warrants, and how data from global phone and Internet networks was secretly intercepted.

While the release of these documents forced Snowden to flee the U.S. and move to Russia, it also alerted the American public -- and many U.S. allies -- of the government's intrusive, unethical and possibly unlawful spying efforts.

Beyond sparking public debate, Snowden's actions have prompted the American Civil Liberties Union to sue the NSA. The suit aims to force the U.S. government to disclose details of its electronic surveillance program and describe what protections it provides to Americans whose communications are swept up during the search for terrorist suspects, Reuters reported.

Eight major technology companies -- including Google, Facebook and Twitter -- have also joined forces to call for tighter controls on government surveillance.

To date, two federal judges have accused the NSA of violating the Constitution, and a panel appointed by President Barack Obama has blasted the agency's spying efforts and called for an overhaul of the program.

On Wednesday night, the editorial board of The New York Times published an editorial that not only described Snowden as a whistleblower but also called on the government to give him clemency.

Considering the enormous value of the information he has revealed, and the abuses he has exposed, Mr. Snowden deserves better than a life of permanent exile, fear and flight. He may have committed a crime to do so, but he has done his country a great service. It is time for the United States to offer Mr. Snowden a plea bargain or some form of clemency that would allow him to return home, face at least substantially reduced punishment in light of his role as a whistle-blower, and have the hope of a life advocating for greater privacy and far stronger oversight of the runaway intelligence community.
The Times noted that none of Snowden's revelations have done profound damage to the intelligence operations of the U.S., nor have his disclosures hurt national security. However, his efforts have exposed the federal government's lack of respect for privacy and constitutional protections.

When someone reveals that government officials have routinely and deliberately broken the law, that person should not face life in prison at the hands of the same government.
The Guardian, which has been at the forefront of the Snowden story from the very beginning, is also calling for clemency.

Snowden gave classified information to journalists, even though he knew the likely consequences. That was an act of courage.
In November, the White House rejected a clemency plea from Snowden, and told him to return to the U.S. to face trial.

..................................................



and the article right after this one will surely make you laugh


Americans' Faith In Government Is In The Toilet

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/01/02/americans-faith-governmen_n_4530627.html

Offline ArMaP

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #441 on: January 02, 2014, 03:01:46 PM »
Anywho, build your own is looking like the only way,
then keep Gates and Jobs out of it from there out.
If you don't connect it to the Internet...

Offline burntheships

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #442 on: January 02, 2014, 06:42:31 PM »
If you don't connect it to the Internet...

and you are correct....though what fun is that?
 ;D

This is where they have us, I think.
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sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #443 on: January 02, 2014, 07:18:16 PM »
http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/nsa-seeks-to-build-quantum-computer-that-could-crack-most-types-of-encryption/2014/01/02/8fff297e-7195-11e3-8def-a33011492df2_story.html



NSA seeks to build quantum computer that could crack most types of encryption


ArticleMoreBy Steven Rich and Barton Gellman, Updated: Thursday, January 2, 5:00 PME-mail the writers


In room-size metal boxes, secure against electromagnetic leaks, the National Security Agency is racing to build a computer that could break nearly every kind of encryption used to protect banking, medical, business and government records around the world.

According to documents provided by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, the effort to build “a cryptologically useful quantum computer” — a machine exponentially faster than classical computers — is part of a $79.7 million research program titled, “Penetrating Hard Targets.” Much of the work is hosted under classified contracts at a laboratory in College Park.

.[Read an annotated description of the Penetrating Hard Targets project]

Classifying the NSA's efforts
The agency describes classification levels for information related to quantum computing. Read it.
http://apps.washingtonpost.com/g/page/world/a-description-of-the-penetrating-hard-targets-project/691/



"If you think you understand quantum mechanics, you don't understand quantum mechanics," said the late Nobel laureate Richard Feynman, widely regarded as the pioneer in quantum computing. The science video blog Vertiasium tries to help make sense of it.


The development of a quantum computer has long been a goal of many in the scientific community, with revolutionary implications for fields like medicine as well as for the NSA’s code-breaking mission. With such technology, all current forms of public key encryption would be broken, including those used on many secure Web sites as well as the type used to protect state secrets.

Physicists and computer scientists have long speculated whether the NSA’s efforts are more advanced than those of the best civilian labs. Although the full extent of the agency’s research remains unknown, the documents provided by Snowden suggest that the NSA is no closer to success than others in the scientific community.

“It seems improbable that the NSA could be that far ahead of the open world without anybody knowing it,” said Scott Aaronson, an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT.

The NSA appears to regard itself as running neck and neck with quantum computing labs sponsored by the European Union and the Swiss government, with steady progress but little prospect of an immediate breakthrough.

“The geographic scope has narrowed from a global effort to a discrete focus on the European Union and Switzerland,” one NSA document states.

Seth Lloyd, professor of quantum mechanical engineering at MIT, said the NSA’s focus is not misplaced. “The E.U. and Switzerland have made significant advances over the last decade and have caught up to the U.S. in quantum computing technology,” he said.

The NSA declined to comment for this story.

The documents, however, indicate that the agency carries out some of its research in large, shielded rooms known as Faraday cages, which are designed to prevent electromagnetic energy from coming in or out. Those, according to one brief description, are required “to keep delicate quantum computing experiments running.”

[Read a document describing classification levels related to quantum computing efforts]

http://apps.washingtonpost.com/g/page/world/classifying-nsa-quantum-computing-efforts/692/


The basic principle underlying quantum computing is known as “quantum superposition,” the idea that an object simultaneously exists in all states. A classical computer uses binary bits, which are either zeroes or ones. A quantum computer uses quantum bits, or qubits, which are simultaneously zero and one.

This seeming impossibility is part of the mystery that lies at the heart of quantum theory, which even theoretical physicists say no one completely understands.

“If you think you understand quantum mechanics, you don’t understand quantum mechanics,” said the late Nobel laureate Richard Feynman, who is widely regarded as the pioneer in quantum computing.

Here’s how it works, in theory: While a classical computer, however fast, must do one calculation at a time, a quantum computer can sometimes avoid having to make calculations that are unnecessary to solving a problem. That allows it to home in on the correct answer much more quickly and efficiently.

Quantum computing is so difficult to attain because of the fragile nature of such computers. In theory, the building blocks of such a computer might include individual atoms, photons or electrons. To maintain the quantum nature of the computer, these particles would need to be carefully isolated from their external environments.

“Quantum computers are extremely delicate, so if you don’t protect them from their environment, then the computation will be useless,” said Daniel Lidar, a professor of electrical engineering and the director of the Center for Quantum Information Science and Technology at the University of Southern California.

A working quantum computer would open the door to easily breaking the strongest encryption tools in use today, including a standard known as RSA, named for the initials of its creators. RSA scrambles communications, making them unreadable to anyone but the intended recipient, without requiring the use of a shared password. It is commonly used in Web browsers to secure financial transactions and in encrypted e-mails. RSA is used because of the difficulty of factoring the product of two large prime numbers. Breaking the encryption involves finding those two numbers. This cannot be done in a reasonable amount of time on a classical computer.

In 2009, computer scientists using classical methods were able to discover the primes within a 768-bit number, but it took almost two years and hundreds of computers to factor it. The scientists estimated that it would take 1,000 times longer to break a 1,024-bit encryption key, which is commonly used for online transactions.

A large-scale quantum computer, however, could theoretically break a 1,024-bit encryption much faster. Some leading Internet companies are moving to 2,048-bit keys, but even those are thought to be vulnerable to rapid decryption with a quantum computer.

Quantum computers have many applications for today’s scientific community, including the creation of artificial intelligence. But the NSA fears the implications for national security.

“The application of quantum technologies to encryption algorithms threatens to dramatically impact the US government’s ability to both protect its communications and eavesdrop on the communications of foreign governments,” according to an internal document provided by Snowden.

Experts are not sure how soon a quantum computer would be feasible. A decade ago, some experts said that developing a large quantum computer was likely 10 to 100 years in the future. Five years ago, Lloyd said the goal was at least 10 years away.

Last year, Jeff Forshaw, a professor at the University of Manchester, told Britain’s Guardian newspaper, “It is probably too soon to speculate on when the first full-scale quantum computer will be built but recent progress indicates that there is every reason to be optimistic.”

“I don’t think we’re likely to have the type of quantum computer the NSA wants within at least five years, in the absence of a significant breakthrough maybe much longer,” Lloyd told The Post in a recent interview.

However, some companies claim to already be producing small quantum computers. A Canadian company, D-Wave Systems , says it has been making quantum computers since 2009. In 2012, it sold a $10 million version to Google, NASA and the Universities Space Research Association, according to news reports.

That quantum computer, however, would never be useful for breaking public key encryption like RSA.

“Even if everything they’re claiming is correct, that computer, by its design, cannot run Shor’s algorithm,” said Matthew Green, a research professor at the Johns Hopkins Information Security Institute, referring to the algorithm that could be used to break encryption like RSA.

Experts think that one of the largest hurdles to breaking encryption with a quantum computer is building a computer with enough qubits, which is difficult given the very fragile state of quantum computers. By the end of September, the NSA expected to be able to have some basic building blocks, which it described in a document as “dynamical decoupling and complete quantum control on two semiconductor qubits.”

“That’s a great step, but it’s a pretty small step on the road to building a large-scale quantum computer,” Lloyd said.

A quantum computer capable of breaking cryptography would need hundreds or thousands more qubits than that.

The budget for the National Intelligence Program, commonly referred to as the “black budget,” details the “Penetrating Hard Targets” project and noted that this step “will enable initial scaling towards large systems in related and follow-on efforts.”

Another project, called the “Owning the Net,” is using quantum research to support the creation of new quantum-based attacks on encryptions like RSA, documents show.

“The irony of quantum computing is that if you can imagine someone building a quantum computer that can break encryption a few decades into the future, then you need to be worried right now,” Lidar said.





you scared yet?

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #444 on: January 04, 2014, 12:00:42 PM »

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/justice-dept-appeals-ruling-against-nsa-collection-of-phone-data/2014/01/03/6e22441e-74c2-11e3-8def-a33011492df2_story.html

Ruling against NSA collection of phone data is appealed


By Sari Horwitz, Published: January 3E-mail the writer
The Justice Department on Friday appealed the ruling of a federal judge who said the National Security Agency’s massive collection of domestic telephone data was almost certainly unconstitutional.

The Justice Department’s filing to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit follows a Dec. 16 ruling by U.S. District Judge Richard J. Leon that granted a request for an injunction and blocked the collection of the phone data for conservative legal activist Larry Klayman and a co-plaintiff.

Leon, who was nominated by President George W. Bush and appointed to the bench in 2002, stayed his decision to allow the Justice Department time to appeal. But in a strongly worded opinion, he rejected the government’s arguments that the program is legal.

The “almost-Orwellian technology” that allows the government to collect, store and analyze phone metadata is “unlike anything that could have been conceived in 1979” and is “at best, the stuff of science fiction,” Leon wrote.

In 1979, the Supreme Court ruled that Americans have no reasonable expectation of privacy in records of their calls that are held by phone companies, and the court said that a warrant to collect them is not required.

In a separate case, less than two weeks after Leon's ruling, a federal judge in New York found just the opposite. U.S. District Judge William H. Pauley III ruled that the domestic collection program was legal and rejected a challenge brought by the American Civil Liberties Union, which filed an appeal Thursday.

If the constitutionality of the NSA program divides the federal appeals courts, it is likely the Supreme Court will decide the issue.

Along with its appeal, the Obama administration on Friday revealed that the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court renewed an order allowing the NSA’s domestic phone record collection.

In a statement, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) said that Leon’s ruling was the “lone contrary decision” and cited several rulings that sided with the administration, including the Dec. 27 ruling by Pauley.

“It is the administration’s view, consistent with the recent holdings of the United States District Courts for the Southern District of New York and Southern District of California, as well as the findings of 15 judges of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court on 36 separate occasions over the past seven years, that the telephony metadata collection program is lawful,” the ODNI statement said.

..........

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2014/01/03/justice-department-appeals-judge-ruling-against-nsa/

Appeals
Administration moves on 2 fronts to preserve NSA surveillance

Published January 03, 2014 • FoxNews.com


sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #445 on: January 04, 2014, 07:58:57 PM »


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/01/04/nsa-spying-congress_n_4542294.html

NSA Does Not Deny Spying On Congress: Members Have 'Same Privacy Protections' As All Americans YEAH ..NONE !!!


The Huffington Post  |  By Chris Gentilviso Posted: 01/04/2014 4:55 pm EST



Hours after Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) questioned whether members of Congress are subject to the NSA's spying, the agency response revealed anything but a denial.

In a statement obtained by the Huffington Post on Saturday, an NSA spokesperson said that members of Congress "have the same privacy protections as all U.S. persons," adding that "transparency" is present between the two entities.

NSA’s authorities to collect signals intelligence data include procedures that protect the privacy of U.S. persons. Such protections are built into and cut across the entire process. Members of Congress have the same privacy protections as all U.S. persons. NSA is fully committed to transparency with Congress. Our interaction with Congress has been extensive both before and since the media disclosures began last June. We are reviewing Sen. Sanders’s letter now, and we will continue to work to ensure that all Members of Congress, including Sen. Sanders, have information about NSA’s mission, authorities, and programs to fully inform the discharge of their duties.
Under Sanders' definition, "spying" includes gathering metadata from personal or official phones, along with“any other data from a third party not made available to the general public in the regular course of business." The metadata classification has been considered by the NSA as not counting as "spying."

Sanders' letter arrived on the same day that the NSA's phone records program was reauthorized by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court. It is the 36th time that a renewal has occurred.





we're freakin doomed..the inmates are running the asylum

Offline robomont

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #446 on: January 05, 2014, 01:43:46 AM »
That iphone system above.only in a droid version.i believe was used against me about a month ago .by a county deputy.i believe these systems are already in place in all police cars.thats why cops only have to walk up to the car with your phone and not have to physically plug something into it.
I believe this is why the talk of a nationalized police force.because basically the whole surveillence system is a street cop to the nsa now.the distraction is telling the world it just the nsa when really its all of it from the cellphones to dishnetwork to xboxs to stop light cameras to cop cars .then on top this system is the wifi pinger visualization system and the cellwave pinger visualization system.these are very similar to the xbox system only working at different frequencies and covering larger areas.because of the systems covering larger areas .their detail is not as fine as wifi or ir.
ive never been much for rules.
being me has its priviledges.

Dumbledore

Offline zorgon

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #447 on: January 05, 2014, 03:57:49 AM »
NSA seeks to build quantum computer that could crack most types of encryption


Their old one :P I wonder if Pegasus can pick it up at government surplus? 1990 version :D

 ::)

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you scared yet?


Nah

Offline The Matrix Traveller

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #448 on: January 05, 2014, 04:14:15 AM »
We should put a bid in for it, say 10 RMB and find a corner for it in our museum..  :)

The restriction on the 1990 version is the human input  :P

50 years from now, it will be seen as a joke...   :)

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #449 on: January 07, 2014, 11:09:34 AM »

http://news.yahoo.com/snowden-more-u-israel-secrets-expose-greenwald-231902264--sector.html

Snowden has more U.S.-Israel secrets to expose:
Greenwald.  18 hours ago
 
JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Former U.S. spy agency contractor Edward Snowden has more secrets to reveal that relate to Israel, the journalist who first brought his leaks to the world's attention said on Monday.

 
Israel played down the disclosures. But Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said he had ordered the matter examined and that "there are things that must not be done" between allies.

Glenn Greenwald, who as a writer for Britain's Guardian met face-to-face with the fugitive Snowden and has written or co-authored many of the newspaper's stories based on his material, was asked in an Israeli television interview whether the ex-contractor had more secrets to tell that related to Israel.

"Yes. I don't want to preview any stories that aren't yet published, but it is definitely the case that there are a huge number of very significant stories that are left to report," said the Brazil-based Greenwald, speaking to Channel Ten TV by video link.

"We have only had these documents for seven months, which, given their volume and complexity, is not a very long time. There definitely are stories left that involve the Middle East, that involve Israel. The reporting is going to continue at roughly the same pace that has been happening."

Last month, several Israeli cabinet members and lawmakers said news of U.S. spying on Israel was an opportunity to press Washington to free jailed Israeli agent Jonathan Pollard.

Pollard, a former U.S. Navy intelligence analyst, was sentenced to a life term in 1987 in the United States for spying for Israel. A succession of U.S. presidents have spurned Israeli calls for his pardon.

In what appeared to be a bid to calm the clamor, Netanyahu said Israel constantly sought Pollard's release and did not need a "special occasion" to discuss his case with Washington.

Greenwald voiced understanding for the Pollard linkage.

"I think you are absolutely right to contrast the Jonathan Pollard case with revelations of American spying on their closest allies within the Israeli government, because it does underlie, underscore exactly the hypocrisy that lies at the center of so much of what the U.S. government does," he said.

(Writing by Dan Williams; Editing by Ken Wills)

Politics & GovernmentForeign PolicyIsraelEdward SnowdenGlenn Greenwald.


.....................................................................


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/31/edward-snowden-job_n_4180601.html


Edward Snowden Has A New Job, Russian Lawyer Says
Reuters  |  Posted: 10/31/2013 7:04 am EDT  |  Updated: 10/31/2013 2:42 pm EDT

Lawyer says Snowden to work for Russian internet site

* Says name of site being withheld for security reasons

* Snowden's location in Russia is being kept secret

* Russia has granted former U.S. spy agency contractor asylum

By Steve Gutterman

MOSCOW, Oct 31 (Reuters) - Former U.S. spy agency contractor Edward Snowden has found a job working for a website in Russia, where he was granted asylum after fleeing the United States, a Russian lawyer who is helping him said on Thursday.

"Edward starts work in November," lawyer Anatoly Kucherena said, according to state-run news agency RIA.

"He will provide support for a large Russian site," he said, adding that he would not name the site "for security reasons".

Snowden, 30, a former National Security Agency contractor who disclosed secret U.S. internet telephone surveillance programmes, fled to Hong Kong and then to Russia in June.

President Vladimir Putin has rejected U.S. pleas to send Snowden home to face charges including espionage, and the temporary asylum he was granted in early August can be extended annually.

Snowden's location in Russia has not been disclosed and since July he has appeared only in a handful of photographs and video clips from a meeting this month with visiting former U.S. national security officials who support his cause.

Putin, a former KGB spy, said repeatedly that Russia would only shelter Snowden if he stopped harming the United States.

But state media have treated him as a whistleblower and the decision to grant him asylum seemed to underscore Putin's accusations that the U.S. government preaches to the world about rights and freedoms it does not uphold at home.

Putin has dismissed the widespread assumption that Russian intelligence officers had grilled Snowden for information after he arrived, and Kucherena has portrayed him as trying to live as normal a life as possible under the circumstances.

He said earlier that he hoped Snowden would find a job because he was living on scant funds, mostly from donations.

A tabloid news site on Thursday published what it said was a photo of Snowden on a Moscow river cruise this summer, and the same site earlier published a photo of a man who looked like Snowden pushing a shopping cart in a supermarket parking lot.

Kucherena was not immediately available for comment, an aide said. (Writing by Steve Gutterman; Editing by Alistair Lyon)






 


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