collapse

Author Topic: they know what you are doing  (Read 126607 times)

Offline thorfourwinds

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3944
  • Gold 360
    • EARTH AID CONCERT
Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #420 on: December 16, 2013, 09:57:40 PM »


NSA headquarters at Fort Meade, MD where TAO's main team reportedly works (Wikipedia)

The Washington Post previously profiled the team of "elite hackers" who make up the NSA's TAO division.
  
The British intelligence service liked this strategy too, NRC Handelsblad reports, because they successfully duped a Belgium telecom company with a fake LinkedIn account. A strip at the bottom says the map is relative to relative to the U.K., Australia, New Zealand, and Canada, the "Five Eyes" nations that share intelligence.
 
The bulk of CNE operations take place in Europe, South American and Asia. Some are speculating CNE operations focus on Internet service providers, telecom giants and other similar companies to better facilitate massive information collection. 

Where the NSA's team of hackers fit into the organization's greater intelligence gathering structure is presently unclear. But another new document, a February 2012 memo leaked to The New York Times about the NSA's goals for the future, shows exactly how extensive the NSA thought its intelligence gathering would become.

They wanted everything:

Intent on unlocking the secrets of adversaries, the paper underscores the agency’s long-term goal of being able to collect virtually everything available in the digital world. To achieve that objective, the paper suggests that the N.S.A. plans to gain greater access, in a variety of ways, to the infrastructure of the world’s telecommunications networks.

Prior to Edward Snowden revealing the operation to the world and ruining the fun, that is.

There's now far more public and international scrutiny directed towards the bulk intelligence gathering operation. 
EARTH AID is dedicated to the creation of an interactive multimedia worldwide event to raise awareness about the challenges and solutions of nuclear energy.

sky otter

  • Guest
Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #421 on: December 16, 2013, 10:03:01 PM »
headline at huff                     http://www.huffingtonpost.com/

TOLD YA


FEDERAL JUDGE: NSA Spying Program Likely Unconstitutional..

. Obama To Meet With Tech Honchos...

'Applications To Work At The NSA Are Down By More Than One Third,

And Retention Rates Have Also Declined'...
 
« Last Edit: December 16, 2013, 10:04:50 PM by sky otter »

sky otter

  • Guest
Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #422 on: December 17, 2013, 08:31:18 AM »




http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/17/edward-snowden-brazil-open-letter_n_4457662.html


Edward Snowden Pens 'Open Letter' Offering To Help Brazil Investigate U.S. Spying

By BRADLEY BROOKS 12/17/13 07:57 AM ET EST 



RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden wrote in a lengthy "open letter to the people of Brazil" that he's been inspired by the global debate ignited by his release of thousands of National Security Agency documents, and that the NSA's culture of indiscriminate global espionage "is collapsing."

In the letter, released widely online, Snowden commended the Brazilian government for its strong stand against U.S. spying.

He said he'd be willing to help the South American nation investigate NSA spying on its soil, but could not fully participate in doing so without being granted political asylum, because the U.S. "government will continue to interfere with my ability to speak."

Revelations about the NSA's spy programs were first published in June, based on some of the thousands of documents Snowden handed over to the Brazil-based American journalist Glenn Greenwald and his reporting partner Laura Poitras, a U.S. filmmaker.

The documents revealed that Brazil is the top NSA target in Latin America, spying that has included the monitoring of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff's cellphone and hacking into the internal network of state-run oil company Petrobras.

The revelations enraged Rousseff, who in October canceled an official visit to Washington that was to include a state dinner. She's also pushing the United Nations to give citizens more protections against spying.

In his letter, Snowden dismissed U.S. explanations to the Brazilian government and others that the bulk metadata gathered on billions of emails and calls was more "data collection" than surveillance.

"There is a huge difference between legal programs, legitimate spying ... and these programs of dragnet mass surveillance that put entire populations under an all-seeing eye and save copies forever," he wrote. "These programs were never about terrorism: they're about economic spying, social control, and diplomatic manipulation. They're about power."

Brazilian senators have asked for Snowden's help during hearings about the NSA's targeting of Brazil, an important transit hub for trans-Atlantic fiber optic cables that are hacked. Both Greenwald and his domestic partner David Miranda spoke before the senate, and Miranda has taken up the cause of persuading the Brazilian government to grant political asylum to Snowden.

Snowden, who is living in Russia on a temporary one-year visa, previously requested political asylum in Brazil and several other nations.

On Tuesday, neither Brazil's Foreign Ministry nor the presidential office said they had immediate comment on Snowden's letter or any pending asylum request.

Several members of Brazil's congress have called for Snowden to receive asylum, so that he could assist lawmakers' investigation into NSA activity in Brazil.

Rousseff recently joined Germany in pushing for the United Nations to adopt a symbolic resolution which seeks to extend personal privacy rights to all people.

The Brazilian leader has also ordered her government to take several measures, including laying fiber optic lines directly to Europe and South American nations, in an effort to "divorce" Brazil from the U.S.-centric backbone of the Internet that experts say has facilitated NSA spying.

The Snowden letter was first published Tuesday in a Portuguese translation by the Folha de S. Paulo newspaper. The AP later obtained the original English version.

It comes one day after a U.S. district judge ruled that the NSA's bulk collection of millions of Americans' telephone records likely violates the U.S. Constitution's ban on unreasonable search. The case is likely to go to the Supreme Court for a final decision.

"Six months ago, I revealed that the NSA wanted to listen to the whole world," Snowden wrote. "Now, the whole world is listening back, and speaking out, too. ... The culture of indiscriminate worldwide surveillance, exposed to public debates and real investigations on every continent, is collapsing."

sky otter

  • Guest
Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #423 on: December 18, 2013, 06:49:59 AM »


http://news.msn.com/world/brazil-refuses-to-grant-snowden-asylum


Brazil refuses to grant Snowden asylum




In a letter published Tuesday by the Folha de S. Paulo newspaper, Edward Snowden said that he would be willing to help Brazil's government investigate US spying.

BRASILIA — Brazil has no plans to grant asylum to Edward Snowden even after the former U.S. National Security Agency contractor offered on Tuesday to help investigate revelations of spying on Brazilians and their president, a local newspaper reported.

The Folha de S.Paulo newspaper, citing unnamed government officials, said the Brazilian government has no interest in investigating the mass Internet surveillance programs Snowden revealed in June and does not intend to give him asylum.

Related: Snowden offers to help Brazil if given asylum

In an "Open Letter to the Brazilian People" published by Folha and social media, Snowden offered to help a congressional probe into NSA spying on the country, including the personal communications of President Dilma Rousseff.

"I have expressed my willingness to assist wherever appropriate and lawful, but unfortunately the United States government has worked very hard to limit my ability to do so," the letter said.

Snowden is living in Russia under temporary asylum that is due to expire in August. He had previously asked for asylum in Brazil, among other countries, but Brasilia did not answer his request. While Snowden stopped short of asking for asylum again in the letter, he suggested that any collaboration with Brazilian authorities would depend them granting him asylum.

"Until a country grants permanent political asylum, the U.S. government will continue to interfere with my ability to speak," Snowden wrote.

The revelations of NSA spying damaged relations between the United States and Latin America's largest country and prompted Rousseff to cancel a state visit to Washington in October. The spying also led Rousseff to become a global advocate for curbs on Internet surveillance.

Evidence that the NSA monitored Rousseff's email and cellphone, and hacked into the computing network of state-run oil company Petrobras, angered Brazilians and led the Senate to probe the extent of U.S. spying in Brazil. Some members of Brazil's Congress have asked Russia for permission to interview Snowden but have received no reply, a congressional aide said.

In a Twitter message, Senator Ricardo Ferraço, chairman of the Senate foreign relations committee, said "Brazil should not miss the opportunity to grant asylum to Edward Snowden, who was key to unraveling the U.S. espionage system."

Other politicians, mainly opponents of Rousseff's leftist government, said granting Snowden asylum would be counter-productive and would lead to further deterioration of ties with the United States, Brazil's largest trading partner after China.

Rights watchdog Amnesty International said Brazil should give "full consideration" to Snowden's claim for asylum.

"It is his right to seek international protection, and it's also Brazil's international obligation to review and decide on his request under the refugee convention," Amnesty said in a statement.

A Brazilian foreign ministry spokesman said Brazil has never received a formal application for asylum from Snowden and thus had nothing to consider.

Related: White House: Snowden should still face charges in US

The original English version of Snowden's letter was published on the Facebook page of David Miranda, partner of journalist and blogger Glenn Greenwald, who first brought the Snowden leaks to the world's attention.

Miranda started a petition on the website Avaaz, pressing Rousseff to grant asylum to the "courageous" Snowden.

In his letter, Snowden praised Brazil's efforts at the United Nations to limit excessive electronic surveillance.

Last month a U.N. General Assembly committee expressed concern at the harm such scrutiny, including spying in foreign states and the mass collection of personal data, might have on human rights, following a joint resolution introduced by Brazil and Germany.

On Monday, White House spokesman Jay Carney dismissed the suggestion that the United States could grant amnesty to Snowden if he turned over the documents in his possession.



sky otter

  • Guest
Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #424 on: December 18, 2013, 04:52:18 PM »

how long can they delay till they find a way around it...



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/18/nsa-surveillance_n_4468213.html


Task Force Urges Limits On NSA Surveillance



AP  |  Posted: 12/18/2013 2:50 pm EST  |  Updated: 12/18/2013 4:50 pm EST

By JULIE PACE and KIMBERLY DOZIER, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS



vid at link

WASHINGTON (AP) — A presidential advisory panel has recommended sweeping limits on the government's surveillance programs, including requiring a court to sign off on individual searches of phone records and stripping the National Security Agency of its ability to store that data from Americans.

It was unclear how the changes, if enacted, would impact the scope of the vast government surveillance programs. While President Barack Obama ordered the review board to submit recommendations following government spying disclosures earlier this year, he is under no obligation to accept the proposals.

The White House authorized the release of the review group's report Wednesday, weeks ahead of schedule. The president was also conducting an internal review of the government's surveillance programs and planned to announce his decisions in January.

The review board's proposals address the government's ability to collect intelligence both in the United States and overseas.

The recommendations include tightening federal law enforcement's use of so-called national security letters, which give the government sweeping authority to demand financial and phone records without prior court approval in national security cases. The task force recommended that authorities should be required to obtain a prior "judicial finding" showing "reasonable grounds" that the information sought is relevant to terrorism or other intelligence activities.

In addition, the panel proposed terminating the NSA's ability to store telephone data and instead require it to be held by the phone companies or a third party. Access to the data would then be permitted only through an order from a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.

The panel called for more independent review of what the NSA collects and the process by which it goes about gathering data.

Amid an international furor over NSA spying on the leaders of allied nations such as Germany, the review group recommended that the president personally approve all sensitive methods used by the intelligence community. It said the process should identify both when surveillance of foreign leaders should be used and when it should be limited.

Among the considerations in deciding whether to spy on allies, the report said, is whether the United States shares "fundamental values and interests" with the leaders of those nations.

"Just because we can doesn't mean we should," said Richard A. Clarke, who served on the five-member panel.

Read the full report here:

http://www.docstoc.com/docs/165709600/Presidentâ??s%20Review%20Group%20on%20Intelligence%20%20and%20Communications%20Technologies%20Report%20On%20NSA


sky otter

  • Guest
Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #425 on: December 19, 2013, 11:01:19 AM »

ah-ha..big business money will change the spying...probably make it go back underground..cause
this puppy is already to big  to get back into the kennel..


oh shhhhhhhhhhhet.. too late to fix the quote below but i will fix this one...sigh  ::)



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/18/brazil-saab-jet-deal_n_4469386.html


Brazil Chooses Saab Jet Deal For Air Force After NSA Spying Sours Boeing Bid



Reuters  |  Posted: 12/18/2013 6:20 pm EST  |  Updated: 12/19/2013 9:52 am EST



By Alonso Soto and Brian Winter

BRASILIA/SAO PAULO, Dec 18 (Reuters) - Brazil awarded a $4.5 billion contract to Saab AB on Wednesday to replace its aging fleet of fighter jets, a surprise coup for the Swedish company after news of U.S. spying on Brazilians helped derail Boeing's chances for the deal.

The contract, negotiated over the course of three presidencies, will supply Brazil's air force with 36 new Gripen NG fighters by 2020. Aside from the cost of the jets themselves, the agreement is expected to generate billions of additional dollars in future supply and service contracts.

Saab did not immediately comment on the purchase. In addition to Chicago-based Boeing Co, France's Dassault Aviation SA was a contender for the contract.

The timing of the announcement, after more than a decade of off-and-on negotiations, appeared to catch the companies involved by surprise. Even Juniti Saito, Brazil's top air force commander, said on Wednesday that he only heard of the decision a day earlier in a meeting with President Dilma Rousseff.

Brazilian officials said the deal, one of the most coveted emerging-market defense contracts, went to Saab because it provided the most affordable option for the new jets, as well as the best conditions for technology transfer to local partners.

The choice, Defense Minister Celso Amorim said, "took into account performance, the effective transfer of technology and costs - not just of acquisition but of maintenance."

Until earlier this year, Boeing's F/A-18 Super Hornet had been considered the front runner. But revelations of spying by the U.S. National Security Agency in Brazil, including personal communication by Rousseff, led Brazil to believe it could not trust a U.S. company.

"The NSA problem ruined it for the Americans," a Brazilian government source said on condition of anonymity.

A U.S. source close to the negotiations said that whatever intelligence the spying had delivered for the American government was unlikely to outweigh the commercial cost of the revelations.

"Was that worth 4 billion dollars?" the source asked.

The lament echo's recent complaints by Cisco Systems Inc , which said in November that a backlash against U.S. government spying contributed to lower demand for its products in China.

In a statement, Boeing called Brazil's decision a "disappointment," but added that it would continue to work with Brazil to meet its defense requirements.


Dassault, for its part, said it regrets Brazil's decision and called Saab's fighter an aircraft that was inferior to its Rafale jet.

"The Gripen is a lighter, single engine aircraft that does not match the Rafale in terms of performance and therefore does not carry the same price tag," it said.

Saab says the Gripen NG has the lowest logistical and operational costs of all fighters currently in service.

Brazil coexists peacefully with all of its South American neighbors and has no enemies elsewhere. The country, however, is eager to fortify its military as it considers the long-term defense of its vast borders and abundant natural resources, including the Amazon rainforest and offshore oil discoveries.

"We are a peaceful country, but we won't be defenseless," Rousseff said on Wednesday at a lunch with senior officials from Brazil's military, where she said the announcement was forthcoming. "A country the size of Brazil must always be ready to protect its citizens, patrimony and sovereignty."

Sweden's defense minister, Karin Enstrom, said in an interview that the contract, "is a sign that the Gripen is a well-functioning system which is cost efficient."

Under the terms of their agreement, Brazil and Saab will now finalize contract details within a year. The first jet is expected to be delivered two years later, with about 12 of the aircraft expected annually after that.

Brazil's decision unexpectedly wraps up a tortuous and prolonged decision-making process that had made the negotiations the object of ridicule in some defense circles.

However, the deal was taken very seriously by the competitors.

French President François Hollande personally lobbied for Dassault last week during a state visit. Boeing, for its part, was so committed to winning the contract that it opened a big corporate office in Brazil and named Donna Hrinak, a former U.S. ambassador to the country, as its top executive there.

The timing of the announcement surprised many analysts, who believed that the slowdown in Latin America's biggest economy, coupled with Rousseff's expected bid for re-election next year, would delay the purchase until 2015.

Indeed, the decision coincides with pressure on Rousseff from economists, the private sector and political opponents to curb public spending. Having initially increased government spending in efforts to spur growth, the president now faces growing criticism because of stubborn inflation and a worsening outlook for the country's budgetary targets.

Still, the country's current fleet of Mirage fighters, which the new jets will replace, is so old that the air force this week is taking them out of service. And Brazil's government said the money to pay for the jets would not come out of the budget until 2015, after the contract is finalized.

Analysts said the Gripen's cost advantage stems from its relative simplicity compared with the other jets.

"The Gripen is more accessible in terms of technology," said Richard Aboulafia, an analyst at the Teal Group, a Virginia-based research company for aerospace and defense. "It's something Brazil could conceivable build itself."

At the briefing in which they announced their decision, government officials said Brazilian aircraft maker Embraer SA would be Saab's principal partner. The transfer of technology is crucial to help Brazil develop future generations of fighter aircraft.

"There isn't necessarily a need to produce all the parts in Brazil," Amorim, the defense minister said. "What's important is that specific aviation technology is transferred to Brazil so we can develop it."

The delta-winged Gripen, Swedish for Griffin, was first introduced into service in the late 90's and is currently flown by the Swedish, Hungarian, South African, Thai and Czech air forces, according to the company's website.

Saab shares rose 1.84 percent to 133 krona on Wednesday, their highest close in 10 days. Earlier in the day, they rose as much as 5.7 percent to 138 krona, the highest in five months.

Boeing shares fell 0.13 percent to $135.70 in New York, while Dassault Aviation shares fell 0.4 percent to 920 euros in Paris.
« Last Edit: December 19, 2013, 07:17:01 PM by sky otter »

Online Ellirium113

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1624
  • Gold 303
  • We are here
Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #426 on: December 19, 2013, 03:12:50 PM »

ah-ha..big business money will change the spying...probably make it go back underground..cause
this puppy is already to get back into the kennel..



Right back at-ya NSA will change the MONEY!!

Quote
A White House review panel report into the activities of the NSA suggested that the government was using the spy agency to launch cyber attacks against financial institutions and change the amounts held in bank accounts.

Quote
“Top financial experts say that the NSA and other intelligence agencies are using information gained from spying to profit from this inside information. And the NSA wants to ramp up its spying on Wall Street … to “protect” it. “Whose money, exactly, is the NSA “protecting” … and how are they protecting it?” asks Washington’s Blog, “What about the money of people that the U.S. government considers undesirables?”

http://www.prisonplanet.com/government-using-nsa-to-change-amount-in-bank-accounts-warns-panel.html

Online Ellirium113

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1624
  • Gold 303
  • We are here
Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #427 on: December 19, 2013, 05:10:23 PM »
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L_Jvb5cBfiE[/youtube]


Eyes everywhere: NSA's second tier spying partners identified


Quote
Denmark, Belgium, the Netherlands and several other EU countries were named among “third party partners” in the NSA-led global signal intelligence program, a new leak submitted by journalist Glenn Greenwald to Danish TV reveals.

According to the document, obtained by Swedish TV program ‘Mission: Investigate’, that has been probing Sweden's participation in global spying operations, nine European countries were added to the list of NSA accomplices.

The "third party partners" to the Five Eyes nations has now grown to include nine states - Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands and Spain.

http://rt.com/news/denmark-nsa-signit-partner-516/
« Last Edit: December 19, 2013, 05:15:43 PM by Ellirium113 »

sky otter

  • Guest
Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #428 on: December 20, 2013, 09:26:44 PM »


http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/21/world/nsa-dragnet-included-allies-aid-groups-and-business-elite.html?hp&_r=1&pagewanted=all&

N.S.A. Spied on Allies, Aid Groups and Businesses

By JAMES GLANZ and ANDREW W. LEHREN
Published: December 20, 2013 347 Comments

Secret documents reveal more than 1,000 targets of American and British surveillance in recent years, including the office of an Israeli prime minister, heads of international aid organizations, foreign energy companies and a European Union official involved in antitrust battles with American technology businesses
While the names of some political and diplomatic leaders have previously emerged as targets, the newly disclosed intelligence documents provide a much fuller portrait of the spies’ sweeping interests in more than 60 countries.

Britain’s Government Communications Headquarters, working closely with the National Security Agency, monitored the communications of senior European Union officials, foreign leaders including African heads of state and sometimes their family members, directors of United Nations and other relief programs, and officials overseeing oil and finance ministries, according to the documents. In addition to Israel, some targets involved close allies like France and Germany, where tensions have already erupted over recent revelations about spying by the N.S.A.

Details of the surveillance are described in documents from the N.S.A. and Britain’s eavesdropping agency, known as GCHQ, dating from 2008 to 2011. The target lists appear in a set of GCHQ reports that sometimes identify which agency requested the surveillance, but more often do not. The documents were leaked by the former N.S.A. contractor Edward J. Snowden and shared by The New York Times, The Guardian and Der Spiegel.

The reports are spare, technical bulletins produced as the spies, typically working out of British intelligence sites, systematically tapped one international communications link after another, focusing especially on satellite transmissions. The value of each link is gauged, in part, by the number of surveillance targets found to be using it for emails, text messages or phone calls. More than 1,000 targets, which also include people suspected of being terrorists or militants, are in the reports.

It is unclear what the eavesdroppers gleaned. The documents include a few fragmentary transcripts of conversations and messages, but otherwise contain only hints that further information was available elsewhere, possibly in a larger database.

Some condemned the surveillance on Friday as unjustified and improper. “This is not the type of behavior that we expect from strategic partners,” Pia Ahrenkilde Hansen, a spokeswoman for the European Commission, said on the latest revelations of American and British spying in Europe.

Some of the surveillance relates to issues that are being scrutinized by President Obama and a panel he appointed in Washington that on Wednesday recommended tighter limits on the N.S.A., particularly on spying of foreign leaders, especially allies.

The reports show that spies monitored the email traffic of several Israeli officials, including one target identified as “Israeli prime minister,” followed by an email address. The prime minister at the time, in January 2009, was Ehud Olmert. The next month, spies intercepted the email traffic of the Israeli defense minister, Ehud Barak, according to another report. Two Israeli embassies also appear on the target lists.

Mr. Olmert said in a telephone interview on Friday that the email address was used for correspondence with his office, which he said staff members often handled. He added that it was unlikely that any secrets could have been compromised.

“This was an unimpressive target,” Mr. Olmert said. He noted, for example, that his most sensitive discussions with President George W. Bush took place in person. “I would be surprised if there was any attempt by American intelligence in Israel to listen to the prime minister’s lines,” he said.

Mr. Barak, who declined to comment, has said publicly that he used to take it for granted that he was under surveillance.

Despite the close ties between the United States and Israel, the record of mutual spying is long: Israeli spies, including Jonathan Jay Pollard, who was sentenced in 1987 to life in prison for passing intelligence information to Israel, have often operated in the United States, and the United States has often turned the abilities of the N.S.A. against Israel.

Mr. Olmert’s office email was intercepted while he was dealing with fallout from Israel’s military response to rocket attacks from Gaza, but also at a particularly tense time in relations with the United States. The two countries were simultaneously at odds on Israeli preparations to attack Iran’s nuclear program and cooperating on a wave of cyberattacks on Iran’s major nuclear enrichment facility.

A year before the interception of Mr. Olmert’s office email, the documents listed another target, the Institute of Physics at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, an internationally recognized center for research in atomic and nuclear physics.

Also appearing on the surveillance lists is Joaquín Almunia, vice president of the European Commission, which, among other powers, has oversight of antitrust issues in Europe. The commission has broad authority over local and foreign companies, and it has punished a number of American companies, including Microsoft and Intel, with heavy fines for hampering fair competition. The reports say that spies intercepted Mr. Almunia’s communications in 2008 and 2009.

Mr. Almunia, a Spaniard, assumed direct authority over the commission’s antitrust office in 2010. He has been involved in a three-year standoff with Google over how the company runs its search engine. Competitors of the online giant had complained that it was prioritizing its own search results and using content like travel reviews and ratings from other websites without permission. While pushing for a settlement with Google, Mr. Almunia has warned that the company could face large fines if it does not cooperate.

The surveillance reports do not specify whether the interceptions of Mr. Almunia’s communications were requested by the N.S.A. or British spies. Nor do the reports make clear whether he was a longstanding surveillance target or swept up as part of a fleeting operation. Contacted by The Times, Mr. Almunia said he was “strongly upset” about the spying.

Ms. Hansen, the spokeswoman for the European Commission, said that it was already engaged in talks with the United States that were “needed to restore trust and confidence in the trans-Atlantic relationship.” She added that “the commission will raise these new allegations with U.S. and U.K. authorities.”

In a statement, the N.S.A. denied that it had ever carried out espionage to benefit American businesses.

“We do not use our foreign intelligence capabilities to steal the trade secrets of foreign companies on behalf of — or give intelligence we collect to — U.S. companies to enhance their international competitiveness or increase their bottom line,” said Vanee Vines, an N.S.A. spokeswoman.

But she added that some economic spying was justified by national security needs. “The intelligence community’s efforts to understand economic systems and policies, and monitor anomalous economic activities, are critical to providing policy makers with the information they need to make informed decisions that are in the best interest of our national security,” Ms. Vines said.

Spies have a freer hand with economic targets in Britain, where the law permits intelligence gathering in the service of the “economic well-being” of the country. A GCHQ spokesman said that its policy was not to comment on intelligence matters, but that the agency “takes its obligations under the law very seriously.”

At the request of GCHQ, The Times agreed to withhold some details from the documents because of security concerns.

The surveillance reports show American and British spies’ deep appetite for information. The French companies Total, the oil and gas giant, and Thales, an electronics, logistics and transportation outfit, appear as targets, as do a French ambassador, an “Estonian Skype security team” and the German Embassy in Rwanda.

Germany is especially sensitive about American spying since reports emerged that the agency listened to Chancellor Angela Merkel’s cellphone calls. Negotiations for a proposed agreement between Germany and the United States on spying rules have recently stalled for several reasons, including the United States’ guarantee only that it would never spy on the chancellor — a promise it has refused to extend to other German officials.

Multiple United Nations Missions in Geneva are listed as targets, including Unicef and the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research. So is Médecins du Monde, a medical relief organization that goes into war-ravaged areas. Leigh Daynes, an executive director of the organization in Britain, responded to news about the surveillance by saying: “There is absolutely no reason for our operations to be secretly monitored.”

More obvious intelligence targets are also listed, though in smaller numbers, including people identified as “Israeli grey arms dealer,” “Taleban ministry of refugee affairs” and “various entities in Beijing.” Some of those included are described as possible members of Al Qaeda, and as suspected extremists or jihadists.

While few if any American citizens appear to be named in the documents, they make clear that some of the intercepted communications either began or ended in the United States and that N.S.A. facilities carried out interceptions around the world in collaboration with their British partners. Some of the interceptions appear to have been made at the Sugar Grove, W.Va., listening post run by the N.S.A. and code-named Timberline, and some are explicitly tied to N.S.A. target lists in the reports.

Many of the reports, written by British teams specializing in Sigint, shorthand for “signals intelligence,” are called “Bude Sigint Development Reports,” referring to a British spy campus on the Cornwall coast. The reports often reveal which countries were the endpoints for the intercepted communications, and information on which satellite was carrying the traffic.

Strengthening the likelihood that full transcripts were taken during the intercepts is the case of Mohamed Ibn Chambas, an official of the Economic Community of West African States, known as Ecowas, a regional initiative of 15 countries that promotes economic and industrial activity. Whether intentionally or through some oversight, when Mr. Chambas’s communications were intercepted in August 2009, dozens of his complete text messages were copied into one of the reports.

Referred to in the transcripts as “Dr. Chambers,” he seems to have been monitored during an especially humdrum day or two of travel. “Am glad yr day was satisfying,” Mr. Chambas texted one acquaintance. “I spent my whole day travelling ... Had to go from Abidjan to Accra to catch a flt to Monrovia ... The usual saga of intra afr.”

Later he recommended a book, “A Colonial History of Northern Ghana,” to the same person. “Interesting and informative,” Mr. Chambas texted. The high point of his day was receiving an award in Liberia, but soon he was busy working out logistics for future appointments.

“Where is the conference pl? Didnt get the invt,” he texted another contact. He discussed further details before adding, perhaps wistfully, given his grinding travel schedule: “Have a restful Sunday.”


Katrin Bennhold contributed reporting from London, David E. Sanger from Washington, and Ethan Bronner from New York.

This article has been revised to reflect the following correction:

Correction: December 20, 2013


An earlier version of this article misidentified the office held by Angela Merkel of Germany. She is chancellor, not prime minister.


A version of this article appears in print on December 21, 2013, on page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: U.S. and Britain Extended Spying To 1,000 Targets .

sky otter

  • Guest
Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #429 on: December 24, 2013, 07:54:25 AM »


http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/12/24/22029559-nsa-leaker-edward-snowden-missions-already-accomplished?lite


NSA leaker Edward Snowden: 'Mission's already accomplished'


By Alastair Jamieson, Staff writer, NBC News
National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden said his "mission's already accomplished" and spoke of having “personal satisfaction” at the revelations about U.S. surveillance policies in an interview published Tuesday.

The former intelligence contractor, who exposed extensive details of global electronic surveillance by the U.S. spy agency, said he was not being disloyal to the U.S. or to his former employer.

"I am not trying to bring down the NSA, I am working to improve the NSA," he told The Washington Post. "I am still working for the NSA right now. They are the only ones who don't realize it."

It is the first full interview with Snowden, now 30, since he arrived in Moscow in June in a dramatic bid to evade prosecution by authorities in the U.S., where he is charged with espionage and felony theft of government property.

He has been granted temporary asylum by Russia, and remains at an undisclosed location, but his long-term future status remains unclear.

"For me, in terms of personal satisfaction, the mission's already accomplished," he said in the interview, which was accompanied by what appeared to be new pictures. "I already won."

“As soon as the journalists were able to work, everything that I had been trying to do was validated,” he said. “I didn't want to change society. I wanted to give society a chance to determine if it should change itself."

President Barack Obama hinted Friday that he would consider some changes to NSA's bulk collection of Americans' phone records to address the public's concern about privacy. His comments came in a week in which a federal judge declared the NSA's collection program probably was unconstitutional. A presidential advisory panel has suggested 46 changes to NSA operations, The Associated Press reported.

Snowden also revealed himself to be "an indoor cat", adding that he rarely left the house where he was staying in Moscow.

“As long as I can sit down and think and write and talk to somebody, that's more meaningful to me than going out and looking at landmarks."

He also told the Post: “There is no evidence at all for the claim that I have loyalties to Russia or China or any country other than the United States,” he said. "I have no relationship with the Russian government. I have not entered into any agreements with them.”

“If I defected at all,” Snowden said, “I defected from the government to the public.”

The Associated Press contributed to this story

............................................


longer version

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/23/edward-snowden-mission-accomplished_n_4496020.html

Edward Snowden: 'Mission's Already Accomplished... I Already Won'
 AP  |  Posted: 12/23/2013 10:34 pm EST  |  Updated: 12/24/2013 12:28 am EST


Offline stealthyaroura

  • searcher of truth
  • The Roundtable
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 992
  • Gold 63
  • open minded student of truth.
Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #430 on: December 24, 2013, 05:22:24 PM »
aye well now the payback! (i see you covered this sky)
The UK, Boeing to be precise have just lost a HUGE order to build and supply the eurofighter
to some of the middle eastern powers thanks to our ties with the NSA.

Way to bloody go pillocks! >:( lost out to SAAB. thats a massive economic blow to my country!

lets see how good the nosey kuntz are at keeping track of the pick pocketing Romanians
that are getting ready to flood the UK!

oh thats right they cant even keep track of the sick dangerous NONCES can they! >:( FUMING!!!! 
Nikola Tesla humanitarian / Genius.
never forget this great man who gave so much
& asked for nothing but to let electricity be free for all.

Offline astr0144

  • The Roundtable
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3980
  • Gold 307
Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #431 on: December 25, 2013, 05:54:42 PM »
Hi Sky,

I did initially look at your thread many weeks ago, but have not kept up on it as yet...Initially I had not realised it was directly connected to Ed Snowden even though along the same lines.

Sorry  :-[  if my link below crossed paths...but its title does at least relate to Ed Snowden which now does connect to this thread as well !

Hope thats Ok  :)

Here is a short Video I found that says its related to the Interview he was supposed to have done over Christmas eve/day.. that unfortunately If he did it I missed it...

Hopefully it  will be repeated or the full version loaded to youtube for all of us to see..


http://uk.news.yahoo.com/video/snowden-releases-christmas-video-push-224542619.html


http://www.thelivingmoon.com/forum1/index.php?topic=5906.msg81720;boardseen#new

sky otter

  • Guest
Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #432 on: December 25, 2013, 07:54:18 PM »


astro
it's all good...  ;D
there is so much here that it is easy to miss stuff

i like the idea of adding to old threads to continue them and to cross referencing like we just did here.. that way  you can find more and just have to remember one spot to start

hugs

sky otter

  • Guest
Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #433 on: December 26, 2013, 12:20:31 PM »


yep..here it is




[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WqkpxMrxWkI[/youtube]

sky otter

  • Guest
Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #434 on: December 29, 2013, 05:51:43 PM »
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/29/nsa-hacking-tactics-_n_4515897.html


NSA Hacking Tactics Revealed By Der Spiegel

By RAPHAEL SATTER 12/29/13 01:03 PM ET EST 



LONDON (AP) — A German magazine lifted the lid on the operations of the National Security Agency's hacking unit Sunday, reporting that American spies intercept computer deliveries, exploit hardware vulnerabilities, and even hijack Microsoft's internal reporting system to spy on their targets.

Der Spiegel's revelations relate to a division of the NSA known as Tailored Access Operations, or TAO, which is painted as an elite team of hackers specializing in stealing data from the toughest of targets.

Citing internal NSA documents, the magazine said Sunday that TAO's mission was "Getting the ungettable," and quoted an unnamed intelligence official as saying that TAO had gathered "some of the most significant intelligence our country has ever seen."

Der Spiegel said TAO had a catalog of high-tech gadgets for particularly hard-to-crack cases, including computer monitor cables specially modified to record what is being typed across the screen, USB sticks secretly fitted with radio transmitters to broadcast stolen data over the airwaves, and fake base stations intended to intercept mobile phone signals on the go.

The NSA doesn't just rely on James Bond-style spy gear, the magazine said. Some of the attacks described by Der Spiegel exploit weaknesses in the architecture of the Internet to deliver malicious software to specific computers. Others take advantage of weaknesses in hardware or software distributed by some of the world's leading information technology companies, including Cisco Systems, Inc. and China's Huawei Technologies Ltd., the magazine reported.

Der Spiegel cited a 2008 mail order catalog-style list of vulnerabilities that NSA spies could exploit from companies such as Irvine, California-based Western Digital Corp. or Round Rock, Texas-based Dell Inc. The magazine said that suggested the agency was "compromising the technology and products of American companies."

Old-fashioned methods get a mention too. Der Spiegel said that if the NSA tracked a target ordering a new computer or other electronic accessories, TAO could tap its allies in the FBI and the CIA, intercept the hardware in transit, and take it to a secret workshop where it could be discretely fitted with espionage software before being sent on its way.

Intercepting computer equipment in such a way is among the NSA's "most productive operations," and has helped harvest intelligence from around the world, one document cited by Der Spiegel stated.

One of the most striking reported revelations concerned the NSA's alleged ability to spy on Microsoft Corp.'s crash reports, familiar to many users of the Windows operating system as the dialogue box which pops up when a game freezes or a Word document dies. The reporting system is intended to help Microsoft engineers improve their products and fix bugs, but Der Spiegel said the NSA was also sifting through the reports to help spies break into machines running Windows. One NSA document cited by the magazine appeared to poke fun at Microsoft's expense, replacing the software giant's standard error report message with the words: "This information may be intercepted by a foreign sigint (signals intelligence) system to gather detailed information and better exploit your machine."

Microsoft did not immediately return a call seeking comment, but the company is one of several U.S. firms that have demanded more transparency from the NSA — and worked to bolster their security — in the wake of the revelations of former intelligence worker Edward Snowden, whose disclosures have ignited an international debate over privacy and surveillance.

Der Spiegel did not explicitly say where its cache NSA documents had come from, although the magazine has previously published a series of stories based on documents leaked by Snowden, and one of Snowden's key contacts — American documentary filmmaker Laura Poitras — was listed among the article's six authors.

No one was immediately available at Der Spiegel to clarify whether Snowden was the source for the latest story.

___

Geir Moulson in Berlin contributed to this report.

 


Wal-Mart.com USA, LLC
affiliate_link
Free Click Tracking
Wal-Mart.com USA, LLC

* Recent Posts

Re: Most Important/Definitive Documentation of Fukushima 'Lost' by AboveTopSecret by spacemaverick
[Today at 05:11:20 AM]


Re: Tom DeLonge Annoucement - New Tech by space otter
[February 24, 2018, 02:09:21 PM]


Re: Tom DeLonge Annoucement - New Tech by Pimander
[February 24, 2018, 01:14:31 PM]


Re: Tom DeLonge Annoucement - New Tech by space otter
[February 24, 2018, 09:47:37 AM]


Re: Tom DeLonge Annoucement - New Tech by A51Watcher
[February 23, 2018, 06:14:48 PM]


Re: Most Important/Definitive Documentation of Fukushima 'Lost' by AboveTopSecret by ArMaP
[February 23, 2018, 01:37:45 PM]


Re: Most Important/Definitive Documentation of Fukushima 'Lost' by AboveTopSecret by thorfourwinds
[February 22, 2018, 09:07:22 PM]


Re: The American Left uncensored by ArMaP
[February 22, 2018, 01:34:52 PM]


Re: The American Left uncensored by Littleenki
[February 22, 2018, 07:13:59 AM]


The American Left uncensored by petrus4
[February 22, 2018, 05:52:43 AM]


Re: The Question We Should Be Asking by petrus4
[February 22, 2018, 04:46:03 AM]


Re: The Question We Should Be Asking by Ellirium113
[February 21, 2018, 06:35:07 PM]


Re: The Question We Should Be Asking by Eighthman
[February 21, 2018, 06:23:13 PM]


Re: The Question We Should Be Asking by Eighthman
[February 21, 2018, 05:41:06 PM]


Re: The Question We Should Be Asking by zorgon
[February 21, 2018, 04:48:19 PM]


Re: The Question We Should Be Asking by Ellirium113
[February 21, 2018, 04:06:56 PM]


Re: The Question We Should Be Asking by Irene
[February 21, 2018, 09:45:51 AM]


Australien Skies 2 - Exclusive Premiere by thorfourwinds
[February 20, 2018, 10:10:11 PM]


Re: The Question We Should Be Asking by robomont
[February 20, 2018, 08:21:05 PM]


Re: The Question We Should Be Asking by petrus4
[February 20, 2018, 05:10:21 PM]