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Author Topic: they know what you are doing  (Read 126594 times)

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #390 on: December 01, 2013, 08:15:30 AM »


everybody wants to know what you're doing... >:(

did you know that
when you shop some of the little magnetic tags in and on merchandise that makes the door security go off..
some of them now can  follow you home so they can see where you live..
i get into my car and pull them all off and out of the boxes and walk back to the store and toss them in the garbage can in front of the store

if i need to exchange anything all i really need is my reciept



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/30/stores-track-you_n_4363811.html

New Technology Helps Stores Track Your Every Move This Season
AP  |  Posted: 11/30/2013 9:46 am EST

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's a big question for marketers: What kind of a buyer are you? And, as important, what are you willing to pay?

In the search for answers this shopping season, consumer behavior online and off is being tracked aggressively with help from advances in technology.

And it can happen whether buyers are on their work computers, mobile devices or just standing in the grocery aisle. The data can be connected with other personal information like income, ZIP code and when a person's car insurance expires.

Retailers say these techniques help customize shopping experiences and can lead to good deals for shoppers. Consumer advocates say aggressive tracking and profiling also opens the door to price discrimination, with companies charging someone more online or denying them entirely based on their home price or how often they visit a site.

"You can't have Christmas any more without big data and marketers," said Jeff Chester, executive director at the Center for Digital Democracy. "You know that song where Santa knows when you've been sleeping? He knows when you're awake? Believe me, that's where he's getting his information from."

Consumer tracking has long been a part of American consumerism. Retailers push shoppers to sign up for loyalty cards, register purchased items for warranty programs and note ZIP codes to feed their mailing lists. Online stores and advertising services employ browser "cookies," the tiny bits of software code that can track a person's movements across the Internet, to analyze shoppers and present them with relevant pop-up ads.

More recently, marketers have developed increasingly sophisticated ways to combine offline and online data that creates detailed profiles of shoppers. They also are perfecting location-tracking technology as a means of attracting new customers and influencing shoppers as they wander through brick-and-mortar stores.

A major push encourages shoppers to agree to be tracked in exchange for a good deal. Brick-and-mortar stores used to balk at customers who used smartphones to compare prices at rival stores, but retailers like Target are now pushing their own mobile apps and offering in-store Wi-Fi. The mobile apps entice shoppers with coupon deals or ads as they move throughout a store, while in-store Wi-Fi is another way to track a consumer's online movements.

To further lure buyers, major holiday retailers, including Macy's, Best Buy and JCPenney, have partnered with the Shopkick mobile app. If shoppers turn on the app while in their store, they can be rewarded with discounts or song downloads for trying on clothes, scanning barcodes and making purchases.

Another app, Snapette, blends American's addiction to social media sites with location technology. Aimed at women keen on fashion, consumers can see what accessories or shoes are creating a buzz in their particular neighborhood, while stores get a chance to entice nearby shoppers with ads or coupons.

Not all new technology tracking is voluntary. Stores have been experimenting with heat sensors and monitoring cellphone signals in their stores to see which aisles attract the most attention. One product called "Shopperception" uses the same motion-detection technology in the Xbox Kinect to track a customer's movement, including whether they picked up a product only to return it to the shelf. In addition to analyzing customer behavior, it can trigger nearby digital signs offering coupons and steering shoppers to certain products.

The company contends that the technology is less intrusive than other tracking devices, including security cameras, because a person's image is never stored and their movements only registered as a data point.

Marketers also are learning to overcome limitations with software cookies. One tech startup called Drawbridge claims to have found a way to link a person's laptop and mobile device by analyzing their movements online, enabling advertisers to reach the same consumer whether they're on their work computer or smartphone.

But how all that information is used and where it ends up is still unclear. The Federal Trade Commission, along with several lawmakers, has been investigating the "data broker" industry, companies that collect and sell information on individuals by pooling online habits with other information like court records, property taxes, even income. The congressional Government Accountability Office concluded in November that existing laws have fallen behind the pace of technological advancements in the industry, which enables companies to aggregate large amounts of data without a person's knowledge or ability to correct errors.


"There are lots of potential uses of information that are not revealed to consumers," said Susan Grant, director of consumer protection at the Consumer Federation of America. To protect themselves, "consumers still need to do quite a bit of shopping to make sure that they get (what) meets their needs the best and is the best price."


Offline ArMaP

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #391 on: December 01, 2013, 08:29:06 AM »
everybody wants to know what you're doing... >:(

did you know that
when you shop some of the little magnetic tags in and on merchandise that makes the door security go off..
some of them now can  follow you home so they can see where you live..
i get into my car and pull them all off and out of the boxes and walk back to the store and toss them in the garbage can in front of the store

if i need to exchange anything all i really need is my reciept
How can that work without the person having a reading mechanism at home? ???

Offline Ellirium113

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #392 on: December 01, 2013, 09:08:19 AM »

everybody wants to know what you're doing... >:(

did you know that
when you shop some of the little magnetic tags in and on merchandise that makes the door security go off..
some of them now can  follow you home so they can see where you live..
i get into my car and pull them all off and out of the boxes and walk back to the store and toss them in the garbage can in front of the store

if i need to exchange anything all i really need is my reciept


Gee I hope you paid CASH for it or that was a complete waste of time.  ;)

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #393 on: December 01, 2013, 10:54:26 AM »

yes i pay cash for everything..just call me paranoid.. ;)

and i don't know how they work.. only that they track..it was someone who worked in management in a store.....i don't even know if i should believe it...

ok.. i had to go look it up, of course..
thinking that the person who told me was telling me about the future and not the present
so while i still don't know the answer i do have more info on stuff..lol..





http://us.norton.com/yoursecurityresource/detail.jsp?aid=rfid

RFID Chips and Your Privacy
Mary O. Foley
Find Under: New Targets
You probably aren’t aware of it, but some of today’s most modern conveniences are provided by tiny computer chips. For example, you may have a gadget in your car that automatically pays a toll bridge fee as you drive through the toll booth. This is accomplished with a computer chip. Or you may use a security card to gain access to your office building. This, too, is made possible by a computer chip.

Many of these computer chips communicate information about your purchases, your credit card numbers, and even your identity. These special chips are a type known as radio frequency identification (RFID). The chips send data over radio signals to special antennas, or "readers." From there, the data goes into a computer database.

RFID chips are embedded into a growing number of items you have in your wallet or in your car, and they may soon be added to items you buy in stores. RFID chips are increasingly being used in payment systems, such as charge cards and gas station express payment fobs. Many people appreciate the convenience because it eliminates the step of swiping a charge card. Instead, you merely wave your wallet or key chain over a scanner. In addition, since 2006, U.S. passports contain these chips, which hold a digital image of the passport holder. Some states are requiring that driver’s licenses feature the technology, too.

As the chips get smaller -- some are no bigger than a grain of rice -- and cheaper, companies such as Procter & Gamble, General Motors and others are experimenting with installing them in products sold in stores. Experts predict that someday you will go to a supermarket, load your cart with goods tagged with RFID chips, and walk out the door without having your items rung up by a cashier. The price of the goods will be automatically tallied and deducted from your RFID-enabled credit card simply by walking past a bank of antennas.

Convenience Versus Security
While RFID technology allows faster commuting or more convenient shopping, it may also allow others to know more than they should about you. The fact that these chips can be scanned invisibly, and can carry so much private data, has triggered concerns that personal information could fall into the wrong hands. Some privacy advocates deride the technology as “spychips,” asserting that any person with an RFID reader, standing in the right place, could pilfer the data for reasons ranging from identity theft to government surveillance.

“There is a threat to individuals, and to our society,” argues Ari Schwartz, deputy director of the Center for Democracy and Technology (CDT), a nonprofit civil liberties advocacy group. Those at risk of being stalked, such as victims of domestic violence or law enforcement officials, could be most vulnerable, he says. As for society, over time, the use of this technology could cost Americans their civil liberties. “We could find ourselves living in a ‘Minority Report’ kind of world,” he warns, referring to the 2002 movie about government surveillance gone awry.

But RFID proponents note that all new technologies have their detractors. “Many of these same arguments were raised with barcodes,” notes Mark Roberti, editor of RFID Journal magazine. “There are probably 30 to 40 million people in the U.S. every day who carry RFID transponders on their body or in their car and there has never been a single instance of anyone having their privacy infringed,” he claims.

Moreover, some IT security experts note that the risk of eavesdropping is much greater over a cell phone, which has its own power source -- unlike most RFID chips -- and can be tracked over many miles instead of simply a few feet.

How to Foil RFID Chips
Since RFID chips are likely to become more prevalent, we need to be aware of the risks. If you want to evade trackers, Roberti offers the following tips:


Wrap a piece of foil around your charge card, key fob, passport or other chip-containing item when not in use. This will block the radio signal.



Smash the chip with a blunt object.



Jolt the chip with static electricity.



Physically remove the chip yourself.


CDT’s Schwartz adds that some companies, such as GM, are responding to consumer concerns by developing information for their owner’s manuals or product labels about how to disable or remove RFID chips. Schwartz says: “In terms of protecting consumers, we see this as progress.”

Most experts say that there is little immediate risk to consumers from the current uses of RFID chips for toll collection, payment systems, and identification. In fact, there may in fact be benefits in terms of the convenience of use. But it is a good idea for consumers to be aware of developments of this new technology so that they can best protect themselves.






http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/gadgets/high-tech-gadgets/rfid.htm
Outside the realm of retail merchandise, RFID tags are tracking vehicles, airline passengers, Alzheimer's patients and pets. Soon, they may even track your preference for chunky or creamy peanut butter. Some critics say RFID technology is becoming too much a part of our lives -- that is, if we're even aware of all the parts of our lives that it affects.

In this article, you'll learn about the types of RFID tags and how these tags can be tracked through the entire supply chain. We'll also look at the noncommercial uses of RFID tags and how the Departments of State and Homeland Security are using them. Lastly, we'll examine what some critics consider an Orwellian application of RFID tags in animals, humans and our society.
« Last Edit: December 01, 2013, 11:30:26 AM by sky otter »

Offline zorgon

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #394 on: December 01, 2013, 11:51:54 AM »


when you shop some of the little magnetic tags in and on merchandise that makes the door security go off..
some of them now can  follow you home so they can see where you live..
i get into my car and pull them all off and out of the boxes and walk back to the store and toss them in the garbage can in front of the store

Those magnetic strips get deactivated when you pay. The checkout counter has a Degaussing device. If it wasn't deactivated it would set of the scanner when you went out :D

I used to install such systems.

If you want to have fun... pull some out before you check out and stick them to shopping carts :P

 :o


PLAYSWITHMACHINES

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #395 on: December 01, 2013, 11:59:29 AM »
Quite right, Sky :D Gold!

FYI, the RFID passport was introduced over here in 2005, and was hacked by students in 2006. They are supposed to be readable from a foot away or less, but you can actually scan them from 30 feet...........

This was proven & we told the gubmint about it, yet they still issue them ::)

Yes a high voltage or even 20 seconds in a microwave will kill them, although expect problems at the border, they will want to know why it isn't working....

The correct response of course, is;
"Why isn't WHAT working?"

Since they (like the UK) never told us about them till after the fact.......

They won't even tell us exactly WHAT is stored on the chip, they say it's just the same info as in the passport, but who knows?

ETA: OK not the magnetic or coil tags :P

Interesting little fact; Your photo is in there too, albeit very grainy, it is stored as a 3-d profile of your face, difficult for humans but dead easy recognition for computers as it maps the contours of your face, not the actual fine details.......

Big Brother, we know all your tricks, & we don't give a sh**.............. :P

TIP: If you want to protect your identity, line your wallet / passport in tin foil ;)

ETA: get a tin foil hat while your about it... ::)
« Last Edit: December 01, 2013, 12:08:23 PM by PlaysWithMachines »

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #396 on: December 01, 2013, 01:23:52 PM »


thanks pwm..even my 91+ mom has the alum foil..

and Z..yeah i may be un-techie but i know how THOSE work ;D

but what i was told was that they have a newer version where they look the same
and  scan only the part that turns off the door security.... but follows the direction you are heading for home.
don't know how far it tracks.. maybe they only want to know if you go to another store..
don't know..
but the idea pisses me off...so i just toss em asap

i am fortunate enough to have a newer chevy but it has that onstar in it..
pssssssss..one wire in the truck takes care of that..
and i am told that if you pull it out they can ??????
but hey.. i haul long things that poke all kinds of places.. coulda happened any time

yes -- call me paranoid or just plain ass annoyed..
 :-*

PLAYSWITHMACHINES

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #397 on: December 01, 2013, 02:09:11 PM »
Quote
yes -- call me paranoid or just plain ass annoyed..

I'm with you all the way, Sister 8)

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #398 on: December 02, 2013, 02:42:06 PM »


http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/dec/02/edward-snowden-un-investigation-surveillance

Edward Snowden revelations prompt UN investigation into surveillance
UN's senior counter-terrorism official says revelations 'are at the very apex of public interest concerns'
Nick Hopkins and Matthew Taylor

The Guardian, Monday 2 December 2013 13.28 EST

Ben Emmerson: 'The Guardian has revealed an extensive programme of surveillance which potentially affects every one of us.' Photograph: Sarah Lee for the Guardian


The UN's senior counter-terrorism official is to launch an investigation into the surveillance powers of American and British intelligence agencies following Edward Snowden's revelations that they are using secret programmes to store and analyse billions of emails, phone calls and text messages.

The UN special rapporteur Ben Emmerson QC said his inquiry would also seek to establish whether the British parliament had been misled about the capabilities of Britain's eavesdropping headquarters, GCHQ, and whether the current system of oversight and scrutiny was strong enough to meet United Nations standards.

The inquiry will make a series of recommendations to the UN general assembly next year.

In an article for the Guardian, Emmerson said Snowden had disclosed "issues at the very apex of public interest concerns". He said the media had a duty and right to publish stories about the activities of GCHQ, and its American counterpart the National Security Agency.

"The astonishing suggestion that this sort of responsible journalism can somehow be equated with aiding and abetting terrorism needs to be scotched decisively," said Emmerson, who has been the UN's leading voice on counter-terrorism and human rights since 2011.

"It is the role of a free press to hold governments to account, and yet there have even been outrageous suggestions from some Conservative MPs that the Guardian should face a criminal investigation. It has been disheartening to see some tabloids giving prominence to this nonsense."

Emmerson's intervention comes ahead of Tuesday's hearing of the home affairs select committee, which is conducting its own inquiry into counter-terrorism.

The Guardian's editor in chief, Alan Rusbridger, will give evidence to MPs on the committee on Tuesday afternoon, followed by the Metropolitan police commissioner, Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe, and assistant commissioner Cressida Dick.

Over the last six months the Guardian, along with other international media organisations, has revealed the existence of mass surveillance programmes, such as GCHQ's Tempora, which taps into the cables that carry internet traffic in and out of the UK.

Last month, the heads of Britain's three intelligence agencies, MI5, GCHQ and MI6, gave evidence before parliament's intelligence and security committee.

During a 90-minute hearing, they accused Snowden of leaking material that had been "a gift to terrorists".

But Emmerson said such claims "need to be subjected to penetrating scrutiny".

He said his inquiry will be requiring further testimony from GCHQ's director, Sir Iain Lobban, the director of MI5, Andrew Parker, and MI6 chief Sir John Sawers.

"I will be seeking a far more detailed explanation than security chiefs gave the (ISC) committee. They must justify some of the claims they have made in public, because as matters stand, I have seen nothing in the Guardian articles which could be a risk to national security. In this instance, the balance of public interest is clear."

He added: "When it comes to assessing the balance that must be struck between maintaining secrecy and exposing information in the public interest there are often borderline cases. This isn't one of them. The Guardian's revelations are precisely the sort of information that a free press is supposed to reveal."



Emmerson said nobody had suggested the Mail on Sunday should be prosecuted when it published revelations from the former MI5 officer, David Shayler, and that the attorney general had rightly abandoned a prosecution against Katharine Gun, the GCHQ whistleblower who in 2003 revealed the US and UK were trying to manipulate a vote at the UN security council in favour of military intervention in Iraq.

No jury would ever have convicted her even though she had broken the Official Secrets Act, Emmerson said.

"The Guardian has revealed there is an extensive programme of mass surveillance which potentially affects every one of us, but has been assiduous in avoiding the revelation of any detail which could put sources at risk. The Mail on Sunday, on the other hand, published material that was of less obvious public interest."

Emmerson said the Snowden disclosures had caused reverberations across the world.

"There can be no doubt the revelations concern matters of international public interest. Wholescale reviews have been mooted by President Obama, Chancellor Merkel and Nick Clegg. In the US, a number of the revelations have already resulted in legislation.

"In Europe, the political class is incandescent. Many states have registered serious objections at the UN, and there are diplomatic moves towards an international agreement to restrict surveillance activity."

Chaired by Keith Vaz, the home affairs select committee called for the Guardian to give evidence following the ISC hearing.

However, a number of civil liberties groups and campaigners have raised concerns about the intense political pressure put on the Guardian, and condemned the UK government's demand that it destroy the Snowden files it was researching in the UK.

The freedom of expression group Article 19 and the Open Rights Group are among two signatories to a letter sent to Vaz ahead of Tuesday's session. They describe their deep concerns that the review of the Guardian "could restrict media freedom in the UK by discouraging future reporting on important matters of public interest".

The letter calls on MPs to take into account "international human rights standards, and in particular those that relate to the right to freedom of expression and media freedom".

Offline Ellirium113

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #399 on: December 02, 2013, 03:38:14 PM »
This might be a bit old but is relevent to this:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X034R3yzDhw[/youtube]

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #400 on: December 04, 2013, 05:30:50 PM »

hey Ellirium...i like those guys..thanks...i guess none of those folks wants the info out there..




http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/04/nsa-cellphone-records_n_4386808.html

NSA TRACKING CELLPHONES WORLDWIDE

NSA Tracking Billions Of Cellphone Records Daily: Report
By KIMBERLY DOZIER 12/04/13 06:19 PM ET EST 

WASHINGTON (AP) — The National Security Agency tracks the locations of nearly 5 billion cellphones every day overseas, including those belonging to Americans abroad, The Washington Post reported Wednesday.

The NSA inadvertently gathers the location records of "tens of millions of Americans who travel abroad" annually, along with the billions of other records it collects by tapping into worldwide mobile network cables, the newspaper said in a report on its website.

Such data means the NSA can track the movements of almost any cellphone around the world, and map the relationships of the cellphone user. The Post said a powerful analytic computer program called CO-TRAVELER crunches the data of billions of unsuspecting people, building patterns of relationships between them by where their phones go. That can reveal a previously unknown terrorist suspect, in guilt by cellphone-location association, for instance.

The program is detailed in documents given to the newspaper by former NSA systems analyst Edward Snowden. The Post also quotes anonymous NSA officials explaining the program, saying they spoke with the permission of their agency.

Shawn Turner, a spokesman for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, declined to comment on the report.

The DNI's general counsel, Robert Litt, has said that NSA does not gather location data on U.S. cellphones inside the U.S. — but NSA Director Keith Alexander testified before Congress his agency ran tests in 2010 and 2011 to see if it was technically possible to gather such U.S. cell-site data. Alexander said that the information was never used for intelligence purposes and that the testing was reported to congressional intelligence committees.

But Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said at the time that Alexander could have explained more. "The intelligence leadership has decided to leave most of the real story secret," Wyden said, though he would not elaborate on the extent of the program. Wyden is among a bipartisan group of lawmakers who have introduced legislation to trim NSA's surveillance powers.

Alexander and other NSA officials have explained that when U.S. data is gathered "incidentally" overseas, it is "minimized," meaning that when an NSA analysts realize they are dealing with a U.S. phone number, they limit what can be done with it and how long that data can be kept.

Rights activists say those measures fall short of protecting U.S. privacy.

"The scale of foreign surveillance has become so vast, the amount of information about Americans 'incidentally' captured may itself be approaching mass surveillance levels,'" said Elizabeth Goitein of the Brennan Center for Justice's Liberty and National Security Program.

"The government should be targeting its surveillance at those suspected of wrongdoing, not assembling massive associational databases that by their very nature record the movements of a huge number of innocent people," said Catherine Crump, a staff attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union.

___

Online:

http://apps.washingtonpost.com/g/page/national/how-the-nsa-is-tracking-people-right-now/634/

Offline Amaterasu

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #401 on: December 04, 2013, 06:19:40 PM »
I love the word, "inadvertently."  Yeah.  Riiiiight.
"If the universe is made of mostly Dark Energy...can We use it to run Our cars?"

"If You want peace, take the profit out of war."

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #402 on: December 05, 2013, 06:57:33 PM »



ok.. i hafta make this comment..America is not sending this into space..a bunch of dickheads who got our tax money are.....no one voted  or was ask if they should get money or what they should do with it..grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr >:(



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/05/nro-satellite-logo_n_4394577.html






America Is Launching A Giant, World-Sucking Octopus Into Space

 The Huffington Post  |  By Matt Sledge
Posted: 12/05/2013 7:05 pm EST


One of the National Security Agency's partners is launching a spy satellite with a classified payload into space on Thursday night -- and its logo is an angry, globe-gripping octopus.

The spacecraft, being rocketed into the sky by an Atlas V rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base, carries a payload from the National Reconnaissance Office. Far less well-known than the NSA, the NRO has a budget that is only a shade smaller -- $10.3 billion a year -- and provides satellite-based surveillance capabilities.


Office of the DNI        ? @ODNIgov
Follow
Ready for launch? An Atlas 5 will blast off at just past 11PM, PST carrying an classified NRO payload (also cubesats)

4:40 PM - 5 Dec 2013
36 Retweets 9 favorites


"Nothing is beyond our reach," reads a motto beneath the world-sucking cephalopod. The logo is the latest in a long line of patches produced for classified military missions that are equal parts menacing and mysterious.

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence, which also oversees the NSA, tweeted pictures of the launch preparation. That spurred Christopher Soghoian, of the American Civil Liberties Union, to give the spooks some free advice: "You may want to downplay the massive dragnet spying thing right now. This logo isn't helping."
[/size]

Offline Amaterasu

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #403 on: December 05, 2013, 07:09:34 PM »
Frankly, if Our money pays for it, it is Ours to know.

Classified cargo, My rump.  WHAT are They payloading???
"If the universe is made of mostly Dark Energy...can We use it to run Our cars?"

"If You want peace, take the profit out of war."

Offline zorgon

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #404 on: December 06, 2013, 03:10:22 AM »
Frankly, if Our money pays for it, it is Ours to know.
Classified cargo, My rump.  WHAT are They payloading???

You don't have a need to know :P

But I will see if I can ask at Vandenburg and see what they will tell me :D

 


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