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Author Topic: they know what you are doing  (Read 126533 times)

Offline ArMaP

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #330 on: October 08, 2013, 05:01:26 PM »
Fvcking STOOPID gubment SPOOKS

NSA Fort Meade,  Maryland

Doesn't that have too many parking spaces for the size of the buildings?

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #331 on: October 09, 2013, 07:53:10 AM »


probably has some floors underground

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #332 on: October 14, 2013, 08:19:40 PM »

http://news.msn.com/us/report-nsa-collecting-millions-of-contact-lists

Report: NSA collecting millions of contact lists


The Washington Post reported that the NSA has been searching through millions of contact lists from personal email and instant messaging accounts.

WASHINGTON — The National Security Agency has been sifting through millions of contact lists from personal email and instant messaging accounts around the world — including those of Americans — in its effort to find possible links to terrorism or other criminal activity, according to a published report.

The Washington Post reported late Monday that the spy agency intercepts hundreds of thousands of email address books every day from private accounts on Yahoo, Gmail, Facebook and Hotmail that move though global data links. The NSA also collects about a half million buddy lists from live chat services and email accounts.

The Post said it learned about the collection tactics from secret documents provided by NSA leaker Edward Snowden and confirmed by senior intelligence officials. It was the latest revelation of the spy agency's practices to be disclosed by Snowden, the former NSA systems analyst who fled the U.S. and now resides in Russia.

The newspaper said the NSA analyzes the contacts to map relationships and connections among various foreign intelligence targets. During a typical day last year, the NSA's Special Source Operations branch collected more than 440,000 email address books, the Post said. That would correspond to a rate of more than 250 million a year.

A spokesman for the national intelligence director's office, which oversees the NSA, told the Post that the agency was seeking intelligence on valid targets and was not interested in personal information from ordinary Americans.

Spokesman Shawn Turner said the NSA was guided by rules that require the agency to "minimize the acquisition, use and dissemination" of information that identifies U.S. citizens or permanent residents.

While the collection was taking place overseas, the Post said it encompassed the contact lists of many American users. The spy agency obtains the contact lists through secret arrangements with foreign telecommunications companies or other services that control Internet traffic, the Post reported.

Earlier this year, Snowden gave documents to the Post and Britain's Guardian newspaper disclosing U.S. surveillance programs that collect vast amounts of phone records and online data in the name of foreign intelligence, often sweeping up information on American citizens.

The collection of contact lists in bulk would be illegal if done in the United States, but the Post said the agency can get around that restriction by intercepting lists from access points around the world.

The newspaper quoted a senior intelligence official as saying NSA analysts may not search or distribute information from the contacts database unless they can "make the case that something in there is a valid foreign intelligence target in and of itself."

Offline zorgon

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #333 on: October 14, 2013, 09:02:41 PM »
Doesn't that have too many parking spaces for the size of the buildings?

probably has some floors underground


Located on the grounds of Fort Meade, the headquarters for the nation's premier covert intelligence gathering organization are housed in two high-rise office structures, built and dedicated by Ronald Reagan in 1986, and in other structures on the base, including an estimated 10 acres of which are underground. At least 20,000 employees work for the NSA at Fort Meade, making it the largest employer in the county, one of the largest employers in Maryland, and the largest employer of mathematicians in the country. While the extent of NSA's technical facilities is guarded as a national security measure, the NSA's headquarters is believed to house the second most powerful supercomputer in the world. The NSA operates other computer labs, offices, and satellite interception posts around the world.


http://clui.org/ludb/site/national-security-agency-nsa-headquarters

Offline Amaterasu

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #334 on: October 14, 2013, 10:17:33 PM »
Pull the money rug out from under Them.
"If the universe is made of mostly Dark Energy...can We use it to run Our cars?"

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Offline zorgon

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #335 on: October 14, 2013, 10:31:38 PM »
They don't have rugs :P Liquid cooled floors to keep the super computers running smooth :D


[youtube]BH8X8w8a4f4[/youtube]

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #336 on: October 16, 2013, 03:35:39 PM »

you should never ask if it can get  worse..you’ll get an answer you may not want...like O picking the next guys...sigh





http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/16/keith-alexander-nsa_n_4110810.html


Keith Alexander, John C. Inglis Expected To Depart NSA Soon


Reuters  |  Posted: 10/16/2013 4:42 pm EDT
By Warren Strobel and Mark Hosenball

WASHINGTON Oct 16 (Reuters) - The director of the U.S. National Security Agency and his deputy are expected to depart in the coming months, U.S. officials said on Wednesday, in a development that could give President Barack Obama a chance to reshape the eavesdropping agency.

Army General Keith Alexander's eight-year tenure was rocked this year by revelations contained in documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden about the agency's widespread scooping up of telephone, e-mail and social media data.

Alexander has formalized plans to leave by next March or April, while his civilian deputy, John "Chris" Inglis, is due to retire by year's end, according to U.S. officials who spoke on condition of anonymity.

One leading candidate to replace Alexander is Vice Admiral Michael Rogers, currently commander of the U.S. Navy's 10th Fleet and U.S. Fleet Cyber Command, officials told Reuters. The 10th Fleet and Fleet Cyber Command both have their headquarters at Fort Meade, Maryland, between Washington and Baltimore. The NSA is also headquartered at Fort Meade.

There has been no final decision on selecting Rogers to succeed Alexander, and other candidates may be considered, the officials said.

An NSA spokeswoman had no comment on the leadership changes.

Alexander has served as NSA director since August 2005, making him its longest-serving chief. He also serves as commander of a related military unit, the U.S. Cyber Command.

Alexander, who has vigorously defended the NSA's activities as lawful and necessary to detect and disrupt terrorist plots, has previously said he planned to leave in the spring.

Inglis, who began his NSA career as a computer security scientist, has been the NSA's second-ranking official since 2006.

While both men are leaving voluntarily, the dual vacancies give Obama an opportunity both to install new leadership following Snowden's revelations and to decide whether the NSA and Cyber Command should have separate leaders.

Cyber Command, which has grown significantly in recent years, has the authority to engage in both defensive and offensive operations in cyberspace. Many NSA veterans argue that having the same person lead the spy agency and Cyber Command diminishes the emphasis on the NSA's work and its unique capabilities.

Rogers has been the Navy's top cyber commander since September 2011. Prior to that, he was director of intelligence for the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff and for the U.S. Pacific Command.

Rogers is "a good leader, very insightful and well thought of within the community," said a U.S. defense official who was not authorized to speak publicly on the matter.

Rogers has worked hard to ensure that the Navy has sufficient sailors trained to take on added cyber responsibilities for U.S. Cyber Command, the official said.

The NSA - which spies on electronic communications of all kinds and protects U.S. government communications - has been one of the most secretive of all U.S. intelligence outfits. Its employees used to joke that NSA stood for either "No Such Agency" or "Never Say Anything."

But the agency became the focus of controversy this year when Snowden leaked to the media tens of thousands of highly classified documents from the NSA and its British eavesdropping partner. Alexander vigorously defended the agency's actions in congressional testimony and other public appearances.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2013, 03:38:03 PM by sky otter »

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #337 on: October 16, 2013, 08:10:17 PM »


http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/documents-reveal-nsas-extensive-involvement-in-targeted-killing-program/2013/10/16/29775278-3674-11e3-8a0e-4e2cf80831fc_story.html

Documents reveal NSA’s extensive involvement in targeted killing program
Video: In June, President Obama said the NSA’s programs “help us prevent terrorist attacks.”


By Greg Miller, Julie Tate and Barton Gellman, Updated: Wednesday, October 16, 9:57 PM E-mail the writers
It was an innocuous e-mail, one of millions sent every day by spouses with updates on the situation at home. But this one was of particular interest to the National Security Agency, and contained clues that put the sender’s husband in the cross hairs of a CIA drone.

Days later, Hassan Ghul — an associate of Osama bin Laden who provided a critical piece of intelligence that helped the CIA find the al-Qaeda leader — was killed by a drone strike in Pakistan’s tribal belt.

The U.S. government has never publicly acknowledged killing Ghul. But documents provided to The Washington Post by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden confirm his demise in October 2012 and reveal the agency’s extensive involvement in the targeted killing program that has served as a centerpiece of President Obama’s counterterrorism strategy.

An al-Qaeda operative who had a knack for surfacing at dramatic moments in the post-Sept. 11 story line, Ghul was an emissary to Iraq for the terrorist group at the height of that war. He was captured in 2004 and helped expose bin Laden’s courier network before spending two years at a secret CIA prison. Then, in 2006, the United States delivered him to his native Pakistan, where he was released and returned to the al-Qaeda fold.

But beyond filling in gaps about Ghul, the documents provide the most detailed account of the intricate collaboration between the CIA and the NSA in the drone campaign.

The Post is withholding many details about those missions, at the request of U.S. intelligence officials who cited potential damage to ongoing operations and national security.

The NSA is “focused on discovering and developing intelligence about valid foreign intelligence targets,” an NSA spokeswoman said in a statement provided to The Post on Wednesday, adding that the agency’s operations “protect the nation and its interests from threats such as terrorism and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.”

In the search for targets, the NSA has draped a surveillance blanket over dozens of square miles of northwest Pakistan. In Ghul’s case, the agency deployed an arsenal of cyber-espionage tools, secretly seizing control of laptops, siphoning audio files and other messages, and tracking radio transmissions to determine where Ghul might “bed down.”

The e-mail from Ghul’s wife “about her current living conditions” contained enough detail to confirm the coordinates of that household, according to a document summarizing the mission. “This information enabled a capture/kill operation against an individual believed to be Hassan Ghul on October 1,” it said.

The file is part of a collection of records in the Snowden trove that make clear that the drone campaign — often depicted as the CIA’s exclusive domain — relies heavily on the NSA’s ability to vacuum up enormous quantities of e-mail, phone calls and other fragments of signals intelligence, or SIGINT.

To handle the expanding workload, the NSA created a secret unit known as the Counter-Terrorism Mission Aligned Cell, or CT MAC, to concentrate the agency’s vast resources on hard-to-find terrorism targets. The unit spent a year tracking Ghul and his courier network, tunneling into an array of systems and devices, before he was killed. Without those penetrations, the document concluded, “this opportunity would not have been possible.”

1At a time when the NSA is facing intense criticism for gathering data on Americans, the drone files may bolster the agency’s case that its resources are focused on fighting terrorism and supporting U.S. operations overseas.

“Ours is a noble cause,” NSA Director Keith B. Alexander said during a public event last month. “Our job is to defend this nation and to protect our civil liberties and privacy.”



this is only page one of four.. got to the above  link to read it all

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #338 on: October 18, 2013, 11:39:49 AM »



[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHrZgS-Gvi4[/youtube]



Published on Jan 31, 2013

Rise Of The Drones: http://video.pbs.org/video/2326108547

A new camera developed by the Pentagon's research arm was highlighted in a recent special on PBS' "Nova" in an episode called "Rise of the Drones." It's a camera system so detailed it can discern specific movements and even what a subject is wearing.
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA's) Autonomous Real-Time Ground Ubiquitous Surveillance Imaging System (ARGUS) has 1.8 billion pixels (1.8 gigapixels), making it the world' highest resolution camera. The sensors on the camera are so precise, PBS stated it is the equivalent to the capabilities of 100 Predator drones in a medium city.
In the clip from PBS, it is said this is the first time the government has allowed information to be shared about these capabilities.
"It is important for the public to know that some of these capabilities exist," Yiannis Antonaides with contractor BAE Systems said in the clip, but noted the sensor itself cannot be revealed. "Because we are not allowed to expose some of the pieces that make up this sensor, so you get to look a pretty plastic curtains."

The technology allows the user to open up a specific windows of interest in the camera's view while still keeping up an image of the larger picture (sort of like split screen). Antonaides explained that the colored boxes in the image show that the sensor recognized moving objects. "You can see individuals crossing the street. You can see individuals walking in parking lots. There's actually enough resolution to see the people waving their arms or walking around or what kind of clothes they wear," he said. PBS noted that ARGUS can actually see much more details than just attire. It can see objects as small as six inches. At 2:23 in the clip, Antonaides points out that from 17,500 feet, a white object in the field of view is a bird flying. PBS pointed out that DARPA put a time crunch on creating the camera, which lead Antonaides to look into technology that you probably have in your purse or pocket at this very moment. Taking similar imaging systems used in smartphones and putting 368 together, is essentially how Antonaides and other engineers at BAE Systems created ARGUS. It is this "mosaic" of cameras that allows the system to zoom in on specific sections in extreme detail. As for data, the system stores up to 1 million terabytes a day. Putting this into perspective, PBS notes this is equal to 5,000 hours of HD footage.

"You can go back and say 'I would like to know what happened at this particular location three days, two hours, four minutes ago' and it would actually show you what happened as if you were watching it live," Antonaides said.

It is still classified information whether ARGUS has been used in the field yet.

"If we had our choice, we would like ARGUS to be over the same area 24 hours a day, seven days a week. That's not very achievable with manned platforms. This is where UAVs come in and they're absolutely the perfect platform," Antonaides said.
President Barack Obama's authorization of military aid to the Syrian rebels "dramatically" increases U.S. support for the opposition, the White House said Friday, while acknowledging that it will take time for the supplies to reach fighters struggling in their clashes with Syrian President Bashar Assad.

U.S. officials said the new aid would include weapons and ammunition and comes in response to firmer evidence from the White House of chemical weapons use by Assad's regime.

"There's already material that's been flowing to the opposition and that will continue in the weeks to come," said Ben Rhodes, Obama's deputy national security adviser.

Obama has said the use of chemical weapons would cross a "red line," suggesting greater American intervention. While a small percentage of the 93,000 people reportedly killed in Syria are said to have died from chemical weapons — U.S. intelligence puts the number at 100 to 150 — the White House views the deployment of the deadly agents as a flouting of international norms.

Rhodes said Obama made the decision to authorize military aid to the rebels over the past few weeks. He also defended the president's caution on the issue, saying "these are not steps the president takes lightly."


AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais
President Barack Obama gestures as he answers... View Full Size

The History of Syria in 60 Seconds Watch Video

White House Confirms Syria's Use of Chemical Weapons Watch Video

Category News & Politics

LicenseStandard YouTube License
« Last Edit: October 18, 2013, 11:44:16 AM by sky otter »

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #339 on: October 23, 2013, 11:49:50 AM »


yeah like this is news.. :(



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/23/media-nsa-coverage-study-columbia_n_4148499.html?utm_hp_ref=media


Big Newspapers Tilted In Favor Of The NSA, Study Finds


 The Huffington Post  |  By Jack Mirkinson
Posted: 10/23/2013 8:43 am EDT  |  Updated: 10/23/2013 8:43 am EDT


A new study released on Wednesday found that much of the coverage of the National Security Agency spying controversy has been weighted in favor of the surveillance agencies.

The Columbia Journalism Review study  http://www.cjr.org/the_kicker/news_media_pro_surveillance_bi.php?page=all

examined stories from USA Today, the New York Times, the Washington Post and the Los Angeles Times over a two-month period. The results were consistent:

Of the 30 traditionally pro- or anti-surveillance terms we examined...in all four newspapers, key words generally used to justify increased surveillance, such as security or terrorism, were used much more frequently than terms that tend to invoke opposition to mass surveillance, such as privacy or liberty.
USA Today led the pack, using pro-surveillance terms 36 percent more frequently than anti-surveillance terms. The LA Times followed at 24 percent, while The New York Times was at 14.1 percent. Even the Washington Post, where Barton Gellman was the first US journalist to break the news of the NSA's surveillance, exhibited a net pro-surveillance bias in its coverage of 11.1 percent. Although keyword frequency analysis on its own is not always conclusive, large, consistent discrepancies of the kind observed here strongly suggest a net media bias in favor of the US and UK governments' pro-surveillance position.


The study also noted that the coverage flew in the face of the American public's consistent opposition to many NSA spying programs. Other recent studies have shown similar gaps; a survey   http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/17/cable-news-syria-pew_n_3940141.html

of cable news coverage of the conflict in Syria, for instance, found that news networks were far more hawkish on the issue than the public at large.

Read the full findings here.     http://www.cjr.org/the_kicker/news_media_pro_surveillance_bi.php?page=all

Offline Elvis Hendrix

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #340 on: October 23, 2013, 01:51:45 PM »
"Today, a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration – that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively. There's no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we're the imagination of ourselves. Here's Tom with the weather."
B H.

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #341 on: October 23, 2013, 03:22:50 PM »
i truly don't think there is anyone left to offend :(






http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/23/merkel-phone-tapped_n_4150812.html

Angela Merkel's Cell Phone Tapped By NSA?
 U.S. Accused Of Spying On German Chancellor

By JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and LORI HINNANT 10/23/13 01:56 PM ET EDT 

BRUSSELS -- BRUSSELS (AP) — The German government says Chancellor Angela Merkel has called President Barack Obama after receiving information that U.S. intelligence may have targeted her mobile phone.

Merkel spokesman Steffen Seibert said Merkel made clear in Wednesday's call that "she views such practices, if the indications are confirmed ... as completely unacceptable" and called for U.S. authorities to clarify the extent of surveillance in Germany.

A statement from Seibert said the German government "has received information that the chancellor's cellphone may be monitored by American intelligence." The government wouldn't elaborate but news magazine Der Spiegel, which has published material from NSA leaker Edward Snowden, said its research triggered the response.






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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/21/nsa-france-spying-report_n_4134690.html

NSA France: U.S. Conducted Large-Scale Spying On French Citizens: Report

By LORI HINNANT 10/21/13 05:55 AM ET EDT 

PARIS -- PARIS (AP) — The U.S. National Security Agency swept up 70.3 million French telephone records in a 30-day period, according to a newspaper report that offered new details of the massive scope of a surveillance operation that has angered some of the country's closest allies. The French government on Monday summoned the U.S. ambassador for an explanation.

The report in Le Monde, co-written by Glenn Greenwald who originally revealed the NSA surveillance program, found that when certain numbers were used, the conversations were automatically recorded. The surveillance operation also swept up text messages based on key words, Le Monde reported, based on records from Dec. 10 to Jan 7.

The Le Monde reporting emerged as U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry arrived in Paris for diplomatic talks Monday about a peace process for Israel and Palestinian authorities.

"This sort of practice between partners that invades privacy is totally unacceptable and we have to make sure, very quickly, that this no longer happens," French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said during a meeting in Luxembourg with his European counterparts. Fabius said the U.S. ambassador had been summoned to the Foreign Ministry.

Similar programs have been revealed in Britain and Germany. In Brazil, the revelations so angered the president that she cancelled a state visit to Washington and publicly denounced the U.S. for "violation of human rights and of civil liberties."

The most recent documents cited by Le Monde, dated to April 2013, also indicated the NSA's interest in email addresses linked to Wanadoo — once part of France Telecom — and Alcatel-Lucent, the French-American telecom company. One of the documents instructed analysts to draw not only from the electronic surveillance program, but also from another initiative dubbed Upstream, which allowed surveillance on undersea communications cables.

Neither the U.S. embassy nor State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki had immediate comment.

..................................................


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/20/nsa-felipe-calderon-mexico-spying-hacked_n_4132889.html



NSA Hacked Mexican Presidents' Email For Years: Report

The Huffington Post  |  By Alana Horowitz
Posted: 10/20/2013 2:34 pm EDT  |  Updated: 10/21/2013 1:52 pm EDT


The National Security Agency hacked the email of former Mexican President Felipe Calderon, according to a report from Der Spiegel.

The report, which stems from documents leaked by Edward Snowden, alleges that a division of the NSA "successfully exploited a key mail server in the Mexican Presidencia domain within the Mexican Presidential network to gain first-ever access to President Felipe Calderon's public email account." Der Speigel also reports that the spying, which began in May 2010, also targeted other top officials in the Mexican government.

The report claims that some of the information retrieved in the surveillance program provided economic benefits to the U.S.

For more on the bombshell allegations, head over to Der Spiegel.

The report comes weeks after news that the NSA had access to current Mexican President Pena Nieto's emails, as well as Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff's.

Rousseff blasted the U.S.'s controversial surveillance program at the U.N. last month.

"Meddling in such a manner in the lives and affairs of other countries is a breach of international law and, as such, it is an affront to the principles that should otherwise govern relations among countries, especially among friendly nations," she said.





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http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/22/world/europe/france-nsa-spring/index.html?iref=allsearch

 

U.S. spy chief says reports of NSA logging French phone calls are false

By Ed Payne and Alex Felton, CNN

updated 8:59 AM EDT, Wed October 23, 2013
 




London (CNN) -- The director of national intelligence for the United States says the allegation made in a French newspaper that the National Security Agency intercepted more than 70 million phone calls in France over 30 days is false.

A written statement from James Clapper's office on Tuesday said, "Recent articles published in the French newspaper Le Monde contain inaccurate and misleading information regarding U.S. foreign intelligence activities."

The statement added the United States does gather intelligence of "the type gathered by all nations."

The news release comes the same day French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry met to discuss the allegations.

Fabius called the practice unacceptable and told Kerry that it must stop, the French Foreign Ministry said. The pair also discussed the situation in Syria ahead of a "Friends of Syria" meeting that is taking place in London on Tuesday.

The top diplomats huddled a day after the details of the alleged spying appeared in Le Monde.

U.S. President Barack Obama and French President Francois Hollande spoke Monday on the matter, according to a White House statement.

"The President and President Hollande discussed recent disclosures in the press -- some of which have distorted our activities and some of which raise legitimate questions for our friends and allies about how these capabilities are employed," the statement said. "The President made clear that the United States has begun to review the way that we gather intelligence, so that we properly balance the legitimate security concerns of our citizens and allies with the privacy concerns that all people share."

A news release from Hollande's office said he expressed his "deep disapproval with regard to these practices" to Obama and that such alleged activities would be unacceptable between allies and friends.

The two presidents agreed that French and American intelligence services will cooperate on investigating the report.

Intercepting millions of calls

The NSA monitored the phone calls made in France, Le Monde reported Monday, citing documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

The intercepts took place from December 10, 2012, to January 8, 2013, the article reported. An NSA graph shows an average of 3 million data intercepts a day.

Report: U.S. intercepts French phone calls on a 'massive scale'

According to Le Monde, this is how the system worked: "When a telephone number is used in France, it activates a signal which automatically triggers the recording of the call. Apparently this surveillance system also picks up SMS (text) messages and their content using key words. Finally, the NSA apparently stores the history of the connections of each target -- or the meta-data."

It wasn't immediately clear from the article if the conversations were recorded or just the data surrounding each call.

Mexico lashes out against report of U.S. spying

Other spying allegations

The report comes after a weekend article in the German news magazine Der Spiegel that said the NSA "systematically" eavesdropped on the Mexican government. It hacked the public e-mail account of former Mexican President Felipe Calderon, which was also used by Cabinet members, according to Der Spiegel.

The magazine also quoted documents leaked by Snowden.

"This practice is unacceptable, illegitimate and against Mexican and international law," Mexico's Foreign Ministry said.

It added that it would push for a speedy investigation.

"In a relationship between neighbors and partners, there is no room for the practices alleged to have taken place," the ministry said.

A senior U.S. State Department official told CNN that the Mexican government reached out about the report and that the two governments will be discussing it via diplomatic channels.

In September, Mexico and Brazil summoned U.S. ambassadors after media reports that the United States had spied on their countries' presidents. Those reports were also based on documents leaked by Snowden.

Mexico to summon U.S. ambassador over spying allegations





 :(

Offline Pimander

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #342 on: October 24, 2013, 08:11:16 AM »
Merkel can't be surprised by any of this.  They all spy on each other.  What bothers the Germans is that it is now public knowledge that we can listen in to them easily.

If we knew about PRISM on PRC Forum a long time ago then so did foreign governments.  I find the PR stuff amusing and entertaining still.  Thanks for posting Sky.

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #343 on: October 24, 2013, 08:29:46 PM »


http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/10/24/21124561-report-us-monitored-the-phone-calls-of-35-world-leaders?lite=

Report: US monitored the phone calls of 35 world leaders


In response to a new report indicating the NSA monitored phone conversations of 35 world leaders, a senior White House official told NBC News, "We are not going to comment publicly on every specific alleged intelligence activity." NBC's Brian Williams reports


By Costas Pitas, Reuters
LONDON — The United States monitored the phone conversations of 35 world leaders according to classified documents leaked by fugitive whistleblower Edward Snowden, Britain's Guardian newspaper said on Thursday.

Phone numbers were passed on to the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) by an official in another government department, according to the documents, the Guardian said on its website.

It added that staff in the White House, State Department and the Pentagon were urged to share the contact details of foreign politicians.

Reacting to the report, a White House spokeswoman said, "We are not going to comment publicly on every specific alleged intelligence activity, and as a matter of policy we have made clear that the United States gathers foreign intelligence of the type gathered by all nations."

The revelations come a day after Germany demanded answers from Washington over allegations Chancellor Angela Merkel's phone was bugged, the worst spat between the two countries in a decade.

The White House did not deny the bugging, saying only it would not happen in future.

"In one recent case, a U.S. official provided NSA with 200 phone numbers to 35 world leaders," reads an excerpt from a confidential memo dated October 2006 which was quoted by the Guardian.

The identities of the politicians in question were not revealed.

The revelations in the center-left Guardian suggested that the bugging of world leaders could be more widespread than originally thought, with the issue set to overshadow an EU summit in Brussels

Additional reporting by Jeff Mason in Washington

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/24/nsa-world-leaders_n_4158922.html



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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-24652419

24 October 2013 Last updated at 08:52 ET

MEPs vote to suspend US data sharing

The European Parliament has voted to suspend the sharing of financial data with the US, following allegations that citizens' data was spied on.

The allegation forms part of leaked documents from whistleblower Edward Snowden.

The vote is non-binding but illustrates MEPs' growing unease over how much data was shared with the US.

It comes a day after it was alleged that German Chancellor Angela Merkel's mobile phone calls were monitored.

The European Parliament voted to suspend its Terrorist Finance Tracking Program (TFTP) agreement with the US, in response to the alleged tapping of EU citizens' bank data held by the Belgian company SWIFT.

The agreement granted the US authorities access to bank data for terror-related investigations but leaked documents made public by whistleblower Edward Snowden allege that the global bank transfer network was the target of wider US surveillance.

MEPs also want to launch a full inquiry into the alleged spying.

Merkel phone
 
The row over exactly how much snooping was done on European citizens appears to be escalating.

Germany has summoned the US ambassador in Berlin over the claims that the US monitored Mrs Merkel's mobile phone calls.

Other leaders are also likely to want further clarification from Washington over the activities of its National Security Agency (NSA) in Europe.

Meanwhile student group, europe v facebook, is launching a fresh attack on how deeply the social network was involved in the US spying programme.

It has won the right for a review of why the Irish data protection commissioner is not investigating the amount of European data shared with the US.

Commissioner Billy Hawkes has previously claimed that there "is nothing to investigate" over Facebook's role in the PRISM programme.

Max Schrem, who heads the group, remains unconvinced.

"When it comes to the fundamental rights of millions of users and the biggest surveillance scandal in years, he will have to take responsibility and do something about it," he said

Offline Pimander

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #344 on: October 25, 2013, 05:10:43 AM »
Lets face it, it isn't like they would monitor conspiracy theorists phones but not bother with world leaders.  Everybody knew that they were, I think it is a bit uncomfortable it being discussed in public though.

I reckon that the Germans want access to PRISM data on request before they shut up about this.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2013, 05:16:33 AM by Pimander »

 


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