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Author Topic: they know what you are doing  (Read 126315 times)

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #255 on: August 13, 2013, 06:36:09 AM »


hey Robo...no problem
but they are already working on the next election
coming to a state near you...sigh





North Carolina Voter ID Bill Signed Into Law By Gov. Pat McCrory, Sparking Lawsuits
The Huffington Post  |  By Luke Johnson Posted: 08/12/2013 6:03 pm EDT  |  Updated: 08/12/2013 7:01 pm EDT

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/12/north-carolina-voter-id_n_3745253.html

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #256 on: August 13, 2013, 08:36:07 PM »

customers want what? ? ?

obviously lines have been added so you don't copy the entire artice..OPPS





http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/13/gmail-privacy_n_3751971.html

Google: Gmail Users Can't Legitimately Expect Privacy

The Huffington Post  |  By Braden Goyette
Posted: 08/13/2013 9:16 pm EDT  |  Updated: 08/13/2013 9:41 pm EDT


Google doesn't believe that people can reasonably expect their emails to stay private.

At least, that's what the internet giant articulated in a brief that was filed last month in federal court and recently surfaced by Consumer Watchdog. The document was written in response to a class-action lawsuit accusing Google of violating wiretap law when it scans emails to serve up targeted ads.

Plantiffs accuse Google of violating the privacy of its users by mining their personal messages for information that it uses to inform which targeted ads it displays. The suit calls for Google to fully disclose exactly what information it's taking from emails, and to pay damages for these alleged violations of privacy. (You can read a redacted version of the complaint here).

The company argued in its motion to dismiss the lawsuit that "all users of email must necessarily expect that their emails will be subject to automated processing." (You can read the full motion here).

Google asserts that, in principle, if you entrust your personal messages to a third party, you can't expect that the third party won't touch any of that information:

Just as a sender of a letter to a business colleague cannot be surprised that the recipient’s assistant opens the letter, people who use web-based email today cannot be surprised if their communications are processed by the recipient’s ECS provider in the course of delivery. Indeed, “a person has no legitimate expectation of privacy in information he voluntarily turns over to third parties.” Smith v. Maryland, 442 U.S. 735, 743-44 (1979). In particular, the Court noted that persons communicating through a service provided by an intermediary (in the Smith case, a telephone call routed through a telephone company) must necessarily expect that the communication will be subject to the intermediary’s systems. For example, the Court explained that in using the telephone, a person “voluntarily convey numerical information to the telephone company and ‘expose’ that information to its equipment in the ordinary course of business.”
Google also argued that restricting how email providers are permitted to process the data they receive could "criminalize" features like spam filtering and inbox searches:

Last, Plaintiffs’ claims should be rejected because they would lead to anomalous results with far-ranging consequences beyond the allegations in the Complaint. Plaintiffs’ theory–that any scanning of email content by ECS providers is illegal–would effectively criminalize routine practices that are an everyday aspect of using email. Indeed, Plaintiffs’ effort to carve out spam filtering and virus detection from their claims underscores the fact that their theory of liability would otherwise encompass these common services that email users depend on.
This isn't the first time Google has gotten into trouble over privacy issues. In 2011, the company settled with the Federal Trade Commission after the regulator accused Google of employing "deceptive" privacy practices during the 2010 launch of Google Buzz.

Google was also named by the Guardian newspaper in June as one of the companies that gives the NSA "direct access to its systems" as part of a surveillance program called PRISM. Google has denied the allegations; the company's Chief Legal Officer David Drummond told the Guardian that the company is "not in cahoots with the NSA and there's no government program that Google participates in that allows the kind of access that the media originally reported."

Google also argued that restricting how email providers are permitted to process the data they receive could "criminalize" features like spam filtering and inbox searches:





?7 Gmail Questions You Were Afraid To Ask

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #257 on: August 14, 2013, 02:24:47 PM »

i read this yesterday and it really bothered me..the update makes it more explainable but not any more reassuring




http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/13/hacked-baby-monitor-houston-texas-parents_n_3750675.html?utm_hp_ref=parents&ir=Parents

Hacked Baby Monitor Caught Spying On 2-Year-Old Girl In Texas (UPDATE)
The Huffington Post  |  By Ryan Grenoble Posted: 08/13/2013 7:19 pm EDT  |  Updated: 08/14/2013 11:18

you need another reason to make sure your networks are secure and up to date, here it is: hacked baby monitors.

In a true nightmare story, two Texas parents say they woke up this past weekend to hear a stranger's voice coming from the room of their 2-year-old girl.

"It felt like somebody broke into our house," Marc Gilbert told ABC affiliate KTRK.

As Gilbert walked down the hall and entered the room, he says he heard the voice say, "Wake up Allyson, you little [expletive]." The camera on their trusted baby monitor then rotated to watch Marc walk into the room as he rushed to unplug it.

Marc said Allyson has impaired hearing and apparently slept through the entire baby monitor incident. Regardless, it has left the family shaken.

"I don't think it ever will be connected again ... I think we are going to go without the baby monitor now," Gilbert told ABC News.

Hackers targeting webcams on laptops and other computers is nothing new. The uber-creepy (not to mention illegal) practice, known as "ratting," was well documented in an Ars Technica article published in March. But baby monitors? That's enough to make us fear the boogeyman again.

UPDATE: Aug. 14 -- Forbes believes the device Gilbert installed as a baby monitor was a Foscam wireless camera, which boasts "remote internet monitoring from anywhere in the world" as one of its top features. The camera has a known firmware vulnerability that can be exploited via a number of methods. A firmware update has been released to address the problem.

In a comment posted to the original ABC story, Gilbert says he had a firewall enabled and both the camera and routers were password protected.

Offline Somamech

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #258 on: August 14, 2013, 02:45:17 PM »
Otter this is what got my beef up when so called normal people joined the web in the form's of Facespock and what have you.

Basically most people always suspected the web was monitored in the circle's of web prior to facespock.  The web was about joining a forum run by an individual, making friends with people within a mutual group of people and then maybe chatting on IRC or what have you. 

Oddly people complain about Facebook yet what happend is that people gave up their choice of platform to mega company's.  In the old day's you chose who you want to chat with,  you chose the forum's you have interst in , and in some case's you use a chat program to choose to keep in touch with people you may meet in these endeavour's. 

See where it's gone now ?  People don't choose their software to engage with one another.  Twitter is only a chat program and nothing else.  Facebook is another level of chat program / website.  It's way easier to monitoer that sort of activity when it's centralised than metric's elsewhere.   

I've often wondered why I have never heard a good rant piece on twitter and facebook regarding this matter !!! 

   

Offline ArMaP

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #259 on: August 15, 2013, 02:55:17 AM »
It's way easier to monitoer that sort of activity when it's centralised than metric's elsewhere. 

I've often wondered why I have never heard a good rant piece on twitter and facebook regarding this matter !!!
And what about Facebook's "Friend Finder"? I find that particularly interesting, as they present the email address we used to join Facebook and then ask for the email account password, so they can look at our emails and contacts and look for those people on Facebook.

That's only to help us, obviously.  ::)

The other day I noticed that Facebook was asking me to use Friend Finder and said my sister had used it. As I found that highly unlikely I asked my sister about it and she confirmed that she never used it, she wasn't even aware that such thing existed.

So, not only do they want access to our email, they also lie about who used the system to try to convince us of using it.

Offline stealthyaroura

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #260 on: August 17, 2013, 02:06:29 PM »
SKY it's an epic thread my friend and please keep it up PEOPLE NEED TO KNOW THE TRUTH!
I just don't find any of this surprising, as stated the UK have been listening for decades so
it's been common knowledge here for years.yes I would like it to end but i just don't let them
get to me.and as for snowdon MEH! he's a plant  ::) simply for the sheep imo.
Nikola Tesla humanitarian / Genius.
never forget this great man who gave so much
& asked for nothing but to let electricity be free for all.

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #261 on: August 18, 2013, 03:13:21 PM »
hi stealthy
yeah kinda epic..hahahah..got more below..and this is not good




http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/aug/18/david-miranda-detained-uk-nsa

Detaining my partner: a failed attempt at intimidation
The detention of my partner, David Miranda, by UK authorities will have the opposite effect of the one intended



Glenn Greenwald
theguardian.com, Sunday 18 August 2013 14.44 EDT

At 6:30 am this morning my time - 5:30 am on the East Coast of the US - I received a telephone call from someone who identified himself as a "security official at Heathrow airport." He told me that my partner, David Miranda, had been "detained" at the London airport "under Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act of 2000."

David had spent the last week in Berlin, where he stayed with Laura Poitras, the US filmmaker who has worked with me extensively on the NSA stories. A Brazilian citizen, he was returning to our home in Rio de Janeiro this morning on British Airways, flying first to London and then on to Rio. When he arrived in London this morning, he was detained.

At the time the "security official" called me, David had been detained for 3 hours. The security official told me that they had the right to detain him for up to 9 hours in order to question him, at which point they could either arrest and charge him or ask a court to extend the question time. The official - who refused to give his name but would only identify himself by his number: 203654 - said David was not allowed to have a lawyer present, nor would they allow me to talk to him.

I immediately contacted the Guardian, which sent lawyers to the airport, as well various Brazilian officials I know. Within the hour, several senior Brazilian officials were engaged and expressing indignation over what was being done. The Guardian has the full story here.(see below)
Despite all that, five more hours went by and neither the Guardian's lawyers nor Brazilian officials, including the Ambassador to the UK in London, were able to obtain any information about David. We spent most of that time contemplating the charges he would likely face once the 9-hour period elapsed.

According to a document published by the UK government about Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act, "fewer than 3 people in every 10,000 are examined as they pass through UK borders" (David was not entering the UK but only transiting through to Rio). Moreover, "most examinations, over 97%, last under an hour." An appendix to that document states that only .06% of all people detained are kept for more than 6 hours.

The stated purpose of this law, as the name suggests, is to question people about terrorism. The detention power, claims the UK government, is used "to determine whether that person is or has been involved in the commission, preparation or instigation of acts of terrorism."

But they obviously had zero suspicion that David was associated with a terrorist organization or involved in any terrorist plot. Instead, they spent their time interrogating him about the NSA reporting which Laura Poitras, the Guardian and I are doing, as well the content of the electronic products he was carrying. They completely abused their own terrorism law for reasons having nothing whatsoever to do with terrorism: a potent reminder of how often governments lie when they claim that they need powers to stop "the terrorists", and how dangerous it is to vest unchecked power with political officials in its name.

Worse, they kept David detained right up until the last minute: for the full 9 hours, something they very rarely do. Only at the last minute did they finally release him. We spent all day - as every hour passed - worried that he would be arrested and charged under a terrorism statute. This was obviously designed to send a message of intimidation to those of us working journalistically on reporting on the NSA and its British counterpart, the GCHQ.

Before letting him go, they seized numerous possessions of his, including his laptop, his cellphone, various video game consoles, DVDs, USB sticks, and other materials. They did not say when they would return any of it, or if they would.

This is obviously a rather profound escalation of their attacks on the news-gathering process and journalism. It's bad enough to prosecute and imprison sources. It's worse still to imprison journalists who report the truth. But to start detaining the family members and loved ones of journalists is simply despotic. Even the Mafia had ethical rules against targeting the family members of people they felt threatened by. But the UK puppets and their owners in the US national security state obviously are unconstrained by even those minimal scruples.

If the UK and US governments believe that tactics like this are going to deter or intimidate us in any way from continuing to report aggressively on what these documents reveal, they are beyond deluded. If anything, it will have only the opposite effect: to embolden us even further. Beyond that, every time the US and UK governments show their true character to the world - when they prevent the Bolivian President's plane from flying safely home, when they threaten journalists with prosecution, when they engage in behavior like what they did today - all they do is helpfully underscore why it's so dangerous to allow them to exercise vast, unchecked spying power in the dark.

David was unable to call me because his phone and laptop are now with UK authorities. So I don't yet know what they told him. But the Guardian's lawyer was able to speak with him immediately upon his release, and told me that, while a bit distressed from the ordeal, he was in very good spirits and quite defiant, and he asked the lawyer to convey that defiance to me. I already share it, as I'm certain US and UK authorities will soon see.
.

..........................





http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/aug/18/glenn-greenwald-guardian-partner-detained-heathrow



Glenn Greenwald's partner detained at Heathrow airport for nine hoursDavid Miranda, partner of Guardian interviewer of whistleblower Edward Snowden, questioned under Terrorism Act

Glenn Greenwald: a failed attempt at intimidation

Glenn Greenwald (right) and his partner David Miranda, who was held by UK authorities at Heathrow airport. Photograph: Janine Gibson
The partner of the Guardian journalist who has written a series of stories revealing mass surveillance programmes by the US National Security Agency was held for almost nine hours on Sunday by UK authorities as he passed through London's Heathrow airport on his way home to Rio de Janeiro.

David Miranda, who lives with Glenn Greenwald, was returning from a trip to Berlin when he was stopped by officers at 8.05am and informed that he was to be questioned under schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act 2000. The controversial law, which applies only at airports, ports and border areas, allows officers to stop, search, question and detain individuals.

The 28-year-old was held for nine hours, the maximum the law allows before officers must release or formally arrest the individual. According to official figures, most examinations under schedule 7 – over 97% – last under an hour, and only one in 2,000 people detained are kept for more than six hours.

Miranda was released, but officials confiscated electronics equipment including his mobile phone, laptop, camera, memory sticks, DVDs and games consoles.

Since 5 June, Greenwald has written a series of stories revealing the NSA's electronic surveillance programmes, detailed in thousands of files passed to him by whistleblower Edward Snowden. The Guardian has also published a number of stories about blanket electronic surveillance by Britain's GCHQ, also based on documents from Snowden.

While in Berlin, Miranda had visited Laura Poitras, the US film-maker who has also been working on the Snowden files with Greenwald and the Guardian. The Guardian paid for Miranda's flights.

"This is a profound attack on press freedoms and the news gathering process," Greenwald said. "To detain my partner for a full nine hours while denying him a lawyer, and then seize large amounts of his possessions, is clearly intended to send a message of intimidation to those of us who have been reporting on the NSA and GCHQ. The actions of the UK pose a serious threat to journalists everywhere.

"But the last thing it will do is intimidate or deter us in any way from doing our job as journalists. Quite the contrary: it will only embolden us more to continue to report aggressively."

A spokesperson for the Guardian said: "We were dismayed that the partner of a Guardian journalist who has been writing about the security services was detained for nearly nine hours while passing through Heathrow airport. We are urgently seeking clarification from the British authorities."

A spokesperson for Scotland Yard said: "At 08:05 on Sunday, 18 August a 28-year-old man was detained at Heathrow airport under schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act 2000. He was not arrested. He was subsequently released at 17:00."

Scotland Yard refused to be drawn on why Miranda was stopped using powers which enable police officers to stop and question travellers at UK ports and airports.

There was no comment from the Home Office in relation to the detention. However, there was surprise in political circles and elsewhere. Labour MP Tom Watson said that he was shocked at the news and called for it to be made clear if any ministers were involved in authorising the detention.

He said: "It's almost impossible, even without full knowledge of the case, to conclude that Glenn Greenwald's partner was a terrorist suspect.

"I think that we need to know if any ministers knew about this decision, and exactly who authorised it."

"The clause in this act is not meant to be used as a catch-all that can be used in this way."

Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act has been widely criticised for giving police broad powers under the guise of anti-terror legislation to stop and search individuals without prior authorisation or reasonable suspicion – setting it apart from other police powers.

Those stopped have no automatic right to legal advice and it is a criminal offence to refuse to co-operate with questioning under schedule 7, which critics say is a curtailment of the right to silence.

Last month the UK government said it would reduce the maximum period of detention to six hours and promised a review of the operation on schedule 7 amid concerns it unfairly targets minority groups and gives individuals fewer legal protections than they would have if detained at a police station

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #262 on: August 19, 2013, 08:02:17 PM »




http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/19/guardian-hard-drives_n_3782382.html

Guardian Editor: U.K. 'Security Experts' Entered Offices And Destroyed Hard Drives
The Huffington Post  |  By Adam Goldberg
Posted: 08/19/2013 8:42 pm EDT  |  Updated: 08/19/2013 10:06 pm EDT


Alan Rusbridger, editor of The Guardian, wrote on Monday about an unsettling encounter http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/aug/19/david-miranda-schedule7-danger-reporters with "security experts" from the U.K.'s GCHQ intelligence agency.

According to Rusbridger, "a very senior government official" contacted him about two months ago demanding the surrender or destruction of all materials in the publication's possession relating to the surveillance operations uncovered by Edward Snowden.

About a month later, Rusbridger recalls receiving a phone call "from the centre of government" in which he was told, "You've had your fun. Now we want the stuff back." He goes on to explain:

There followed further meetings with shadowy Whitehall figures. The demand was the same: hand the Snowden material back or destroy it. I explained that we could not research and report on this subject if we complied with this request. The man from Whitehall looked mystified. "You've had your debate. There's no need to write any more."
During one meeting, Rusbridger explained to an official that if the British government were to take legal steps in order to roadblock the paper's reporting, the work could simply be done outside of the country. That's when things took a disturbing turn:

The man was unmoved. And so one of the more bizarre moments in the Guardian's long history occurred – with two GCHQ security experts overseeing the destruction of hard drives in the Guardian's basement just to make sure there was nothing in the mangled bits of metal which could possibly be of any interest to passing Chinese agents. "We can call off the black helicopters," joked one as we swept up the remains of a MacBook Pro.
Despite this apparent attempt at intimidation, as well as the previously reported nine-hour detention http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/18/glenn-greenwald-partner-detained-david-miranda-airport_n_3776825.htmlof Glenn Greenwald's partner David Miranda at London's Heathrow airport, Rusbridger explained that The Guardian "will continue to do patient, painstaking reporting on the Snowden documents, we just won't do it in London."

Greenwald has been similarly undeterred http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/19/glenn-greenwald-uk-secrets-britain-detains-partner_n_3779667.html by recent events. Following the detention of Miranda under the controversial schedule 7 portion of Britain's Terrorism Act, http://www.theguardian.com/law/2013/aug/19/david-miranda-detention-schedule-7-terrorism-act

Greenwald stated, "I will be far more aggressive in my reporting from now. I am going to publish many more documents. I am going to publish things on England too. I have many documents on England's spy system. I think they will be sorry for what they did."

Rusbridger's full column can be read here.http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/aug/19/david-miranda-schedule7-danger-reporters

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #263 on: August 21, 2013, 10:42:32 AM »


you tech guys might be interested in this



http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-23768810




Groklaw news website abandoned over US surveillance
By Pia Gadkari Technology reporter
20 August 2013 Last updated at 14:32 ET



 Groklaw publishes information on technology and patent legal cases An award-winning legal news website has stopped work, saying it cannot operate under current US surveillance policies.

Pamela Jones, Groklaw's founder, cited the alleged US practice of screening emails from abroad and storing messages "enciphered or otherwise thought to contain secret meaning" for five years.

Groklaw had promised its sources anonymity, but said it could not now ensure contributors would stay secret.

Experts said they were worried that a site like Groklaw was closing.

The US National Security Agency's operations came under the spotlight following a series of leaks to the Guardian newspaper by former intelligence analyst Edward Snowden.

The NSA has since confirmed that it collected and analysed emails and other "select communications" from non-US persons, and that messages from US citizens were "sometimes incidentally acquired" as part of its operations.

In the wake of the disclosures, two encrypted email services - designed so that no-one other than the recipient could read the messages - have also closed.

One of those services, Lavabit, alluded to harassment by the US government in a statement to its customers when it shut down.

'Impunity for journalists'
 
"There is no way to continue doing Groklaw, not long term, which is incredibly sad," Ms Jones wrote, adding: "There is now no shield from forced exposure."

Ms Jones suggested that the anonymity of Groklaw's contributors could be at risk, since emails were screened by the US government.

"I can't do Groklaw without your input," she said. "There is now no private way, evidently, to collaborate."

She added: "What kind of world are we living in if the governments of the world think total surveillance is an appropriate thing?"

The website gave no prior indication that it might close, and legal experts have said the development is unfortunate.

"I'm saddened to hear about the demise of Groklaw," said Michael Meurer, a professor of law at Boston University.

"It has been a great source for information about the latest developments in technology law and policy. Several of my students launched their research projects based on what they learned reading Groklaw."

London-based patent lawyer Andrew Alton, of Urquhart-Dykes and Lord, said: "It's been a great resource because it brings together all the available documents, instead of reading second or third hand analysis.

"I understand why Ms Jones has decided it cannot continue.

"There is a danger that, by encouraging people to contribute, those individuals might be incriminating themselves."

Heather Blake, of Reporters Without Borders, said it was an issue of great concern if journalists in the US and UK began to feel intimidated by their governments.

"This has been going on in countries where there have been high levels of impunity for journalists both online and offline," she said.

"Humans have a right to freedom of expression, and freedom of information."

Andrea Matwyshyn, a law professor at Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, added: "The final Groklaw post debunked the argument that if one has nothing to hide, one should not be concerned with internet privacy, comparing digital surveillance to the type of dignitary violation committed by a burglar who touches undergarments in a home.

"This comparison will likely strike a chord with many internet users who feel unable to understand who is collecting information about them and for what purpose."

Prominent patents blogger, Florian Mueller, who has been the subject of criticism by Groklaw, noted the website announced it would close in 2011.

"We've had our differences in the past," he said. "But I think it likely that Groklaw will be back."

The site, which was founded in 2003, has focused on technology and patent cases, most recently reporting on a battle between Apple and Samsung.

More on This Story
Related StoriesAnalysis: Will web 'snoop' plans work? 02 APRIL 2012, TECHNOLOGY
Inside the minds of the 'hacktivists' 26 NOVEMBER 2012, TECHNOLOGY

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #264 on: August 21, 2013, 10:50:32 AM »


http://m.theatlanticwire.com/national/2013/08/nsa-overwhelmed-their-snowden-damage-assessment/68554/


An 'Overwhelmed' NSA Still Doesn't Know What Snowden Took

By Abby Ohlheiser   |   Aug 20, 2013
Despite the NSA's statements to the contrary, it looks like the intelligence agency doesn't know everything that whistleblower Edward Snowden took from them after all. Intelligence officials told NBC News that the NSA was still “overwhelmed” with the work of finding out what else Snowden has. The news comes just two days after British authorities detained journalist Glenn Greenwald's partner David Miranda for nearly 9 hours.

Here's why the agency hasn't yet caught up to Snowden's leaks, according to NBC:

The NSA had poor data compartmentalization, said the sources, allowing Snowden, who was a system administrator, to roam freely across wide areas. By using a “thin client” computer he remotely accessed the NSA data from his base in Hawaii. One U.S. intelligence official said government officials “are overwhelmed" trying to account for what Snowden took. Another said that the NSA has a poor audit capability, which is frustrating efforts to complete a damage assessment.

NBC's report fits right into a PR war over what the government knows about Snowden's secret stash. Here's the recap: in early June, investigators figured out that Snowden probably took information from the NSA's servers using a thumb drive, leading one official to say that they "know how many documents he downloaded and what server he took them from," implying that the government was well on its way to getting a handle on the damage. But later that month, Deputy National Security Advisor Ben Rhodes told reporters that the White House still didn't know what Snowden took. Then, an anonymously-sourced story at CNN confidently claimed that Snowden didn't have the "instruction manual" to the NSA's surveillance programs, in response to a comment from Greenwald indicating that Snowden had something like a "blueprint" to the agency in his hands. But the most overtly omniscient statement on the NSA's capacity to figure out what Snowden has comes from the agency's director Keith Alexander:

We have tremendous oversight over these programs. We can audit the actions of our people 100 percent, and we do that.

The Atlantic previously raised some doubts over that claim. For one thing, Alexander said in June that the agency was "now putting in place actions that would give us the ability to track our system administrators." Alexander has since said that he was going to just replace almost all of the system administrators working for the NSA with machines.

NSA followers won't be terribly surprised at the discrepancy between public and private statements from the agency. Just last week, an internal audit obtained by Snowden and leaked to the Washington Post revealed that the agency has very little oversight from the secret court designed to keep it legal. That report was, if not the last, one of the final nails in the coffin for the agency's "oversight" rebuttal to criticism of their secret data collection programs.

The detention of Greenwald's partner Miranda, and the ensuing reports of apparent intimidation from British officials towards the Guardian over their reporting on Snowden's leaks, indicates that some authorities might be taking harder tactic towards the whole damage control problem. According to the Guardian's editor, British intelligence officials even forced the paper to destroy hard drives containing encrypted versions of the leaks. British intelligence officials could be worried about potential reports in the future on some of the information authorities are pretty sure Snowden took: details of the data collection programs in the U.K., Canada, Australia and New Zealand, who work closely with the NSA. But don't worry: the White House is ready to assure Americans that such tactics wouldn't happen in the U.S. of A.: Deputy Press Secretary Josh Earnest told reporters today in a press briefing that it was "very difficult to imagine a scenario in which" destroying the hard drive of a journalist "would be appropriate."

Offline ArMaP

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #265 on: August 21, 2013, 12:26:09 PM »
An 'Overwhelmed' NSA Still Doesn't Know What Snowden Took
I suppose that means that they do not know what everyone is doing. :)

Offline stealthyaroura

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #266 on: August 21, 2013, 12:42:44 PM »
Quote
But don't worry: the White House is ready to assure Americans that such tactics wouldn't happen in the U.S. of A.: Deputy Press Secretary Josh Earnest told reporters today in a press briefing that it was "very difficult to imagine a scenario in which" destroying the hard drive of a journalist "would be appropriate."

BWHAHAHAHAHA yeah rite ::) BULL poop
LOL if it wasn't so serious.

Hmmmm 2 words killer drones! "you won't see them coming"
"YOU THINK I'M JOKING?" obama the hypocrite/nobel peace prize winner ::)
Nikola Tesla humanitarian / Genius.
never forget this great man who gave so much
& asked for nothing but to let electricity be free for all.

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #267 on: August 21, 2013, 03:21:06 PM »


hey stealthy (and the rest)  you missed this



http://www.thelivingmoon.com/forum1/index.php?topic=5093.0

Quote

dang.. i had to come back and point this out..
i was really expecting someone to pick up on this..it's hysterical




Deer Trail, Colo.
Earlier this month, the town board split on an ordinance that would allow Deer Trail residents to
 shoot down drones in exchange for a $100 cash reward.
Residents will now vote on the measure in a special election on Oct. 7.




proves no body reads anything longer than two sentences'' 

Offline ArMaP

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #268 on: August 21, 2013, 05:26:24 PM »

hey stealthy (and the rest)  you missed this
Yes, on purpose, I'm not interested in drones. :)

Offline zorgon

  • Administrator
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  • Posts: 19931
  • Gold 879
Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #269 on: August 21, 2013, 05:31:05 PM »
Yes, on purpose, I'm not interested in drones. :)

She meant THIS

would allow Deer Trail residents to  shoot down drones in exchange for a $100 cash reward.

 ::)

 


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