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Offline dreb13

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #180 on: June 29, 2013, 12:04:18 AM »
Funny how life imitates art.  Just like the xfiles spinoff show that pretty much described the 9/11 attacks, now we have HBO's drama series The Newsroom.  This is an episode that originally aired a year ago.

[youtube]BeztenbI4T8[/youtube]

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #181 on: June 30, 2013, 08:37:20 PM »


Edward Snowden Can't Leave Moscow Without Consent Of Russian Authorities, Says Ecuadorean President
By MICHAEL WEISSENSTEIN 06/30/13 03:56 PM ET EDT 

PORTOVIEJO, Ecuador -- Edward Snowden is "under the care of the Russian authorities" and can't leave Moscow's international airport without their consent, Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa told The Associated Press Sunday in an interview telegraphing the slim and diminishing possibility that the National Security Agency leaker will end up in Ecuador.

Correa portrayed Russia as entirely the master of Snowden's fate and said Ecuador is still awaiting an asylum request from Snowden before deciding its next moves.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has distanced himself from the case since Snowden arrived in Moscow last week, insisting the 30-year-old former NSA contractor remains in the transit zone of the capital's Sheremetyevo Airport and that as long as he has not legally entered Russia, he is out of the Kremlin's control.

At the same time, the Kremlin said Sunday that it will take public opinion and the views of human rights activists into account when considering Snowden's case, a move that could lay the groundwork for him to seek asylum in Russia.

"This is the decision of Russian authorities," Correa told the AP during a visit to this Pacific coast city. "He doesn't have a passport. I don't know the Russian laws, I don't know if he can leave the airport, but I understand that he can't. At this moment he's under the care of the Russian authorities. If he arrives at an Ecuadorean Embassy we'll analyze his request for asylum."

Last week, several members of Russia's Presidential Council for Human Rights spoke out in support of Snowden, saying he deserved to receive political asylum in the country of his choice and should not be handed over to the United States. And a handful of protesters picketed outside the Moscow airport in what appeared to be an orchestrated demonstration on Friday, holding signs reading "Edward, Russia is your second motherland" and "Russia is behind Snowden."

Putin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told Ekho Moskvy radio that while Snowden is not Russia's concern, the Kremlin is aware of the viewpoints of Russian experts and representatives of human rights organizations.

"Public opinion on the subject is very rich," Peskov said in the radio interview. "We are aware of this and are taking it into account."

Correa said he had no idea Snowden's intended destination was Ecuador when he fled Hong Kong for Russia last week. He said the Ecuadorean consul in London committed "a serious error" by not consulting officials in Ecuador's capital when the consul issued a letter of safe passage for Snowden. He said the consul would be punished, although he didn't specify how.


Analysts familiar with the workings of the Ecuadorean government said Correa's claims that the decision was entirely Russia's appeared to be at least partly disingenuous. They said they believed Correa's administration at first intended to host Snowden, then started back-tracking this week when the possible consequences became clearer.

"I think the government started to realize the dimensions of what it was getting itself into, how it was managing things and the consequences that this could bring," said Santiago Basabe, an analyst and professor of political sciences at the Latin American School of Social Sciences in the Ecuadorean capital, Quito. "So it started pulling back, and they'll never tell us why, but I think the alarm bells started to go off from people very close to the government, maybe Ecuador's ambassador in Washington warned them about the consequences of asylum for Snowden."

Correa said Snowden must assume responsibility if he broke U.S. laws, but added the broader legitimacy of Snowden's action must be taken into consideration. He said Ecuador would still consider an asylum request but only if Snowden is able to make it to Ecuador or an Ecuadorean Embassy to apply.

The U.S. is seeking the former NSA contractor's extradition for leaking secret documents that, among other things, detail U.S. surveillance of international online activity. On Sunday, German magazine Der Spiegel reported that classified documents taken by Snowden also revealed U.S. spies had allegedly bugged European Union offices.

Correa never entirely closed the door to Snowden, whom he said had drawn vital attention to the U.S. eavesdropping program and potential violations of human rights. But Correa appeared to be sending the message that it is unlikely Snowden will ever end up in Ecuador. He repeatedly emphasized the importance of the U.S. legal process and praised Vice President Joe Biden for what he described as a courteous and appreciated half-hour call about the Snowden case on Friday.

He similarly declined to reject an important set of U.S. trade benefits for Ecuadorean exports, again a contrast with his government's unilateral renunciation of a separate set of tariff benefits earlier in the week.

"If he really could have broken North American laws, I am very respectful of other countries and their laws and I believe that someone who breaks the law must assume his responsibilities," Correa said. "But we also believe in human rights and due process."

He said Biden had asked him to send Snowden back to the United States immediately because he faces criminal charges, is a fugitive from justice and has had his passport revoked.

"I told him that we would analyze his opinion, which is very important to us," Correa said, adding that he had demanded the return of several Ecuadoreans who are in the United States but face criminal charges at home.

"I greatly appreciated the call," he said, contrasting it with threats made by a small group of U.S. senators to revoke Ecuadorean trade privileges. "When I received the call from Vice President Biden, which was with great cordiality and a different vision, we really welcomed it a lot."

Ecuadorean officials believe Russian authorities stymied the country's efforts to approve a political asylum application from the former NSA systems analyst, according to government officials with direct knowledge of the case.

Those officials said Ecuador had been making detailed plans to receive and host Snowden. One of the officials said Russia's refusal to let Snowden leave or be picked up by Ecuadorean officials had thwarted the plans. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they weren't authorized to discuss the case by name.

One of the officials said Snowden had intended to travel from Moscow to the Ecuadorean capital of Quito. The official said Ecuador had also asked Russia to let Snowden take a commercial flight to meet Foreign Minister Ricardo Patino in Vietnam or Singapore, where Patino was on an official trip.

The Russians rejected all of Ecuador's requests to let Snowden leave Moscow, or to let an Ecuadorean government plane pick him up there, the official said.

Asked Sunday about those accounts, Correa responded, without elaborating, "We don't have long-range aircraft. It's a joke."

Snowden's path to Ecuador would have gone through Cuba, which said little about the case all week, including whether it would have allowed him to use its territory to transit.

Cuban leader Fidel Castro praised Correa's rejection of U.S. trade pressure, expressing his "sympathies" for the Ecuadorean leader in a Sunday editorial in the state press.

_______ Gonzalo Solano contributed from Quito, Ecuador. Lynn Berry in Moscow contributed to this report.


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/30/edward-snowden-ecuador_n_3526167.html?utm_hp_ref=world

Offline Ellirium113

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #182 on: July 01, 2013, 08:10:38 AM »
Quote
July 1, 2013 - French President Francois Hollande told the United States on Monday to immediately cease spying on European institutions, after reports of covert US surveillance of EU diplomatic missions.

"We cannot accept this kind of behaviour between partners and allies," Hollande told journalists during a visit to the northwestern city of Lorient. "We ask that this immediately stop."

http://www.disclose.tv/news/Ultimatum_France_tells_US_to_immediately_stop_spying/90485

Thanks to Canada's Security and Prosperity agreement with the U.S. information is shared much more easily through the legal loopholes...

Quote
Canada has its own version of the NSA as well -- the Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC), an extremely secretive government agency responsible for monitoring foreign communications related to Canada’s national security. The agency can officially only monitor Canadian communications when a foreign party is involved.

But CSEC’s no-spying-on-Canadians rule apparently disappears when the agency is asked for help from other agencies, such as the RCMP, border services or CSIS, according to CSEC expert Bill Robinson, as quoted at the Ottawa Citizen.

No one can say for sure how much spying on Canadians CSEC may be doing, but Geist argues that the agency’s own explanations of how Canadians can end up under surveillance “sound awfully similar to the powers in the U.S. Given the lack of transparency, it certainly seems possible that there are similar activities taking place here.”

CSEC’s budget and staff have more than doubled since 9/11, to 2,000 people and $400 million annually. And the agency recently got even more secretive, to the point that an annual report on the agency’s priorities is now classified.


http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/06/08/nsa-spying-canada_n_3408662.html

Quote
The Canada -US Smart Border Declaration was signed December 12, 2001 by John Manley when he was Deputy Prime Minister and Tom Ridge US Homeland Security Director. Point 24 of this 30 point action plan refers to Joint Enforcement Coordination- a comprehensive and permanent coordination of law enforcement , anti terrorism efforts and information sharing. Point 25 is about Integrated Intelligence- joint teams to analyze and disseminate information and intelligence, and to produce threat and intelligence assessments.

This internet, e mail, cell phone spying is not about pornography as Anne McLellan whitewashes to sell it. Her hypocrisy here is as guilty as the duplicity found out it the Gomery report on fiscal corruption in the system.

The 9/11 justification is wearing more than thin. What the ministers call "architecture", I call the trappings of a police state. I do not want it. No Canadians were asked if we wanted it. No Canadians were asked if we wanted a regime change into an unaccountable unelected North American Union ruled by Orwellian laws that imprison us. The Empire of Surveillance must be struck down! All Canadians are entitled to security and prosperity, not imprisonment and poverty.


http://actionparty.ca/news/civil-rights-freedoms/canadas-sweeping-law-to-spy-on-canadians/

Offline stealthyaroura

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #183 on: July 01, 2013, 03:57:11 PM »
[youtube]hnMPQmIPibE#t[/youtube]
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never forget this great man who gave so much
& asked for nothing but to let electricity be free for all.

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #184 on: July 01, 2013, 04:08:05 PM »


i smell a big rat


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-23138073

1 July 2013 Last updated at 18:07 ET Share this pageEmail Print Share this page

Edward Snowden 'applies for asylum in Russia'

Vladimir Putin: "He should cease his work aimed at damaging our American partners"

US intelligence leaker Edward Snowden has applied to Russia for political asylum, a Russian official says.

Foreign ministry consul Kim Shevchenko said the request was made on Sunday night. The Kremlin has made no comment.

The 30-year-old former CIA analyst is believed to be holed up in a Moscow airport hotel. He is wanted by the US.

Earlier, Russian President Vladimir Putin said Moscow "never hands over anybody anywhere and has no intention of doing so".

"If [Snowden] wants to go somewhere and there are those who would take him, he is welcome to do so," he told a news conference.

"If he wants to stay here, there is one condition: He must stop his activities aimed at inflicting damage on our American partners, no matter how strange it may sound coming from my lips."

The US, where Mr Snowden faces charges of espionage, has not yet made any comment on the latest developments.

It was thought Mr Snowden had been seeking asylum in Latin America, possibly Ecuador whose embassy in London is sheltering Wikileaks founder Julian Assange.

Details have emerged of a letter from Mr Snowden to Ecuador's President Rafael Correa, thanking the country for guaranteeing "my rights would be protected upon departing Hong Kong - I could never have risked travel without that".

He tells President Correa of his "great personal admiration of your commitment to doing what is right rather than what is rewarding".

US 'hopeful'
 
President Barack Obama, speaking earlier in Tanzania, said Washington and Moscow had held "high level" discussions about Mr Snowden.



Analysis
 
Steve Rosenberg
 
BBC News, Moscow
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
If it was up to the Russian parliament, Edward Snowden's asylum application might already have been signed and sealed. Fuelled by anti-US sentiment, Russian MPs have been queuing up to support it.

But it will not be parliament that decides: it will be the Kremlin. Earlier, President Putin appeared to suggest it was unlikely Mr Snowden would remain in Russia. The 30-year-old American could stay, he said, on one condition: that he stops damaging Russia's "American partners" with his leaks. The Kremlin leader added that Mr Snowden probably would not agree to that, and therefore should choose an onward destination and go there.

Might that destination be Venezuela? The Venezuelan president is currently in Moscow attending a gas exporters' summit. He is due to meet President Putin for talks on Tuesday. It is hard to imagine Edward Snowden's fate would not be on the agenda.
"We don't have an extradition treaty with Russia," he said. "On the other hand, Mr Snowden, we understand, has travelled there without a valid passport and legal papers.

"And we are hopeful the Russian government makes decisions based on the normal procedures regarding international travel and the normal interactions law enforcement have."

Some Russian politicians and human rights campaigners are publicly backing Mr Snowden's request, the BBC's Steve Rosenberg reports from Moscow.

If it is granted, the US will be furious but President Putin could claim it is simply the will of the Russian people, he adds.

'Ironclad assurances'
 
According to Russia's Interfax news agency, Mr Snowden's application for asylum was handed to a consular official at Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport late on Sunday evening.

The application was delivered by Sarah Harrison, a member of the Wikileaks legal team acting as Mr Snowden's representative, Kim Shevchenko was quoted by the news agency saying.

Russia's Federal Migration Service has denied the reports.

The LA Times quoted a Russian foreign ministry official as saying Mr Snowden had applied to 15 countries for asylum.

Mr Snowden has reportedly been in the transit area of Sheremetyevo Airport since arriving there from Hong Kong on 23 June.




Start Quote
We cannot accept this kind of behaviour between partners and allies”
End Quote
Francois Hollande
 
French President
 
Is it OK to spy on your friends?
He flew there soon after revealing himself to be the source behind the leaking of thousands of classified documents showing the extent of US email and telephone surveillance.

His father, Lon Snowden, in a letter to the attorney general seen by the BBC at the weekend, said he thought his son would return voluntarily to the US if there were "ironclad assurances that his constitutional rights would be honoured".

'Bugging friends unacceptable'
 
Meanwhile, Washington is facing the fall-out over claims published at the weekend of alleged spying by the US security services on the embassies and missions of its EU allies, including France, Italy and Greece.

The European Commission called the claims "disturbing news if proven true" and said it expected "clarity and transparency" about the issue from Washington.

President Obama: "We have gone through regular law-enforcement channels"
A spokesman for German Chancellor Angela Merkel said "bugging friends is unacceptable... We are no longer in the Cold War".

French President Francois Hollande indicated that a major US-EU trade deal - to be negotiated next week - was under threat unless the US could give a guarantee that its surveillance of the EU had ended.

"We cannot accept this kind of behaviour between partners and allies. We ask that this immediately stop," he told journalists during a visit to western France.

Responding to the claims, President Obama said that all nations with intelligence services tried to understand what other nations were thinking, but that if he wanted to know what a European leader was thinking, he would call that person himself.

Offline burntheships

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #185 on: July 01, 2013, 04:34:03 PM »

i smell a big rat



Yes, I had that waft across my keyboard this morning.

All I can say is spy games are dangerous, I would not
want to end up in Russia ever.
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Offline stealthyaroura

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #186 on: July 01, 2013, 05:01:32 PM »


want to end up in Russia ever.


speak for yaself LOL
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sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #187 on: July 01, 2013, 07:33:41 PM »

it's not looking good for snowden..i wander what putin will ask for in exchange..?




http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-23139980

1 July 2013 Last updated at 20:31 ET Share this pageEmail Print Share this page

Snowden accuses Obama of blocking asylum requests
 
just what did he think would happen..they would throw him a going away party..hummmmmmmmm
well they might yet...


Edward Snowden is believed to be staying at Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport

US intelligence leaker Edward Snowden has accused President Barack Obama of denying him his right to asylum, in a statement published by Wikileaks.

It is his first public announcement since flying to Russia on 23 June, where he has applied for asylum.

The former CIA analyst, who is holed up in a Moscow airport hotel, is wanted by the US on charges of espionage.

He says President Obama is putting pressure on the countries from which he has requested political asylum.

"The president ordered his vice president to pressure the leaders of nations from which I have requested protection to deny my asylum petitions," he is quoted by Wikileaks as saying.

"This kind of deception from a world leader is not justice, and neither is the extralegal penalty of exile. These are the old, bad tools of political aggression. Their purpose is to frighten, not me, but those who would come after me."

In the statement, Mr Snowden describes himself as "a stateless person", accusing the US government of stopping him from exercising the "basic right...to seek asylum".

On Sunday night, the 30-year-old fugitive applied for asylum in Russia, according to foreign ministry consul Kim Shevchenko.

Vladimir Putin: "He should cease his work aimed at damaging our American partners"
The request was reportedly submitted by Sarah Harrison, a British member of the Wikileaks legal team acting as Mr Snowden's representative.

However, the Kremlin has so far made no comment.

Earlier, Russian President Vladimir Putin said Moscow "never hands over anybody anywhere and has no intention of doing so".

He suggested Mr Snowden could stay on the condition he stops damaging Russia's "American partners" with his leaks.

The leaking of thousands of classified intelligence documents has led to revelations that the US is systematically seizing vast amounts of phone and web data.

'High-level discussions'
 
Mr Snowden is thought to be seeking asylum in Latin America, particularly in Ecuador whose embassy in London is sheltering Wikileaks founder Julian Assange.

 
Steve Rosenberg
 
BBC News, Moscow
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
If it was up to the Russian parliament, Edward Snowden's asylum application might already have been signed and sealed. Fuelled by anti-US sentiment, Russian MPs have been queuing up to support it.

But it will not be parliament that decides: it will be the Kremlin. Earlier, President Putin appeared to suggest it was unlikely Mr Snowden would remain in Russia. The 30-year-old American could stay, he said, on one condition: that he stops damaging Russia's "American partners" with his leaks. The Kremlin leader added that Mr Snowden probably would not agree to that, and therefore should choose an onward destination and go there.

Might that destination be Venezuela? The Venezuelan president is currently in Moscow attending a gas exporters' summit. He is due to meet President Putin for talks on Tuesday. It is hard to imagine Edward Snowden's fate would not be on the agenda.
Ecuador's President Rafael Correa told the Agence France-Presse news agency on Monday that his country would process Mr Snowden's asylum request if he manages to enter an Ecuadorean embassy.

However, if he can complete his asylum request on Russian territory , then "the situation can be processed and resolved there," President Correa adds.

Details have also emerged of a letter from Mr Snowden to President Correa, thanking Ecuador for guaranteeing "my rights would be protected upon departing Hong Kong - I could never have risked travel without that".

He tells President Correa of his "great personal admiration of your commitment to doing what is right rather than what is rewarding".

Speaking in Tanzania on Monday, President Barack Obama said Moscow and Washington had held "high level discussions" about Mr Snowden.

"We don't have an extradition treaty with Russia," he said. "On the other hand, Mr Snowden, we understand, has travelled there without a valid passport and legal papers."

Mr Snowden has reportedly been in the transit area of Sheremetyevo Airport since arriving there from Hong Kong on 23 June.

While it remains unclear in which other countries he has applied for asylum, the LA Times recently quoted a Russian foreign ministry official as saying Mr Snowden had applied to some 15 countries.

Offline spacemaverick

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #188 on: July 01, 2013, 07:41:46 PM »
I have no proof for what I am about to say and it is just  a wild opinion or speculation.  His continued leaking of information could reveal cooperation between the highest levels of Russia and the highest levels of America and would be embarrassing to both powers.  Collaboration maybe?  For what you might ask?  Look at the road the US Government has been taking in past years and the slide towards a different political slant or ideal.  Makes me wonder about how close to a Russian style of government we are becoming.  Like I said....wild speculation on my part.
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Offline burntheships

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #189 on: July 01, 2013, 08:57:58 PM »
Makes me wonder about how close to a Russian style of government we are becoming. 

I think you have a valid insight here, look at Obama
and Putin. Mr. O....aka known as Mr. Flexibility.

Now Putin says sure Snowden can come on in if he stops
leaking our American freinds intel.

Spy vs Spy.

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Offline Gigas

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #190 on: July 01, 2013, 10:11:54 PM »
If snowden fails to shut up, putin will shut snowden away with pussy riot. Well maybe, I don't really know cause this is a made for TV show and anythings going to happen with this
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sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #191 on: July 02, 2013, 04:03:12 AM »

ahh now it is getting curiouser and curiouser..nobody wants him

on a side note can anyone access huff post?..i can't  - not even from older links..i wonder what that is about



http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-23139980

2 July 2013 Last updated at 05:56 ET

Edward Snowden 'broadens asylum requests' - Wikileaks
 Edward Snowden is believed to be staying at Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport
Fugitive US intelligence leaker Edward Snowden has sent asylum requests to 21 countries, according to a statement published by Wikileaks.

They include China, France, Ireland and Venezuela. But seven European countries said the requests were invalid.

And Russia said Mr Snowden later withdrew the application to Moscow as the Kremlin had set conditions.

He accuses US President Barack Obama of putting pressure on the countries to which he has applied.

The former intelligence systems analyst, who is holed up at Moscow airport, is wanted by the US on charges of leaking secrets.

Vladimir Putin's warning to Mr Snowden that he should stop "harming our American partners" is indicative of a significant shifting of gear. Russia now has ownership of the Snowden affair. What happens to Mr Snowden will depend upon Russia's calculations and what serves Russia's interests.

The authorities in Moscow could have moved Mr Snowden on quickly, joining the diplomatic game of pass-the-parcel that began in Hong Kong. But the longer the errant US intelligence analyst stays in limbo at the Moscow airport, so the more Russia has become a central actor in this drama.

Russia must balance a range of factors in seeking to determine Mr Snowden's fate - the risk of a serious rift with Washington and Russia's own standing as an international actor that upholds the legal order must be set against the strong vein of sympathy for Mr Snowden amongst Russian public opinion.

US Secretary of State John Kerry raised Mr Snowden's case in talks with his Russian counterpart Sergei Lavrov on the sidelines of the Asean summit in Brunei.But Mr Kerry said the two did not discuss the matter substantively ."I did raise the issue of Mr Snowden but that is not his portfolio, nor is it mine, but it is being handled within the justice department," he said, quoted by Reuters news agency.

'Not an agent'
 
The Wikileaks press release said that most of the asylum requests - including to Russia itself - were handed to the Russian consulate at Sheremetyevo airport late on Sunday for delivery to the relevant embassies in Moscow.

The requests were submitted by Sarah Harrison, a British member of the Wikileaks legal team acting as Mr Snowden's representative, the statement added.But Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov later said Mr Snowden withdrew the application to Russia because Moscow had said he should give up "anti-American activity"."After learning of Russia's position yesterday, voiced by President Putin ... he abandoned his intention [of staying] and his request to be able to stay in Russia," he said.

Russian President Vladimir Putin had said that while Moscow "never hands over anybody anywhere", Mr Snowden could only stay on condition that he stopped damaging Russia's "American partners" with his leaks.

Mr Snowden has reportedly been in the transit area of Sheremetyevo since arriving there from Hong Kong on 23 June.

Mr Peskov confirmed he was still there and had not crossed into Russian territory, adding that the former analyst had never been a Russian agent and had never worked with its intelligence services.

Norway, Poland, Germany, Austria, Finland, Spain and Switzerland said asylum requests could only be made on their soil.

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, who is on a visit to Moscow, said Caracas had not yet received an asylum application from Mr Snowden but that he had "done something very important for humanity" and "deserved the world's protection".

"The world's conscience should react, the world youth should react, the decent people who want a peaceful world should react, everyone should react and find solidarity with this young man who has denounced and altered the world that they [the US] pretend to control."

Mr Snowden had previously submitted an application to Ecuador, whose embassy in London is sheltering Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, and to Iceland.

 Ecuador's President Rafael Correa told the Agence France-Presse news agency on Monday that his country would process Mr Snowden's asylum request if he managed to enter an Ecuadorean embassy.

However, if he can complete his asylum request on Russian territory , then "the situation can be processed and resolved there," President Correa added.

Details have also emerged of a letter from Mr Snowden to President Correa, thanking Ecuador for guaranteeing "my rights would be protected upon departing Hong Kong - I could never have risked travel without that".

'Stateless person'
 
Speaking in Tanzania on Monday, President Barack Obama said Moscow and Washington had held "high level discussions" about Mr Snowden, who he said had travelled to Moscow without valid documents.

Mr Snowden describes himself as "a stateless person", accusing the US government of stopping him from exercising the "basic right...to seek asylum".

"The president ordered his vice president to pressure the leaders of nations from which I have requested protection to deny my asylum petitions," he is quoted by Wikileaks as saying.

"This kind of deception from a world leader is not justice, and neither is the extralegal penalty of exile. These are the old, bad tools of political aggression. Their purpose is to frighten, not me, but those who would come after me."

The leaking of thousands of classified intelligence documents has led to revelations that the US is systematically seizing vast amounts of phone and web data.

..........

Analysis
 
Jonathan Marcus
 
BBC diplomatic correspondent
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Vladimir Putin's warning to Mr Snowden that he should stop "harming our American partners" is indicative of a significant shifting of gear. Russia now has ownership of the Snowden affair. What happens to Mr Snowden will depend upon Russia's calculations and what serves Russia's interests.

The authorities in Moscow could have moved Mr Snowden on quickly, joining the diplomatic game of pass-the-parcel that began in Hong Kong. But the longer the errant US intelligence analyst stays in limbo at the Moscow airport, so the more Russia has become a central actor in this drama.

Russia must balance a range of factors in seeking to determine Mr Snowden's fate - the risk of a serious rift with Washington and Russia's own standing as an international actor that upholds the legal order must be set against the strong vein of sympathy for Mr Snowden amongst Russian public opinion.

deuem

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #192 on: July 02, 2013, 07:36:33 AM »

Offline spacemaverick

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #193 on: July 02, 2013, 09:06:29 AM »
This is a portion of a story from the Daily Beast.

"This whole Snowden charade is entirely in keeping with Putin’s technique of having it both ways. He gets to look like a tough guy for standing up to Obama on an issue that matters to Putin not at all while at the same time he pretends he is cooperating as best he can. If Snowden were actually valuable there would be no public show. He’d be in a bunker deep under KGB headquarters, and the Kremlin would be in full denial mode. Or he’d likely never have been let out of China. And as at the G8 meeting, other leaders are too afraid to challenge this flagrant hypocrisy, which further emboldens Putin."

For the entire story click on the link.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/07/02/putin-toys-with-obama-as-syria-burns-and-snowden-runs-free.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+thedailybeast%2Farticles+%28The+Daily+Beast+-+Latest+Articles%29

Snowden is a political pawn.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2013, 09:08:33 AM by spacemaverick »
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Offline burntheships

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #194 on: July 02, 2013, 10:32:16 AM »
At this point, I have to say it seems Snowden was a bit
naive in the foresight of his options once he went
public.

Yes, the violation of our civil rights with the intrusive
surveillance by the NSA in the name of the war on terror
(which in itself is a complete lie) is unconstitutional,
however even thinking that "leaking" this stuff to the press
was going to change that was rather unrealistic.

Not that we dont have a terrorist problem,
as we do. But...howcome they miss the real
perps so much?

I wonder if he was looking at Julian Assange and thinking
he could also get away with this to a large degree?
Thing is Assange was not an American Citizen.

« Last Edit: July 02, 2013, 06:27:43 PM by burntheships »
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