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Author Topic: they know what you are doing  (Read 126392 times)

Offline ArMaP

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #165 on: June 16, 2013, 09:53:42 AM »
I know a guy that has a company that sells an email proxy service, making it available to the clients with a web mail interface, along with some organisational goodies.

The software used is from an Israeli company, so I guess Israel has the Internet spying market (at least partially) controlled. :)

Offline zorgon

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #166 on: June 16, 2013, 10:54:57 AM »
I contacted a buddy of mine that says they use ZONEALARM which is an ACTIVE antivirus program meaning it always is being monitored by a server.

I use ZoneAlarm... it is free and stops all OUTGOING until you assign permission. Many aps and malware put files and scripts on your comp that attempt to dial out. If your firewall doesn't block outgoing yer SCREWED :P

Since I used ZoneAlarm free version I have never had a virus or malware issue. I also did the checks and my comp passes in full stealth mode :D

So I will stick with ZoneAlarm

If the Mossad really wants to know what I am up to... they can log in like the NAVY did :P Maybe I can get some advertizing from them too :D

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #167 on: June 16, 2013, 08:41:48 PM »


of course there is more ..so much more that most will get bored and turn away saying
so what!!!!    :(






UK Spies Hacked Diplomats' Phones, Emails, Guardian Report Claims
By RAPHAEL SATTER 06/16/13 09:12 PM ET EDT 

 
 LONDON -- The Guardian newspaper says the British eavesdropping agency GCHQ repeatedly hacked into foreign diplomats' phones and emails when the U.K. hosted international conferences, even going so far as to set up a bugged Internet café in an effort to get an edge in high-stakes negotiations.

The report – the latest in a series of revelations which have ignited a worldwide debate over the scope of Western intelligence gathering – came just hours before Britain was due to open the G-8 summit Monday, a meeting of the seven biggest economies plus Russia, in Northern Ireland. The allegation that the United Kingdom has previously used its position as host to spy on its allies and other attendees could make for awkward conversation as the delegates arrive for talks.

"The diplomatic fallout from this could be considerable," said British academic Richard J. Aldrich, whose book "GCHQ" charts the agency's history.

GCHQ declined to comment on the report.

The Guardian cites more than half a dozen internal government documents provided by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden as the basis for its reporting on GCHQ's intelligence operations, which it says involved, among other things, hacking into the South African foreign ministry's computer network and targeting the Turkish delegation at the 2009 G-20 summit in London.

The source material – whose authenticity could not immediately be determined – appears to be a mixed bag. The Guardian describes one as "a PowerPoint slide," another as "a briefing paper" and others simply as "documents."

Some of the leaked material was posted to the Guardian's website with heavy redactions. A spokesman for the newspaper said that the redactions were made at the newspaper's initiative, but declined to elaborate.

It wasn't completely clear how Snowden would have had access to the British intelligence documents, although in one article the Guardian mentions that source material was drawn from a top-secret internal network shared by GCHQ and the NSA. Aldrich said he wouldn't be surprised if the GCHQ material came from a shared network accessed by Snowden, explaining that the NSA and GCHQ collaborated so closely that in some areas the two agencies effectively operated as one.

One document cited by the Guardian – but not posted to its website – appeared to boast of GCHQ's tapping into smartphones. The Guardian quoted the document as saying that "capabilities against BlackBerry provided advance copies of G20 briefings to ministers." It went on to say that "Diplomatic targets from all nations have an MO (a habit) of using smartphones," adding that spies "exploited this use at the G-20 meetings last year."


Another document cited – but also not posted – concerned GCHQ's use of a customized Internet cafe which was "able to extract key logging info, providing creds for delegates, meaning we have sustained intelligence options against them even after conference has finished." No further details were given, but the reference to key logging suggested that computers at the café would have been pre-installed with malicious software designed to spy on key strokes, steal passwords, and eavesdrop on emails.

Aldrich said that revelation stuck out as particularly ingenious.

"It's a bit `Mission Impossible,'" he said.


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/16/uk-spies-hacked-diplomats-phones-emails_n_3451680.html

Offline zorgon

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #168 on: June 17, 2013, 02:49:19 AM »

of course there is more ..so much more that most will get bored and turn away saying
so what!!!!    :(


I think THAT is the plan :D

Offline robomont

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #169 on: June 17, 2013, 04:13:14 AM »
i wonder if that program would work on android?

ive never been much for rules.
being me has its priviledges.

Dumbledore

Offline stealthyaroura

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #170 on: June 17, 2013, 08:34:24 AM »
Iv'e just installed the Mozilla Firefox browser just as an experiment after I read there had been an extension called "Dark side of the Prism" Now what it does is every time you hit a web site that is being monitored by prism software it plays a track from Pink Floyd's Dark Side Of The Moon album.

Well something like that anyway (I don't understand all of it)

A bit like this. PRC=nothing,facebook=song,youtube=song,ATS=nothing, etc .
I'm just playing with it really as I have zone alarm too.
Nikola Tesla humanitarian / Genius.
never forget this great man who gave so much
& asked for nothing but to let electricity be free for all.

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #171 on: June 21, 2013, 06:30:54 PM »
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/21/edward-snowden-charged_n_3480984.html


Edward Snowden Charged With Espionage Over NSA Leaks
Reuters  |  Posted: 06/21/2013 6:53 pm EDT  |  Updated: 06/21/2013 9:16 pm EDT

 
 WASHINGTON, June 21 (Reuters) - The U.S. government has filed sealed criminal charges against former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden, who admitted leaking secrets about classified U.S. surveillance programs, U.S. sources said on Friday.

A U.S. Justice Department official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said a criminal complaint had been filed against Snowden, who disclosed documents detailing U.S. telephone and internet surveillance efforts.

Another U.S. source, also speaking on condition of anonymity, said the United States was preparing to seek Snowden's extradition from Hong Kong, where he is believed to be in hiding.

Earlier, the Washington Post reported that U.S. prosecutors have filed a sealed criminal complaint charging Snowden with espionage, theft and conversion of government property. The Post also reported that the United States has asked Hong Kong to detain Snowden on a provisional arrest warrant.

The criminal complaint was filed in the Eastern District of Virginia, where Snowden's former employer, Booz Allen Hamilton, is located, the Post reported.

Documents leaked by Snowden revealed that U.S. security services had monitored data about phone calls from Verizon and Internet data from large companies such as Google and Facebook as part of counterterrorism efforts.

U.S. federal prosecutors, by filing a criminal complaint, lay claim to a legal basis to make the request of the authorities in Hong Kong, the Post reported. The prosecutors now have 60 days to file an indictment and can then take steps to secure Snowden's extradition from Hong Kong for a criminal trial in the United States, the newspaper reported.


Snowden would be able to challenge the U.S. request for his extradition in court in Hong Kong, the Post reported.

The newspaper noted the U.S. extradition treaty with Hong Kong has an exception for political offenses, and that espionage has been viewed as a political offense.

An Icelandic businessman linked to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks said on Thursday he had readied a private plane in China to fly Snowden to Iceland if Iceland's government would grant asylum.

Iceland refused on Friday to say whether it would grant asylum to Snowden. (Reporting by Mark Hosenball and Tabassum Zakaria; Editing by Jim Loney and Will Dunham)


... . . . . . . . . . . . . .




hey someone can make money here..you guys any good at finding bugs..?




Facebook Bug Exposed Email Addresses, Phone Numbers Of 6 Million Users
The Huffington Post  |  By Alexis Kleinman Posted: 06/21/2013 7:04 pm EDT  |  Updated: 06/21/2013 9:09 pm EDT

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez) .381Share116Tweet7Email83CommentGet Technology Alerts:
 
 Sign Up ..Follow:Facebook, Facebook Bug, Facebook Contact Info, Facebook Email Addresses, Technology News .

On Friday, Facebook admitted that a bug made the private contact information -- either email addresses or phone numbers -- of 6 million users accidentally accessible to Facebookers who downloaded their account histories onto their own computers. Compared to Facebook's over 1 billion total members, 6 million isn't much. But any security flaw has the potential to frighten people away from a website.

A bug allowed "some of a person’s contact information (email or phone number) to be accessed by people who either had some contact information about that person or some connection to them," Facebook wrote in a note on its security page. Using the network's "Download Your Information" tool, some Facebook members were inadvertently sent the phone numbers or email address of Facebook friends that were otherwise private. Facebook assured users that the bug was fixed within a day, and that there is no evidence that the information was used maliciously.

The bug was found not by Facebook's team, but by someone going through Facebook's "white hat" hacker program, which offers a bounty for anyone who can find bugs on the site, paying a minimum reward of $500 per bug. The bounty is awarded "based on [the bug's] severity and creativity," according to Facebook's White Hat page. In April, HuffPost profiled one of Facebook's most prolific bug finders, Nir Goldshlager.



rest at link tells you how to do it

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/21/facebook-bug_n_3480739.html
« Last Edit: June 21, 2013, 06:49:15 PM by sky otter »

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #172 on: June 23, 2013, 07:22:58 AM »


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/21/uk-spying-scandal_n_3479942.html


UK Spying Scandal Even Bigger Than In U.S., According To GCHQ Documents Obtained By The Guardian
By RAPHAEL SATTER 06/21/13 04:42 PM ET EDT 

LONDON — British spies are running an online eavesdropping operation so vast that internal documents say it even outstrips the United States' international Internet surveillance effort, the Guardian newspaper reported Friday.

The paper cited British intelligence memos leaked by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden to claim that U.K. spies were tapping into the world's network of fiber optic cables to deliver the "biggest internet access" of any member of the Five Eyes – the name given to the espionage alliance composed of the United States, Britain, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand.

That access could in theory expose a huge chunk of the world's everyday communications – including the content of people's emails, calls, and more – to scrutiny from British spies and their American allies. How much data the Brits are copying off the fiber optic network isn't clear, but it's likely to be enormous. The Guardian said the information flowing across more than 200 cables was being monitored by more than 500 analysts from the NSA and its U.K. counterpart, GCHQ.

"This is a massive amount of data!" the Guardian quoted a leaked slide as boasting. The paper said other leaked slides, including one labeled "Collect-it-all," gave hints as to the program's ambition.

"Why can't we collect all the signals all the time?" NSA chief Lt. Gen. Keith Alexander was quoted as saying in another slide. "Sounds like a good summer project for Menwith" – a reference to GCHQ's Menwith Hill eavesdropping site in northern England.

The NSA declined to comment on Friday's report. GCHQ also declined to comment on the report, although in an emailed statement it repeated past assurances about the legality of its actions.

"Our work is carried out in accordance with a strict legal and policy framework which ensures that our activities are authorized, necessary, and proportionate," the statement said.

The Guardian, whose revelations about America and Britain's globe-spanning surveillance programs have reignited an international debate over the ethics of espionage, said GCHQ was using probes to capture and copy data as it crisscrossed the Atlantic between Western Europe and North America.

It said that, by last year, GCHQ was in some way handling 600 million telecommunications every day – although it did not go into any further detail and it was not clear whether that meant that GCHQ could systematically record or even track all the electronic movement at once.


Fiber optic cables – thin strands of glass bundled together and strung out underground or across the oceans – play a critical role in keeping the world connected. A 2010 estimate suggested that such cables are responsible for 95 percent of the world's international voice and data traffic, and the Guardian said Britain's geographic position on Europe's western fringe gave it natural access to many of the trans-Atlantic cables as they emerged from the sea.

The Guardian said GCHQ's probes did more than just monitor the data live; British eavesdroppers can store content for three days and metadata – information about who was talking to whom, for how long, from where, and through what medium – for 30 days.

The paper quoted Snowden, the leaker, as saying that the surveillance was "not just a US problem. The U.K. has a huge dog in this fight ... They (GCHQ) are worse than the U.S."

Snowden, whose whereabouts are unknown, faces the prospect of prosecution in the United States over his disclosures, and some there have called on him to be tried for treason. Snowden has expressed interest in seeking asylum in Iceland, where a local businessman said he was prepared to fly the leaker should he request it.

Attempts by The Associated Press to reach Snowden have so far been unsuccessful.

___

Kimberly Dozier in Washington contributed to this report.




.....................................................................................


         
 
Edward Snowden Leaves Hong Kong:

Plane Believed To Be Carrying Leaker Lands In Moscow


 By LYNN BERRY and KELVIN CHAN 06/23/13 09:43 AM ET EDT 


 http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/23/edward-snowden-hong-kong_n_3486459.html?utm_hp_ref=politics


Offline Ellirium113

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #173 on: June 23, 2013, 09:15:14 AM »
EXCLUSIVE: US spies on Chinese mobile phone companies, steals SMS data: Edward Snowden


Quote
The US government is hacking Chinese mobile phone companies to steal millions of text messages, Edward Snowden has told the South China Morning Post. And the former National Security Agency contractor claims he has the evidence to prove it.

The former CIA technician and NSA contractor, hiding in Hong Kong after the US sought his arrest, made the claims after revealing to the Post that the NSA had snooped on targets in Hong Kong and on the mainland.

“There’s far more than this,” Snowden said in an interview on June 12. “The NSA does all kinds of things like hack Chinese cell phone companies to steal all of your SMS data.”

Text messaging is the most preferred communication tool in mainland China, used widely by ordinary people and government officials from formal work exchanges to small chats.

Quote
The US and UK also had technology which gave them unauthorised access to Blackberry phones of delegates at two G20 summits in London in 2009, Snowden said.


http://www.scmp.com/news/china/article/1266821/us-hacks-chinese-mobile-phone-companies-steals-sms-data-edward-snowden

To me it looks like they don't really give a S#!t who are, where you are or if it is legal or not. They are going to spy on you in any way shape or form. Love it or hate it.  >:(

At least I don't have to tell them how I feel about it because they already have it on record!

Offline stealthyaroura

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #174 on: June 23, 2013, 11:17:55 AM »
what do you all think to this tube on snowdon? I don't know as these are USA folk and i'm UK.
some of you may be able to connect the dots if there are any. this could be rubbish too.
[youtube]9q2G-5xfFrA#t[/youtube]

WAIT it's WELLAWARE.COM ::) the guy who says obama is bush etc. he makes some crazy assumptions.
Whilst SOME of the people may have triple identities as in the sandy hook/Boston bomb false flags
He takes these false identities to far. some are just silly.
sorry if it's garbage. I just don't know the USA players like i would the UK.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2013, 11:32:30 AM by stealthyaroura »
Nikola Tesla humanitarian / Genius.
never forget this great man who gave so much
& asked for nothing but to let electricity be free for all.

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #175 on: June 23, 2013, 11:47:43 AM »


yeah, garbage probably.. went one site like this (before news) trashes it..it becomes pretty funny


 
(Before It's News)

A reader asked me to look into the site wellaware.com, the owners of which have been spreading spurious nonsense about ‘actors’ at Sandy Hook (amongst several other notable historical events and persons).

It took just a few minutes of perusing the various ‘investigations’ at wellaware.com to conclude that the ‘researchers’ that run that site are:

registered blind

or

equipped with an IQ of around 50

or

deliberately spreading nonsense to get attention.

or

a combination of all three.

I won’t go into debunking all of their blatant BS because it is so obvious and would be  a waste of time

Offline stealthyaroura

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #176 on: June 23, 2013, 12:08:14 PM »
Hmm is there a delete button otter :-[
yes the site is scary crazy stupid. it does beg the question WHY. what a waste of time.
the people don't even resemble who he says they are. well 99% of them anyhow.
I can only say sorry my mistake. jumped the gun there.
Nikola Tesla humanitarian / Genius.
never forget this great man who gave so much
& asked for nothing but to let electricity be free for all.

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #177 on: June 23, 2013, 03:21:21 PM »
 ;D



hey Stealthy...I call zorro..opps.. I mean zorgon for that

but no worries.. let it stand as an example of how easy it is to be drawn in
just think of all those folks who actually believe it..and even argue that it is true

my opinion is this type of site is the real disinfo...

 ::)

Offline stealthyaroura

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #178 on: June 23, 2013, 05:42:04 PM »
I reckon your rite there otter I mean the guy has put an awful lot of work into
that site and he believes 100% that he is correct. it's ether disinfo or the
guy has far to much time on his hands.I bet he refuses to be wrong too.
hate that.   ::)
Nikola Tesla humanitarian / Genius.
never forget this great man who gave so much
& asked for nothing but to let electricity be free for all.

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #179 on: June 27, 2013, 10:51:22 AM »

ok.. if yoiu weren't aware of this before .. then you just haven't been paying attention to the world as it now is...smile you're constantly on candid camera..ggggggggggrrrrrrrrrrr




http://money.msn.com/now/12-ways-you-could-be-tracked

Here's looking at you

Surprising revelations emerged recently about the extent to which federal agencies are tracking our phone calls, Internet usage and other information. And while President Obama and members of Congress have tried to downplay the issue -- and as the tech companies involved, including Apple (AAPL), Microsoft (MSFT) and Google (GOOG), try to restore the trust of their customers -- many Americans remain concerned about the balance between national security and personal privacy. (Microsoft owns and publishes MSN Money.)

It also raises questions about how far the snooping could go. How many ways could we be tracked, if the government -- or perhaps even a company -- wanted to follow our movements, our habits and our interests? How much of our daily lives are on the grid?

Don't pull out the tin-foil hats just yet. We aren't suggesting that you are being tracked in all these ways. Instead, we set out to look at how a person's life could be chronicled.

Read on to see 12 parts of your life that could be an open book:

Your location
The National Security Agency could collect the "geolocational" information that shows the location of cellphone calls made or received, but it chooses not to, The Wall Street Journal reported.

One official told the newspaper that the location information doesn't give enough good intelligence to justify the money and agent hours spent on it.



Your groceries
Grocery stores know what customers are buying by analyzing purchases tied to shopper loyalty cards. But the federal government can see the information as well. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has analyzed past grocery purchases to track the source of salmonella outbreaks, The Denver Post reports.

The CDC used information from Costco (COST) membership cards in one case.



Your daily errands
Automatic license plate readers are becoming increasingly popular with law enforcement around the country, Slate reports.

These plate recognition cameras are mounted in public places and sometimes on police patrol cars, and take pictures of every car that passes by. The technology is good for tracking stolen vehicles, toll evaders or criminals, but privacy advocates worry about the data being collected.

Oh, and if you're "checking in" at different places through social networking sites like Foursquare or Facebook (FB), that information can be easily accessed by the government as well.



Your phone calls
The National Security Agency has been gathering the telephone records of millions of Verizon (VZ) customers, The Guardian reported in June. The NSA receives daily updates of all phone calls within the U.S. and international calls made to and from the U.S.

Verizon wasn't the only carrier caught up in this. AT&T (T) and Sprint Nextel (S) also reportedly handed over data.

The information was reportedly metadata in most cases -- such as whom people called, where, when and for how long -- rather than the contents of actual conversations. Weeks after the bombshell report, experts were still wondering if the NSA's actions were legal.



Your driving patterns
Some insurance companies are offering discounts to customers willing to allow monitors in their cars. The data from GPS systems and other devices tell the company if drivers are going the speed limit or braking too hard, and safe drivers are rewarded with lower premiums.

Progressive (PGR) says its Snapshot device doesn't capture GPS location data, but General Motors' (GM) OnStar does, according to E-Commerce Times. That means a driver's location at a specific time could be requested by a subpoena.



Your credit card purchases
The NSA also watches credit-card transactions, The Wall Street Journal reports.

But the agency is very tight-lipped about this, and it's unclear whether the NSA has an ongoing credit card monitoring program or just performs individual investigations here and there. And, not surprisingly, the credit card companies aren't talking about this either.



Your online activity
Oh yeah, they're on to you. Right now. The NSA has requested information from Google (GOOG), Facebook (FB) and other tech companies about what people are doing online.

The Guardian and The Washington Post said that the NSA received information about Internet users' email messages, file transfers and live chats, but several tech companies said they didn't know anything about this practice.

Internet service providers have also given federal officials information about what websites customers visit, The Wall Street Journal reports.



Your electricity usage
Why would anyone care how much power you use? Some authorities are very interested in high electricity bills because they can signal nefarious activity.

Just ask the former South Carolina state trooper who found himself on the wrong side of the law after his utility company called the authorities about his high electricity use last year. Police raided the property and found an indoor marijuana farm.



Your hobbies
New York newspaper The Journal News sparked outrage last year when it published a map showing the locations of all handgun owners in two counties. The information is public record, the newspaper said, and it found the data with a simple Freedom of Information Act request.

Other permits could be accessed as well, including hunting and fishing licenses, making your favorite pastime a possible subject of interest.



Your real estate purchases
When you buy a house, the information is a matter of public record. The government (or anyone else, for that matter) can look up the sale amount and closing date, a description of your home and what the property is currently valued at.

Real-estate websites like Zillow (Z) make this information freely available to all.



Your political donations
Political candidates must report the names of donors giving more than $200 total to a campaign, according to the Federal Election Campaign Act. The donations are a matter of public record and can be accessed on sites such as OpenSecrets.

While this doesn't impact most of the voting public -- fewer than 0.5% of Americans gave $200 or more to federal candidates in 2008, according to Americans for Campaign Reform -- the political leanings of over a million people are easily discovered.



Your library records
Privacy has been a hot-button subject for librarians for years, many of whom don't believe in sharing their patrons' checkout records. The issue headed to the courts in 2006, after the federal government asked a library for records that could be used in a counterterrorism probe, according to The New York Times.

The furor over library records now seems so quaint, doesn't it? The fact that someone might know you checked out "50 Shades of Grey" seems of less consequence these days, when the government might very well be listening in on your phone calls.

 


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