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Author Topic: they know what you are doing  (Read 126349 times)

Offline The Matrix Traveller

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #120 on: June 11, 2013, 04:43:19 PM »
Does it really matter if everything is known about ourselves ?

Why are some so "Paranoid" about this ?

After all LIFE knows ALL anyway.

You can't HIDE anything !   :)

We only fear that everything is known about us, IF we have something to hide !

If everything is known about ME... then I am seen in TRUTH !

IF NOT then I am misunderstood !

The human species in fact has NO Control over LIFE at all.   :)

It is LIFE which Controls ALL, through its Written Programs,
yet to be understood in its True Context by most on Earth.

Edward

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #121 on: June 11, 2013, 05:51:26 PM »
I understand what your are saying. 

There is how ever veils of many kinds around. When we start dropping some of these, your sentiments will echo all that much more clearer.


Edward


Edit: that should make some sense. I came back and read it and I'm like wtf did I just say???  LOL   :o ;)
« Last Edit: June 11, 2013, 07:47:11 PM by Edward »

Offline vril

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #122 on: June 11, 2013, 07:25:58 PM »
Does it really matter if everything is known about ourselves ?

Why are some so "Paranoid" about this ?

After all LIFE knows ALL anyway.

You can't HIDE anything !   :)

We only fear that everything is known about us, IF we have something to hide !

If everything is known about ME... then I am seen in TRUTH !

IF NOT then I am misunderstood !

The human species in fact has NO Control over LIFE at all.   :)

It is LIFE which Controls ALL, through its Written Programs,
yet to be understood in its True Context by most on Earth.

It's not so much that everything is known, obviously our entire life is recorded by the powers that be (read: aliens) and I am completely fine with that.  The problem is what humans do with this knowledge (law enforcement, government).  Of course, people just have been living in an illusion of civil liberty, the government has been doing this for decades if not centuries, it's just so pervasive now that the system cannot even be dismantled.

This is about my feeling on it too.  It was also pretty obvious to me that this has been happening for decades.  I guess the fear is just what law enforcement and government will do w The facade of terrorism has just made the majority of people accept it too. 

Offline Sgt.Rocknroll

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #123 on: June 11, 2013, 07:43:29 PM »
Does it really matter if everything is known about ourselves ?

Why are some so "Paranoid" about this ?

After all LIFE knows ALL anyway.

You can't HIDE anything !   :)

We only fear that everything is known about us, IF we have something to hide !

If everything is known about ME... then I am seen in TRUTH !

IF NOT then I am misunderstood !

The human species in fact has NO Control over LIFE at all.   :)

It is LIFE which Controls ALL, through its Written Programs,
yet to be understood in its True Context by most on Earth.

I don't think it's so much people knowing about us, it's the realization that you might be watched and probed without your outright consent.

Anyone that thinks they have any kind of personal privacy, should not use a computer, cell phones, or any digital media,. Ie Facebook and the like. I'm not a bit surprised that the NSA is envolved. They had their name stamped on every piece of equipment I've ever been around. You should have seen the crypto equipment and keying material they had in the 70's. man it'd make your head swim.  Sorry rambling a bit. Time for bed.
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Offline The Matrix Traveller

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #124 on: June 11, 2013, 07:44:48 PM »
It's not so much that everything is known, obviously our entire life is recorded by the powers that be (read: aliens) and I am completely fine with that.  The problem is what humans do with this knowledge (law enforcement, government).  Of course, people just have been living in an illusion of civil liberty, the government has been doing this for decades if not centuries, it's just so pervasive now that the system cannot even be dismantled.

This is about my feeling on it too.  It was also pretty obvious to me that this has been happening for decades.  I guess the fear is just what law enforcement and government will do w The facade of terrorism has just made the majority of people accept it too.

We must remember our whole experience (Individual Body & Environment) is being produce by something
(LIFE) other than the human Species.

This is done through a "Processing System" known by some.

And used in every day Life by those NOT from the Earth !

This "Technology" is used in just about everything by other Civilisations from outside the Earth,
in "Transport Systems", "Communication", "Manufacture", "Accessing Knowledge" and "Entertainment" etc..

Your/our Individual Experience is produced before, you/we enter into the experience (vril & Environment
i.e. Earth or Universe Experience) but we are about to know, how to change (Edit our own Experience)

The human species is the Result of "Reading" (A Computer Term) a "Program Book".

This experience (re. Body and Universe) is a bit like what we have today in the form of a "1st Person"
Video or Computer Game played on the net.

Except what we believe to be "Reality", is merely a more sophisticated "1st Person" Game
than what is played on the Net.   :)

So Gov. have NO "Control", over anything at all...  It is just an Illusion....   :)  But a very well executed One.   :)

Offline The Matrix Traveller

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #125 on: June 11, 2013, 07:48:00 PM »
Privacy is only an "Illusion", some wish to believe in...   :)

Offline Amaterasu

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #126 on: June 11, 2013, 11:08:06 PM »
"I could go on and on..."

lol! Reminds me of the TAP stuff. As a Texan would say, "All hat and no cattle". The Constitution stands, just as it always has!

You keep believing that, rdunk, but I propose to You that it surely explains why so many "representatives" do NOT uphold the constitution as WE might believe it to be.  They took oaths...but to what?
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Online zorgon

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #127 on: June 12, 2013, 03:53:50 AM »
Obama Demands Court Uphold His “Right” To Ignore Constitution



Quote
Obama’s Department of Justice is demanding a federal judge dismiss the injunction with which she sought to uphold the constitutional rights of the American people.

On May 16th, federal judge Kathleen Forrest granted a preliminary injunction to plaintiffs in a lawsuit filed against Barack Obama and the National Defense Authorization Act of 2012 (NDAA), striking down those sections of the Act that provide the president the power to indefinitely detain American citizens without benefit of their 5th and 6th Amendment rights.

Under the terms of the Act, Obama had been given exclusive authority to direct members of the US military to arrest and imprison anyone he believed to have “substantially supported” al Qaeda, the Taliban, or “associated forces.” When pressed by plaintiff’s attorneys about the practical extent of this authority, government lawyers admitted “…the NDAA does give the president the power to lock up people like journalist Chris Hedges and peaceful activists,” admitting that “…even war correspondents could be locked up indefinitely under the NDAA.”

And when asked by the judge what it meant to be an “associated force”, Obama’s lawyers “…claimed the right to refrain from offering any clear definition of [the] term, or clear boundaries of the president’s power under [the] law.” In short, it is the federal government’s scheme that the Act remain so vague that a corrupt and power-hungry Administration may imprison virtually anyone it considers a threat to its pursuit of absolute power.

On July 25th, Administration lawyers filed papers demanding Judge Forrest’s preliminary injunction NOT be made permanent. In the filing, Obama made it clear his Administration would ignore the court and its injunction regardless of what the judge may decide, claiming incorrectly that “…[the] injunction would have ‘nil’ effect, for the government would continue to possess the identical detention authority under the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force…” Of course, that is a lie, as the AUMF applies only to known members of al Qaeda or the Taliban.

Most indicative of the Obama Administration’s contempt for Judge Forrest, the law, and the American people was government attorney Benjamin Torrance’s claim that it was “the Obama Administration’s position” NDAA detention provisions do not apply to American citizens living in the US. Judge Forrest responded by quoting Chief Justice Roberts, who wrote in a 2010 case that the Supreme Court “…would not uphold an unconstitutional statute merely because the government promised to use it reasonably.” So much for Judge Forrest’s faith in the validity and value of Obama’s signing statement promise to not employ his Section 1021 authority to indefinitely detain the American public!

Yet incredibly, when pressed on the issue, this Obama mouthpiece suggested to Forrest that concerns about the president’s detention powers were excessive as American citizens would, after all, have the ability to file  a writ of habeas corpus should they be illegally or improperly jailed! “How long does [such a] petition take,” asked Forrest? When Torrance refused to answer, the Judge continued, “Several years, right”?

So not only did Obama’s attorney lie about his Marxist boss’s corrupt intentions; he actually claimed that the abuse of American citizens was somehow acceptable because those unconstitutionally imprisoned might ask that the charges against them be produced after ONLY a few years behind bars!

Judge Forrest will soon decide whether to make the injunction permanent. Every citizen must watch very carefully for that ruling, as the “mainstream” media has ignored the story completely. We must all hope the Judge will not be intimidated by this corrupt Regime as so many of her colleagues have been before her.

Follow Coach at twitter.com @KcoachcCoach

http://www.westernjournalism.com/obama-demands-court-uphold-his-right-to-ignore-constitution/

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #128 on: June 12, 2013, 04:07:00 AM »
Now Russia set to offer whistleblower asylum: Putin 'considers' giving Edward Snowden refuge as NSA leaker vanishes in Hong Kong

Quote
Russia today hinted that Vladimir Putin would grant political asylum to Edward Snowden, the NSA whistleblower who leaked the secret information about a classified U.S. government surveillance program.

'We will take action based on what actually happens. If we receive such a request, it will be considered,' said the Russian president's official spokesman Dmitry Peskov.

The former CIA undercover operative is on the run after checking out of his luxury Hong Kong hotel on Sunday - his whereabouts is unknown.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2339329/Russia-hints-Putin-grant-political-asylum-whistleblower-Edward-Snowden-NSA-leaker-vanishes-Hong-Kong.html


Offline petrus4

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #129 on: June 12, 2013, 04:25:33 AM »
Obama Demands Court Uphold His “Right” To Ignore Constitution

The great irony, however, is that while Americans continue their reflexive worship of the Constitution, they fail to recognise that part of the reason for the mess in which they currently find themselves, can be attributed to weaknesses in said Constitutional system.

I will explain here, by saying that, in Western (and particularly American) society, we are held to derive our philosophy, and the very fabric of our thought itself, from Greece and Rome.  This is the first point.

The second point, however, is that while American Presidents often throw the word "democracy," around as though they know what it means, what they of course do not mention, is that democracy in the direct and genuine sense of the word, was a Greek invention, specifically.  The Republican system which America currently has, was modelled on Rome.

Why is this a problem?  Simply because the core element of this political system, is a legislature.  That is, you do not have direct democracy; you have representative democracy via said legislature.

I will contend that there has never been a representative, or non-direct legislature in human history, which did not rapidly degenerate into a corrupt, fascist gerontocracy, virtually the moment after its' inception.  Rome's legislature did not escape that fate, and neither has America.

The American Senate can rightfully be considered a mausoleum.  It is populated by a body of ghouls, none of whom are less than 50 years old at a bare minimum, and all of whom are subject to vast bribes from the corporate establishment.  This is precisely as it was in Rome's day, as well; and it is a crucial element of the cause of Rome's fall.  If Americans were going to consider trying to implement genuine political reform, my first suggestion would probably be to employ the services of Buffy the vampire slayer.



If you want to learn about a form of government that truly involved the people, however, then for that you would need to study Sparta, and to a lesser extent Athens.  The Spartans had direct democracy; and more importantly, they recognised that a quality education was vital for the survival and effective functioning of real participatory government.

America, by contrast, is ruled by a plutocracy of geriatric psychopaths; and said psychopaths have no interest in promoting public education or critical thought whatsoever.  John Rockefeller said it directly; that he did not want a nation of thinkers, but a nation of workers.

The political situation will not improve, until people are willing to become politically self-responsible; and in order for them to do that, they must (particularly in the case of Americans, as mentioned) cease believing that the best system they can have, is one in which they deliberately forfeit said responsibility to someone else, rather than exercising it themselves.  With a legislature, that is what you do.

If you want political integrity back, there are two ways you can get it.

a}  The legislative branch must be abolished completely.  The people must vote directly on laws themselves, rather than them delegating a geriatric fascist cabal to do so for them.  The only truly democratic means of passing laws is by referendum.  Anything else is psychopathic fraud.  Anyone who responds to this point, by quoting any of the Constitution's authors to the effect that democracy is "mob rule," will be summarily and contemptuously ignored, as a victim of plutocratic mind control.

The judges can stay where they are; I have no grievance with them for the most part, and indeed we often see the judicial branch acting as the people's last line of defense, while the legislature are busy enjoying their bribes.  That is not to say that the judges themselves are incorruptible, either; but they do genuinely seem to be less prone to it than the Congress.

b}  If you are going to keep an executive, then the executive must be informed in no uncertain terms that his role is to serve the people; meaning said general population that is responsible for voting on said laws, and that if he does not execute the people's will, the people will execute him. 

I suspect that impeachment also carrying the death penalty would create a much stronger incentive for appropriate Presidential behaviour, and in point of fact, that has been the practice since JFK; it is simply that the Eye have executed Presidents who have attempted to deviate from their will, rather than said law being held and exercised by the people themselves.  Regicide may be a moral crime, but at times it is also a social virtue.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2013, 04:36:15 AM by petrus4 »
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sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #130 on: June 12, 2013, 07:19:00 AM »

interesting history on the whistleblower Snowden within  this fraction of an interview


http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jun/09/edward-snowden-nsa-whistleblower-surveillance


Snowden did not always believe the US government posed a threat to his political values. He was brought up originally in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. His family moved later to Maryland, near the NSA headquarters in Fort Meade.

By his own admission, he was not a stellar student. In order to get the credits necessary to obtain a high school diploma, he attended a community college in Maryland, studying computing, but never completed the coursework. (He later obtained his GED.)

In 2003, he enlisted in the US army and began a training program to join the Special Forces. Invoking the same principles that he now cites to justify his leaks, he said: "I wanted to fight in the Iraq war because I felt like I had an obligation as a human being to help free people from oppression".

He recounted how his beliefs about the war's purpose were quickly dispelled. "Most of the people training us seemed pumped up about killing Arabs, not helping anyone," he said. After he broke both his legs in a training accident, he was discharged.

After that, he got his first job in an NSA facility, working as a security guard for one of the agency's covert facilities at the University of Maryland. From there, he went to the CIA, where he worked on IT security. His understanding of the internet and his talent for computer programming enabled him to rise fairly quickly for someone who lacked even a high school diploma.

By 2007, the CIA stationed him with diplomatic cover in Geneva, Switzerland. His responsibility for maintaining computer network security meant he had clearance to access a wide array of classified documents.

That access, along with the almost three years he spent around CIA officers, led him to begin seriously questioning the rightness of what he saw.

He described as formative an incident in which he claimed CIA operatives were attempting to recruit a Swiss banker to obtain secret banking information. Snowden said they achieved this by purposely getting the banker drunk and encouraging him to drive home in his car. When the banker was arrested for drunk driving, the undercover agent seeking to befriend him offered to help, and a bond was formed that led to successful recruitment.

"Much of what I saw in Geneva really disillusioned me about how my government functions and what its impact is in the world," he says. "I realised that I was part of something that was doing far more harm than good."

He said it was during his CIA stint in Geneva that he thought for the first time about exposing government secrets. But, at the time, he chose not to for two reasons.

First, he said: "Most of the secrets the CIA has are about people, not machines and systems, so I didn't feel comfortable with disclosures that I thought could endanger anyone". Secondly, the election of Barack Obama in 2008 gave him hope that there would be real reforms, rendering disclosures unnecessary.

He left the CIA in 2009 in order to take his first job working for a private contractor that assigned him to a functioning NSA facility, stationed on a military base in Japan. It was then, he said, that he "watched as Obama advanced the very policies that I thought would be reined in", and as a result, "I got hardened."

The primary lesson from this experience was that "you can't wait around for someone else to act. I had been looking for leaders, but I realised that leadership is about being the first to act."

Over the next three years, he learned just how all-consuming the NSA's surveillance activities were, claiming "they are intent on making every conversation and every form of behaviour in the world known to them".

He described how he once viewed the internet as "the most important invention in all of human history". As an adolescent, he spent days at a time "speaking to people with all sorts of views that I would never have encountered on my own".

But he believed that the value of the internet, along with basic privacy, is being rapidly destroyed by ubiquitous surveillance. "I don't see myself as a hero," he said, "because what I'm doing is self-interested: I don't want to live in a world where there's no privacy and therefore no room for intellectual exploration and creativity."

Once he reached the conclusion that the NSA's surveillance net would soon be irrevocable, he said it was just a matter of time before he chose to act. "What they're doing" poses "an existential threat to democracy", he said.

A matter of principle
As strong as those beliefs are, there still remains the question: why did he do it? Giving up his freedom and a privileged lifestyle? "There are more important things than money. If I were motivated by money, I could have sold these documents to any number of countries and gotten very rich."

For him, it is a matter of principle. "The government has granted itself power it is not entitled to. There is no public oversight. The result is people like myself have the latitude to go further than they are allowed to," he said.

His allegiance to internet freedom is reflected in the stickers on his laptop: "I support Online Rights: Electronic Frontier Foundation," reads one. Another hails the online organisation offering anonymity, the Tor Project.

Asked by reporters to establish his authenticity to ensure he is not some fantasist, he laid bare, without hesitation, his personal details, from his social security number to his CIA ID and his expired diplomatic passport. There is no shiftiness. Ask him about anything in his personal life and he will answer.

He is quiet, smart, easy-going and self-effacing. A master on computers, he seemed happiest when talking about the technical side of surveillance, at a level of detail comprehensible probably only to fellow communication specialists. But he showed intense passion when talking about the value of privacy and how he felt it was being steadily eroded by the behaviour of the intelligence services.

His manner was calm and relaxed but he has been understandably twitchy since he went into hiding, waiting for the knock on the hotel door. A fire alarm goes off. "That has not happened before," he said, betraying anxiety wondering if was real, a test or a CIA ploy to get him out onto the street.

Strewn about the side of his bed are his suitcase, a plate with the remains of room-service breakfast, and a copy of Angler, the biography of former vice-president Dick Cheney.

Ever since last week's news stories began to appear in the Guardian, Snowden has vigilantly watched TV and read the internet to see the effects of his choices. He seemed satisfied that the debate he longed to provoke was finally taking place.

He lay, propped up against pillows, watching CNN's Wolf Blitzer ask a discussion panel about government intrusion if they had any idea who the leaker was. From 8,000 miles away, the leaker looked on impassively, not even indulging in a wry smile.

Snowden said that he admires both Ellsberg and Manning, but argues that there is one important distinction between himself and the army private, whose trial coincidentally began the week Snowden's leaks began to make news.

"I carefully evaluated every single document I disclosed to ensure that each was legitimately in the public interest," he said. "There are all sorts of documents that would have made a big impact that I didn't turn over, because harming people isn't my goal. Transparency is."

He purposely chose, he said, to give the documents to journalists whose judgment he trusted about what should be public and what should remain concealed.

As for his future, he is vague. He hoped the publicity the leaks have generated will offer him some protection, making it "harder for them to get dirty".

He views his best hope as the possibility of asylum, with Iceland – with its reputation of a champion of internet freedom – at the top of his list. He knows that may prove a wish unfulfilled.

But after the intense political controversy he has already created with just the first week's haul of stories, "I feel satisfied that this was all worth it. I have no regrets."

sky otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #131 on: June 12, 2013, 09:47:57 AM »


NSA Spying Controversy Highlights Embrace Of Big Data
 Posted: 06/12/2013 7:36 am EDT  |  Updated: 06/12/2013 10:28 am EDT

Even within the infrastructure of the American surveillance apparatus, the National Security Agency is notoriously secretive. The spy agency jealously guards from public view practically all aspects of its operations, from the information it collects to its plans for a massive 100,000-square-foot building being constructed in the Utah desert.
http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2013/06/11/inside-nsas-secret-utah-data-center/

But when it comes to the agency's primary tool for making sense of all that data, the NSA hasn't been secretive at all. Indeed, two years ago, it made public the very code for a key program it uses to analyze the firehose of information pouring into its computer servers.

The NSA’s decision to give away that code to developers has helped fuel what is now a booming trend in technology known as "big data." The technology, Accumulo, makes it possible for companies to sift through massive amounts of information with essentially the same degree of sophistication and security as the country's top spy agency.

The use of computers to spot connections along a trail of digital breadcrumbs is hardly new. For years, major companies, from Amazon to Facebook to Google, have analyzed customer information to suggest books, friends or search results.

But the NSA’s use of such computing power was not widely understood until last week, when The Guardian and The Washington Post reported the agency was collecting and crunching huge amounts of Internet, phone and financial data in a bid to predict terrorist activity.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jun/06/us-tech-giants-nsa-data



The revelation that the NSA was collecting a massive trove of phone and Internet records from Americans highlights privacy concerns around the use of data analysis to draw conclusions from a wide of variety of information.

“There are all sorts of things you can do with this technology,” said Matthew Turck, managing director in FirstMark Capital, a venture capital firm. “Now it’s up to society to decide what’s acceptable and what’s not acceptable.”

The same cheap data storage and free open-source software used by the NSA now allows companies to conduct the kind of sophisticated data analysis once was only available to Internet giants like IBM and Google.

“Ten years ago, if you wanted to store and process that much data you would have to spend millions of dollars buying really expensive servers,” said Ben Siscovick, general partner at IA Ventures, a venture capital firm that invests in big data companies. “Now, the tools are out there, and they’re accessible in a low-cost way to just about anybody who wants it.”

For advocates of big data -- an industry with an estimated value approaching $100 billion -- the potential for technology like Accumulo has barely been tapped.

"This is the first technological innovation since the Internet with the potential to change the world," said Christopher Lynch, an investor that has bankrolled 10 Boston-area big data companies.

One of those companies is Sqrrl, which Lynch helped launch two years ago after poaching from the NSA six engineers who developed Accumulo. Sqrrl markets its technology to companies in the telecom, health care and financial sectors who need extra security when dealing with sensitive customer data. The database sorts through enormous amounts of information and restricts access to users with high-level security clearances, said Ely Kahn, the company's co-founder.

Its technology is used by major banks to predict whether customers will pay off their credit cards based on information like the demographic characteristics of their neighborhoods. It is also used by a telecom provider to spot damage on its network by searching for keywords like “broken” in a database of customer service calls, Kahn said.

“It’s similar to the way Amazon or eBay use databases to predict what you might want to buy next,” he said.



But the growing reliance on databases and software to draw conclusions has raised privacy concerns before. Target, for example, sparked controversy last year when an employee told The New York Times how the company could determine whether a woman was pregnant based on her purchasing history and demographic information.
http://www.forbes.com/fdc/welcome_mjx.shtml


Lenders have started assessing the creditworthiness of borrowers by doing big-data analysis on their social media connections.
http://www.economist.com/news/finance-and-economics/21571468-lenders-are-turning-social-media-assess-borrowers-stat-oil
 And some health insurers have started buying massive databases to potentially flag people for being at risk of obesity if they have a history of buying plus-sized clothing, according to The Wall Street Journal.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323384604578326151014237898.html

FirstMark Capital's Turck predicted that the ability for both the NSA and companies to unlock secrets from the data they collect “is only going to get more powerful and more precise."

“The genie is out of the bottle,” he said.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/12/nsa-big-data_n_3423482.html

Offline robomont

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #132 on: June 12, 2013, 10:09:49 AM »
lets say im a pot smoker and grower.my  gov doesnt need that info.
lets say i want to hedge against the dollar.some nsa agent could use that to bankrupt me.and make himself filthier rich than he already is.
its time to end big gov.
ive never been much for rules.
being me has its priviledges.

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Online zorgon

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #133 on: June 12, 2013, 10:55:15 AM »

Online zorgon

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #134 on: June 12, 2013, 10:59:49 AM »
"The Government Spooks Are Drunk With Power!" Congressman Ted Poe

[youtube]6Z968_74B98[/youtube]

 


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[February 18, 2018, 06:55:12 AM]


Re: Mandalay: The biggest shooting since Columbine. by petrus4
[February 17, 2018, 09:54:11 PM]