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Author Topic: they know what you are doing  (Read 126487 times)

Offline SerpUkhovian

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #570 on: May 24, 2015, 03:40:11 AM »
Quote
After 49 days and 40 nights when the sewers back up

R i i i i g h t . . . .
Have you noticed since everyone has a cell phone these days no one talks about seeing UFOs like they used to?

space otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #571 on: May 24, 2015, 11:41:33 AM »



After 40 days and 40 nights when the sewers back up :D


it wouldn't take that long...maybe two days of hard rain.. the sewer systems as well as the rest of the sub structure in this country is 50 years and older and not meant for the anount of folks we have today.....the feds have a sewer separation thing going..but in a heavy rain.. still  bad
sigh


http://www.wowt.com/home/headlines/Sewer-Separation-Project-Digs-In-198343501.html
Sewer Separation Project Digs In......The federal mandate




Offline zorgon

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #572 on: May 24, 2015, 11:50:16 AM »
it wouldn't take that long...maybe two days of hard rain.. the sewer systems as well as the rest of the sub structure in this country is 50 years and older and not meant for the anount of folks we have today.....the feds have a sewer separation thing going..but in a heavy rain.. still  bad
sigh

LOL  You need an education :P 

[youtube]pfU92tDr8rg[/youtube]



space otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #573 on: May 24, 2015, 11:52:05 AM »


oh that used to make me laugh.. but not anymore

boo hiss to bc...

space otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #574 on: May 27, 2015, 05:06:22 AM »


White House: No 'Plan B' If Congress Fails To Act On Patriot Act
 


 Reuters 
 

 Posted:  05/26/2015 1:45 pm EDT    Updated:  05/26/2015 3:38 pm EDT



WASHINGTON, May 26 (Reuters) - The Obama administration has no backup plan if the U.S. Congress fails to act on legislation that would extend certain provisions of the USA Patriot Act, a White House spokesman said on Tuesday.

"I'm not aware of any sort of plan B that exists or that is currently being contemplated," White House spokesman Josh Earnest told reporters. "It would certainly put at grave risk these programs and could risk a lapse in some of these important national security capabilities."

Legislation to extend provisions for two months have stalled in the Senate, leaving the fate of the country's domestic surveillance program uncertain before its June 1 expiration. Republican U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has said the chamber will return to Washington on May 31 to consider ways to prevent the expiration. (Reporting by Lisa Lambert and Doina Chiacu; Additional reporting by Patricia Zengerle)


waiting for  the 31st...they will just come up with something else

space otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #575 on: May 31, 2015, 05:52:11 PM »
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/05/31/senate-patriot-act_n_7480402.html


Senate Votes To Move Ahead On Debate Over Patriot Act Reforms
 
 Reuters 
   Posted:  05/31/2015 4:46 pm EDT    Updated:  44 minutes ago


By Patricia Zengerle and Warren Strobel

WASHINGTON, May 31 (Reuters) - The U.S. Senate advanced legislation on Sunday reforming a controversial program that collects Americans' telephone call records, but final passage appeared doubtful before the surveillance system expires at midnight.

A bill that would end U.S. spy agencies' bulk collection of the telephone data and replace it with a more targeted system cleared a crucial procedural hurdle, ending an impasse over whether to move ahead with the legislation.

The Senate voted 77-17 in favor of a measure that allowed the chamber to begin debate on the bill, called the USA Freedom Act. But the domestic surveillance program was still due to expire at midnight (0400 GMT on Monday) after Senator Rand Paul blocked several attempts at short-term extensions.

Senate rules mean it likely will be the middle of the week before the chamber can vote on whether or not to pass the Freedom Act, which extends the existing surveillance program for six months while the new system gets up and running.

Still, Paul, a Republican 2016 presidential hopeful who had vigorously opposed the Freedom Act, acknowledged after the procedural vote: "This bill will ultimately pass."

The bill would replace three key surveillance provisions of the USA Patriot Act, signed into law by Republican President George W. Bush after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the United States.

Parts of it have been renewed under Democratic President Barack Obama. Under the law, the eavesdropping National Security Agency collects and searches U.S. telephone records - but not the content of the calls themselves - in a program first made public by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

Action to renew or reform the program had stalled in the Senate, due largely to disputes within the Republican Party, which holds majorities in both the House of Representatives and Senate.

Libertarians want the program ended altogether, while security hawks want it extended, unchanged.

The Senate came back early from its Memorial Day recess to resume consideration of the legislation at 4 p.m. EDT (2000 GMT) on Sunday, just as security officials said they had to begin shutting down the NSA program to meet the midnight deadline.

As the Senate session got underway, Paul vowed to force the program to expire, called it illegal and the beginning of a powerful surveillance state.

"It's the tip of the iceberg, what we're talking about here," he said.

But another Republican, Senator Dan Coats, warned that the phone records program could expire at a time of heightened militant threats.

The Islamic State group "has made a direct threat toward the United States and its citizens," Coats said. It "looks like we'll have the opportunity to debate this while the program expires," he said.

Supporters of the Freedom Act need 60 votes to move it forward in the 100-member Senate.

A previous attempt on May 23 fell three votes short and the bill's backers have been pushing hard to sway three more senators.

One senator who voted against the bill on May 23, Mark Kirk, an Illinois Republican, said on Sunday he would now vote "yes."

Senator Dean Heller, a Nevada Republican, said he believed there were now enough votes to pass the Freedom Act. "Everybody's come to their senses," he said.

The Freedom Act, which ends the spy agencies' bulk collection of domestic telephone "metadata" and replaces it with a more targeted system, has already passed the House by an overwhelming margin and has Obama's strong support.

Along with the call records program, other government investigative powers would lapse after midnight Sunday.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation will no longer be able to employ 'roving wiretaps' aimed at terrorism suspects who use multiple disposable cell phones, and it will have more difficulty seizing such suspects' and their associates' personal and business records.

A review panel that Obama established in 2013 concluded that the telephone metadata program had not been essential to preventing any terrorist attack. Security officials counter that it provides important data that, combined with other intelligence, can help stop attacks.

CIA Director John Brennan, appearing on CBS's "Face the Nation" program, said data collection was "important to American lives" and that being without them could mean missing warning of a big attack on the United States.

Under the Freedom Act, the telephone records would be held by telecommunications companies, not the government, and the NSA would have to get court approval to gain access to specific data. (Additional reporting by Douwe Miedema and Bill Trott.; Editing by Crispian Balmer, Mohammad Zargham and Eric Walsh)

space otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #576 on: June 01, 2015, 10:19:04 AM »


sadly come Wednesday they will just change the wording a bit and put it all back in place with the freedom act...yea.. freedom for them to continue
sigh

 :(

space otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #577 on: June 02, 2015, 06:58:56 AM »
 

 ahhhhh the news just gets better and better :'(




FBI Confirms Wide-Scale Use Of Surveillance Flights Over U.S. Cities
 

vid at link

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/06/02/fbi-surveillance-flights_n_7490396.html

AP      |  By JACK GILLUM, EILEEN SULLIVAN and ERIC TUCKER 
  Posted:  06/02/2015 3:07 am EDT    Updated:  5 hours ago


WASHINGTON (AP) — The FBI is operating a small air force with scores of low-flying planes across the U.S. carrying video and, at times, cellphone surveillance technology — all hidden behind fictitious companies that are fronts for the government, The Associated Press has learned.

The planes' surveillance equipment is generally used without a judge's approval, and the FBI said the flights are used for specific, ongoing investigations. In a recent 30-day period, the agency flew above more than 30 cities in 11 states across the country, an AP review found.

Aerial surveillance represents a changing frontier for law enforcement, providing what the government maintains is an important tool in criminal, terrorism or intelligence probes. But the program raises questions about whether there should be updated policies protecting civil liberties as new technologies pose intrusive opportunities for government spying.

The FBI confirmed for the first time the wide-scale use of the aircraft, which the AP traced to at least 13 fake companies, such as FVX Research, KQM Aviation, NBR Aviation and PXW Services. Even basic aspects of the program are withheld from the public in censored versions of official reports from the Justice Department's inspector general.

"The FBI's aviation program is not secret," spokesman Christopher Allen said in a statement. "Specific aircraft and their capabilities are protected for operational security purposes." Allen added that the FBI's planes "are not equipped, designed or used for bulk collection activities or mass surveillance."

But the planes can capture video of unrelated criminal activity on the ground that could be handed over for prosecutions.

Some of the aircraft can also be equipped with technology that can identify thousands of people below through the cellphones they carry, even if they're not making a call or in public. Officials said that practice, which mimics cell towers into coughing up basic subscriber information, is rare.

Details confirmed by the FBI track closely with published reports since at least 2003 that a government surveillance program might be behind suspicious-looking planes slowly circling neighborhoods. The AP traced at least 50 aircraft back to the FBI, and identified more than 100 flights since late April orbiting both major cities and rural areas.

One of the planes, photographed in flight last week by the AP in northern Virginia, bristled with unusual antennas under its fuselage and a camera on its left side. A federal budget document from 2010 mentioned at least 115 planes, including 90 Cessna aircraft, in the FBI's surveillance fleet.

The FBI said it also occasionally helps local police with aerial support, such as during the recent disturbance in Baltimore that followed the death of 25-year-old Freddie Gray, who sustained grievous injuries while in police custody. Those types of requests are reviewed by senior FBI officials.

The surveillance flights comply with agency rules, an FBI spokesman said. Those rules, which are heavily redacted in publicly available documents, limit the types of equipment the agency can use, as well as the justifications and duration of the surveillance.

Details about the flights come as the Justice Department seeks to navigate privacy concerns arising from aerial surveillance by unmanned aircrafts, or drones. President Barack Obama has said he welcomes a debate on government surveillance, and has called for more transparency about spying in the wake of disclosures about classified programs.

"These are not your grandparents' surveillance aircraft," said Jay Stanley, a senior policy analyst with the American Civil Liberties Union, calling the flights significant "if the federal government is maintaining a fleet of aircraft whose purpose is to circle over American cities, especially with the technology we know can be attached to those aircraft."

During the past few weeks, the AP tracked planes from the FBI's fleet on more than 100 flights over at least 11 states plus Washington, D.C., most with Cessna 182T Skylane aircraft. These included parts of Houston, Phoenix, Seattle, Chicago, Boston, Minneapolis and Southern California.

Evolving technology can record higher-quality video from long distances, even at night, and can capture certain identifying information from cellphones using a device known as a "cell-site simulator" — or Stingray, to use one of the product's brand names. These can trick pinpointed cellphones into revealing identification numbers of subscribers, including those not suspected of a crime.

Officials say cellphone surveillance is rare, although the AP found in recent weeks FBI flights orbiting large, enclosed buildings for extended periods where aerial photography would be less effective than electronic signals collection. Those included above Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport and the Mall of America in Bloomington, Minnesota.

After The Washington Post revealed flights by two planes circling over Baltimore in early May, the AP began analyzing detailed flight data and aircraft-ownership registrations that shared similar addresses and flight patterns. That review found some FBI missions circled above at least 40,000 residents during a single flight over Anaheim, California, in late May, according to Census data and records provided by the website FlightRadar24.com.

Most flight patterns occurred in counter-clockwise orbits up to several miles wide and roughly one mile above the ground at slow speeds. A 2003 newsletter from the company FLIR Systems Inc., which makes camera technology such as seen on the planes, described flying slowly in left-handed patterns.

"Aircraft surveillance has become an indispensable intelligence collection and investigative technique which serves as a force multiplier to the ground teams," the FBI said in 2009 when it asked Congress for $5.1 million for the program




Recently, independent journalists and websites have cited companies traced to a bank of Virginia post office boxes, including one shared with the Justice Department. The AP analyzed similar data since early May, while also drawing upon aircraft registration documents, business records and interviews with U.S. officials to understand the scope of the operations.

The FBI asked the AP not to disclose the names of the fake companies it uncovered, saying that would saddle taxpayers with the expense of creating new cover companies to shield the government's involvement, and could endanger the planes and integrity of the surveillance missions. The AP declined the FBI's request because the companies' names — as well as common addresses linked to the Justice Department — are listed on public documents and in government databases.

At least 13 front companies that AP identified being actively used by the FBI are registered to post office boxes in Bristow, Virginia, which is near a regional airport used for private and charter flights. Only one of them appears in state business records.

Included on most aircraft registrations is a mysterious name, Robert Lindley. He is listed as chief executive and has at least three distinct signatures among the companies. Two documents include a signature for Robert Taylor, which is strikingly similar to one of Lindley's three handwriting patterns.

The FBI would not say whether Lindley is a U.S. government employee. The AP unsuccessfully tried to reach Lindley at phone numbers registered to people of the same name in the Washington area since Monday.

Law enforcement officials said Justice Department lawyers approved the decision to create fictitious companies to protect the flights' operational security and the Federal Aviation Administration was aware of the practice. One of the Lindley-headed companies shares a post office box openly used by the Justice Department.

Such elusive practices have endured for decades. A 1990 report by the then-General Accounting Office noted that, in July 1988, the FBI had moved its "headquarters-operated" aircraft into a company that wasn't publicly linked to the bureau.

The FBI does not generally obtain warrants to record video from its planes of people moving outside in the open, but it also said that under a new policy it has recently begun obtaining court orders to use cell-site simulators. The Obama administration had until recently been directing local authorities through secret agreements not to reveal their own use of the devices, even encouraging prosecutors to drop cases rather than disclose the technology's use in open court.

A Justice Department memo last month also expressly barred its component law enforcement agencies from using unmanned drones "solely for the purpose of monitoring activities protected by the First Amendment" and said they are to be used only in connection with authorized investigations and activities. A department spokeswoman said the policy applied only to unmanned aircraft systems rather than piloted airplanes. The First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution guarantees freedom of speech and assembly.

___

Associated Press writers Sean Murphy in Oklahoma City; Joan Lowy and Ted Bridis in Washington; Randall Chase in Wilmington, Delaware; and news researchers Monika Mathur in Washington and Rhonda Shafner in New York contributed to this report.

___

View documents: http://apne.ws/1HEyP0t


space otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #578 on: June 04, 2015, 09:37:15 AM »
ya know since they know everything about us I don't see any reason why we can't all just be naked in public..


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/06/04/snowden-surveillance-expanding_n_7511428.html

New Snowden Documents Reveal Secret Memos Expanding Spying
 


vid at link


 ProPublica    |  By Julia Angwin and Jeff Larson 
   Posted:  06/04/2015 11:22 am EDT    Updated:  28 minutes ago

by Julia Angwin and Jeff Larson, ProPublica, Charlie Savage, New York Times, and Henrik Moltke, special to ProPublica, June 4, 2015, 11:01 a.m.

This story was co-published with the New York Times.

Without public notice or debate, the Obama administration has expanded the National Security Agency's warrantless surveillance of Americans' international Internet traffic to search for evidence of malicious computer hacking, according to classified NSA documents.

In mid-2012, Justice Department lawyers wrote two secret memos permitting the spy agency to begin hunting on Internet cables, without a warrant and on American soil, for data linked to computer intrusions originating abroad 2014 including traffic that flows to suspicious Internet addresses or contains malware, the documents show.

The Justice Department allowed the agency to monitor only addresses and "cybersignatures" 2014 patterns associated with computer intrusions 2014 that it could tie to foreign governments. But the documents also note that the NSA sought to target hackers even when it could not establish any links to foreign powers.

The disclosures, based on documents provided by Edward J. Snowden, the former NSA contractor, and shared with the New York Times and ProPublica, come at a time of unprecedented cyberattacks on American financial institutions, businesses and government agencies, but also of greater scrutiny of secret legal justifications for broader government surveillance.

While the Senate passed legislation this week limiting some of the NSA's authority, it involved provisions in the U.S.A. Patriot Act and did not apply to the warrantless wiretapping program.

Government officials defended the NSA's monitoring of suspected hackers as necessary to shield Americans from the increasingly aggressive activities of foreign governments. But critics say it raises difficult trade-offs that should be subject to public debate.

The NSA's activities run "smack into law enforcement land," said Jonathan Mayer, a cybersecurity scholar at Stanford Law School who has researched privacy issues and who reviewed several of the documents. "That's a major policy decision about how to structure cybersecurity in the U.S. and not a conversation that has been had in public."

It is not clear what standards the agency is using to select targets. It can be hard to know for sure who is behind a particular intrusion 2014 a foreign government or a criminal gang 2014 and the NSA is supposed to focus on foreign intelligence, not law enforcement.

The government can also gather significant volumes of Americans' information 2014 anything from private emails to trade secrets and business dealings 2014 through Internet surveillance because monitoring the data flowing to a hacker involves copying that information as the hacker steals it.

One internal NSA document notes that agency surveillance activities through "hacker signatures pull in a lot." Brian Hale, the spokesman for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, said, "It should come as no surprise that the U.S. government gathers intelligence on foreign powers that attempt to penetrate U.S. networks and steal the private information of U.S. citizens and companies." He added that "targeting overseas individuals engaging in hostile cyberactivities on behalf of a foreign power is a lawful foreign intelligence purpose."

The effort is the latest known expansion of the NSA's warrantless surveillance program, which allows the government to intercept Americans' cross-border communications if the target is a foreigner abroad. While the NSA has long searched for specific email addresses and phone numbers of foreign intelligence targets, the Obama administration three years ago started allowing the agency to search its communications streams for less-identifying Internet protocol addresses or strings of harmful computer code.

The surveillance activity traces to changes that began after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. The government tore down a so-called wall that prevented intelligence and criminal investigators from sharing information about suspected spies and terrorists. The barrier had been erected to protect Americans' rights because intelligence investigations use lower legal standards than criminal inquiries, but policy makers decided it was too much of an obstacle to terrorism investigations.

The NSA also started the warrantless wiretapping program, which caused an outcry when it was disclosed in 2005. In 2008, under the FISA Amendments Act, Congress legalized the surveillance program so long as the agency targeted only noncitizens abroad. A year later, the new Obama administration began crafting a new cybersecurity policy 2014 including weighing whether the Internet had made the distinction between a spy and a criminal obsolete.

"Reliance on legal authorities that make theoretical distinctions between armed attacks, terrorism and criminal activity may prove impractical," the White House National Security Council wrote in a classified annex to a policy report in May 2009, which was included in the NSA's internal files.

About that time, the documents show, the NSA 2014 whose mission includes protecting military and intelligence networks against intruders 2014 proposed using the warrantless surveillance program for cybersecurity purposes. The agency received "guidance on targeting using the signatures" from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, according to an internal newsletter.

In May and July 2012, according to an internal timeline, the Justice Department granted its secret approval for the searches of cybersignatures and Internet addresses. The Justice Department tied that authority to a pre-existing approval by the secret surveillance court permitting the government to use the program to monitor foreign governments.

That limit meant the NSA had to have some evidence for believing that the hackers were working for a specific foreign power. That rule, the NSA soon complained, left a "huge collection gap against cyberthreats to the nation" because it is often hard to know exactly who is behind an intrusion, according to an agency newsletter. Different computer intruders can use the same piece of malware, take steps to hide their location or pretend to be someone else.

So the NSA, in 2012, began pressing to go back to the surveillance court and seek permission to use the program explicitly for cybersecurity purposes. That way, it could monitor international communications for any "malicious cyberactivity," even if it did not yet know who was behind the attack.

The newsletter described the further expansion as one of "highest priorities" of the NSA director, Gen. Keith B. Alexander. However, a former senior intelligence official said that the government never asked the court to grant that authority.

Meanwhile, the F.B.I. in 2011 had obtained a new kind of wiretap order from the secret surveillance court for cybersecurity investigations, permitting it to target Internet data flowing to or from specific Internet addresses linked to certain governments.

To carry out the orders, the F.B.I. negotiated in 2012 to use the NSA's system for monitoring Internet traffic crossing "chokepoints operated by U.S. providers through which international communications enter and leave the United States," according to a 2012 NSA document. The NSA would send the intercepted traffic to the bureau's "cyberdata repository" in Quantico, Virginia.

The disclosure that the NSA and the F.B.I. have expanded their cybersurveillance adds a dimension to a recurring debate over the post-Sept. 11 expansion of government spying powers: Information about Americans sometimes gets swept up incidentally when foreigners are targeted, and prosecutors can use that information in criminal cases.

Citing the potential for a copy of data "exfiltrated" by a hacker to contain "so much" information about Americans, one NSA lawyer suggested keeping the stolen data out of the agency's regular repository for information collected by surveillance so that analysts working on unrelated issues could not query it, a 2010 training document showed. But it is not clear whether the agency or the F.B.I. has imposed any additional limits on the data of hacking victims.

In a response to questions for this article, the F.B.I. pointed to its existing procedures for protecting victims' data acquired during investigations, but also said it continually reviewed its policies "to adapt to these changing threats while protecting civil liberties and the interests of victims of cybercrimes."

None of these actions or proposals had been disclosed to the public. As recently as February, when President Obama spoke about cybersecurity at an event at Stanford University, he lauded the importance of transparency but did not mention this change.

"The technology so often outstrips whatever rules and structures and standards have been put in place, which means that government has to be constantly self-critical and we have to be able to have an open debate about it," Obama said.

Laura Poitras contributed reporting.





Offline zorgon

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #579 on: June 04, 2015, 10:22:01 AM »
ya know since they know everything about us I don't see any reason why we can't all just be naked in public..

Scary thought   :o




New Snowden Documents Reveal Secret Memos Expanding Spying

What I want to know is where are all these NEW Snowden documents coming from?



space otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #580 on: June 04, 2015, 12:17:15 PM »


ahhhhhhh geze Z.. my retina's are burnt..you must be getting mean with age..


anywho  I thought that I read somewhere at the beginning that he had a bunch of stuff and was going to release it a piece at a time ..but of course I can't  find where that was written

but I did find a few other interesting things about him and the image of him in the vid he wasn't looking so good
soooooooooooooooooooo who knows.?  ?   ?


here are a few tidbits I found




http://www.businessinsider.com/things-we-learned-from-wireds-huge-new-interview-with-edward-snowden-2014-8

Hunter Walker Aug. 13, 2014, 12:00 PM

2.  Bamford thinks someone else is "spilling secrets under Snowden's
name."
Though he said Snowden "adamantly refuses to address this possibility on the record," Bamford is convinced there is another leaker who is sending out intelligence documents "under Snowden's name."

"Independent of my visit to Snowden, I was given unrestricted access to his cache of documents in various locations. And going through this archive using a sophisticated digital search tool, I could not find some of the documents that have made their way into public view, leading me to conclude that there must be a second
leaker somewhere," wrote Bamford.


6. Glenn Greenwald lost the keys to documents Snowden gave him.
Journalist Glenn Greenwald was the first to publish many of the revelations from Snowden's leaks, but Greenwald has allegedly been unable to access many documents Snowden gave him about British intelligence agencies.

Bamford wrote that, last year, Greenwald, "found himself unable to open the encryption on a large trove of secrets from GCHQ—the British counterpart of the NSA—that Snowden had passed to him." According to Bamford, this was the reason Greenwald sent his partner, David Miranda, from their home in Brazil to the U.K. After getting another set of the documents, Miranda was stopped and detained by British authorities who seized the documents and were able to access them because they "discovered a paper of Miranda's with the password for one of the files."

In an exchange with cybersecurity expert Christopher Soghoian, on Twitter, Greenwald described Bamford's account of Miranda's detention as "completely wrong. Greenwald did not respond to an email from Business Insider asking what was incorrect about the story.




.....................


http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/04/13/edward-snowden-is-acting-very-strange-inside-russia.html


Spy Games
04.13.155:15 AM ET
Michael Weiss ?


Edward Snowden Is Acting Very Strange Inside Russia

down towards the end of the article

Russian spy-watcher Andrei Soldatov on Snowden’s strange behavior in Russia, the Nemtsov assassination, and signs of a power struggle in Putin’s inner circle.
I think there is some sort of a deal with the Russian authorities. It seems Snowden insisted that he’d never be used by Russian propaganda. He never made it onto RT or other state media outlets and of course they would be happy to have him.

He tries to be completely invisible in Russia. There was a strange case a few months ago. The Russian Association of Electronic Communication, or RAEC, announced in the spring of 2014 that they’d secured an approval from Snowden to have a special Snowden prize for Internet media… So RAEC had the ceremony in December. I was there. The problem was, there was no sign of Snowden! There was not even a video message from him, just nothing.

It seems the idea is to stress that he’s just not in the U.S., he’s somewhere, but not in Russia. I don’t think it was his strategy from the beginning. After all, he questioned Putin last April during Putin’s annual question-and-answer press conference about mass surveillance in Russia.

So my impression is that it’s not his decision.

But that gives the lie that he’s not being controlled.

[Soldatov nods.]

He’s clearly being exploited—after all, many repressive measures on the Internet in Russia were presented to Russians as a response to Snowden’s revelations. For instance, the legislation to relocate the servers of global platforms to Russia by September of this year, to make them available for the Russian secret services, was presented as a measure to assure the security of Russian citizens’ personal data.

I was told that there was some talk in American human-rights organizations that there might be interviews arranged for Russian journalists. But that never happened. So obviously Snowden’s handlers told him that he could say whatever he wants about the NSA and so on, but only to American journalists coming from the United States.

What I find interesting about this is that in December of 2014 Snowden, when asked about his security situation at the Amnesty International event, said, “My security’s great. I live a fairly normal life, I ride the Moscow underground when I go about day to day.” 

Thus he’s withdrawn the only plausible reason for why he’s not transparent here in Russia. So what’s the reason to be so secretive? There is some problem with logic here. For instance, I would understand if he says, “Look, I cannot comment on Russian surveillance, this is not my war.” Instead, he asked his question about Russian surveillance. And he is not transparent. I just don’t get it.



Offline Dyna

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #581 on: June 04, 2015, 03:23:26 PM »
I doubt it, I don't see any way of that being possible.

Have not read this full thread yet so many may have pointed it out. Things released or made public are usually long being used by military and police.


Peoples home security systems and numerous smart electronics are easy to use track a person's movements and exchanges it seems.

I don't use the things most people do but one day an electrician without notice installed a smart meter on our homes electric connection. Ours is the only one anywhere we have looked over the neighborhood.

Quote
Researchers in London have devised a stealthy system that gives off no radio waves so it can't be detected, but by sniffing Wi-Fi signals, it can pinpoint a person's movement inside a building. University College London scientists Karl Woodbridge and Kevin Chetty developed this suitcase-sized prototype that has successfully been tested through a one-foot-thick brick wall to determine "a person's location, speed and direction."
http://www.networkworld.com/article/2222896/microsoft-subnet/stealthy-wi-fi-spy-sees-you-through-walls-thanks-to-your-wireless-router.html

If so they will be ready with world wide free Wi-Fi
Quote
A New York City-based company, the Media Development Investment Fund, plans to launch hundreds of low-cost miniature satellites known as “cubesats” into orbit around the Earth to create the Outernet, a wireless connection to the Web available for free to every person in the world. If everything goes according to plan, the Outernet could be here as soon as June 2015.
http://www.ibtimes.com/introducing-outernet-free-worldwide-wi-fi-access-beamed-space-1556016
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Offline zorgon

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #582 on: June 04, 2015, 03:38:49 PM »
Peoples home security systems and numerous smart electronics are easy to use track a person's movements and exchanges it seems.

Yes 100% true  I installed alarms for years... The monitoring station tracks every time you turn on an off your system

But ADT also provided another service... they could LISTEN IN to the house. The INTENT was to call you in case there was a medicalproblem, or hear the burglar.  The theory was that they could only do this AFTER the alarm was tripped...  as I said that was the THEORY :P

Offline zorgon

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #583 on: June 04, 2015, 03:47:47 PM »

here are a few tidbits I found

Now THAT seems highly likely

When Snowden told us the NSA was spying on us, well that wasn't anything new  Pegasus, Cryptome, ATS and many others have said that for years, provided proof, gave code names of the listening stations

So all Snowden did was confirm it to the Little Hobbits :P  And after a few months outrage, they still do what they always have done... Babble-a-lot.


Long suspected Snowden was a controlled release... and 'leaking' stuff under his name is a good move.. He is already branded traitor and you can only kill him once

All smells like Rotten Tuna




http://www.businessinsider.com/things-we-learned-from-wireds-huge-new-interview-with-edward-snowden-2014-8

Hunter Walker Aug. 13, 2014, 12:00 PM

2.  Bamford thinks someone else is "spilling secrets under Snowden's
name."
Though he said Snowden "adamantly refuses to address this possibility on the record," Bamford is convinced there is another leaker who is sending out intelligence documents "under Snowden's name."

"Independent of my visit to Snowden, I was given unrestricted access to his cache of documents in various locations. And going through this archive using a sophisticated digital search tool, I could not find some of the documents that have made their way into public view, leading me to conclude that there must be a second
leaker somewhere," wrote Bamford.


6. Glenn Greenwald lost the keys to documents Snowden gave him.
Journalist Glenn Greenwald was the first to publish many of the revelations from Snowden's leaks, but Greenwald has allegedly been unable to access many documents Snowden gave him about British intelligence agencies.

Bamford wrote that, last year, Greenwald, "found himself unable to open the encryption on a large trove of secrets from GCHQ—the British counterpart of the NSA—that Snowden had passed to him." According to Bamford, this was the reason Greenwald sent his partner, David Miranda, from their home in Brazil to the U.K. After getting another set of the documents, Miranda was stopped and detained by British authorities who seized the documents and were able to access them because they "discovered a paper of Miranda's with the password for one of the files."

In an exchange with cybersecurity expert Christopher Soghoian, on Twitter, Greenwald described Bamford's account of Miranda's detention as "completely wrong. Greenwald did not respond to an email from Business Insider asking what was incorrect about the story.




.....................


http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/04/13/edward-snowden-is-acting-very-strange-inside-russia.html


Spy Games
04.13.155:15 AM ET
Michael Weiss ?


Edward Snowden Is Acting Very Strange Inside Russia

down towards the end of the article

Russian spy-watcher Andrei Soldatov on Snowden’s strange behavior in Russia, the Nemtsov assassination, and signs of a power struggle in Putin’s inner circle.
I think there is some sort of a deal with the Russian authorities. It seems Snowden insisted that he’d never be used by Russian propaganda. He never made it onto RT or other state media outlets and of course they would be happy to have him.

He tries to be completely invisible in Russia. There was a strange case a few months ago. The Russian Association of Electronic Communication, or RAEC, announced in the spring of 2014 that they’d secured an approval from Snowden to have a special Snowden prize for Internet media… So RAEC had the ceremony in December. I was there. The problem was, there was no sign of Snowden! There was not even a video message from him, just nothing.

It seems the idea is to stress that he’s just not in the U.S., he’s somewhere, but not in Russia. I don’t think it was his strategy from the beginning. After all, he questioned Putin last April during Putin’s annual question-and-answer press conference about mass surveillance in Russia.

So my impression is that it’s not his decision.

But that gives the lie that he’s not being controlled.

[Soldatov nods.]

He’s clearly being exploited—after all, many repressive measures on the Internet in Russia were presented to Russians as a response to Snowden’s revelations. For instance, the legislation to relocate the servers of global platforms to Russia by September of this year, to make them available for the Russian secret services, was presented as a measure to assure the security of Russian citizens’ personal data.

I was told that there was some talk in American human-rights organizations that there might be interviews arranged for Russian journalists. But that never happened. So obviously Snowden’s handlers told him that he could say whatever he wants about the NSA and so on, but only to American journalists coming from the United States.

What I find interesting about this is that in December of 2014 Snowden, when asked about his security situation at the Amnesty International event, said, “My security’s great. I live a fairly normal life, I ride the Moscow underground when I go about day to day.” 

Thus he’s withdrawn the only plausible reason for why he’s not transparent here in Russia. So what’s the reason to be so secretive? There is some problem with logic here. For instance, I would understand if he says, “Look, I cannot comment on Russian surveillance, this is not my war.” Instead, he asked his question about Russian surveillance. And he is not transparent. I just don’t get it.
[/quote]

Offline Glaucon

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #584 on: June 04, 2015, 09:35:41 PM »
"Transparency" in Russia simply gives their media apparatus more information to shape their narrative.
"The beginning of wisdom comes with the definition of terms" -Socrates

"..that the people being ignorant, and always discontented, to lay the foundation of government in the unsteady opinion and uncertain humour of the people, is to expose it to certain ruin" -Locke

 


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