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Author Topic: Water Wars/control - Jesse Ventura : Great Lakes FULL  (Read 11648 times)

sky otter

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Re: Water Wars/control - Jesse Ventura : Great Lakes FULL
« Reply #30 on: June 19, 2013, 04:53:20 PM »


maybe this is why the great lakes levels are going down..been going on for some time

http://www.westernjournalism.com/barack-obamas-war-on-americas-fresh-water-supply/

Barack Obama’s War On America’s Fresh Water Supply
September 7, 2012 by Suzanne Eovaldi 24 Comments
inShare.38

Barack Obama is keeping his promise to lower the sea levels, and he’s starting with the drought- plagued Midwest where Lake Michigan water is being shipped by the boatloads over to China!  By using a little-known loophole in the 2006 Great Lakes Compact, Obama minions are allowing Nestle Company to export precious fresh water out of Lake Michigan to the tune of an estimated $500,000 to $1.8 million per day profit. By draining the precious jewel of the Great Lakes in the middle of America, our federal water managers are allowing the export of our water out of our country across thousands of miles of oceans into the Asian basin plagued by huge population centers that are suffering from their constant lack of fresh water.  How’s that for cutting America down to size?

The water is being sold at a “240 times markup”; that is, well over 240 times its production costs. In 2006, then-President George W. Bush signed into law a set of agreements aimed at safeguarding and maintaining the Great Lakes, which hold 20% of the world’s fresh water.  But clever bureaucrats and corporate profiteers discovered they could use a loophole to bottle and sell Lake Michigan water, water intended for use by its surrounding states and their watershed. By saying “this loophole allows for Great Lakes water to be labeled a COMMODITY”, our public water officials are allowing the huge supply to be tapped and sold off to companies like Nestle at a very low price.  This water can then be flipped for huge profits! Surrounding wildlife and water critters depending on fresh Lake Michigan water now are feeling the shortage, and our much-needed relief from the horrible Midwest drought of 2012 must compete with foreign countries for water that belongs to America!  If anyone is wondering if this current Administration really does have the concern of America at its heart, then this little-publicized Water War should be a huge wake-up call for all of us.

Gorgeous Flathead Lake in northwest Montana boasts one of the largest fresh water lakes west of the Mississippi River.  It will come into their cross hairs soon if we don’t get busy and start contacting our do-nothing Congress about this travesty at 1- 877-762-8762.  Montana and other western states already are up in arms about this all-out attempt by Democrats to shut off irrigation water in the Klamath Falls River Basin.

Four dams are slated for permanent destruction.  Who can forget what has been done to America’s breadbasket, California’s Central Valley, along with the San Joaquin Valley?  Our American farmers and our citizens now must compete with foreign countries for our own American water.  When will Barack Obama’s insane war on America’s fresh water supply end?

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Offline zorgon

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Re: Water Wars/control - Jesse Ventura : Great Lakes FULL
« Reply #31 on: June 19, 2013, 07:18:53 PM »
Nestle CEO: Water Is Not A Human Right, Should Be Privatized



Quote
Is water a free and basic human right, or should all the water on the planet belong to major corporations and be treated as a product? Should the poor who cannot afford to pay these said corporations suffer from starvation due to their lack of financial wealth? According to the former CEO and now Chairman of the largest food product manufacturer in the world, corporations should own every drop of water on the planet — and you’re not getting any unless you pay up.

The company notorious for sending out hordes of ‘internet warriors’ to defend the company and its actions online in comments and message boards (perhaps we’ll find some below) even takes a firm stance behind Monsanto’s GMOs and their ‘proven safety’. In fact, the former Nestle CEO actually says that his idea of water privatization is very similar to Monsanto’s GMOs. In a video interview, Nestle Chairman Peter Brabeck-Letmathe states that there has never been ‘one illness’ ever caused from the consumption of GMOs.

Watch the video below for yourself:

[youtube]nTqvBhFVdvE[/youtube]

I can vouch for the fact that the subtitles are accurate..

This is INSANE
« Last Edit: June 19, 2013, 07:21:44 PM by zorgon »

Offline Amaterasu

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Re: Water Wars/control - Jesse Ventura : Great Lakes FULL
« Reply #32 on: August 17, 2013, 07:25:48 PM »
And I say BOTH food and water are rights, but the greedy have taken food from Us, and are now going after water.
"If the universe is made of mostly Dark Energy...can We use it to run Our cars?"

"If You want peace, take the profit out of war."

sky otter

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Re: Water Wars/control - Jesse Ventura : Great Lakes FULL
« Reply #33 on: August 20, 2013, 11:15:00 AM »


http://www.weather.com/news/science/environment/drought-lake-powell-lake-mead-climate-change-20130818


more pics at link

Dwindling Colorado River Forces First-Ever Cuts in Lake Powell Water Releases
Terrell Johnson Published: Aug 20, 2013, 9:07 AM EDT weather.com



More than a dozen years of drought have begun to extract a heavy toll from water supplies in the West, where a report released last week forecast dramatic cuts next year in releases between the two main reservoirs on the Colorado River, the primary source of water for tens of millions of people across seven western states.

After studying the problems facing the river for the past two years, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation – the agency charged with managing water in the West – announced Friday that it would cut the amount of water released next year by Lake Powell in Arizona by 750,000 acre-feet, enough to supply about 1.5 million homes.

It marks the first reduction in water flows since the mid 1960s, when the lake was created by the construction of Glen Canyon Dam. "This is the worst 14-year drought period in the last hundred years," said Larry Wolkoviak, director of the bureau's Upper Colorado Region.

The move could trigger an "unprecedented water crisis within the next few years," the business coalition group Protect the Flows told USA Today, as reductions could have major ramifications for farmers and businesses downstream that depend on those flows, as well as on hydroelectric power generation.

"The river is already severely endangered due to way too many dams and diversions," Gary Wockner of SavetheColorado.org told National Geographic, noting the impact the reduced flows also would have on fish and wildlife throughout the Grand Canyon. "The impact on the health of the Colorado River is unsustainable."

It's difficult to overstate how important the Colorado River is to the West. From Lake Powell along the Arizona-Utah border, the river flows more than 300 miles through the Grand Canyon to Lake Mead in Nevada, supplying drinking water to more than 36 million people in Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, Wyoming and Utah.

The river also supplies water to 22 native American tribes, 11 national parks, 7 national wildlife refuges, and 4 million acres of farmland, ThinkProgress reports.

At Lake Mead, water levels will lower by 8 feet as a result of the reduction, after the lake already has dropped by about 100 feet since the current drought began in 2000, the Wall Street Journal notes. That would bring water levels there – now about 1,105 feet – within striking range of 1,075 feet, considered the threshold for the U.S. Department of the Interior to declare a water shortage.



Low water levels at the Lake Mead Reservoir at Hoover Dam, shown in the 'bathtub ring' around the shoreline. The ring is colored white thanks to mineral deposits on surfaces that once were underwater.






Today, Lake Powell is only about 45 percent of its full capacity while Lake Mead stands at 47 percent full, according to Chuck Collum of the Central Arizona Project (CAP), which delivers water from the Colorado River to central and southern Arizona.

He told USA Today that the forecast would mean CAP would see its water releases reduced by about 320,000 acre-feet, or a cut of about 20 percent. CAP says this will have no impact on the cities and Native American tribes it serves, however, because the reduction would impact largely underground storage and non-Indian agriculture.

For Las Vegas, which draws most of its water from Lake Mead and grew by more than 6,000 people a month in the 2000s, the extremely dry conditions of the past decade already have prompted a raft of water restrictions and conservation measures -- including banning grass front lawns in new home developments.

But the city isn't counting on conservation alone. If the conditions of the past several years continue indefinitely, by 2015 water levels at Lake Mead could drop below one of Las Vegas's two intakes there, imperiling the city's water supply. Today, its water authority is scrambling to build a third intake to allow it to draw water at levels below 1,000 feet -- an insurance policy if the lake's levels drop low enough to put its first intake out of service.

(MORE: 20 Cities That Could Run Out of Water)

"It's essentially a race for us," Scott Huntley of the Southern Nevada Water Authority told National Geographic, because the lake likely "is going to drop more precipitously than seen in the past."

At their root, the potential water shortages both lakes face is the result of what has happened to the Colorado River over the past decade. Long-running drought across the Southwest has starved the river to its current low flows, and climate change is expected to reduce them by 5 to 20 percent over the next 40 years, University of Colorado geoscientist Brad Udall told Smithsonian Magazine.

Its impacts will be felt at each stage of the river's development: less snowfall in the Rocky Mountains will mean less water enters the river at its start, while hotter air temperatures and drier weather will mean longer droughts and more water lost to evaporation.

Drought, combined with overuse – some 70 percent of the river's capacity is siphoned away to water more than 3 million acres of farmland – already have produced some of the Colorado's lowest flows in more than 1,000 years, Udall told National Geographic. "Something very, very unusal is going on," he added, noting that today's low water levels should be a "kick in the pants" to spur both short-term and long-term water planning for the region.

"Climate change has the potential to throw curveballs," Udall added. "To throw extreme events at us the likes of which we've never seen and we're not prepared to deal with."

Offline Somamech

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Re: Water Wars/control - Jesse Ventura : Great Lakes FULL
« Reply #34 on: August 20, 2013, 11:46:10 AM »
That former Nestle CEO video was mind blowing :O

Nearly every day I read an article in MSM about the growing Obesity crisis in the western world causing more death's than anything else in the world and oddly, one does not even have to use a braincell to kinda link that up to the industrial food age. 

This guy talks of Employing people, and money creation YET fail's to address any other issue due to his thought's :O

I can honestly see where Matrix come's from when he talks of Double Logic introduced into the soul. 

And i can see where Amy come's from with TAP... although with double logic going on it seem's like paddling up poop creek in barbed wire canoe with no paddle scenario in this day and age of madness sadly :(

I have spent a lot of time watching Raw Food Vegans, some big scammer's there, but when i mix what they say with health and permaculture along with good farming practise's I do think its possible to change things regarding people's health.  Whether that happens is most likeley in the Canoe with the paddle!

 

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Re: Water Wars/control - Jesse Ventura : Great Lakes FULL
« Reply #35 on: August 20, 2013, 09:52:03 PM »
That former Nestle CEO video was mind blowing :O

Nearly every day I read an article in MSM about the growing Obesity crisis in the western world causing more death's than anything else in the world and oddly, one does not even have to use a braincell to kinda link that up to the industrial food age. 

This guy talks of Employing people, and money creation YET fail's to address any other issue due to his thought's :O

I can honestly see where Matrix come's from when he talks of Double Logic introduced into the soul. 

And i can see where Amy come's from with TAP... although with double logic going on it seem's like paddling up poop creek in barbed wire canoe with no paddle scenario in this day and age of madness sadly :(

I have spent a lot of time watching Raw Food Vegans, some big scammer's there, but when i mix what they say with health and permaculture along with good farming practise's I do think its possible to change things regarding people's health.  Whether that happens is most likeley in the Canoe with the paddle!

Hon, with psychopaths emerging as the top-of-the-heap, in control positions in any money system, if Fukushima doesn't get Us, We best do what We can to end this cycle of madness (literally - psychopathy is a madness).  Regardless how dark it looks, giving up is not an option for Me.

Death will not release Me.

And...  Help spreading the ideas is always appreciated.
"If the universe is made of mostly Dark Energy...can We use it to run Our cars?"

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sky otter

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Re: Water Wars/control - Jesse Ventura : Great Lakes FULL
« Reply #36 on: December 14, 2013, 07:18:27 AM »

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/13/water-stressed-countries_n_4434115.html

These Are The Most Water-Stressed Countries In The World
Posted: 12/13/13 EST

Matt Ferner

Stable and abundant water supplies are becoming increasingly difficult to come by on a warming planet with a growing population. And according to new data, 37 countries in the world already face "extremely high" levels of water stress.

The Washington, DC environmental research organization World Resources Institute released the data from their Aqueduct project Thursday. Extremely high water stress means that more than 80 percent of the water available to the agricultural, domestic and industrial users in a country is being withdrawn annually and that the risk of water scarcity in a region is remarkably high.

"Water stress can have serious consequences for countries around the world," said Paul Reig, associate for WRI's Aqueduct project, to The Huffington Post. "Droughts, floods and competition for limited supplies can threaten national economies and energy production, and even jeopardize people’s lives. If countries and international-level decision makers understand more clearly where water stress is most severe, they can direct attention and money toward the most at-risk regions."

Researchers with the Aqueduct project looked at water risks in 100 river basins and 181 nations around the globe -- the first such country-level water assessment of its kind. By taking a close look at regional baseline water stress, flood and drought occurrence over several years time, inter-annual variability and seasonal variability as well as the amount of water available to a particular region every year from rivers, streams and shallow aquifers, WRI was able to give each country a score 0 to 5, with a 5 being the greatest level of water risk.

Baseline water stress is defined as the ratio of annual water withdrawals to total available annual renewable supply, a higher percentage, as illustrated in WRI's map, means more water users competing for increasingly limited water supplies:

the world chart blows up to too huge to post when moving..sorry go to link


WRI also produced a detailed interactive map using their recent data that can be found here.

WRI notes that it's important for a country to understand its risk of water scarcity and that extremely high levels of water stress doesn't mean that country will fall victim to water scarcity -- proper water management and conservation plans can help to secure a nation's water supplies.

"Publicly available rankings like these can help focus on regions facing the highest stress," Reig said. "International-level decision makers in agriculture, industry, and municipalities can use this information to identify regions with the highest need, then work together to improve water management and water security."

Take Singapore for example -- according to WRI, the country has the highest water stress ranking (5.0), a dense population and has no freshwater lakes or aquifers, and its demand for water far exceeds its naturally occurring supply.

But Singapore is an exceptional water manager, WRI points out in its blog, and is able to meet its freshwater needs:

Advanced rainwater capture systems contribute 20 percent of Singapore’s water supply, 40 percent is imported from Malaysia, grey water reuse adds 30 percent, and desalination produces the remaining 10 percent of the supply to meet the country’s total demand. These forward-thinking and innovative management plans provide a stable water supply for Singapore’s industrial, agricultural, and domestic users—even in the face of significant baseline water stress.
Take a look at the 19 countries around the world, according to WRI, with the most amount of water stress:

also go to link to see some nice pics




reference also to here

http://www.thelivingmoon.com/forum1/index.php?topic=4662.0
« Last Edit: December 14, 2013, 07:20:29 AM by sky otter »

sky otter

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Re: Water Wars/control - Jesse Ventura : Great Lakes FULL
« Reply #37 on: December 15, 2013, 09:37:38 AM »

some really good pics of each city at the link as well as much more embedded info throughout


http://www.weather.com/news/science/environment/10-cities-could-run-out-water-20131212?pageno=1



10 Cities That Could Run Out Of Water


By Terrell Johnson Published: Dec 12, 2013, 6:02 PM EST weather.com

Securing access to plentiful, renewable sources of fresh water is among the biggest struggles large cities around the world face. Growing populations and declining fresh water supplies – from rapidly depleting aquifers as well as drought-stricken reservoirs and rivers – mean that cities are scrambling to find solutions.

In the pages that follow, we look at 10 major U.S. cities facing some of the nation's most acute water shortages, and the hurdles they face in obtaining enough water to meet their citizens', and industries', needs.

The list begins with the driest major city in Texas

>   Sometimes called the "driest major city in Texas," El Paso has contested with drought and water shortages for decades, even as its population has grown from just over 130,000 in 1950 to more than 670,000 today (and more than 800,000 across the El Paso metropolitan area).

El Paso was ranked among the nation's most vulnerable cities in a 2012 University of Florida water availability survey, thanks largely to its arid location.

The city's drinking water comes mostly from groundwater and the Rio Grande that flows through the city, but in recent years it has begun experimenting with building a desalination plant to decontaminate brackish water pumped from underground, while it also uses treated waste water for crop irrigation and industrial uses.



>  The home of technology giants Google, Apple, and Facebook (headquartered in nearby Palo Alto and Mountain View), this Northern California city is part of one of the most water-stressed areas anywhere in the U.S. Columbia University identifies it as one of the regions facing the highest potential for water shortages caused by multi-year droughts.

Exactly that scenario played out here during the record drought that stretched between 2005 and 2007. The drought forced local officials to adopt stringent water use restrictions for releases from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, one of the state's most important sources of water.



>  South Florida's largest city faces some of the nation's most dire threats to its fresh water supplies. Rising seas along the coastline are pushing salt water into its underground drinking water supplies, while its population growth hasn't stopped – rising from about 249,000 people in 1950 to more than 410,000 today, with more than 5.5 million scattered across the Miami metro area.

In addition to this long-term threat, the region also faces the shorter-term challenges of drought. While this year has brought much more plentiful rain to South Florida, just two years ago an intense drought left nearby West Palm Beach less than two months away from running out of water completely.



>  Like much of the Plains and western states, Nebraska has been caught in the grip of searing drought over the past couple of years. Nearly every square mile of land statewide experienced what the U.S. Drought Monitor classifies as "extreme drought" in early 2013, with more than 76 percent of the state reeling under the even-higher classification of "exceptional drought."

That's why it's no surprise that state capital Lincoln, with a population of just over 265,000, faces severe water stress when its main water source, the Platte River, dries up as it did in 2012. This helped University of Florida researchers list it as the nation's third most vulnerable city in their 2012 water availability survey.



>  Rising temperatures in the next 30 to 40 years could put severe strains on the future growth of Salt Lake City, according to a University of Colorado-Boulder study released in November. For every Fahrenheit degree of warming, the study's authors found, the Salt Lake City region could see its fresh water supplies drop by 1.8 to 6.5 percent.

Those supplies come from the creeks and streams that feed the city's thirst for drinking water, which could dry up several weeks earlier in the summer and fall than they do today, the study found. Warmer temperatures will mean more of the region's precipitation falls as rain instead of snow, which will lead to earlier runoff from the nearby Wasatch Mountains.

Local officials and water system planners will need to find new, higher-elevation sources of water or build more water storage, the study's authors noted. "Water emanating from our local Wasatch Mountains is the lifeblood of the Salt Lake Valley, and is vulnerable to the projected changes in climate," Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker said.



>  A combination of low rainfall, low snowpack in the mountains, and dwindling supplies from the drought-stricken Colorado River threaten every one of the main sources of water for this Southern California city that's home to more than 1.3 million people.

With predictions of another dry winter this year, San Diego County Water Authority officials say they're prepared to meet the county's water needs through next summer, thanks to 25 water reservoirs that contain an "ample supply."

But should this year's drought continue into next year and the year after that, the situation becomes much more problematic.

"We built these assets to use them," Ken Weinberg, the authority's water resources director, told San Diego Magazine. "But if you start to see successive dry years and use that storage – that's where we're vulnerable."



>With a population of more than 3.8 million inside its city limits, and some 16 million spread across its greater metropolitan area, Los Angeles routinely ranks among the nation's most water-stressed cities.

Though the city sees an average of nearly 15 inches of rain per year, that average masks the way in which its precipitation falls. One or two wet years are generally followed by seven to eight dry years, which means Los Angeles can see dry stretches that last for years on end.

Demand for water from the Colorado River Basin, where the city gets much of its water supply via hundreds of aqueducts, is projected to far outstrip supply in the coming decades thanks to drought, according to a federal study released at the end of last year.

By 2060, the study estimates water from the river will fall short of demand by more than 3 million acre-feet, about 5 times the amount of water Los Angeles consumes each year.

"They have painted a picture that is undeniable," Barry Nelson of the National Resources Defense Council said of the study. "The history of developing new water in the Colorado River Basin is over."



> San Antonio ranked as the number-one most water stressed city in the country in the University of Florida water availability survey, thanks to its population of some 1.6 million people today, up from just over 400,000 in the middle of the 20th century.

That explosive population growth has put severe stress on water supplies here, prompting the San Antonio Water System to reduce per-capita water usage through initiatives like "Plumbers to People," which provides up to two free water-efficient toilets to local residents with toilets installed before 1993.

"Our business model is to convince our customers to buy less of our product," San Antonio Water System president and CEO Robert Puente told NPR last May.



> Though the bursting of the housing bubble back in 2008 slowed its growth for a while, Las Vegas still ranks among the nation's fastest-growing cities and now boasts a population of nearly 600,000 in its city limits and more than 1.8 million spread across its metro area.

All that growth – the city was home to just over 40,000 people in the mid-1950s – has placed huge demands on its main water supply, the Colorado River Basin and Lake Mead. Because that river has experienced severe drought in recent years, local officials have been forced to build lower intake valves in the reservoir, to ensure the city's water supply isn't cut off.



>Home to more than 3.4 million people, Georgia's capital city has been caught in a tug-of-war with Florida and Alabama in recent years over rights to the water that flows through the Chattahoochee River from its nearby reservoir, Lake Lanier.

Though years like 2013 keep it at bay – Atlanta had a much wetter-than-average summer, with rainfall amounts in June and July more than double the norm – drought is an ever-present threat to the more than 5 million people who live here. It was just last year that Lake Lanier dropped to its lowest levels in years, tying it with historic lows reached in 2009.

Why are low water levels at Lanier so troublesome? Because the city draws nearly two-thirds of its drinking water from the lake and the Chattahoochee River, which means that in times of extreme drought (like the one that lasted from 2007 to 2009), Atlanta really has nowhere else to turn for water.

sky otter

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Re: Water Wars/control - Jesse Ventura : Great Lakes FULL
« Reply #38 on: January 30, 2014, 08:21:05 AM »
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/01/29/california-drought-water-shortage_n_4689106.html



As Drought Persists, 17 California Communities Almost Out Of Water
01/29/14 08:20 PM ET EST 

SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) — Seventeen rural communities in drought-stricken California are in danger of a severe water shortage within four months, according to a list compiled by state officials.

Wells are running dry or reservoirs are nearly empty in some communities. Others have long-running problems that predate the drought.

The communities range from the area covered by the tiny Lompico County Water District in Santa Cruz County to the cities of Healdsburg and Cloverdale in Sonoma County, the San Jose Mercury News (http://bit.ly/LmgFL2 ) reported Tuesday.

Most of the districts, which serve from 39 to 11,000 residents, have too few customers to collect enough revenue to pay for backup water supplies or repair failing equipment, the newspaper reported.

A storm expected to drop light and moderate rains on Northern California on Wednesday and Thursday won't help much.

The list of vulnerable communities was compiled by the state health department based on a survey last week of the more than 3,000 water agencies in California.

"As the drought goes on, there will be more that probably show up on the list," said Dave Mazzera, acting drinking-water division chief for the state Department of Public Health.

State officials are discussing solutions such as trucking in water and providing funding to drill more wells or connect rural water systems to other water systems, Mazzera said.

Lompico County Water District, in the Santa Cruz Mountains near Felton, has just 500 customers and needs nearly $3 million in upgrades to its water system.

"We have been unable to take water out of the creek since August and well production is down, and we didn't have that much water to begin with," said Lois Henry, a Lompico water board member.

Henry said the district may soon have to truck in water.

In Cloverdale, where 9,000 get water from four wells, low flows in the Russian River have prompted the City Council to implement mandatory 25 percent rationing and ban lawn watering. The city raised water rates 50 percent to put in two new wells, which should be completed by July.

"Hopefully we'll be able to get through the summer and the development of this project will pay off." City Manager Paul Caylor said.

Residents of urban areas for the most part have not felt the effects of the drought so far.

Other areas on the state list include small water districts in Fresno, Madera, Mariposa, Kern, Amador, Mendocino, Nevada and Placer counties.

___

Information from: San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News, http://www.mercurynews.com


sky otter

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Re: Water Wars/control - Jesse Ventura : Great Lakes FULL
« Reply #39 on: February 06, 2014, 09:10:22 AM »
 

if you want to know how to get rich in the coming years.. have a way to clean water.. it will be worth more than gold



lots of pics at the links




http://news.msn.com/us/feds-reaffirm-wva-water-safe-for-all

Feds reaffirm W.Va. water safe for all

However, despite assurances from the CDC, some local doctors are telling certain patients not to risk drinking the water.




..........................................................................







http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/82-000-tons-coal-ash-spill-power-plant-n-c-n23401

82,000 Tons Of Coal Ash Spill From Power Plant Into N.C. River
By Alexander Smith
Some 82,000 tons of coal ash mixed with 27 million gallons of contaminated water — enough to fill more than 40 Olympic swimming pools — has leaked from a North Carolina power plant and is threatening water supplies across state lines.

Duke Energy, the United States' largest electricity provider which runs the plant, said Wednesday that hundreds of people using heavy equipment were working day and night to try to solve the situation.

But the company's statement did not provided a timetable for when the leak will be fixed. And regulators are still trying work out if the ash, which can contain toxic chemicals, including lead, arsenic, mercury and radioactive uranium, is a hazard to people or wildlife, The Associated Press reported Thursday.

The coal ash was being stored in a waste pond at the Eden, N.C., power plant, but it started flowing into the Dan River on Sunday when a storm-water pipe running under the pond began to leak.

Brian Williams, a program manager with the Dan River Basin Association, told the AP he is worried that the extent of the damage might not be understood for years.

"How do you clean this up?" he told the news agency. "Dredge the whole river bottom for miles? You can't clean this up. It's going to go up the food chain ... Everything in the ecosystem of a river is connected."

Duke Energy said results downstream showed the water supply remained safe and that it was "exploring multiple options to permanently and safely seal" the pipe.

Across the state line, in Danville, Va., officials told the AP they are successfully filtering out contaminates in the drinking water for their city of 43,000. And Virginia Beach has stopped drawing its water from Lake Gaston, a major reservoir fed by the Dan.



 


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Re: I think im he reason for the gov shutdown by robomont
[January 21, 2018, 02:59:07 AM]


Re: I think im he reason for the gov shutdown by petrus4
[January 21, 2018, 02:32:20 AM]


Re: Penney for your thoughts by petrus4
[January 21, 2018, 02:28:36 AM]