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Author Topic: Original blueprints for 200 mpg carburetor found in England  (Read 1587 times)

Offline zorgon

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Original blueprints for 200 mpg carburetor found in England
« on: March 13, 2013, 04:43:51 AM »
Original blueprints for 200 mpg carburetor found in England

Years ago back in Canada, 1969ish, the University of Toronto was offering a conversion kit that could turn any car of the day into a car run on hydrogen. Hydrogen was readily available at medical and welding gas suppliers. The conversion kit consited of a special carburator, a nickel foam tank and a set of rear springs to carry the extra tank weight. Cost was $680.00 DIY installation.

At around the same time their was a story in the news from Thunderbay Ontario that told of a teen that had invented a carburator that would give any car at least 90 mpg. Rumor had it that the kid was paid off 6 million and he was never heard from again.

So yesterday I was looking up some gas mileage ads and remembered these stories.

See back in the 70's car makers were telling us  42-46 MPG. Then the ads stopped stating mpg and now today they are touting 38mpg and the Hybrids are not much better. WTF happened?

Also when I bought my Toyota 74 Corona at a car show, Ford had a spiffy looking electric car prototype in the booth next door. Price tag was approx $100,000... 

Well sometimes I swear I must have crossed into another timeline... or information has 'vanished' and 'changed' because so far I haven't found any of those items again

Then in the 80's there was an interview on TV showing a new prototype of a Ford Electric car and an exec saying it will never be accepted on the market... It was the SAME car I saw in 1974.

So I started searching and then found THIS one...

Original blueprints for 200 mpg carburetor found in England

Quote
Rather than a future technology, high mileage carburetors are inventions of the past, but unfortunately they did never make it to market. I wonder why. Now one of them may come back to haunt the oil interests - a bit late, but nevertheless.

An article published in Times Online on 19 April 2003 relates the story of how plans for the carburetor designed by Canadian inventor Charles Nelson Pogue in the 1930 were recently re-discovered by a Cornish mechanic in a secret compartment of a toolbox he had been given . . .

Source: Times Online
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2003

Oil Industry Suppressed Plans for 200-MPG Car

The original blueprints for a device that could have revolutionized the motor car have been discovered in the secret compartment of a tool box. A carburetor that would allow a car to travel 200 miles on a gallon of fuel caused oil stocks to crash when it was announced by its Canadian inventor Charles Nelson Pogue in the 1930s.

But the carburetor was never produced and, mysteriously, Pogue went overnight from impoverished inventor to the manager of a successful factory making oil filters for the motor industry. Ever since, suspicion has lingered that oil companies and car manufacturers colluded to bury Pogue’s invention.

Now a retired Cornish mechanic has enlisted the help of the University of Plymouth to rebuild Pogue’s revolutionary carburetor, known as the Winnipeg, from blueprints he found hidden beneath a sheet of plywood in the box. The controversial plans once caused panic among oil companies and rocked the Toronto Stock Exchange when tests carried out on the carburetor in the 1930s proved that it worked.

Patrick Davies, 72, from St Austell, had owned the tool box for 40 years but only recently decided to clean it out. As well as drawings of the carburetor, the envelope contained two pages of plans, three test reports and six pages of notes written by Pogue. They included a report of a test that Pogue had done on his lawnmower, which showed that he had managed to make the engine run for seven days on a quart (just under a litre) of petrol. The documents also described how the machine worked by turning petrol into a vapour before it entered the cylinder chamber, reducing the amount of fuel needed for combustion.

Mr Davies has had the patent number on the plans authenticated, proving that they are genuine documents.
He said: “I couldn’t believe what I saw. I used to be a motor mechanic and I knew this was something else altogether. I was given the tool box by a friend after I helped to paint her house in 1964. Her husband had spent a lot of time in Canada.”

The announcement of Pogue’s invention caused enormous excitement in the American motor industry in 1933, when he drove 200 miles on one gallon of fuel in a Ford V8. However, the Winnipeg was never manufactured commercially and after 1936 it disappeared altogether amid allegations of a political cover-up.

Dr Murray Bell, of the University of Plymouth’s department of mechanical and marine engineering, said he would consider trying to build a model of the Pogue carburetor.

Engineers who have tried in the past to build a carburetor using Pogue’s theories have found the results less than satisfactory. Charles Friend, of Canada’s National Research Council, told Marketplace, a consumer affairs programme: “You can get fantastic mileage if you’re prepared to de-rate the vehicle to a point where, for example, it might take you ten minutes to accelerate from 0 to 30 miles an hour.”

http://www.newmediaexplorer.org/sepp/2003/06/07/original_blueprints_for_200_mpg_carburetor_found_in_england.htm

Offline zorgon

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Re: Original blueprints for 200 mpg carburetor found in England
« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2013, 04:46:39 AM »
Electric Car History

This article makes very brief mention of the 1970 prototype (highlighted below)

Quote
Electric vehicles did not entirely disappear, however. In the United Kingdom, electric delivery vans had found a niche with home delivery companies: electric delivery vans found favour with companies like Harrods, and with milk delivery companies ('milk floats'). By the early 1960s, over 60,000 electric delivery vans were in daily use in the United Kingdom. The traditional home delivery market went into decline in the 1970s and 1980s and the electric commercial vehicle market collapsed. Today, there are still around 12,000 'milk floats' on the roads. A significant number of these vans were originally built in the 1960s or 1970s, and very few are less than 20 years old - a testimony to the longevity of these electric vehicles.

The oil crisis in the early 1970s saw manufacturers planning a new era for electric cars. Ford, General Motors and AMC all produced a number of concepts and prototypes, whilst smaller companies such as Sebring-Vanguard and Elcar Corp in the United States, and Enfield in Europe produced and sold small two-seater electric city cars, a number of which are still in use today and have an enthusiastic following from their owners.

From that time onwards, however, the electric car quietly faded off the scene. In Europe, Fiat and Volkswagen both built a handful of cars in the 1980s, but the cost was too high and there was little or no public interest in them: petrol was comparatively cheap and there seemed no incentive to change.

Interest in electric cars only resurfaced in the mid-1990s, when concerns about the environment and climate change became a factor.

http://www.owningelectriccar.com/electric-car-history.html

Offline robomont

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Re: Original blueprints for 200 mpg carburetor found in England
« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2013, 08:58:16 AM »
the carb probably worked but we have computers that tell injectors what to do now.the worst thing these days is the computer .they could add reliable relays and it would only add ten pounds to the car.this way we wouldnt have cars that snitch on us and computers that cost a fortune to replace.

his carb could be stacked on top another carb that takes care of acceleration.each is engaged when needed.

after reading the part about the electric vehicles i was shocked.

this is the real reason electric vehicles are so expensive.because they are so reliable.
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