collapse

Author Topic: "I Have Become Death, the Destroyer of Worlds"  (Read 26017 times)

Offline petrus4

  • Iconoclast
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2027
  • Gold 615
Re: "I Have Become Death, the Destroyer of Worlds"
« Reply #15 on: August 26, 2012, 10:43:40 PM »

The president of the hospital where I am employed says people live longer when irradiated and Fukushima people now will be healthier because of radiation hormesis.

There is no argument allowed. 

I thank you, thorfourwinds, for providing the most eloquent explanation yet, by way of example, of the reason why I have rejected the cult of scientific authority.  Scientists of all kinds may be bribed and corrupted into claiming that up is down and black is white, at the behest of psychopathic politicians; and the people have been taught to believe said lies, purely because of the supposed scientific credentials of those who issue such pronouncements.

Give me individual, direct, experimental empiricism, or give me death.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2017, 05:41:01 PM by thorfourwinds »
"Sacred cows make the tastiest hamburgers."
        — Abbie Hoffman

deuem

  • Guest
Re: "I Have Become Death, the Destroyer of Worlds"
« Reply #16 on: August 28, 2012, 12:18:20 AM »
I thank you, thorfourwinds, for providing the most eloquent explanation yet, by way of example, of the reason why I have rejected the cult of scientific authority.  Scientists of all kinds may be bribed and corrupted into claiming that up is down and black is white, at the behest of psychopathic politicians; and the people have been taught to believe said lies, purely because of the supposed scientific credentials of those who issue such pronouncements.

Give me individual, direct, experimental empiricism, or give me death.

Hi, to a very small point I would have to agree. We have places all over the world that have natural radiation and it does not kill anyone. In fact it can actuallly help them, to a point. The big difference is how much how fast. When a nuke plant or nuke bomb goes off the amount is way over the natural levels and people will die from too much. Yes you can also die from eating too much or drinking too much, but that is a decission you make for yourself. These people in Japan and now the rest of us have to suffer because of greed and stupidity in construction methods.
 
Where I live the natral raditation levels are very high and in some areas even higher than here and the local people live very long, into the 80, 90, and 100's. Once you go over the limit the cells break down and you start to die or mutate. I would suggest your president to put his feet where his mouth is and take a walk to the exposed sites and have lunch with his loved ones. I think he would change his mind very fast. Tell him he will live longer!
 
deuem

Offline zorgon

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 19908
  • Gold 879
Re: "I Have Become Death, the Destroyer of Worlds"
« Reply #17 on: August 28, 2012, 01:59:08 AM »
The president of the hospital where I am employed says people live longer when irradiated and Fukushima people now will be healthier because of radiation hormesis.


There is no argument allowed. 

Oh come on... just take your PILL like a good boy and all will be well..


I have my stock pile :D
« Last Edit: February 10, 2017, 06:16:20 PM by thorfourwinds »

Offline thorfourwinds

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3941
  • Gold 360
    • EARTH AID CONCERT
Re: "I Have Become Death, the Destroyer of Worlds"
« Reply #18 on: September 04, 2012, 05:38:26 PM »

After Fukushima
Changed the World


Japanese doctors warn of public health problems caused by Fukushima radiation.


Residents of Ohkuma-cho attend a memorial service for the victims of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami on 24 July 2011 in Ohkuma-cho, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, 20 km from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant [EPA]


Scientists and doctors are calling for a new national policy in Japan that mandates the testing of food, soil, water, and the air for radioactivity still being emitted from Fukushima's heavily damaged Daiichi nuclear power plant.

"How much radioactive materials have been released from the plant?"

asked Dr Tatsuhiko Kodama, a professor at the Research Centre for Advanced Science and Technology and Director of the University of Tokyo's Radioisotope Centre, in a July 27 speech to the Committee of Health, Labour and Welfare at Japan's House of Representatives.

"The government and TEPCO have not reported the total amount of the released radioactivity yet,"

said Kodama, who believes things are far worse than even the recent detection of extremely high radiation levels at the plant.

There is widespread concern in Japan about a general lack of government monitoring for radiation, which has caused people to begin their own independent monitoring, which are also finding disturbingly high levels of radiation.

Kodama's centre, using 27 facilities to measure radiation across the country, has been closely monitoring the situation at Fukushima - and their findings are alarming.

According to Dr Kodama,

the total amount of radiation released over a period of more than five months from the ongoing Fukushima nuclear disaster is the equivalent to more than 29 "Hiroshima-type atomic bombs" and the amount of uranium released "is equivalent to 20" Hiroshima bombs.




Kodama, along with other scientists, is concerned about the ongoing crisis resulting from the Fukushima situation, as well as what he believes to be inadequate government reaction, and believes the government needs to begin a large-scale response in order to begin decontaminating affected areas.

Distrust of the Japanese government's response to the nuclear disaster is now common among people living in the effected prefectures, and people are concerned about their health.

Recent readings taken at the plant are alarming.

When on

August 2nd readings of 10,000 millisieverts (10 sieverts) of radioactivity per hour were detected at the plant,


Japan's science ministry
said that level of dose
is fatal to humans,

and is enough radiation to kill a person within one to two weeks after the exposure.

[color=limegreen]10,000 millisieverts (mSv) is the equivalent of approximately 100,000 chest x-rays.[/color]


It is an amount 250 per cent higher
than levels recorded at the plant in March
after it was heavily damaged by the
earthquake and ensuing tsunami.


The operator of Japan's crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), that took the reading, used equipment to measure radiation from a distance, and was unable to ascertain the exact level because the device's maximum reading is only 10,000 mSv.

TEPCO also detected 1,000 millisieverts (mSv) per hour in debris outside the plant, as well as finding 4,000 mSv per hour inside one of the reactor buildings.

The Fukushima disaster has been rated as a "level seven" on the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES). This level, the highest, is the same as the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in 1986, and is defined by the scale as:

"A major release of radioactive material with widespread health and environmental effects requiring implementation of planned and extended countermeasures."


UPDATE:

Gundersen: Level 8 on INES Scale is needed for Fukushima-like disasters (VIDEO)

Quote
Arnie Gundersen:There is a citizen scientist in Pennsylvania who has suggested, and I think it is a great suggestion, that we add a level to the international nuclear scale to address the fact that when more than one nuclear plant is having an accident, the whole world needs to mobilize to solve the problem. I am sure you know that Fukushima Daiichi and Chernobyl were both considered Level 7 accidents which is the worst that could happen.
[...]
it was a multi-unit accident and it also affected many sites. Well, that affects how many resources are brought in from outside and that is why Scott Portzline’s recommendation that we add a level to the nuclear accident scale is so important. So Mr .Portzline is recommending, and I agree with him, that we really need one more rung on the international emergency scale. We need a Level 8.
[...]
the International Atomic Energy Agency needs to admit that there are circumstances beyond a Level 7, a Level 8, where international co-operation is critical.  If only the international community had had a Level 8 and recognized that it was not just a single plant or a single site that was in jeopardy, and that, in fact, 14 nuclear reactors at 4 different sites were in jeopardy.  The world might have been able to minimize the consequences at Fukushima Daiichi and minimize the exposure to the Japanese population if only the international community had acted faster.




The Fukushima and Chernobyl disasters are the only nuclear accidents to have been rated level seven on the scale, which is intended to be logarithmic, similar to the scale used to describe the comparative magnitude of earthquakes. Each increasing level represents an accident approximately ten times more severe than the previous level.

Doctors in Japan are already treating patients suffering health effects they attribute to radiation from the ongoing nuclear disaster.?

"We have begun to see increased nosebleeds, stubborn cases of diarrhoea, and flu-like symptoms in children,"

Dr Yuko Yanagisawa, a physician at Funabashi Futawa Hospital in Chiba Prefecture, told Al Jazeera.

She attributes the symptoms to radiation exposure, and added: "We are encountering new situations we cannot explain with the body of knowledge we have relied upon up until now."??"The situation at the Daiichi Nuclear facility in Fukushima has not yet been fully stabilised, and we can't yet see an end in sight," Yanagisawa said.


"Because the nuclear material
has not yet been encapsulated,
radiation continues to stream
into the environment."

Gee whiz, Wally, where do you think it’s going?


Health concerns

Al Jazeera's Aela Callan, reporting from Japan's Ibaraki prefecture, said of the recently detected high radiation readings:

"It is now looking more likely that this area has been this radioactive since the earthquake and tsunami, but no one realized until now."

Workers at Fukushima are only allowed to be exposed to 250 mSv of ionising radiation per year.

Junichi Matsumoto, a TEPCO spokesman, said the high dose was discovered in an area that does not hamper recovery efforts at the stricken plant.

Yet radioactive cesium exceeding the government limit was detected in processed tea made in Tochigi City, about 160km from the troubled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, according to the Tochigi Prefectural Government, who said radioactive cesium was detected in tea processed from leaves harvested in the city in early July.

The level is more than 3 times the provisional government limit.

Yanagisawa's hospital is located approximately 200km from Fukushima, so the health problems she is seeing that she attributes to radiation exposure causes her to be concerned by what she believes to be a grossly inadequate response from the government.

From her perspective, the only thing the government has done is to, on April 25, raise the acceptable radiation exposure limit for children from 1 mSv/year to 20 mSv/year.

"This has caused controversy, from the medical point of view," Yanagisawa told Al Jazeera. "This is certainly an issue that involves both personal internal exposures as well as low-dose exposures."

Junichi Sato, Greenpeace Japan Executive Director, said:

"It is utterly outrageous
to raise the exposure levels for children
to twenty times the maximum limit for adults."

"The Japanese government cannot simply increase safety limits for the sake of political convenience or to give the impression of normality."


But it will encourage
the little ones to go swimming
in Fukushima Prefecture.


Fukushima reopens beach after nuke crisis

FUKUSHIMA prefecture has opened its first beach to swimmers since last year's nuclear disaster after judging the water to be safe.



Not everyone agrees with the idea.

About 1,000 people descended on Nakoso beach on Monday.

The beach is about 65 kilometres south of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, where three reactors melted down after the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

The opening was celebrated with beach volleyball games and hula dancers from a nearby spa.



Cheers returned to a beach in Fukushima Prefecture for the first time in two years Monday after all bathing beaches in the northeastern Japan prefecture were closed last year after the March 11 earthquake and tsunami and resultant nuclear crisis.

Iwaki city official Joji Kimura says negligible radiation was detected in water at the beach. Airborne radiation was measured at 0.08 microsieverts per hour, far below dangerous levels.

Swimming had been banned at all beaches in Fukushima prefecture since March 2011.

On the Marine Day national holiday, the Nakoso beach in Iwaki was filled with families with children as well as young men and women.

While the prefecture has 17 bathing beaches, Nakoso is the only one that was reopened, because debris disposal and facility restoration have not proceeded well.

Beside the conventional water quality check, the Fukushima prefectural government measured radiation levels in late June. No radioactive cesium was detected in sea water, and air dose rates at the beach were low at up to 0.07 microsievert per hour.

Yosuke Shirado of Iwaki said he is concerned about radiation levels due to the nuclear crisis at Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s disaster-hit Fukushima No. 1 power plant.




Lest we forget:


Fukushima Daiichi Radioactive Seawater Update

Radioactivity levels in the seawater outside of the troubled Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant continue to ignite concerns over the spread of highly radioactive material in the surrounding seawater.

From the Washington Post: “Samples taken 360 yards offshore from the plant Friday showed radioactive iodine levels 1,250 times the legal safety limit. The levels of iodine-131 in the water had been closer to 100 times the limit this past week.

Attention has turned to cleaning up stagnant, highly contaminated water found in turbine rooms outside the reactors. Pools of the radioactive water have been found at the plant’s units 1 and 3. Similar standing water at units 2 and 4 is being tested for radioactivity.


Japan’s Nuclear Crisis likened to Chernobyl. Asian Markets Dip in Response (image courtesy googlenewslive.com)

"The unusually high rates of radiation found in the turbine rooms —

and now in the ocean

 — have fueled concerns that water may be seeping from at least one of the reactor cores, leaks that could release longer-lasting and much riskier forms of contamination.”

Government officials have stated that they are not sure whether the primary containment vessels have been breached. Experts say it could be from reactors or from cooling pools where used nuclear rods are stored.

Nuclear experts have also suggested that the high levels of radioactivity in the surrounding waters could also be attributed in part to emissions in the air.

Officials continue to stress that contaminants will become diluted as currents carry them farther offshore.

However, the elevated radiation levels in the water pose a serious concern for Japan’s large fishing industry, with the possibility that other countries could impose bans on imports.

Fishing has already been banned in the area around the plant.


“I don’t believe the levels we detected today would…cause a direct problem,” Nishiyama said.


ASR modeling of the radioactive seawater tells a different story, cause for serious alarm. While these models do not estimate levels of radioactivity in the surrounding waters, the assumption that nearby currents will quickly dilute the radioactive material does not appear to be accurate.




Instead our model shows radioactive sea water slowly drifting south at an average of 0.2 m/s in an low energy area between the Kuroshio Current, the Japan coastline and an large eddy formation further up in the north. 


Update on Thursday, March 31, 2011 by Nick Behunin

The Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency said that seawater collected roughly 300 yards from the Fukushima Daiichi station was found to contain iodine 131 at

3,355 times the safety standard,


the highest levels reported so far.



On Sunday, a test north of the plant showed 1,150 times the maximum level, while a test one day before showed 1,250 times the limit in seawater taken from a monitoring station at the plant.

Responding to these concerns, ASR Limited, a New-Zealand based marine consulting and research firm, has developed computer models able to accurately predict the spread of the contaminated material.

“We’ve based our simulations on daily updates of the local winds and currents.  This information is then fed in to our model to predict how fast and how far the radioactivity will spread, and what its concentrations will be” Says ASR Scientist Laurent Lebreton who developed the model.

PRESS RELEASE

Authoritative current estimates of the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation are published in the Biological Effects of Ionising Radiation VII (BEIR VII) report from the US National Academy of Sciences.

The report reflects the substantial weight of scientific evidence proving


there is no exposure to ionizing radiation that is risk-free.



The BEIR VII estimates that each 1 mSv of radiation is associated with an increased risk of all forms of cancer other than leukemia of about 1-in-10,000; an increased risk of leukemia of about 1-in-100,000; and a 1-in-17,500 increased risk of cancer death.

Dr Helen Caldicott, the founding president of Physicians for Social Responsibility,

(and our first Earth Aid Concert Twitter Follower)

a group that was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1985, is equally concerned about the health effects from Japan's nuclear disaster.

"Radioactive elements get into the testicles and ovaries, and these cause genetic disease like diabetes, cystic fibrosis, and mental retardation," she told Al Jazeera.

"There are 2,600 of these diseases that get into our genes and are passed from generation to generation, forever."

So far, the only cases of acute radiation exposure have involved TEPCO workers at the stricken plant. Lower doses of radiation, particularly for children, are what many in the medical community are most concerned about, according to Dr Yanagisawa.

"Humans are not yet capable of accurately measuring the low dose exposure or internal exposure," she explained, "Arguing 'it is safe because it is not yet scientifically proven [to be unsafe]' would be wrong. That fact is that we are not yet collecting enough information to prove the situations scientifically. If that is the case, we can never say it is safe just by increasing the annual 1mSv level twenty fold."

Her concern is that the new exposure standards by the Japanese government do not take into account differences between adults and children, since children's sensitivity to radiation exposure is several times higher than that of adults.


Al Jazeera contacted Prime Minister Naoto Kan's office for comment on the situation.

Speaking on behalf of the Deputy Cabinet Secretary for Public Relations for the Prime Minister's office, Noriyuki Shikata said that the Japanese government "refers to the ICRP [International Commission on Radiological Protection] recommendation in 2007, which says the reference levels of radiological protection in emergency exposure situations is 20-100 mSv per year.

The Government of Japan has set planned evacuation zones and specific spots recommended for evacuation where the radiation levels reach 20 mSv/year, in order to avoid excessive radiation exposure."

The prime minister's office explained that approximately 23bn yen ($300mn) is planned for decontamination efforts, and the government plans to have a decontamination policy "by around the end of August", with a secondary budget of about 97bn yen ($1.26bn) for health management and monitoring operations in the affected areas.

When questioned about the issue of "acute radiation exposure", Shikata pointed to the Japanese government having received a report from TEPCO about six of their workers having been exposed to more than 250 mSv, but did not mention any reports of civilian exposures.

Prime Minister Kan's office told Al Jazeera that, for their ongoing response to the Fukushima crisis,

"the government of Japan has conducted all the possible countermeasures such as introduction of automatic dose management by ID codes for all workers and 24 hour allocation of doctors.

The government of Japan will continue to tackle the issue of further improving the health management including medium and long term measures".



Shikata did not comment about Kodama's findings.

Kodama, who is also a doctor of internal medicine, has been working on decontamination of radioactive materials at radiation facilities in hospitals of the University of Tokyo for the past several decades.

"We had rain in Tokyo on March 21 and radiation increased to .2 micosieverts/hour and, since then, the level has been continuously high,"

said Kodama, who added that his reporting of radiation findings to the government has not been met an adequate reaction.

"At that time, the chief cabinet secretary, Mr Edano, told the Japanese people that


... there would be no immediate harm to their health."




Kodama is an expert in internal exposure to radiation, and is concerned that the government has not implemented a strong response geared towards measuring radioactivity in food.

"Although three months have passed since the accident already, why have even such simple things have not been done yet?" he said. "I get very angry and fly into a rage."

According to Kodama, the major problem caused by internal radiation exposure is the generation of cancer cells as  the radiation causes unnatural cellular mutation.

"Radiation has a high risk to embryos in pregnant women, juveniles, and highly proliferative cells of people of growing ages. Even for adults, highly proliferative cells, such as hairs, blood, and intestinal epithelium cells, are sensitive to radiation."




Children are at greater risk ?

Early on in the disaster, Dr Makoto Kondo of the department of radiology of Keio University's School of Medicine warned of "a large difference in radiation effects on adults compared to children". Kondo explained the chances of children developing cancer from radiation exposure was many times higher than adults.

"Children's bodies are underdeveloped and easily affected by radiation, which could cause cancer or slow body development. It can also affect their brain development," he said.

Yanagisawa assumes that the Japanese government's evacuation standards, as well as their raising the permissible exposure limit to 20mSv "can cause hazards to children's health," and therefore "children are at a greater risk".

Nishio Masamichi, director of Japan's Hakkaido Cancer Centre and a radiation treatment specialist, published an article on July 27 titled: "The Problem of Radiation Exposure Countermeasures for the Fukushima Nuclear Accident: Concerns for the Present Situation".

In the report, Masamichi said that such a dramatic increase in permitted radiation exposure was akin to "taking the lives of the people lightly".

He believes that 20mSv is too high, especially for children who are far more susceptible to radiation.


"No level of radiation is acceptable,
for children or anyone else,"


Caldicott told Al Jazeera.

"Children are ten to 20 times
more sensitive than adults.

They must not be exposed
to radiation of any level.

At all."


In early July, officials with the Japanese Nuclear Safety Commission announced that approximately 45 per cent of children in the Fukushima region had experienced thyroid exposure to radiation, according to a survey carried out in late March.


The commission has not carried out any surveys since then.



"Now the Japanese government is underestimating the effects of low dosage and/or internal exposures and not raising the evacuation level even to the same level adopted in Chernobyl," Yanagisawa said.



"People's lives are at stake, especially the lives of children, and it is obvious that the government is not placing top priority on the people's lives in their measures."

Caldicott feels the lack of a stronger response to safeguard the health of people in areas where radiation is found is "reprehensible".


"Millions of people
need to be evacuated
from those
high radiation zones,
especially the children."


Dr Yanagisawa is concerned about what she calls "late onset disorders" from radiation exposure resulting from the Fukushima disaster, as well as increasing cases of infertility and miscarriages.

"Incidence of cancer will undoubtedly increase," she said. "In the case of children, thyroid cancer and leukemia can start to appear after several years. In the case of adults, the incidence of various types of cancer will increase over the course of several decades."

Yanagisawa said it is "without doubt" that cancer rates among the Fukushima nuclear workers will increase, as will cases of lethargy, atherosclerosis, and other chronic diseases among the general population in the effected areas.

Yanagisawa believes it is time to listen to survivors of the atomic bombings. "To be exposed to radiation, to be told there is no immediate effect, and afterwards to be stricken with cancer - what it is like to suffer this way over a long period of time, only the survivors of the atomic bombings can truly understand," she told Al Jazeera.


Radioactive food and water?

An August 1 press release from Japan's MHLW said no radioactive materials have been detected in the tap water of Fukushima prefecture, according to a survey conducted by the Japanese government's Nuclear Emergency Response Headquarters.

The government defines no detection as "no results exceeding the 'Index values for infants (radioactive iodine)'," and says "in case the level of radioactive iodine in tap water exceeds 100 Bq/kg, to refrain from giving infants formula milk dissolved by tap water, having them intake tap water … "

Yet, on June 27, results were published from a study that found 15 residents of Fukushima prefecture had tested positive for radiation in their urine.

Dr Nanao Kamada, professor emeritus of radiation biology at Hiroshima University, has been to Fukushima prefecture twice in order to take internal radiation exposure readings and facilitated the study.

"The risk of internal radiation is more dangerous than external radiation," Dr Kamada told Al Jazeera. "And internal radiation exposure does exist for Fukushima residents."

According to the MHLW, distribution of several food products in Fukushima Prefecture remain restricted.

This includes raw milk, vegetables including spinach, kakina, and all other leafy vegetables, including cabbage, shiitake mushrooms, bamboo shoots, and beef.

The distribution of tealeaves remains restricted in several prefectures, including all of Ibaraki, and parts of Tochigi, Gunma, Chiba, Kanagawa Prefectures. Iwate prefecture suspended all beef exports because of caesium contamination on August 1, making it the fourth prefecture to do so.


Due to caesium contaminated straw, beef exports have been banned in four Japanese prefectures [EPA]

Jyunichi Tokuyama, an expert with the Iwate Prefecture Agricultural and Fisheries Department, told Al Jazeera he did not know how to deal with the crisis. He was surprised because he did not expect radioactive hot spots in his prefecture, 300km from the Fukushima nuclear plant.

"The biggest cause of this contamination is the rice straw being fed to the cows, which was highly radioactive,"

Tokuyama told Al Jazeera.


Kamada feels the Japanese government is acting too slowly in response to the Fukushima disaster, and that the government needs to check radiation exposure levels "in each town and village" in Fukushima prefecture.

"They have to make a general map of radiation doses," he said. "Then they have to be concerned about human health levels, and radiation exposures to humans. They have to make the exposure dose map of Fukushima prefecture. Fukushima is not enough. Probably there are hot spots outside of Fukushima. So they also need to check ground exposure levels."

Caldicott said people around the world should be concerned about the ongoing nuclear crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi plant.

Radiation that continues to be released has global consequences.

More than 11,000 tonnes of radioactive water has been released into the ocean from the stricken plant.



Scientists warn that tuna caught off the Pacific coastal prefecture in northern Japan are now at risk of being radioactive [EPA]

"Those radioactive elements bio-concentrate in the algae, then the crustaceans eat that, which are eaten by small then big fish," Caldicott said. "That's why big fish have high concentrations of radioactivity and humans are at the top of the food chain, so we get the most radiation, ultimately."

On August 6, the 66th anniversary of the US nuclear bombing of Hiroshima, Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan said:


"Regarding nuclear energy,
we will deeply reflect
over the myth that
nuclear energy is safe.


We will thoroughly look into the cause of the [Fukushima] accident, and to secure safety, we'll implement fundamental measures while also decreasing the degree of dependence on nuclear power generation, to aim for a society that does not rely on nuclear power."

But doctors, scientists, agricultural experts, and much of the general public in Japan feel that a much more aggressive response to the nuclear disaster is needed.

Kodama believes the government needs to begin a large-scale response in order to begin decontaminating affected areas. He cited Japan's itai itai disease, when cadmium poisoning from mining resulted in the government eventually having to spend 800 billion yen to decontaminate an area of 1,500 hectares.


"How much cost will be needed if the area is 1,000 times larger?"




Peace Love Light

tfw   

Liberty & Equality or Revolution


“In a time of universal deceit
telling the truth is considered a revolutionary act."

George Orwell


FAIR USE NOTICE

Fair Use has been an important part of Copyright Law for 170 years. The Supreme Court has erred on the side of Fair Use and Free Speech whenever challenged on this issue. 


This post to this website may contain copyrighted material - the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner.

We are making such material available in effort to illustrate, criticize, preserve and discuss a variety of humanitarian, political, human/animal/hybrid rights, economic, democratic, criminal justice, scientific, social justice and radiation rights issues.

All the works contained herein are transformative and do not negatively impact the original copyright holders' financial benefit in any substantive way.

We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 section 107 of the US Copyright Law and therefore requires NO prior authorization for its use.

For more information go to: www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml.
If you wish to use copyrighted material from this post for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.


WAR IS PEACE
SLAVERY IS FREEDOM
IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH
« Last Edit: March 27, 2016, 06:28:36 PM by thorfourwinds »
EARTH AID is dedicated to the creation of an interactive multimedia worldwide event to raise awareness about the challenges and solutions of nuclear energy.

Offline SarK0Y

  • Pegasus Alternate Energy Team
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 395
  • Gold 37
Re: "I Have Become Death, the Destroyer of Worlds"
« Reply #19 on: September 04, 2012, 07:26:35 PM »
L8 seems reasonable at a 1st glance  :) but no one will go up to: first & foremost, no one of humans has suitable instruments/methods to amend a mess that magnitude, so official monkeys shall keep ostrich policy going + most activated activists shall stumble upon $ome accidental occurrences (sudden heart attacks, mental shifts... & pathetic blackmails).  actually, protests & rebellions been perfectly useless. i support only way -- HEIS  :) cheap LEO makes possible to sling nuclear waste to the Moon or Sun at least partially. Amici, i fully understand how hella much many of ye has hated the f*King morons ($-clans). but here no Time exists to waste it on emotions  :)
I do What Me'n'Universum  want :-)

Offline biggles

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1199
  • Gold 47
Re: "I Have Become Death, the Destroyer of Worlds"
« Reply #20 on: September 04, 2012, 11:01:17 PM »
And all caused by us  :(
I know that I know nothing - thanks Capricorn.

Offline thorfourwinds

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3941
  • Gold 360
    • EARTH AID CONCERT
Re: "I Have Become Death, the Destroyer of Worlds"
« Reply #21 on: September 05, 2012, 05:56:32 PM »
L8 seems reasonable at a 1st glance  :) but no one will go up to: first & foremost, no one of humans has suitable instruments/methods to amend a mess that magnitude, so official monkeys shall keep ostrich policy going + most activated activists shall stumble upon $ome accidental occurrences (sudden heart attacks, mental shifts... & pathetic blackmails).  actually, protests & rebellions been perfectly useless. i support only way -- HEIS  :) cheap LEO makes possible to sling nuclear waste to the Moon or Sun at least partially. Amici, i fully understand how hella much many of ye has hated the f*King morons ($-clans). but here no Time exists to waste it on emotions  :)

You jest, we hope    ???
EARTH AID is dedicated to the creation of an interactive multimedia worldwide event to raise awareness about the challenges and solutions of nuclear energy.

Offline SarK0Y

  • Pegasus Alternate Energy Team
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 395
  • Gold 37
Re: "I Have Become Death, the Destroyer of Worlds"
« Reply #22 on: September 05, 2012, 06:17:17 PM »
You jest, we hope    ???
jest? :) actually not. but what exactly ye have against that plan? at now, this way looks impossible, however we can down the cost below 1k $ per kg of payload 4 LEO  :)
I do What Me'n'Universum  want :-)

Offline zorgon

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 19908
  • Gold 879
Re: "I Have Become Death, the Destroyer of Worlds"
« Reply #23 on: September 05, 2012, 09:06:06 PM »
Sending it to the Sun would be a great idea... that little bit won't even fizzle the sun :P

But the Moon? Nah I want to go rock hunting there for new gemstones.. so don't mess up that lace any more than NASA already has  :P

But seriously why not just put it in Yucca Mountain? The facility is already uilt and one day in the future some genius will figure out how to leach off the energy and thank us for having it all in one spot :D

The are is already contaminated so what's it matter? From what I understand its only the transportation TO the site that has people concerned... well heck the stuff would be shipped in those huge storage containers, A LOT better than leaving the stuff just lying around where it is nowj.

And if one of those falls off a truck its not the radiation that will kill you :P

Sent all those billions on that facility and now the STOOPID Hu-mons are afraid to move it there.

Maybe we should ship all the STOOPID Hu-mons into the Sun :P  Now THAT would be a useful cleansing :D


Offline SarK0Y

  • Pegasus Alternate Energy Team
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 395
  • Gold 37
Re: "I Have Become Death, the Destroyer of Worlds"
« Reply #24 on: September 06, 2012, 11:55:29 AM »
Amicus, how long those territories shall be stable to contain so dangerous matter 4 Biosphere? :) look at the sinkhole in the Louisiana, we have no rights to $hit on the Holy Earth anymore. Otherwise we shall be erased as useless material, all mechanisms to run this task are lubricated & calibrated. the Prime Law has no mercy, no exclusions.  :)  he-he-he, i used en w/ bad grammar, but calculations have been made quite well even w/o HEIS  ;D http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread7704/pg12#pid6034054 
I do What Me'n'Universum  want :-)

deuem

  • Guest
Re: "I Have Become Death, the Destroyer of Worlds"
« Reply #25 on: September 08, 2012, 11:34:51 PM »
Thor, did that girl have 3 bumms?

Offline biggles

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1199
  • Gold 47
Re: "I Have Become Death, the Destroyer of Worlds"
« Reply #26 on: September 09, 2012, 01:42:12 AM »
Yes, as in what reactor and spills usually produce heaps of different birth defects.
I know that I know nothing - thanks Capricorn.

Offline thorfourwinds

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3941
  • Gold 360
    • EARTH AID CONCERT
Re: "I Have Become Death, the Destroyer of Worlds"
« Reply #27 on: September 09, 2012, 06:43:57 AM »
Thor, did that girl have 3 bumms?

Greetings Friend Deuem:

...for those with 3 hands and a bumm fetish    ;)

Yes, it appears radiation does enhance the hum-on experience - just ask the NRC/IAEA/EPA/NOAA






« Last Edit: April 18, 2017, 06:25:52 PM by thorfourwinds »
EARTH AID is dedicated to the creation of an interactive multimedia worldwide event to raise awareness about the challenges and solutions of nuclear energy.

Offline Littleenki

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4006
  • Gold 202
Re: "I Have Become Death, the Destroyer of Worlds"
« Reply #28 on: September 09, 2012, 08:04:57 AM »
As if Selma Hayek wasnt hot enough already...good grief!  :)

And now for something completely different...from Monty Python...



Cheers!
« Last Edit: April 18, 2017, 06:26:26 PM by thorfourwinds »
Hermetically sealed, for your protection

Offline thorfourwinds

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3941
  • Gold 360
    • EARTH AID CONCERT
Re: "I Have Become Death, the Destroyer of Worlds"
« Reply #29 on: September 29, 2012, 10:58:39 AM »









25 August 2012

Amid the cover-up of the Fukushima nuclear power disaster, the title of Kimberly Roberson’s book rings so unfortunately true: Silence Deafening, Fukushima Fallout…A Mother’s Response.

It’s relatively brief at 69 pages but gets to the heart of the catastrophe: the meltdowns at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant complex in 2011, the months and months of discharges of radioactivity—


and the silence
of media
and public officials.


“The silence after the earthquake, nuclear meltdowns and tsunamis AF [After Fukushima] was truly deafening and unlike anything I had experienced before. Surreal ‘Twilight Zone’ comparisons were hard to avoid,”

she writes.


“Knowing what I knew, and then seeing those facts to be so thoroughly disregarded by the media and elected officials has begun to take on a sort of nightmare quality.”


“It may take decades for the true magnitude of Fukushima Daiichi to be comprehended, just as the effects of the Chernobyl nuclear meltdown of 1986 are still being realized,”

she continues.


“This is the story of my attempt to learn the truth, and then to do something about it in my own small way.”


The book, published by VisionTalk, is very personal and written from a mother’s perspective. Roberson is also well-educated about the horrors of nuclear technology.

She relates how, working for Greenpeace in Washington, D.C. in 1986, she opened a “letter from the farmer near the Chernobyl nuclear disaster who had mailed us pictures of grossly deformed farm animals.

Those images would later appear in magazines like Time and Newsweek and helped to open the world’s eyes to the largest nuclear disaster to date.”














She writes about a main consequence of pollution from radioactivity and other sources—cancer—and how “it’s reached epidemic proportions.”

As to the Chernobyl nuclear plant disaster, she tells of the English version of the landmark book, Chernobyl: Consequences of the Catastrophe for People and the Environment, published by the New York Academy of Sciences 25 years after the accident—with the horrible consequences manifest.

The book, written by a team of European scientists led by Dr. Alexey Yablokov of Russia, concludes that based on available medical data, nearly one million people around the world died as a result of fall-out from Chernobyl.

“At Chernobyl,” Roberson writes, “there was one reactor affected” while “at Fukushima there are four, and workers are still struggling to contain radiation there as of this writing nearly one year after the disaster began March 11.”

The book is studded with breaks for quotes such as that from Gandhi:


“First they laugh at you,
then they ignore you,
then they fight you,
then you win.”


Winning over nuclear power is still far off, however. Roberson writes how in Spring 2011,

“Apart from the occasional Internet bombshell…the deafening media silence around Fukushima raged on.”


She, however, has been taking action—which she writes about.  There is a petition campaign and, with the findings of radioactivity in her home state of Calilfornia, the creation of the Fukushima Fallout Awareness Network.

“While young children, the elderly and immune deficient are at particular risk, the Fukushima Daiichi will affect us all globally for generations to come just as at Chernobyl,” Roberson writes. “One thing we do know is that we are at a crossroads with nuclear power.”

Roberson’s book helps in choosing a direction: away from this lethal technology.


(Photo Credit: solution-nine.com)








In recent days, Fukushima nuclear power plant in northern Japan attracted worldwide attention. For the powerful devastating earthquake and tsunami, as a result, they suffered heavy losses, it never rains but pours, the earthquake and tsunami have made great havoc of a nuclear power plant in Miyagi Prefecture, even the big bang.

People can not help but think of the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident and its consequences in 1980s of former Soviet Union, it is still a dead city because of nuclear leakage. This group of photos shows the areas nowadays near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant.

Will the Fukushima be the next Chernobyl?







 


 

  
 


 


 


 





 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 



Peace Love Light

tfw
   

Liberty & Equality or Revolution
EARTH AID is dedicated to the creation of an interactive multimedia worldwide event to raise awareness about the challenges and solutions of nuclear energy.

 


Wal-Mart.com USA, LLC
affiliate_link
Free Click Tracking
Wal-Mart.com USA, LLC

* Recent Posts

Penney for your thoughts by Sgt.Rocknroll
[Today at 04:26:12 AM]


Re: HAPPY BIRTHDAY, Sarge by Sgt.Rocknroll
[Today at 03:43:49 AM]


Re: HAPPY BIRTHDAY, Sarge by Smilingtree
[January 16, 2018, 06:56:20 PM]


Re: HAPPY BIRTHDAY, Sarge by thorfourwinds
[January 16, 2018, 05:48:49 PM]


Re: HAPPY BIRTHDAY, Sarge by Sgt.Rocknroll
[January 16, 2018, 04:26:41 PM]


Re: HAPPY BIRTHDAY, Sarge by ArMaP
[January 16, 2018, 07:07:50 AM]


HAPPY BIRTHDAY, Sarge by The Seeker
[January 16, 2018, 05:40:14 AM]


Re: Music You Love by ArMaP
[January 15, 2018, 02:13:35 PM]


Re: Oprah Winfrey for president: a wild idea that just got dramatically more real by micjer
[January 15, 2018, 12:24:47 PM]


Re: Oprah Winfrey for president: a wild idea that just got dramatically more real by Somamech
[January 15, 2018, 08:22:57 AM]


Re: The Kennedy Detail: JFK's Secret Service Agents Break Their Silence by A51Watcher
[January 14, 2018, 01:03:50 PM]


Re: Oprah Winfrey for president: a wild idea that just got dramatically more real by petrus4
[January 14, 2018, 11:52:41 AM]


Re: The Kennedy Detail: JFK's Secret Service Agents Break Their Silence by spacemaverick
[January 13, 2018, 07:57:56 PM]


Re: Oprah Winfrey for president: a wild idea that just got dramatically more real by Shasta56
[January 13, 2018, 06:11:48 PM]


Re: Oprah Winfrey for president: a wild idea that just got dramatically more real by ArMaP
[January 13, 2018, 02:15:02 PM]


Re: The Kennedy Detail: JFK's Secret Service Agents Break Their Silence by petrus4
[January 13, 2018, 01:57:04 PM]


Re: More Jobs Down the Drain Sam's Club Closed 63 Stores today by petrus4
[January 13, 2018, 01:51:47 PM]


Re: Oprah Winfrey for president: a wild idea that just got dramatically more real by petrus4
[January 13, 2018, 01:27:08 PM]


Darn Kids In McDonalds by Eighthman
[January 13, 2018, 07:21:56 AM]


Re: Oprah Winfrey for president: a wild idea that just got dramatically more real by The Seeker
[January 12, 2018, 01:49:00 PM]