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Author Topic: Fukushima Tsunami Meltdown Debris Field ETA America Summer 2012?  (Read 25427 times)

Offline thorfourwinds

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Re: Fukushima Tsunami Meltdown Debris Field ETA America Summer 2012?
« Reply #30 on: December 13, 2012, 09:16:51 AM »


Tsunami debris smartphone app developed


A new smartphone app developed in Victoria will enable people to help track debris from the March 2011 tsunami in Japan as it gets within sight of British Columbia’s shores.

Software specialist Murray Leslie developed the app he’s called Coastbuster.




"It's designed for somebody who's walking their dog or kayaking — a casual user — who can very quickly see something on the beach, take the picture and report it," Leslie told CBC News.

Researchers at the University of Victoria's Ocean Networks group will receive the pictures and pass them on to scientists at U.S. and Canadian agencies tracking the debris.

The information will help them track the potential 1.5 million tonnes of debris slowly making its way on ocean currents toward North America from Japan.

The app should help with the cleanup of all the stuff headed this way, said Cara Lachmuth, of the Surfrider Foundation on Vancouver Island.



"I think it’s amazing. It's super easy to use and makes you want to do it more because there is this big push from governments to see what's out there and categorize it and do something about it," Lachmuth said.

The app is ready for use on android phones, but Leslie said he’s still waiting for approval from Apple for use on the iPhone and iPad.




Naturalist George Sirk stands with some of the tsunami debris collected from the beaches of Thornton Island, off the west coast of Vancouver Island. (Submitted by Jim Palmer)



Japan offers United States sympathy money for disposal of tsunami debris

30 November 2012

Japan’s Foreign Ministry announced their decision to offer a $5 million donation to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Friday. Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda informed Secretary of State Hillary Clinton of the plan during a meeting in September on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum. 

The US government plans to use the money for disposal, detection and the monitoring of debris.

Large volumes of debris have washed ashore along the US west coast and the Pacific Islands. In June, a floating pier from Japan’s Aomori Prefecture arrived ashore in Oregon. US state authorities are mainly responsible for removing the waste.




“Marine debris is an ongoing problem, especially around the Pacific,” NOAA spokesman Keeley Belva told GlobalPost. “It can damage marine habitats and entangle wildlife, it can become a navigational hazard for vessels, and can be an eyesore on our beaches.”




Recent estimates show the potential for over 1.5 million tons of debris to make its way to North America, easily overshadowing the pittance from Japan. Oceanographers have been supposing one-third might hit Hawaii, one-third get caught up in the Great Garbage Patch, and one-third journey on to the U.S. coast.  Depending on ocean and wind currents, large quantities of debris could wash ashore as early as this winter, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

In Washington state, one expert has warned that a floating field of debris measuring about 2,000 miles in length and 500 miles from north to south now lies just 400 miles from the coast.

In Hawaii, Kamilo Beach on the southern tip of Hawaii’s Big Island has long been a dumping ground for debris sent by ocean currents — an estimated 20 tons wash ashore each year.  The tsunami debris is expected to dramatically add to the impacts to the beach and wildlife, from seabirds to fish.

In Canada, a new smartphone app developed in Victoria will enable people to help track debris from the March 2011 tsunami in Japan as it gets within sight of B.C.’s shores.

“It’s designed for somebody who’s walking their dog or kayaking — a casual user — who can very quickly see something on the beach, take the picture and report it,” Software specialist Murray Leslie told CBC News.

Source: NHK
Source: CBC
Source: Global Post
      
 

Debris floats in Keehi Boat Harbor on March 11, 2011 in Honolulu, Hawaii, after a tsunami swept through the area. Tsunami waves rolled thousands of miles across the Pacific Ocean after a massive earthquake off Japan. (Kent Nishimura/AFP/Getty Images)



Tsunami watch: Japan's floating junkyard approaches

Japan's environment ministry expects about 33,000 tons of tsunami debris to reach the western coast of North America by next June.

26 November 2012

TOKYO, Japan — What do an empty fishing boat, a Harley-Davidson, and a soccer ball have in common?

For residents of the West Coast of the US and Canada, they are all reminders of the devastation unleashed on the other side of the Pacific Ocean by last year's Japanese tsunami.

The March 11 disaster, which killed almost 20,000 people, generated tens of millions of tons of wreckage, most of which remained on land. But it also swept an estimated 5 million tons of debris out to sea, 70 percent of which later sank. The fate of the remaining 1.5 million tons is causing concern in communities from Alaska to California, amid warning that the trickle of debris arriving on US shores could soon turn into a deluge.

Japan's environment ministry says it expects about 33,000 tons of debris washed away by the tsunami to reach the western coast of North America by next June.

Depending on ocean and wind currents, large quantities of debris could wash ashore as early as this winter, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The other possibility, it added, was that much of it will be swallowed up by the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, a gyre of marine litter in the central North Pacific.

More than 1,400 reported sightings of tsunami junk have been made along the coast since the disaster on March 11 last year, but only a handful have been linked to the disaster, the NOAA said.

They include lumber, buoys, plastic barrels, fishing nets and equipment, and Styrofoam. The expected increase in the volume of objects reaching the end of their 5,000-mile journey across the Pacific Ocean presents coastal communities with a potential environmental nightmare.

"Marine debris is an ongoing problem, especially around the Pacific," NOAA spokesman Keeley Belva told GlobalPost. "It can damage marine habitats and entangle wildlife, it can become a navigational hazard for vessels, and can be an eyesore on our beaches."

In Washington state, one expert has warned that a floating field of debris measuring about 2,000 miles in length and 500 miles from north to south now lies just 400 miles from the coast.

more
More from GlobalPost: After the tsunami, a multimedia series





Tsunami debris turning British Columbia beaches into 'landfills'

Styrofoam, propane tanks, barrels, and gas cans littering Haida Gwaii beaches

A surge of debris washing up on the shores of B.C.’s Haida Gwaii and believed to be from the 2011 Japanese tsunami is prompting calls to launch possibly the biggest beach cleanup Canada has ever seen.




Countless pieces of Styrofoam now dot beaches on the north shores of Haida Gwaii, formerly the Queen Charlotte Islands, about 800 kilometres northwest of Vancouver.





“It’s a lot now, and it’s just the beginning,” said Haida fisherman Bruce Stewart Burton.

“I'm kind of afraid what we're going to see in the near future.”

There’s no proof much of the suddenly appearing and unmarked debris was washed away from Japan in the March 2011 tsunami, but among the flotsam there are also many bottles with Japanese writing.




The beaches are also in the same general area where a Harley Davidson from Japan washed ashore in April. One part of the beach is so cluttered with new junk that it looks like a landfill, with rusty propane tanks, barrels and plastic gasoline cans, some with fuel still in them.






NOAA Marine Debris Program - Welcome




Volunteers found a deteriorating toy cat during an International Coastal Cleanup event in Waikiki, HI. (Credit: Carey Morishige)


Marine Debris Cyborg Kitty « Marine Debris Blog

By: Dianna Parker, Communications Specialist, NOAA Marine Debris Program

This toy robot cat took home the prize for strangest (creepiest?) item found during NOAA’s 2012 International Coastal Cleanup event last weekend. We’re pretty sure it will haunt our dreams forever.


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Offline Amaterasu

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Re: Fukushima Tsunami Meltdown Debris Field ETA America Summer 2012?
« Reply #31 on: December 13, 2012, 12:10:07 PM »
Has anyOne measured the radioactivity of this debris?
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Offline spacemaverick

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Re: Fukushima Tsunami Meltdown Debris Field ETA America Summer 2012?
« Reply #32 on: January 11, 2014, 03:19:07 PM »
The US Army Corps of Engineers do have debris recovery vesselsthat cn remove heavy debris.  The debris recovery covers anything from small debris to boats and even ships.  I think they need to get on it.
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Re: Fukushima Tsunami Meltdown Debris Field ETA America Summer 2012?
« Reply #33 on: January 11, 2014, 06:27:37 PM »
I would think that none of this junk had time to get radiated,
the readiated water should be a few days behind it and geting worse every day from then on.

If you get junk, you might be in the same path for the radiated water.
Junk is also subject to the winds blowing it around on the surface.

Deuem

Offline zorgon

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Re: Fukushima Tsunami Meltdown Debris Field ETA America Summer 2012?
« Reply #34 on: January 11, 2014, 07:08:46 PM »
Has anyOne measured the radioactivity of this debris?

Zero most likely :D The Tsumami washed it away BEFORE the plants went into meltdown

Offline zorgon

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Re: Fukushima Tsunami Meltdown Debris Field ETA America Summer 2012?
« Reply #35 on: January 11, 2014, 07:09:41 PM »
I would think that none of this junk had time to get radiated,
the readiated water should be a few days behind it and geting worse every day from then on.


what he said :P

Offline thorfourwinds

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Re: Fukushima Tsunami Meltdown Debris Field ETA America Summer 2012?
« Reply #36 on: March 26, 2014, 07:29:45 PM »



[youtube]7eh4nBVJTsw[/youtube]


Radioactive Sea Water Particle Tracing from Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Find more information at ASR Ltd





NOAA Tsunami Debris Modeling

When will the debris from the tsunami in Japan reach the U.S.?

Many variables affect where the debris will go and when. Items will sink, disperse, and break up along the way, and winds and ocean currents constantly change, making it very difficult to predict an exact date and location for the debris’ arrival on our shores.

A NOAA modeling effort shows that some buoyant items first reached the Pacific Northwest coast during winter 2011-2012. More debris is likely still dispersed north of the Main Hawaiian Islands and east of Midway Atoll.

The model gives NOAA an understanding of where debris from the tsunami may be located today, because it incorporates how winds and ocean currents since the event may have moved items through the Pacific Ocean. This model is a snapshot of where debris may be now, but it does not predict when debris will reach U.S. shores in the future.

It's a "hindcast," rather than a "forecast."

The model also takes into account the fact that winds can move different types of debris at different speeds. For example, wind may push an upright boat (large portion above water) faster than a piece of lumber (floating mostly at and below the surface).

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Offline thorfourwinds

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Re: Fukushima Tsunami Meltdown Debris Field ETA America Summer 2012?
« Reply #37 on: March 26, 2014, 07:49:50 PM »

2.5 years later, a Texas-sized debris island from the Japanese Tsunami is coming to the U.S. West Coast

Michael Graham Richard?Science / Ocean Conservation

November 5, 2013

Update: Good news, bad news: It looks like our sources for this story were mistaken about the nature of the debris floating in the direction of the U.S., so the situation is actually much better than we thought. Salon has a piece about it here. This doesn't mean that there's no problem and that debris and invasive species from Japan won't wash up over the next months and years (some already have), though, but it's not quite the 'floating island' initially feared. Apologies for our mistaken coverage.

Carrying invasive species from Japan...
As can be seen in the dramatic footage from the 2011 Tsunami in Japan, a gigantic quantity of debris were washed out to sea. Some of those formed a floating island of junk about the size of Texas, and that island has been pushed by ocean currents for the past couple years, slowly making its way toward North America. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the debris island is about 1,700 miles off the U.S. West Coast.



NOAA/Public Domain

[youtube]BAuWa77vYDU[/youtube]


Uploaded on Jun 17, 2011

New footage of the Japan Tsunami, I own the video and its copyrights, a friend sent it to me while he was living there.?This is the ORIGINAL footage of this specific occurrence and location.?This took place in Kamaishi City.

While tests on debris that have made their way to the U.S. shows they're not contaminated by radiation, they do carry various organisms that could potentially become invasive to the local ecosystems of North Ameirca's Pacific coast. The Oregon State University looked at what was found on a 185-ton dock that washed up and found all of this:


© Oregon State University

It's easy to imagine that there would be many more species on the Texas-sized junk pile.
Via NOAA, QZ



[youtube]z1mqNruPI1Y[/youtube]




What has happened to the tsunami debris from Japan? -- ScienceDaily

21 February 2014

Source:
University of Hawaii - SOEST

Summary:
The amount of debris in the ocean is growing exponentially, becoming more and more hazardous and harmful to marine life and therefore to our ocean food source. Measuring and tracking the movements of such debris are still in their infancy. The driftage generated by the tragic 2011 tsunami in Japan gave scientists a unique chance to learn about the effects of the ocean and wind on floating materials as they move across the North Pacific Ocean.




Many oyster buoys from Japan, such as the one here that washed up on Kauai, began to arrive on the windward shores of the Hawaiian Islands in October, 2012.

Credit: Carl Berg and Surfider Foundation Kauai Volunteers


The amount of debris in the ocean is growing exponentially, becoming more and more hazardous and harmful to marine life and therefore also to our ocean food source. Measuring and tracking the movements of such debris are still in their infancy.

The driftage generated by the tragic 2011 tsunami in Japan gave scientists Nikolai Maximenko and Jan Hafner a unique chance to learn about the effects of the ocean and wind on floating materials as they move across the North Pacific Ocean.

Shortly after the tsunami struck, Maximenko and Hafner used the IPRC Ocean Drift Model to predict where the debris from the tsunami would go. Their computer model is based on trajectories of real satellite-tracked drifting buoys and satellite-measured winds.

The model has now been charting the possible paths of the tsunami driftage for nearly 3 years. The scientists have made a major improvement to the initial model: it now accommodates objects of different shapes and buoyancies that expose different amounts of surface to the wind and travel at different speeds and different trajectories. The model therefore now includes different levels of wind-forcing, simulating the movement of different types of floating debris.

No formal marine debris observing systems exist to verify the model simulations. The model paths for tsunami debris, however, agree with reports of such debris washing up on the shores of Oregon, Washington, Alaska, and the Hawaiian Islands, as well as with observations by sailors crossing the North Pacific.

The first physical evidence of tsunami driftage far from the coasts of Japan, for example, came in September 2011 from the Russian sail training ship Pallada. The captain had been forewarned that the ship might run into a tsunami debris field on its voyage from Honolulu to Vladivostok. Sailors, alerted and on the lookout, sighted much debris just northwest of Midway, and picked up a little fishing boat later confirmed lost in the tsunami.

The model predicted both the timing and the type of material that has washed up along windward shores of Hawaii: the first tsunami driftage came in August -- September 2012, about 1½ years after the tragedy. These were very buoyant pieces, for example, oyster buoys, crates, small fishing boats like the one picked up by Pallada, and parts of small refrigerators.

Then 2½ years after the tsunami, materials sitting lower in the water and less buoyant than the previous driftage arrived: poles and beams with mortise and tenon features. Experts on lumber, who have analyzed cross-cuts of several of these wood pieces, agree that it is Sugi, a species of cypress endemic to Japan. One piece of wood is of very old timber and must have been cut 100 or more years ago.

The IPRC Ocean Drift Model has recently shown to be useful in another dramatic event at sea: validating the El Salvadoran castaway's ordeal. In January 2014, Jose Salvador Alvarenga washed ashore in the Marshall Islands after enduring a 13-month journey from the shores of southern Mexico. The paths of floating objects in the IPRC Ocean Drift model, driven with the currents and wind conditions, lend strong support to this rather improbable odyssey.

Details are at http://iprc.soest.hawaii.edu/news/marine_and_tsunami_debris/2014/14_02_Maximenko_fisherman.pdf.



Scientists track debris from 3-year-old Japan tsunami | More Local News - KITV Home

11 March 2014

Debris may break up into tiny particles and be ingested by sealife, experts say


More than one year after a devastating tsunami struck, a blue bin found near Rabbit Island marked the first tsunami debris to arrive on the islands.??Nikolai Maximenko and his team from the International Pacific Research Center developed a model to track the tsunami debris. He said lighter objects driven by the wind like the blue bin were the first to reach Hawaii.

"In 2012 the front edge of the tsunami recirculated south the California current and pushed by trade winds to Hawaii," Maximenko said.

In 2013, a wave of heavier objects like boats washed ashore including a 20-foot skiff near Kawela Bay.?Some of the heaviest debris like large lumber is now making it to the shorelines.

"Currently, most of the reports that we're receiving are about wood from broken Japanese houses, poles -- electrical and telephone poles -- and broken trees," Maximenko said.??Maximenko said because the wood is so heavy, most of the pieces are still suspended in the middle of the ocean.

"We estimate there may be up to 1 million beams and logs, poles, still floating in the ocean," Maximenko said.??After the wave of wood, scientists said what washes shore will be smaller and smaller as it gets worn down by wind, waves and currents. The debris could break down to microparticles and microplastics which could be detrimental to sea life.

"These tiny particles are mistaken for food and ingested by ocean life and seabirds," Maximenko said. "Virtually every seabird in the Pacific Ocean had some particles in their guts."

The Department of Land and Natural Resources reported that it has 17 confirmed reports of tsunami debris.



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Offline zorgon

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Re: Fukushima Tsunami Meltdown Debris Field ETA America Summer 2012?
« Reply #38 on: March 26, 2014, 09:26:21 PM »
Still my favorite piece of Fukushima Debris :D

Looks like it will make a nice California beach House


Offline thorfourwinds

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Re: Fukushima Tsunami Meltdown Debris Field ETA America Summer 2012?
« Reply #39 on: June 28, 2014, 07:16:35 PM »


The first traces of Fukushima radiation plume has been detected off the coast of Vancouver. WHOI

      
Fukushima Radiation Reaches Waters Off the Coast Of Canada, Expected To Reach U.S. In April

Fukushima may have reached North American shores. Water samples collected off the coast of Vancouver, British Columbia, had trace amounts of radionuclides associated with the disastrous 2011 radiation leak at the Japanese nuclear plant, according to research presented at the Ocean Sciences Meeting on Feb. 24.


[youtube]6Qqd-6N6kjY[/youtube]


Published on Jan 28, 2014
Radioactive contaminants from Fukushima are carried across the Pacific Ocean by currents, the strongest of which is the Kuroshio, and spread along the West Coast of North America by complex coastal processes.

Models predict that radionuclides from Fukushima will begin to arrive on the West Coast in early 2014, mainly in the north (Alaska and British Columbia) and then move further south in coming years before appearing in Hawaii in small amounts.

The concentration of contaminants is expected to be well below limits set by the U.S. EPA for cesium-137 in drinking water (7,400 Bq/m3) or even the highest level recorded in the Baltic Sea after Chernobyl (1,000 Bq/m3).


The levels of radioactive cesium isotopes are well below safe limits and researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution will monitor the shores of Canada and the United States throughout 2014 as Fukushima fallout is expected to arrive in the coming months. Ken Buesseler, senior scientist at WHOI, has been performing tests and collecting samples from 24 different costal locations and presented the research at the Ocean Sciences Meeting Monday.

WHOI scientists detected cesium-134 and cesium-137, radioactive isotopes that have more neutrons, reports LiveScience, but the levels are below safe limits in drinking water.

Radioactive isotopes leaked from Fukushima include cesium-134, cesium-137 and iodine-131. Cesium-137 has a longer half-life than cesium-134 and can be found in the ocean as the result of past nuclear tests.

The scientists are looking to find cesium-134 as it has a half-life of only two years and would be definitive proof of Fukushima radiation reaching North American shores.
Cesium-137 has been found in eight testing locations but no evidence of cesium-134, reports LiveScience.
?



Sample locations being monitored by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution scientists.  Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

According to the WHOI plume prediction, Fukushima radionuclides will reach Alaska and British Columbia in early 2014, traveling south along the coast over the course of two years with trace amounts arriving in Hawaii. WHOI says the levels will be below the safety limit set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The EPA limit for cesium-137 in drinking water is 7,400 Becquerels, the radioactive decay per second, per cubic meter.

Buesseler said in a statement, "We expect over the rest of 2014, levels will become detectable starting first along the northern coastline. But the complex behavior of coastal currents will likely result in varying intensities and changes that cannot be predicted from models alone."

The radioactive plume has not reached the United States coast yet and experts believe the radiation levels will not pose a threat to humans or to marine life.

The San Francisco Chronicle reports that, based on ocean circulation patterns, the first traces of the Fukushima radiation plume will be seen in April.
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Offline thorfourwinds

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Re: Fukushima Tsunami Meltdown Debris Field ETA America Summer 2012?
« Reply #40 on: July 20, 2014, 08:05:20 AM »




News - 2011 Japanese tsunami debris? Barnacle-covered boat turns up ashore Washington state - The Weather Network


Wednesday, April 30, 2014
The massive tsunami that devastated northeastern Japan in 2011 washed about five million tons of debris out to sea.

About 70 per cent of it eventually sank off the Japanese coast, while the remaining 1.5 million tons was dispersed by waves and ocean currents.


This barnacle-covered boat turned up along Ocean Shores, Washington earlier this week and authorities believe it may be from the 2011 tsunami.




If so, it would have traveled over 8,000 km across the Pacific Ocean from Japan.




The boat was turned over to the U.S. Coast Guard and Grays Harbor County authorities.




The State Department of Ecology was expected to inspect if for invasive species and officials were expected to ask the Japanese Consulate in Seattle for help in identifying the boat.





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