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Author Topic: DUCK ! it's spacelab  (Read 82 times)

Offline space otter

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DUCK ! it's spacelab
« on: January 03, 2018, 10:28:46 PM »
  and more good news ..geeeeze

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/19000-pound-space-lab-falling-uncontrolled-back-to-earth/ar-BBHPuDl?li=BBnb7Kz

19,000-pound space lab falling "uncontrolled" back to Earth
 CBS News CBS News
5 hrs ago

It's pretty common for old satellites and other "space junk" to come falling back down to Earth. But while hundreds of pieces of debris come down each year, scientists are nervously watching a 19,000-pound Chinese space station's course because its out-of-control route is making it impossible to figure out where it will crash, CBS Denver reports.

The unmanned space lab named Tiangong-1 is expected to crash back down to Earth at some point in March. China reportedly lost control of the lab nearly two years ago, in June of 2016. The Chinese government later released an estimate that predicted Tiangong-1 would come down at some point in late 2017. The vague guess has led experts to conclude that the country's space agency has lost all ability to direct the crashing station's course or know where it will land.

According to a November analysis by the European Space Agency (ESA), the spacecraft's orbit "will inevitably decay sometime between January and March 2018, when it will make an uncontrolled reentry."

"Even a couple of days before it re-enters we probably won't know better than six or seven hours, plus or minus, when it's going to come down," Harvard astrophysicist Jonathan McDowell told The Guardian in 2016. "Not knowing when it's going to come down translates as not knowing where its going to come down."

While much of the spacecraft would likely burn up in the atmosphere, ESA experts say portions could survive and reach Earth's surface.

According to reports, there is only a 1-in-10,000 chance that the massive space lab will actually crash into a populated area and damage buildings. While the odds are slim, scientists have only been able to narrow the crash zone down to between the 43° North and 43° South latitudes; an area that still includes parts of every inhabited continent on Earth.

"The date, time and geographic footprint of the reentry can only be predicted with large uncertainties. Even shortly before reentry, only a very large time and geographical window can be estimated," said Holger Krag, head of ESA's Space Debris Office.

Offline space otter

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Re: DUCK ! it's spacelab
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2018, 09:08:54 AM »
and on the lighter side.. ;)

https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/smart-living/the-9-most-bizarre-objects-that-have-fallen-to-earth/ss-BBGh8tp?li=BBnb7Kz

Mental FlossJake Rossen
12/5/2017

The 9 Most Bizarre Objects That Have Fallen to Earth

1. GOLF BALLS
Meteorologists have sometimes described foreboding hail storm projectiles as being "golf ball sized," but there was at least one time in history where actual golf balls rained down on an unsuspecting populace. In 1969, residents of Punta Gorda, Florida, were pelted with the sporting good staple, necessitating clean-up on streets, lawns, and gutters. No one was sure what exactly caused the incident, although some observers theorized that a nearby tornado near the Gulf of Mexico managed to scoop up balls from a course and then deposited them over the area.

2. NON-DAIRY CREAMER
Depending on the timing and whether you had an open container of coffee, residents of Chester, South Carolina could get their beverage flavored on the go. In 1969, a nearby Borden factory had issues with its exhaust vents. All clogged up, they wound up emitting powdered creamer into the air, which would dispense over the town and collect on surfaces to make for a milky, sticky nuisance when it got wet. Borden eventually fixed its workplace issues. (It also paid a small fine.)

3. MONEY
Surprisingly, this phenomenon isn't restricted to gentleman's clubs. In 2007, a resident of Worms, Germany stopped her car to collect a small storm of paper euro notes that were swirling around her. Despite the enigmatic source of the cash, the woman felt it was best to report it to area police.

4. THE MYSTERY GLOBE
It’s been an inciting incident for many 1950s B horror movies: a mysterious gelatinous orb falls from the sky, seemingly harmless but soon to transform into a man-eating glob of alien aggression. Fortunately, no one was devoured when a large, gooey, translucent globe dropped into a resident's yard in Miami in 1958. Observers said it had a honeycomb design and pulsated as though it were alive. One brave police officer stuck a finger into it without any consequence. Before it could be studied further, the mass just dried up.

5. A CAMERA LENS
We're not quite sure what home insurance companies say when you file a report saying a two pound camera lens has just come crashing through your roof, but homeowner Debbie Payne probably found out. In 2011, a Canon camera lens burst through her home, leaving a cratered rooftop and other damage. Called to investigate, the Federal Aviation Administration said that such an object falling from an aircraft was possible but hard to prove. Payne lived just 200 feet from an elementary school and said she was grateful the projectile didn't land there.

6. HAZELNUTS
In 1977, a British couple were strolling down a street in Bristol when the husband, Alfred Wilson Osbourne, heard a click and thought buttons had fallen off his coat. He quickly realized the clatter on the pavement wasn't a clothing malfunction but a shower of hazelnuts, which were falling down all around him. After a brief pause, another man experienced the same odd nut fall in the same spot. You'd expect a looming hazelnut tree to be the cause, but none were reported to be in the area. And even if there had been, it was March—far from hazelnut season.

7. CANDY
Residents in Lake County, California were surprised to see clumps of sugar raining down over two days in September 1857. The candy portions were about a quarter-inch in size and seemingly edible: some of the residents there made syrup from the phenomena.

8. MUD
In 1901, editors of Science magazine recorded an account of a mud shower in Easton, Pennsylvania courtesy of a reader from Lafayette College who wrote in to describe the incident. "Window glasses on the western exposure of houses were covered with thousands of drops of dirty water," he wrote. Under a microscope, he observed "little membranous bags containing grains of dust." Some theorized a dust storm had mixed with precipitation to create a brown deluge of filthy rain.

9. A RED HOT CHAIN
Detritus from aircraft is not an uncommon source of falling objects, but it's hard to conceive of what an 18-inch length of chain would be doing in a plane. In 1959, a man named Wallace Baker was working a bulldozer in Missouri when the chain fell on his equipment. That would be plenty unusual, but what astounded Baker was the fact that the chain was so hot it was glowing. When he tried to pick it up, it burned his work gloves. No source was ever located.



there are also more serious threads on here about other stuff that has fallen from the skies
« Last Edit: January 04, 2018, 09:12:32 AM by space otter »

 


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