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Author Topic: Has any Rockets really been to the Moon ?  (Read 103 times)

Offline astr0144

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Has any Rockets really been to the Moon ?
« on: December 25, 2017, 06:03:01 AM »
Has any Rockets really been to the Moon ?

Many a suggestion is that Nasa and the Apollo manned Flights could not go to the moon because of the radiation effects of the Van allen belt...

If that was so.... Its also been suggested because the Saturn V Rockets could not hold enough fuel to get there and back...

and if they were even able to carry as much fuel as we see in a FULL Apollo rocket BEFORE it later splits into parts as the mission occurs where we see sections being disconnected say for eg after the initial stages of the boost to get up into space...where I suspect thats the most fuel carried on the rocket..

What happens once it gets into space and how much would the remaining rocket stages be able to carry and also expected to use as it continued its suggested mission to the moon. ?

As far as I am aware it was not able to use any other fuel or power method to operate the remaining rocket sections..
like solar or nuclear power souces...

SO ... How far could it have gone .. I wonder ? or how much more fuel may it have needed to hav reached the moon.

IF those apollo missions did not reach the moon....

then what about the missions where we see all the close ups of the moon that showed al the craters in great detail as it circulated around the moon ?

Did them missins really occur ? and did they carry enough fuel ?  I assume that were smaller or of less weight..

What did it take for them to get to the moon   and did the radiation effect the electronics ?

Size and weight of a Rocket would vary such things..

or are those missions also faked somehow ???

Any thoughts !


Quote
The Saturn V remains the tallest, heaviest, and most powerful (highest total impulse) rocket ever brought to operational status, and holds records for the heaviest payload launched and largest payload capacity to low Earth orbit (LEO) of 140,000 kg (310,000 lb), which included the third stage and unburned propellant needed to send the Apollo Command/Service Module and Lunar Module to the Moon.[5][6]

Quote
The Saturn V consisted of three stages—the S-IC first stage, S-II second stage and the S-IVB third stage—and the instrument unit. All three stages used liquid oxygen (LOX) as an oxidizer. The first stage used RP-1 for fuel, while the second and third stages used liquid hydrogen (LH2). The upper stages also used small solid-fueled ullage motors that helped to separate the stages during the launch, and to ensure that the liquid propellants were in a proper position to be drawn into the pumps.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saturn_V

Offline ArMaP

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Re: Has any Rockets really been to the Moon ?
« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2017, 12:25:03 PM »
First of all, the US was not the only country to reach the Moon, although it was the only country that had manned missions reaching the Moon (according to the official story, obviously ;) ), so if the USSR was able to send probes (and, in latter missions, return samples of Moon soil), why wouldn't the US be able to send men, just from a technological point of view?
More recently, Japan, India, China and the European Space Agency have sent probes (orbital and landing) to the Moon.

The biggest amount of energy is needed to leave the Earth's surface, as at that point gravity is much stronger, the farther away from Earth the less energy needed. Once in space, with less gravity and without atmosphere drag, they spend much less fuel, that's why satellites can stay in orbit for many years with just short bursts from the engines.

The Van Allen radiation belts are exactly that, belts, they do not cover the whole Earth, so the Apollo missions didn't cross the inner, stronger, belt. They crossed the outer belt, but they didn't remain there for a long time, and, as you probably know, radiation is cumulative, so a short presence in a relatively high radiation area is not as bad as it sounds. Most of the radiation they got during the Apollo missions came from the Sun or cosmic radiation. As for the electronics, the problem only exists with today's electronics, that use so little energy and are so small that the energy and size of a charged particle may be enough to affect a whole circuit.

 


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