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Author Topic: Strange Sounds Heard around the World  (Read 23180 times)

Offline zorgon

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Strange Sounds Heard around the World
« on: October 02, 2011, 09:55:02 PM »
The Hum - Weird Noise Plaguing Villages in the UK

Hums and other strange sounds, unexplained that appear and vanish without any answers, have been heard all around the world. One thing I always liked about the BBC News is they don't treat people like nutcases and take time to listen and present weird cases. The other is that they do report on the odd stuff, not just the main stream news stories

So to begin... lets get a few things straight. Some explanations of hums for which no definitive source has been found have been put forth. These include:

Quote
Tinnitus
Generated by the body, the auditory or the nervous system, with no external stimulus. However, the theory that the Hum is actually tinnitus fails to explain why the Hum can be heard only at certain geographical locations, to the degree those reports are accurate. There may exist individual differences as to the threshold of perception of acoustic or non-acoustic stimuli, or other normal individual variations that could contribute to the perception of the Hum by some people in the population and not by others.

Quote
Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions
Human ears generate their own noises, called spontaneous otoacoustic emissions, which about 30% of people hear. The people that hear these sounds typically hear a faint buzzing or ringing, especially if they are otherwise in complete silence, but most people don't notice them at all

Quote
Other Explanations Offered
1. In the case of Kokomo, Indiana, a city with heavy industries, the source of the hum was thought to have been traced to two sources. The first was a pair of fans in a cooling tower at the local DaimlerChrysler casting plant emitting a 36 Hz tone. The second was an air compressor intake at the Haynes International plant emitting a 10 Hz tone
2. Colliding ocean waves. - Researchers from the USArray Earthscope have tracked down a series of infrasonic humming noises produced by waves crashing together and thence into the ocean floor, off the North-West coast of the USA. Potentially, sound from these collisions could travel to many parts of the globe.

The Hum - Wikipedia

Okay so we got those out of the way right from the get go... :D

Back in Toronto I once woke up in the middle of the night... head hurting like crazy, driving me nuts. A high pitched whine that was literally painful and couldn't escape it. I was the only one in the family that heard it...

Then at 5:30 AM is suddenly stopped... the pain and pressure was gone... it was a sudden relief and silence.

Later that day I found out what it was. Behind our apartment building was the Toronto Subway holding yard. Being winter they kept the trains running all night. One of the electric motors had bad bearings and produced this high frequency scream. When the train moved out for morning service, the sound stopped.

This was reported and only effected people that had a hearing range that included the frequency. So I know first hand how a sound can drive you crazy and not everyone can hear it

Now... on to the reports...
« Last Edit: October 04, 2011, 01:55:11 AM by zorgon »

Offline zorgon

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Re: Strange Sounds Heard around the World
« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2011, 02:35:26 PM »
The Hum - weird noise plaguing villages in the UK

The following stories from the UK are not in chronological order, just posted as I found them following searches;

June 09,  2011 - Woodland in County Durham

Tiny village is latest victim of the 'The hum'



Residents of Woodland in County Durham are being disturbed by a mysterious constant throbbing noise Photo: NNP
telegraph.co.uk

Quote
Now a tiny English village is the latest community to claim to be being hit by the phenomenon known as "the hum".

Residents of Woodland, in County Durham, claim that every night a noise permeates the air similar to the throb of a car engine.

It is sometimes so strong that it even shakes the bed of one of the householders.

But no matter how hard they look, the community cannot find the source of the problem and, at their wits end, have called in the council to investigate.

The 300-strong population is the latest around the world to be hit by the rumble which has in the past led to wild conspiracy theories blaming it on UFOs, government experiments and abandoned mine shafts.

By Richard Alleyne, Science Correspondent

Tiny village is latest victim of the 'The hum'

1970 - Famous Bristol Hum

In Britain, the most famous example was the Bristol hum that made headlines in the late 1970s.

Quote
Its most famous occurrence was in Bristol in the 1970s when more than a thousand people complained of the consistent drone causing nosebleeds, sleeplessness and headaches. It vanished as mysteriously as it arrived and was never explained.
SOURCE

The Hum - weird noise plaguing village is investigated by the Telegraph

The Telegraph sent a crack team of investigators and some equipment lying around the office, to find the source of 'the hum', a mysterious noise plaguing a Co Durham village at night.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7KBc-hKY5A[/youtube]
« Last Edit: October 03, 2011, 02:37:09 PM by zorgon »

Offline zorgon

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Re: Strange Sounds Heard around the World
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2011, 02:35:34 PM »
May 19 2009 - Leeds UK

Have you heard 'the Hum'?
By James Alexander


Quote
For decades, hundreds of people worldwide have been plagued by an elusive buzzing noise known as "the Hum". Some have blamed gas pipes or power lines, others think their ears are faulty. A few even think sinister forces could be at work.

"It's a kind of torture, sometimes you just want to scream," exclaims retired head teacher Katie Jacques.

Sitting in the living room of her home in the suburbs of Leeds, the 69-year-old grandmother describes the dull drone she says is making her life a misery.


At least one suicide in the UK has been linked with the hum

Quote
"It has a rhythm to it - it goes up and down. It sounds almost like a diesel car idling in the distance and you want to go and ask somebody to switch the engine off - and you can't."

Tape of the sound and live interview here

Quote
Bad vibrations

The hum is a phenomenon that has been reported in towns and cities across the world from Vancouver in Canada to Auckland in New Zealand.

In Britain, the most famous example was the so-called "Bristol hum" that made headlines in the late 1970s. One newspaper asked readers in the city: "Have you heard the Hum?" Almost 800 people said they had.

The problem persisted for years. Residents complained of sleep loss, headaches, sickness and nosebleeds. Experts eventually found traffic and factories were to blame.

There have been other cases in Cheshire, Cornwall, Gloucestershire, London, Shropshire, Suffolk and Wiltshire.

A low-pitched drone known as the "Largs hum" has troubled the coastal town of Largs in Strathclyde for more than two decades.
   
At least one suicide in the UK has been linked with the hum.

Have you heard 'the Hum'?  - BBC News

Seems the hum is weird enough that us conspiracy theorists get a lot of mention :D

Quote
'Cover-up'

So what is the cause? Various features of modern life have been blamed - gas pipes, power lines, mobile phone masts, wind farms, nuclear waste, even low-frequency submarine communications.

The internet is abuzz with rumour and speculation. There are dark mutterings about secret military activity, alien contact and government cover-ups. The hum even featured in an episode of the sci-fi drama "The X-Files".

The X-files blamed the NAVY with submarine communications and in that episode people's heads literally exploded  :o

Also two other shows used the theme. The Taos Hum was featured on the TV show Unsolved Mysteries. It was also featured in LiveScience's "Top Ten Unexplained Phenomena", where it took first place

Quote
Back in Leeds, Katie Jacques is pleased the hum is being taken seriously, but remains adamant that her suffering is caused by a real, external noise nuisance.

She suspects it may be something to do with the nearby airport, although the authorities there say no engines are left running overnight.

"People assume you must be hearing things, but I'm not crackers," she laughs.

"I don't know how I can get this over to people, but this is not in my head. It's just as though there's something in your house and you want to switch if off and you can't. It's there all the time."

Have you heard 'the Hum'?  - BBC News

« Last Edit: October 03, 2011, 03:59:06 PM by zorgon »

Offline zorgon

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Re: Strange Sounds Heard around the World
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2011, 02:35:42 PM »
Largs, Strathclyde, Scotland

"A low-pitched drone known as the "Largs hum" has troubled the coastal town of Largs in Strathclyde for more than two decades."

Not a lot of direct info on this one yet but the hum is the subject of a song

Swimmer One - Largs Hum

A song written about the unexplained hum sound found in several towns around the world including Taos, Woodland, Bristo, Bondi and Largs.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EiFboOQBM8k[/youtube]

Sep 28 2001 - Largs, Strathclyde, Scotland

Torture of the twilight zone The Largs hum is a phenomenon that wreaks pain and misery on many. Now sufferer Georgie Hyslop has turned detective to try to solve this mystery. Rebecca McQuillan reports

Quote
One morning, it got so bad Georgie Hyslop thought it was finally going to kill her: her chest constricted as if it had been tightly bound, then the noise intensified in her ears. At the same time, stabbing pains tore down her forehead and pressure began to build up in her nose. It got so bad she felt like her skull was vibrating in her head. She wanted to be sick, but was incapacitated by the pain. For an hour, she lay in bed in her Largs home expecting her life to end. ''I just wanted to die,'' she says. It is a rare admission of despair from the quietly spoken 59-year-old who has spent the past two years living with the Largs hum. A low frequency whirring noise of unknown origin, the hum causes pressure to the head, nose, ears, and sternum, leading to headaches and chest pains, nausea and grinding misery. The low-frequency hum is a documented phenomenon all over the world and was first identified in Largs in the 1980s. But, in spite of its consequences, its cause is unknown, with possible explanations ranging from gas pumps to radar and transmission masts. Moreover, not everyone can hear it, even in the same street. As a result, it has tended to occupy the scientific twilight zone, somewhere between the Beast of Bodmin and UFOs. But, in Scotland at least, that could be on course to change following the efforts of Georgie Hyslop.

Torture of the twilight zone The Largs hum

October 17 2001 - Largs, Strathclyde, Scotland

What's that noise?

Quote
t's a constant, irritating hum that makes life miserable for all who hear it - but nobody knows what it is. Laura Barton investigates.

Largs sits prettily on the west coast of Scotland, looking out over the Firth of Clyde. Paddle steamers putter across the bay, where, from time to time, porpoises are spotted. It's more of a retirement town these days - the jobs have drawn the young folk away. But the tourists still come for the watersports and the sailing, the annual Viking festival, and, of course, the peace and quiet.

Yet peace and quiet have eluded Georgie Hyslop since she moved here 18 months ago, following the death of her husband. Indeed there are nights when she roams around her house, looking for a place to sleep. She opens windows, listens to the radio, searches for somewhere, anywhere, to hide her head from the constant humming sound.

What's that noise? - The Guardian
« Last Edit: October 03, 2011, 03:05:28 PM by zorgon »

Offline zorgon

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Re: Strange Sounds Heard around the World
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2011, 02:36:11 PM »
June 13 2011 - Durham, UK

Who, What, Why: Why is 'the hum' such a mystery?

Quote
A village in Durham is the latest place to report a strange vibrating noise - known as "the hum". Why is it such a mystery?

According to sufferers, it is as if someone has parked next to your house and left the engine running. The Hum is a mystery low frequency noise, a phenomenon that has been reported across Britain, North America and Australia in the past four decades.

There is a range of theories from farm or factory machinery to conspiracy theories such as flying saucers. And yet, "the hum" remains an unsolved case.

Woodland, a village in county Durham, is the latest place to fall victim to the noise. Some residents have reported hearing a buzzing noise like electricity or a car engine that won't go away.

"It sounds like an overhead power line with this constant humming buzz," says Kevin Fail, a 53 year-old bathroom installer who lives in the village.

Quote
As for the source of "the hum", don't expect a breakthrough anytime soon, he says.

"It's been a mystery for 40 years so it may well remain one for a lot longer."

Why is 'the hum' such a mystery? - BBC News

May 20, 2009 -

Quote
It's a menace that drives thousands to distraction and has been blamed on everything from UFOs to nuclear submarines. A scientist claims he's found the cause. Our man (who's heard it) listens in...

To the unaffected, it sounds suspiciously like a case of mass hysteria. It is the stuff of dark conspiracies, cover-ups and general spookiness. But to 'sufferers', if that is the right word, this mysterious throbbing noise, which never goes away and exists right on the brink of perception, is real and concrete enough to ruin lives.

I have only experienced 'The Hum' - at least, I assume it was The Hum - once. I was about eight or nine years old, and I remember becoming aware of a rumbling noise, half-way between a distant pneumatic drill and a badly tuned diesel engine. It happened in the dead of night, and kept me awake for hours.

I opened my window and turned my head this way and that in a futile attempt to locate the origin of the sound, which seemed to be emanating from the end of our quiet street.

Have you heard The Hum? - Daily Mail

June 9, 2011

UK Residents Report Strange "Hum," What's Behind the Worldwide Phenomenon?

Mysterious Humming Noise Plagues U.K. Village, More Strange Noises in the Sky Videos


Unsolved Mysteries-Mystery Hum

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=La65OMYUQBc[/youtube]

« Last Edit: October 03, 2011, 08:27:52 PM by zorgon »

Offline zorgon

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Re: Strange Sounds Heard around the World
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2011, 02:36:24 PM »
August 20 2008 - Suffolk, England

Mystery surrounds humming noise

Quote
A mysterious humming sound has kept people in a Suffolk town awake for the last seven weeks.

The hum, which has been heard in Sudbury overnight, has led to 50 people contacting Sudbury Town Council.

Lord Philips of Sudbury said: "If someone had said to me a spacecraft had landed on the meadows last night I would have said 'well I heard it'."

A council spokeswoman said Babergh District Council was attempting to identify the noise.

Quote
"We have all got theories behind it - some out of this world and some are logic, but no-one really knows what it is.

"It's a high pitched drone, continuous between about six at night and five in the morning and dependent on what age you are, determines what you interpret it as."

Mystery surrounds humming noise  - BBC news

'It is a high-pitched drone'

Community warden Bradley Smith was one of the first people to notice the "Sudbury hum".  Video Interview

'It is a high-pitched drone' - BBC News
« Last Edit: October 04, 2011, 01:51:13 AM by zorgon »

Offline zorgon

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Re: Strange Sounds Heard around the World
« Reply #6 on: October 03, 2011, 08:29:45 PM »
The TAOS Hum

Quote
It was during the 1990s that the Hum phenomenon began to be reported in North America and to be known to the American public, when a study by the University of New Mexico and the complaints from many citizens living near the town of Taos, New Mexico, caught the attention of the media.
Source

Here is a recording (.wav file) of the Taos Hum...

TAOS Hum

The Taos Hum - 11/04/2009

Quote
Citizens of portion of S.W. America and Britain have been complaining of a hum, which makes them go crazy. According to them, it just never seems to go away.

‘Taos Hum’ is the name given by New Mexico natives to this humming sound. In 1993, this annoyance humming sound became so acute that hearers in Taos, New Mexico banded together and requested Congress for carrying out an investigation on the same. Their main aim was to discover the source of Taos Hum, but no conclusive causes were discovered. One of the prevailing theories holds that this hum is actually created by military communications systems used for contacting submarines.

Taos Hum - Unexplained Mysteries

This was actually used in an Episode of the X-Files, where the NAVY submarine communications were literally exploding people heads...  :o

Quote
In 1997, Congress asked observers and scientists from some of the elite research institutes across the nation for look into this strange low-frequency noise heard by New Mexico residents around Taos, New Mexico. The investigation requested by Congress consisted of a team of dozen members. Horace Poteet (from Sandia National Laboratories) and Joe Mullins (from University of New Mexico) were the ones, who eventually wrote the final report of the team. Other New Mexico Research Organizations involved for tackling the situation included Los Alamos National Laboratory and Philips Air Force Laboratory.

So despite what skeptic might say that it's all in peoples heads... seems it is being taken very seriously in some quarters

Quote
According to the ‘Taos Hum Investigation: Informal Report’ released on August 23, 1993, hearers experienced hum sound with abrupt beginning. It made them feel that a device was switched on. Several theories were deduced from this report, including the one from Nick Begich, which stated its origin to be in electromagnetic background buildup. However, no one yet is able to confirm their reports, as they are still looking for more concrete evidences supporting this issue.

Taos Hum - Unexplained Mysteries
« Last Edit: October 03, 2011, 10:41:18 PM by zorgon »

Offline zorgon

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Re: Strange Sounds Heard around the World
« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2011, 08:29:54 PM »
"...hearers experienced hum sound with abrupt beginning. It made them feel that a device was switched on. Several theories were deduced from this report, including the one from Nick Begich, which stated its origin to be in electromagnetic background buildup. "

Now I found THAT very interesting... "electromagnetic background buildup"
Maybe this can be linked to Tesla' secrets of free electricity? Something to explore, anyway.

Still looking for this report:
‘Taos Hum Investigation: Informal Report’ released on August 23, 1993


But I found these papers...

The results of hum studies in the United States
James P. Cowan
URS Corporation, 5 Industrial Way, Salem, New Hampshire, USA


Quote
ABSTRACT
Stories of mysterious hums, low frequency sounds that only select individuals can hear without being able to identify the source, have become prevalent throughout the world over the past 20 years. In the United States, the first formal study to determine the source of a hum was performed in the Toas, New Mexico area in the early 1990's. The results of that study were inconclusive. In 2003, another U.S. hum study was commissioned in Kokomo, Indiana, where hundreds of residents reported hearing a hum and blamed other, non-acoustical effects on the same phenomenon. In this paper, the lead investigator of the Kokomo Hum study discusses the study and its results, as well as consistencies with the results of the Toas Hum study and the reports of others around the world, in an effort to identify the still-elusive source of this mysterious phenomenon.

The results of hum studies in the United States - [PDF][Archived]

Human auditory system response to Modulated electromagnetic energy.
ALLAN H Frey
General Electric Advanced Electronics Center
Cornell University, Ithaca, New York


Quote
The intent of this paper is to bring a new phenomenon to the attention of physiologists. Using extremely low average power densities of electromagnetic energy, the perception of sounds was induced in normal and deaf humans. The effect was induced several hundred feet from the antenna the instant the transmitter was turned on, and is a function of carrier frequency and modulation. Attempts were made to match the sounds induced by electromagnetic energy and acoustic energy. The closest match occurred when the acoustic amplifier was driven by the rf transmitter's modulator. Peak power density is a critical factor and, with acoustic noise of approximately 80 db, a peak power density of approximately 275 mw/cm2 is needed to induce the perception at carrier frequencies of 425 mc and 1,310 mc. The average power density can be at least as low as 400 uw/cm2. The evidence for the various possible sites of electromagnetic energy sensor are discussed and locations peripheral to the cochlea are ruled out.

Frey AH (1962). Human auditory system response to modulated electromagnetic energy. J Appl Physiol 17: 689-692 - [HTML][Archived]

A Model for Photoreceptor-Based Magnetoreception in Birds
Thorsten Ritz, Salih Adem, and Klaus Schulten
Theoretical Biophysics Group, Beckman Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 USA


Quote
ABSTRACT
A large variety of animals has the ability to sense the geomagnetic field and utilize it as a source of directional
(compass) information. It is not known by which biophysical mechanism this magnetoreception is achieved. We investigate The possibility that magnetoreception involves radical-pair processes that are governed by anisotropic hyperfine coupling between (unpaired) electron and nuclear spins. We will show theoretically that fields of geomagnetic field strength and weaker can produce significantly different reaction yields for different alignments of the radical pairs with the magnetic field. As a model for a magnetic sensory organ we propose a system of radical pairs being 1) orientationally ordered in a molecular substrate and 2) exhibiting changes in the reaction yields that affect the visual transduction pathway. We evaluate three dimensional visual modulation patterns that can arise from the influence of the geomagnetic field on radical-pair systems. The
variations of these patterns with orientation and field strength can furnish the magnetic compass ability of birds with the same characteristics as observed in behavioral experiments. We propose that the recently discovered photoreceptor cryptochrome is part of the magnetoreception system and suggest further studies to prove or disprove this hypothesis.

Ritz T, Adem S, Schultenet K (2000). A model for photoreceptor-based magnetoreception in birds. Biophys J 78: 707-718. - [PDF][Archived]

Auditory Response to Pulsed
Radiofrequency Energy
J.A. Elder* and C.K. Chou
Motorola Florida Research Laboratories, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, USA


Quote
INTRODUCTION
An informational advertisement describing observations made in 1947 on the hearing of sounds that occurred at the repetition rate of a radar while the listener stood close to the antenna included the comment that people encountered skepticism and rather pointed questions about their mental health when they first told Their coworkers of their hearing experiences [Airborne Instruments Laboratory, 1956]. The skepticism surrounding early reports of radiofrequency (RF) hearing was based on knowledge of the mechanism of human hearing. The ear was known to be exquisitely sensitive to pressure waves but to have no sensitivity to electromagnetic waves at microwave frequencies (300 MHz–300 GHz).
Auditory Response to Pulsed Radiofrequency Energy - J.A. Elder* and C.K. Chou - [PDF][Archived]

Neurophone-A Vital Hearing and Learning Tool - Dr Patrick Flanagan - [PDF][Archived]

5aNS2. A perceived low-frequency sound in Taos, New Mexico. Joe H. Mullins (Dept. of Mech. Eng., Univ. of New Mexico,. Albuquerque, NM 87121) - [PDF][Archived]

Mullins, Joe H. and James P. Kelly, "The Mystery of the Taos Hum", Echoes, Volume 5, Number 3, Autumn 1995 - [PDF][Archived]

Related Links:

1. Taos Hum, Tones of Planet Earth
2. Sourcing the Taos Hum By Thomas Begich, Staff Writer
3. Flanagan, Patrick, Ph.D., M.D., "The NeurophoneTM Instructions", March 30, 1996.
4. Investigating the Weird hums, booms and tremors - ATS Thread VERY GOOD collection of hums around the world
5. Taos Hum Home Page
6. Do you hear the hum? (NOT ringing)



« Last Edit: March 10, 2012, 03:03:20 PM by zorgon »

Offline zorgon

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Re: Strange Sounds Heard around the World
« Reply #8 on: October 03, 2011, 08:30:05 PM »
1999 - Kokomo Hum - Indiana

Complaints Surround Mysterious 'Kokomo Hum'

Quote
Some say it's like a diesel engine idling. Others describe it as a deep drone or fluorescent light-like buzz. And a great many people don't hear anything at all.

Complaints about the "Kokomo Hum" began in 1999, when a handful of local residents began to report a constant low-pitched rumbling noise. They say they developed a range of mysterious health problems soon after, including dizziness, diarrhea, extreme fatigue, joint and muscle pain, nosebleeds, and excruciating, unending headaches.

"I think we all know something was starting to go drastically wrong about two years ago," says LaQuita Zimmerman, a 55-year-old grandmother who has lived in Kokomo her entire life. "It went from a headache to a never-ending headache," she says. When she leaves Kokomo to visit relatives, the suffering abates, she says.

"It's been over two years now," says Maria McDaniels, who lives several miles away from Zimmerman. "We just noticed a low hum — a drone in the background. It seemed to increase in intensity in the wee hours of the night."

Complaints Surround Mysterious 'Kokomo Hum' - ABC news

Quote
In the case of Kokomo, Indiana, a city with heavy industries, the source of the hum was thought to have been traced to two sources. The first was a pair of fans in a cooling tower at the local DaimlerChrysler casting plant emitting a 36 Hz tone. The second was an air compressor intake at the Haynes International plant emitting a 10 Hz tone

Source

June 23, 2002

Hum Haunts Indiana City; Its Source Is a Mystery

Quote
mystery is simmering in this sleepy industrial city.

To Billy Kellems, it sounds like butter ''crackling in a skillet.'' In the middle of the night, it is more like the buzz of a busy interstate, though there is no highway for miles, Mr. Kellems said. Others say it sounds like the deep growling of a train idling.

The phenomenon is called the Kokomo hum, and it is more than an annoyance. Many blame the hum, which began in 1999, for health problems, including headaches, nausea, diarrhea, fatigue and joint pain.

Residents say they hope that a study commissioned by the city will get to the root of their troubles. Meanwhile, they live with the hum.

''Life has to go on, the headaches, the nausea, the sleepless nights,'' Mr. Kellems, 36, said, sitting beside his wife, Maria McDaniel, also 36, in his backyard. No hum was audible, only the chirping of birds.

Hum Haunts Indiana City - New York Times

Quote
An acoustics consulting firm concluded two industrial fans appear to be among the sources of a mysterious hum that some Kokomo residents believe is to blame for their health and sleeping problems.

Jim Cowan of Cambridge, Mass, - based Acentech presented the results of a 10-month study during a public meeting Thursday. Acentech hired by the city for the study, isolated low-frequency and infrasonic tones at local industries in Kokomo, about 40 miles north of Indianapolis.

An audible low-frequency sound was traced to a cooling tower on the roof of Kokomo's DaimlerChrysler Casting Plant. A second and quieter tone was traced to an air compressor fan at Haynes International.

Kokomo Hum

Kokomo Hum Blamed on Industrial Fans? (Not HAARP?)

A FAN?  :o  40 miles away?  :o  uh huh...

Can You Hear the Hum? - Skeptoid view

Making noise over the [Kokomo] hum - Physics Forum Scepticism & Debunking discussion
« Last Edit: October 04, 2011, 02:27:00 AM by zorgon »

Offline zorgon

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Re: Strange Sounds Heard around the World
« Reply #9 on: October 03, 2011, 09:54:23 PM »
Aug 11, 2009 - Florida

Loud Rumbling Noise & Shaking in Florida

"Same time as meteor shower. This sound has been going on non-stop for the last 30 minutes..."

Strange sounds from the sky

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-X8J0l_ISNI[/youtube]

March 18 2011 - Flager County, Florida

Mysterious rumbling in Flagler County explained

Quote
PALM COAST, Fla. (WOFL FOX 35) - Several people who were shaken with jittery nerves called 911 operators in Flagler County on Friday to report a mysterious sound coming from the direction of the Atlantic Ocean. Others reported feeling the ground shake and suspected it might be an earthquake.

It turns out the sound and shaking was created by a sonic boom produced by a military jet.

People from Palm Coast to St. Augustine reported the rumbling shortly before 10 a.m., saying the event continued for about ten seconds.

The U.S. Geological Survey reports that there has been no seismic activity and that it is very rare to have an earthquake in Florida, but it does happen from time to time. Most are reported in the Panhandle region, though a few have been felt in Central Florida as well.

Todd Harper with the Flagler County Emergency Operations Center confirmed with a military liaison in Tallahassee that jets were flying training missions at the time near Ocala's Pinecastle Bombing Range.

Harper said that very often when the military will conduct training exercises, the pilots will fly over Flagler County and out to the ocean to make the turn to go back to the bombing range. If a pilot is flying faster than the speed of sound, it would have created a sonic boom.

Mysterious rumbling in Flagler County explained - FOX News

March 19 2011 - Flager County, Florida

Mysterious rumbling mimics earthquake

Quote
Whatever gave some Flagler County residents a rumble Friday morning wasn't an earthquake -- at least not one recorded on any instruments by scientists.

About a dozen people reported trembling and rumblings in Flagler County, from The Hammock stretching across Palm Coast to Bunnell, said Flagler County Emergency Management Director Troy Harper. The phone started ringing about 9:40 a.m. with reports of rumbling along with vibrating windows and garage doors, he said.

"We've had about a dozen non-emergency calls, people inquiring about a trembling or rumbling," Harper said.

It may have been a military jet breaking the sound barrier after dropping a bomb at the Pinecastle Range Complex in the Ocala National Forest, Harper said. He added he doesn't expect a pilot to admit it, though.

"Sometimes, they get a little overzealous on their throttle and they break the sound barrier when they are not supposed to," Harper said.

Whatever it was will likely remain a mystery, a seismic enigma.

Mysterious rumbling mimics earthquake  - Journal Online

I am not buying the FOX news story about "Sonic Booms"  live near Nellis AFB and am no stranger to sonic booms and the loud rumblings when Nellis warms up the jets and they take off for red flag operations over the desert. Its loud, can be heard for miles, but sounds NOTHING like this. If this was near Edwards AFB I would guess "Rocket Engine testing..." but as far as I know now this was not near Cape Kennedy. But here is the sound, recorded for about 20 minutes than it suddenly stops.. Sonic 'boom' lasting 20 minutes? Hey ya wanna buy some nice dry land in the bayou?

March 20,2011

Florida March, 2011-EERIE SOUND From Sky! 20min

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VvnHyU8e1c8[/youtube]

Two comments from viewers of note:

"We've heard the exact same noises here in Ohio several? times this summer. Very strange indeed."
SunnyShell1 12 hours ago

"I live in Detroit and have heard a similar sound for a few years..always late at night.? I also sometimes hear loud rumbling that is unexplained."
hygeia511 1 day ago


August 24 2011 - St. Pete, Florida

Strange noise in the sky August 2011 St. Pete,Fl.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cuJD4ehNEm4[/youtube]

Offline zorgon

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Re: Strange Sounds Heard around the World
« Reply #10 on: October 03, 2011, 09:55:00 PM »
Some More Videos on Strange Sounds

These ones I have added as I found them, but have not had time to track any related news items...

Strange Rumbling Sound - Maryland US

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wwx6OmnD_jg[/youtube]

Strange Noise in the skies of Jersey City New Jersey Part 1

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bju3pHUL45w[/youtube]

Offline Caver78

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Re: Strange Sounds Heard around the World
« Reply #11 on: December 14, 2011, 02:45:41 PM »
This made the news earlier this fall.
http://www2.macleans.ca/tag/the-hum/

What’s keeping Windsor awake at night?
By Alex Ballingall - Thursday, November 24, 2011 - 6 Comments
They call it “the hum”— a mysterious rumble that’s sparked a cross-border spat

Photograph by Brent Foster

Quote
They say it comes most often in the dead of night: a deep, relentless rumble that rolls in from the west. At the best of times, it’s a low frequency drone—not unlike the sound of idling truck engines, says one resident. At its worst, the mysterious force known as the Windsor Hum is described as an incessant roar. It rattles windows, frightens dogs, wakes up babies, doles out headaches and deprives people of sleep.

“It pulsates all night long,” says Christine Southern, who lives with her husband and two children in LaSalle, a suburb of Windsor, Ont., near the eastern bank of the Detroit River, where the sound is reportedly strongest. “You can feel it in your chest,” she says. “Once you hear it, you can’t not hear it. You listen for it every night.”

For months, no one knew where it was coming from. Far-fetched theories were tossed about. Some people insisted it was alien spaceships, says Southern, a leading voice on the Windsor Hum Facebook group, which has more than 780 members. Others said it came from secret military testing beneath the surface of the Great Lakes. As it turns out, the likely source may be just as difficult to address.


Photograph by Brent Foster
They say it comes most often in the dead of night: a deep, relentless rumble that rolls in from the west. At the best of times, it’s a low frequency drone—not unlike the sound of idling truck engines, says one resident. At its worst, the mysterious force known as the Windsor Hum is described as an incessant roar. It rattles windows, frightens dogs, wakes up babies, doles out headaches and deprives people of sleep.

“It pulsates all night long,” says Christine Southern, who lives with her husband and two children in LaSalle, a suburb of Windsor, Ont., near the eastern bank of the Detroit River, where the sound is reportedly strongest. “You can feel it in your chest,” she says. “Once you hear it, you can’t not hear it. You listen for it every night.”

For months, no one knew where it was coming from. Far-fetched theories were tossed about. Some people insisted it was alien spaceships, says Southern, a leading voice on the Windsor Hum Facebook group, which has more than 780 members. Others said it came from secret military testing beneath the surface of the Great Lakes. As it turns out, the likely source may be just as difficult to address.


According to data amassed this summer by seismic monitors placed by Natural Resources Canada, the Windsor Hum is coming from a one-square-kilometre area “in the general vicinity” of Zug Island, Mich., a fenced-in, heavy industrial zone dominated by steelmaking operations and patrolled by armed guards. It sits at the intersection of the Detroit River and River Rouge, about 15 km south of Detroit. Authorities in the region—namely, officials from the City of River Rouge, where Zug Island is located—have apparently backed down from initial indications that they would investigate the Hum, while companies operating on and around the island have been silent. And since Zug Island lies a few hundred metres west of the border, any action is now out of Canada’s jurisdictional reach.

The story of the Windsor Hum goes back about two years, when people like Southern started losing sleep due to rumbling vibrations. Last February, city councillor Al Maghneih received his first complaint. Ever since, the 30-year-old has led the charge to determine the source of the sound he likens to Barry White’s bass vocals. “It’s annoying, and it comes to the point where it affects the quality of life of the constituents,” Maghneih told Maclean’s from his office in Windsor. “There’s always been industrial sounds, industrial noises, and this year it’s been much worse.” Maghneih started tracking the location of each complaint on a map. “All indicators were pointing to the vicinity of Zug Island,” he says.

Ontario’s Ministry of Environment has received more than 420 official complaints about the Windsor Hum, according to spokesperson Kate Jordan. After looking at “all possible industrial sources” on the Canadian side of the Detroit River—including the nearby salt mines—scientists set up four seismic monitors to learn more about the vibrations. Cathy Woodgold of Earthquakes Canada, the branch of Natural Resources that specializes in measuring tremors in the ground, says that after a few weeks collecting data, it was determined that the sound was a low frequency vibration travelling through the air. The study also confirmed Maghneih’s suspicion: the sound is coming from an area “on or around Zug Island,” says Woodgold.

U.S. Steel has the heaviest industrial presence on Zug Island. The company’s Great Lakes Works steel manufacturing operation has the capability to produce 3.8 million net tons of raw steel every year. The company also owns the Delray Connecting Rail line, which carries raw materials, waste, and output products along several tracks that criss-cross the 2.4-sq.-km island. If the data collected by Canadian scientists is accurate, the source of the Hum is likely to be somewhere amongst the blast furnaces and metallurgy facilities of U.S. Steel’s operation.

In 2008, as the American economy spiralled into recession, U.S. Steel suspended operations at its Zug Island plant. A year later, manufacturing resumed, and the Hum was first heard. The question now is: what kind of changes, if any, did the company make to its steelmaking process? U.S. Steel’s Great Lakes Works operation did not respond to inquiries from Maclean’s. The company has not spoken publicly on the issue, and there is no definitive proof that the Hum is coming from their operation on Zug Island.

In early September, Maghneih drove to Michigan to meet with Michael Bowdler, mayor of River Rouge. The two men decided to check things out for themselves. “We jumped in his SUV, drove over to Zug Island and we parked right onto the gates,” Maghneih recalls. Despite being faced with signs that prohibited trespassing on U.S. Steel property and the taking of photographs, Maghneih pulled out his BlackBerry and began recording a video. The recording, which he later uploaded to YouTube, captured a deep rumble coming from somewhere behind the fence. Maghneih believes it was the Hum, and claims Mayor Bowdler felt similarly. “He was like, ‘Oh wow, it’s true,’ ” says Maghneih, describing Bowdler’s reaction to the sound.

“I’m not laying firm accusations against U.S. Steel, but things coming out of their blast furnace sound awfully similar to the things people are complaining about,” says Maghneih, adding that the manufacturer hasn’t returned his phone calls.

On Sept. 29, officials from Ontario’s Environment Ministry, Natural Resources Canada, Windsor and River Rouge gathered in Windsor to release information about the Hum. At the meeting, representatives from River Rouge announced they had hired Integrated Environmental, Inc. to help determine a more precise source of the Hum. Local lawyer David Robins, who mused about a class action lawsuit over the Hum in the Windsor Star, was among the more than 150 people in attendance. “Most people walked away from this with the message: stay tuned and we’ll have more to tell you,” he says.

For Maghneih, things finally seemed to be coming together. But then, “out of the blue,” he received an email saying the city of River Rouge didn’t have enough money to continue their investigation. He waited a week before notifying the public, calling Mayor Bowdler’s office and sending emails seeking clarification. He received no answers. “What used to be a very warm relationship with an open line is now radio silence,” says Maghneih. “What the hell is that? What happened?”

Bowdler’s office didn’t return calls placed by Maclean’s, but Rick Harding, president and senior principal of the environmental consulting firm hired by River Rouge, acknowledges that the city “doesn’t have the financial wherewithal” to carry out an investigation like the one conducted in Windsor.

As Harding points out, the relative lack of political will in River Rouge to determine a source of the Hum may be for historical and economic reasons. River Rouge is a small community with fewer than 8,000 people. It has existed alongside heavy industry for decades. Residents, therefore, have been less likely to notice—much less to complain about—the Hum. “The community experiences noises, vibrations, on a routine basis,” says Harding. “To discern one from another is not easy.”

Maghneih suspects River Rouge doesn’t want to upset U.S. Steel, a major source of employment for the region, where median household income levels are estimated to be nearly half the Michigan state average.

In early November, Windsor city council passed a resolution acknowledging the Hum, and pledging to pressure all levels of government in Canada and the U.S. to continue working to identify the exact source of the noise. According to the Ministry of Environment, Ottawa has held discussions with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Michigan state government.

As officials jockey for a way around this jurisdictional impasse, those affected by the noise in Windsor are encouraging each other to keep the issue on the table. Southern, for example, has written letters to Prime Minister Stephen Harper and the governor of Michigan. “I’ll fight this right to the end,” she vows. Even still, answers remain elusive, and people keep losing sleep to the nefarious rumble rolling in from the west.

Source: McCleans Canada
« Last Edit: December 23, 2011, 05:39:57 PM by zorgon »

Offline zorgon

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Re: Strange Sounds Heard around the World
« Reply #12 on: December 23, 2011, 05:36:37 PM »
The Warminster “thing”

Here is an older one... started as weird sounds then led into a huge UFO flap

Warminster
The Warminster UFO Flap


Quote
In the 1960s and early 1970s Warminster became the centre of a UFO flap that, at the time, was unprecedented in the UK.

The Warminster phenomenon began not with unidentified objects but with unidentified sounds; which is, perhaps, why the phenomenon came to be labelled the 'Thing'.

The genesis of the Warminster UFO phenomenon is described in Arthur Shuttlewood's The Warminster Mystery. Shuttlewood was a journalist with the Warminster Journal, the local newspaper. It was through this position that Shuttlewood first came into contact with the phenomenon.

The date on which the Warminster phenomenon started is a moot point. Flying Saucer Review reported that, in November 1961, four witnesses near Warminster witnessed a UFO leaving a trail of sparks. Two of the events reported by Shuttlewood in The Warminster Mystery as occurring in 1965 are also reported by Shuttlewood, in the Warminster Journal in December 1965, as having occurred in 1963 and 1964.

The history of the Warminster phenomenon as recounted by Shuttlewood, however, began early on Christmas morning, 1964. A number of witnesses were awoken by strange sounds, variously described as like twigs or leaves being drawn across a roof, or a chimney crashing to the ground, or roof tiles being forcefully rattled around. The sounds were witnessed in one case by as many as thirty individuals. Perhaps the strangest was that witnessed at 6.12am that morning by Mrs Marjorie Bye, who was walking to the Holy Communion service at Christ Church in Warminster. As she approached the church the air about her filled with strange sounds that she found disturbing, and made her feel weak and unable to move. These unidentified noises continued on an ad-hoc basis until at least June 1966. Roughly nine cases are described in The Warminster Mystery in which the only unusual phenomena are noises. Over the course of time this "noise" phenomenon receded and the visual phenomenon took its place to become the most important element of the Warminster phenomenon; the Warminster Thing became a UFO.

Through the early months of 1965, no UFOs were seen. The first UFO sighting recorded in The Warminster Mystery was around 19 May 1965, when three times during that week one witness saw unusual objects in the sky. The UFOs were silent, stationary and cigar-shaped, covered in winking bright lights, and gradually faded as the witness watched. On the 3 June 1965, a brightly glowing, cigar-shaped object was witnessed by a family in Heytesbury, a village near Warminster. The UFO remained motionless over the south of Warminster for almost half an hour. The UFO was also observed by two Warminster residents, who described the UFO as 'twin red-hot pokers', and by seventeen people swimming or fishing at Shearwater, a lake near Warminster.

Although UFO sightings had now commenced, the strange sounds still continued to be heard, and on the 10 August 1965 a connection between UFOs and the strange sounds appeared to be confirmed. At 3.45am, a local woman was woken by a terrible droning sound. When she looked out of her bedroom window she saw a bright object like a massive star. It remained visible for some 25 minutes, then the humming began to attenuate, and the UFO began to flicker; the noise finally stopped, and the object vanished from sight. As with the reports from earlier in the year, it was the noise that most disturbed the witness.

As the reports of strange sounds and unidentified lights in the sky began to flood in to Arthur Shuttlewood and the local papers, ufological groups and personalities became involved. Shuttlewood managed to place stories in the national papers. A public meeting was held in the town in August 1965 at which the topic of UFOs was discussed. The meeting was televised and reported in local and national papers. The media coverage led to an invasion of the curious over the bank holiday weekend. Public interest in the Warminster phenomenon was further piqued by the publication, in the Daily Mirror, of a photograph of a UFO, taken in daylight over the town by Gordon Faulkner at the end of August. Interest in the Warminster Thing had become national, and was later to become international. Ufologists and skywatchers flocked to Warminster.

UFOs continued to be seen throughout the decade subsequent to 1965. The hey-day of the mass skywatch was in the mid-1960s, but continued through to the mid-1970s. Cradle Hill became the centre of skywatching activities, but Starr (Middle) Hill and Cley Hill were also popular with skywatchers. Warminster's reputation as a UFO hotspot diminished towards the end of the 1970s, although UFOs do continue to be reported in the area. In the 1980s the growth of the crop circle phenomena in Wiltshire rekindled interest in Warminster's UFO connection.

Because of its notoriety, Warminster was subject to much experimental and playful hoaxing. It has also been suggested that the iconic image of the Warminster UFO, Faulkner's photo of 1965, was a hoax, although Faulkner maintains that the photograph is genuine.

The proximity of Warminster to Salisbury Plain and its military presence could explain some of the UFO sightings, as weapons testing and live firing is carried out on the Plain.

Every year since August 2007, veterans of Warminster's skywatches, joined by interested newcomers, have visited Cradle Hill to relive and retell some of their memories of the phenomenon. In 2009 and 2010, Paranormal/UFO-themed two-day conferences (called Weird 09 and Weird 10) were held in Warminster. The conferences included presentations by experts in their fields, such as Paul Devereux [Earthlights, Ley Lines], Nick Pope [Ex British MOD civil servant responsible for collating UFO sightings in the UK], Nick Redfern [UFO/Cryptozoology investigator and author], Malcolm Robinson [Paranormal/UFO investigator] and Dr. David Clarke [author of a number of books on UFOs and related subjects].

Warminster - wikipedia

Related Links:

1. The Warminster “thing”
2. WARMINSTER, WILTSHIRE. In the 1960s and early 1970s Warminster became the centre ... These unidentified noises continued on an ad hoc basis until at least June 1966.
3. 1964, United Kingdom, The Warminster Thing (UFO)


Warminster UFO


Warminster UFO

Quote
In the mid-1960s a sleepy Wiltshire town became the unlikely epicentre of a UFO phenomenon.

Warminster, in West Wiltshire, became known globally for what was enigmatically called "The Thing". The Thing took many forms by those who claimed to have observed it between 1965 and 1977.

The first sign of The Thing was during the Christmas of 1964, when residents heard a loud, unidentifiable whine. The strange sightings were reported in the Warminster Journal. Local journalist Arthur Shuttlewood was instrumental in making the phenomenon national news and in one year more than 1000 sightings of unidentified flying objects were recorded.


Arthur Shuttlewood

Arthur Shuttlewood They continued to be seen on a regular basis between 1965 and 1977, and in many ways formed a key chapter of the 1960s . Although there have been few sightings in recent years, Warminster is still seen by many as synonymous with UFOs.

With the army based on nearby Salisbury Plain, Warminster is well known as a military town.

This gave rise to the theory that visitors from outer space could very well have been mistaken military aircraft.

But believers shrugged off this theory believing that the military were one of the reasons Warminster had been chosen for visitations. Whatever the reason for the coming of The Thing, it has certainly put Warminster on the map.

Source: UFO Casebook

Also see; Revisiting Riddle Of The Warminster Thing

Original Source; {dead links}
http://www.weirdwiltshire.co.uk/ufos/world.html
http://www.weirdwiltshire.co.uk/ufos/
« Last Edit: March 10, 2012, 03:04:17 PM by zorgon »

Offline zorgon

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Re: Strange Sounds Heard around the World
« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2012, 01:35:05 PM »
Strange sounds 2012 The Pas Manitoba, Canada

This time we have some really odd sounds... like trumpets. The sounds in fact are similar to the sounds used in the Mars Invasion movie. There is a very likely chance that many of these recorded in different areas are copies of the one in Russia or just viral hoaxes. I will post the ones that started this thread, sent to me by Somamech... then post the very long Russian recording, which I believe to be the original and most likely the real one as it was recorded on different days


Starting the year off with more weird sounds. In this case it sounds like they are very close to the source.

[youtube]xf4e-AxJ7nM[/youtube]

What makes this one more interesting the sound was also recorded in Winnipeg Manitoba on the same day... but there it sounds like it is very far in the distance

Strange Sounds in Winnipeg, Manitoba

[youtube]AxSulCgmJJA[/youtube]

Strange sounds 2012 The Pas Manitoba, Canada - ATS Thread

Offline zorgon

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Re: Strange Sounds Heard around the World
« Reply #14 on: January 17, 2012, 01:38:51 PM »
Here is the one  from Russia  Same trumpeting sound

Strange sound in Kiev (Ukraine)
Aug 3, 2011

[youtube]84V5eySzQf0[/youtube]

Strange sound in Kiev again Aug.11.11

[youtube]vcUDYBIrWio[/youtube]

This is the one that started it all and sounds the most likely to be the source. I also found this one covered by the local TV news in the Ukraine... interviewing people who heard it



Strange Sounds in Kiev - Ukrainian TV News Investigation - August 2011

[youtube]F6ol6mu8PU4&[/youtube]
« Last Edit: January 17, 2012, 03:02:46 PM by zorgon »

 


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