Pegasus Research Consortium

Endangered Earth => Survival Tips => Topic started by: The Seeker on April 01, 2014, 07:58:33 PM

Title: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: The Seeker on April 01, 2014, 07:58:33 PM
For most people living in the concrete jungle, the thought of how am I going to survive if the SHTF in any number of possible scenarios, such as loss of the power grid, government collapse, yellowstone popping its cookies, etc...has never crossed their mind.

on any given day there is a three day supply of food on the grocery store  shelves in America; yep, three days...if the supply chain is interrupted for some reason, trains can't haul, trucks can't deliver, the cupboard gets bare quickly...

I have always advocated that everyone should keep a bugout bag in each of their vehicles for emergencies, and an additional one at home with increased amounts of supplies that will support their needs for a minimum of two weeks...

it literally blows my mind at the number of households (especially in urban or city limits) that do not have any supplies to hand; I mean, literally, they shop for food every day...

At a minimum, there is enough room in the trunk for these essential items that will cover  almost any scenario...

a case of bottled water; a one pound bag of soda crackers; one jar of peanut butter; one pint of honey; one pound of beef jerky; at least a dozen packages of instant soup; several assorted tins or pouches of fish, chicken, sardines, vienna sausages, corned beef, items that are easy open and can be consumed right from the package...

it is all too true that most of these items listed are high fat content; in a survival situation that is a good thing; also include some trail mix and a few candy bars; also good to have salt,pepper, mustard, and ketchup( mine also has a bottle of hot sauce 8) )plus several different flavors of instant kool aid and tea/drink mix that can be added to the water...


include a small tarp (8x8 or 8x12) 100' of parachute cord or nylon twine, 2 space blankets, strike anywhere matches, butane lighters, a knife, one package of emergency candles, flashlight, a decent first aid kit; a box of alcohol wipes, liquid soap, a roll of paper towels, toilet paper, and I keep a box of plastic forks and spoons along with a camper's mess kit...

everything I have listed except the water fits into a medium duty backpack quite easily along with a brick of .22long rifle shells and a nine shot revolver, small led lantern with extra batteries, crank powered radio, magnesium fire starter and a compass...

I will add to this as I go, but you get the basic idea...


seeker
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: sky otter on April 01, 2014, 08:17:14 PM


seeker
i hope you won't mind my adding just a little tiny suggestion to your wonderful list


if you can't manage to do this at one time..stagger your items.. and replace items at least once every 6 months...while this stuff stays a long time it still doesn't stay forever...
i.e. get a new jar of peanut butter and take the old one  into the house to make cookies..

another tiny item in case of emergency.. like a natural disaster is to have your bank, insurance, etc numbers written down somewhere where you can get to them if.. heaven forbid your house burns down with yoiur info in it..

great beginning info seeker...hugs
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: rdunk on April 01, 2014, 11:30:44 PM
Of course, the modus response will somewhat depend upon the created event being encountered. Certain situations will require a "bug-out" to somewhere different than one normally lives in. Other situations could call for a "hunker-down" in place as a reasonable response. The bug-out requires some amount of mobility consideration, whereas, the hunker-down has a bit more allowable flexibility in preparation. Certainly, life support is a primary factor in either situation, and both have many commonalities for prep.

Both could represent extreme variation to the "normal way if life" for us, so not only do we need to prepare physically, i suggest that we need to prepare mentally, through some planning/practice, so that we KNOW what has to be done, when we need to do it! I also suggest that good mental preparation is the "best seed" that enables the "best over-all planning and material preparation". 

One of the things I have heard mentioned, that we need to keep in mind. in any event,  "survival" is the intent! And that makes a big difference in what is necessary for a short-term bug-out bag/box/car trunk. For a long-term/permanent condition, then that is a whole nuther story!

No, I am not prepared very well, only just a little so far.
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: Fruitbat on April 02, 2014, 03:04:16 AM

When you start to think slightly longer term then don't forget your CB radio (in a biscuit tin)...

FB.
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: sky otter on April 02, 2014, 05:41:01 AM
well i won't be going anywhere.. unless i need to get 'home' from somewhere
so mine is a bug-back bag
i.e good walking shoes and jacket and hat


to old to run.. shoot me  as i protect or share my stash...at this point i'm good with either

karma's on you..mines' good  ;D
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: The Seeker on April 02, 2014, 05:01:00 PM
the bug out bag is a basic concept to help get you from point a to point b; during the snow jam we had here in north georgia in late january, a lot of people would have been in a lot better situation if they had a BOB in the car; several of my employees wound up walking 6-10 miles in the snow to get home; my normal commute is 25 miles and takes 50 minutes; that night it took me six hours to get home, and I know how to drive in ice and snow...

I myself do have preps here at Boogewr woods to ride out most anything; most peeps don't...


seeker
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: sky otter on April 02, 2014, 06:22:11 PM


seeker
i hope you didn't think i was pickin..
i think  it's a great idea to educated any one who hasn't thought about it


being on my own mostly i have always traveled with supplies and stuff and think it's normal
and i'm always surprised when someone says.. why are you draging all that around..
and i answer   it's in case of an emergency.. and they say.. you just call someone
hahahahahahahahahah... yeah right
if you can't depend on yourself..you're..well you know where that was going


so any info you can impart is really good info ...


thanks for caring enough to do this
 8)
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: The Seeker on April 02, 2014, 07:00:10 PM
Sky, country folk like you and I have a history of taking care of and providing for ourselves...as the wheel turns I've always had to face and deal with what ever showed up...

and there have been times in my younger days when i was so broke i couldn't by a loaf of bread; but as soon as I could I would buy enough staples, usually flour, cornmeal, dried beans, cooking oil, and a few others so I could eat through the next dry spell...

then around 1980 I actually got to the point where I could stay a little ahead, canning and preserving from the garden, and stocking the pantry; been doing it ever since...

you keep adding those sage words for all to see, lil' sister...


seeker
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: sky otter on April 02, 2014, 07:24:00 PM


ah seeker
i advise primitive camping for a weekend for everyone...does wonders to folk... ;)

learning what you will need to survive for a weekend of primitive camping is a great start..
cause you can't cart everything  with you and you learn what to improvise with
i think the number one skill is clean water.. lots to learn with that one

so you have a freezer full of stuff..if the elec goes out for a week .. you're toast
oh so you have a generator..good for you.. how much gas have you got..?

sooo many things to consider.. no way can you cover all the  'what if's"
learning to  have faith in your self and be self reliant is an on going study of life
and the best advice  to follow

of course .. all those little things you can share won't go to waste either.. ;D


Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: The Seeker on April 02, 2014, 09:18:45 PM
Aye, lil' otter, self learning is always the best kind; in 2003 a buddy of mine and myself stayed in the desert outside Quartzite, Arizona for over a month at a Gold Prospector's claim site, and other than replenishing our water supply, lived basically off what we had brought with us as a grubstake, cooking over a campfire and spending 99% of our time without electricity, running water, refrigeration, and enjoyed the hell out of it...


unfortunately, most peeps don't have those skills or desire anymore...

Several items for the BOB that come in quite handy are ziploc bags; I usually keep several sandwich, quart, and gallon size along with some old plastic bags from the store and trash bags; can be quite handy...

another useful tool I have looks like a cell phone but is actually a taser; spider or snake bite areas can be purged of the venom by popping it a couple of times with it; isn't exactly pleasant, but it does work...


seeker
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: zorgon on April 03, 2014, 02:57:40 AM
I had a really long detaile survivor thread here at the beginning

Lost it all when we had the first meltdown :P

I will have to add some of it again

Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: The Seeker on April 03, 2014, 03:42:17 AM
Please do, Z; too many know too little...


seeker
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: astr0144 on April 03, 2014, 04:23:38 AM
Hi Seeker,

I assume that you have seen it at some time..

it seems to offer quite a few good tips on planning for emergencies..

https://www.efoodsdirect.com/blog/tag/alex-jones/

Alex Jones is offering a series of emergency food packages from a few days up to a years supply...

If one has the money this is quite an easy option to just buy say 6 to 12 months worth of supplies...

Otherwise...

Admittedly this may seem a bit expensive, but if one spends a bit of time researching does a bit of investigating...I am sure we could find some of these similar things elsewhere and create our own cheaper..

but it will offer some good ideas...

http://www.efoodsdirect.com/store/index.php/shop/food-supplies.html
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: Abracadabra on April 03, 2014, 05:05:02 AM
 
  Basic survival YEP we never know
We have started our ''kit'' last fall, we don't buy weekly
but we add some supplies sometimes,step by step it's easy
and feel more safe with
 
In my area we have to think about warm garments too
with the severe winter we just passed with some peaks at -43 Celsius.....in March  :o hummmmm
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: Abracadabra on April 03, 2014, 05:23:17 AM

A little trick in this subject
Do you know if you take a 6 volt battery hack and you
disassembly it (with precaution) you'll find 32 AA batteries
very good investment. 8)
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: rdunk on April 03, 2014, 10:02:36 AM
Of course, a lot of people have been thinking about this for a long time! Just for information on what others suggest and are doing to be "prepared, there are tons of youtube videos that address this subject. And the many videos are good sources for information that we each can use in deciding our own emergency/survival needs.

Obviously, some of the videos are amateurish, while others are more professionally done. To view, just put into the youtube search common subject words, such as bug-out, survival, prepare, emergency, and etc. Of course, there are internet links to be found using a similar word search that provide much detail. 
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: ArMaP on April 03, 2014, 12:07:36 PM
Considering that I live in an area that was affected by the strongest earthquake ever recorded in Europe, I should have something like that, but I do not. ;D

Cold weather is not much of problem here, as the lowest temperature I have ever witnessed was 0.5ยบ C, but, as in any city, food and water could be a problem, along with medication, although my asthma as become much more manageable than it was two years ago, I still need my salbutamol.
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: WarToad on April 03, 2014, 12:37:54 PM
everything I have listed except the water fits into a medium duty backpack quite easily along with a brick of .22long rifle shells and a nine shot revolver,
seeker

I have a 12g shotgun and 9mm Glock I keep on hand.  For the shotgun I keep a mix of ammo for it's versitility.  Deer slugs to various birdshot and buckshot.
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: rdunk on April 03, 2014, 03:19:07 PM
Well, there are multiple ways for an SHTF" event to occur, both corporately and individually. Most of us who have "some age" probably have experienced such an event(s). Some can be bad weather events, which affect some and not others, as we have seen this past winter in many areas of the country. Also tornados and hurricanes. There were millions without power as a result of hurricane Sandy, and as I remember, some people didn't have electrical power back for weeks or months.

For me, New Years 1979 was one such event. An ice storm hit North Central Texas New Years Eve night, and it did not get above freezing for about two weeks. We lost power that night, and water a day or two afterwards. I was prepared to stay reasonably warm with a large fireplace and wood. We could cook some with coals from the fireplace. So, we were able to stay there, with some difficulties. After the water went off, I would get buckets of water from my private lake, just in front of my house, for flushing the commodes. We did fine, until the lake froze over so thick that getting water for flushing became very difficult. That is when we "bugged-out" and went to my mom and dad's in the Dallas area, who had everything!!! :))

As a result, I did commit that I would not be caught like that again. Even the large fireplace would only heat the den to about 65 degrees tops, and the rest of the house was still very cold. That summer, I bought and installed my first wood stove, and it easily would heat our 2000 sq. ft. home - all rooms. Now of course, "wood pellet" stoves will do likewise, as I have used a pellet stove in another place too.

That was a time of family experience for us, and for us it clearly showed how important good preparation could be. I say that now, even though I wasn't really well prepared for it then, and, because of various circumstances, I am not that well prepared now.

The question remains for each of us, "how do we prepare" for what could be a life-changing event, especially those that commonly occur(s) somewhere most every year? To some extent, no-prep is like playing "Russian Roulette" with the circumstances - to a great extent, the cost of prep is much like the cost of insurance - we pay for it, but hope we never have to use it!

 
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: ArMaP on April 03, 2014, 03:45:25 PM
The question remains for each of us, "how do we prepare" for what could be a life-changing event, especially those that commonly occur(s) somewhere most every year?
As someone that works with exact things, I think that how we prepare depends on what we are preparing for, as preparing for something generic will probably result in too much work that may not be enough for specific cases.

In my case, as mentioned above, the most likely natural SHTF source is an earthquake, as this is an earthquake area (I think I have witnessed some 7 or 8 earthquakes in my life, the biggest and first a 7.8 in 1969) and we don't have hurricanes, big tornadoes (only very small ones), very low temperatures (I have never seen snow) or any of those ways nature has of showing how weak the humans are. :)
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: The Seeker on April 03, 2014, 07:23:35 PM
I have seen ice storms that took out our power for two weeks at a time in the 60's, 70's, and early 80's; had tornadoes tear up jack around us several times, even had a couple of hurricanes that blasted us in 1975 and 1994...not to mention the blizzard of '93...

each must examine the circumstances that apply to you and then decide how to prepare; I actually began the learning process about different events that could befall us and what would be the best course of action in 1977 after I discovered what POTUS Jimmy Carter did upon taking office; it was alledged by good sources that he took us from defcon 4 to defcon 2 for a hundred days for no reason other than to show the world his cojones...

I also remember the Cuban Missile crisis very well; we lived right down the road from Dobbins Air Base in Marietta, Georgia, and it seemed that every 5 minutes jets were scrambling over our house...

making preps for a SHTF scenario is not complicated and doesn't have to be expensive; I have been slowly building my base of supplies for over 30 years; I rotate out items with expiration dates and keep a running tab of the inventory; most of it is common sense and buying 3 cans of peas this week instead of 1...or corn...

I live in what used to be a rural area; a move farther out is in the plans for the near future.

Now for a few more items to add to the basic list: a folding shovel and a good hatchet will always be useful in making expedient shelter in adverse weather conditions;  there are many different small water purification items such as a Life Straw and purification tablets, and having charcoal on hand makes it easy to construct a water purifier; just need a bucket, some tinfoil,play sand, the charcoal, gravel, and a few minutes of time...



seeker
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: sky otter on April 03, 2014, 09:07:10 PM


ah seeker
expanding on the water thing would be nice...if you would , please

the more options on the water  stuff the better
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: rdunk on April 03, 2014, 10:38:08 PM
Hey Sky, Water Straw and etc: :)

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=waterstraw
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: sky otter on April 04, 2014, 10:40:13 AM


yeah rdunk thanks but  i know about those.. they're great if you are on the move

 i meant whatever method seeker was talking about
with sand and gravel..sounded like a leech bed..lol and it made me curious to learn another method

i think if you are smart you try this stuff before you really need it..to see what really works
water is the one thing we really need and pre testing helps weed the stuff that doesn't work for you

i always have bleach and the 8 drops of bleach into a gallon of water is good..but then straining it thur charcoal makes even a more tasty liquid...and you have to be careful about bleach and plastic containers...glass is your best option if possible


http://www.csgnetwork.com/h2oemergencypurifycalc.html

http://water.epa.gov/drink/emerprep/emergencydisinfection.cfm


when you hear the gov putting out ads on how to be ready for emergencies..
hummmm.. you wander a few things like what DO THEY KNOW
and that we have been warned.. if you aren't paying attention  you're just plaind ass stupid

 ;D
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: The Seeker on April 04, 2014, 01:06:55 PM
sky, the principle is similar to a leach bed; line a 5 gallon bucket with 6" of gravel in the bottom after drilling 15-20 1/8" holes around the bottom edge; put a layer of aluminum foil to cover it, punch several dozen pinholes in it in the center of the foil, then a layer of charcoal 3-4" deep, layer of aluminum foil to cover the charcoal, then 6" of sand; make 2 full layers like this;

you have to have the bucket where it can be put in a wash tub or something similar; pour a gallon of water in the top and when it comes out into the tub put it in a clean container with the bleach drops, let it sit for 24 hours and you are ready to go...


seeker
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: burntheships on April 04, 2014, 03:11:51 PM
Great stuff here.  :)

With Yellowstone, and LA going off, lots
of talk about earthquakes right now.
Its a good time to plan.

Being prepared mentally is top of the list.
SHTF situs will likely bring intense physical,
mental emotional stress.  Plan ahead with
a written strategy, and stash this away
with your BOB, and supplies. This does
not need to be long, a page or two should
do it.

Then, adding to the above ideas, in my
BOB I always want to have a comfortable
durable pair of socks, and lightweight
but sturdy work gloves.

If I had to start out on foot, I would make
sure to bring these with.



 

 
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: The Seeker on April 04, 2014, 08:07:29 PM
Great stuff here.  :)

With Yellowstone, and LA going off, lots
of talk about earthquakes right now.
Its a good time to plan.

it is never too late to plan until it is happening...

Quote
Being prepared mentally is top of the list.
SHTF situs will likely bring intense physical,
mental emotional stress.  Plan ahead with
a written strategy, and stash this away
with your BOB, and supplies. This does
not need to be long, a page or two should
do it.
very good BTS; a written plan of action helps to eliminate those brain farts that cause you to forget to bring your meds, boots, underwear, etc...

Quote
Then, adding to the above ideas, in my
BOB I always want to have a comfortable
durable pair of socks, and lightweight
but sturdy work gloves.

Agreed; a pair or two of cheap cotton gloves, a box of nitrile disposable gloves, and a good sturdy pair of leather gloves is a plus; I also try to keep an extra set of clothes with the BOB, and seldom do I go outside without comfortable, durable footwear, usually boots...
 

Quote
If I had to start out on foot, I would make
sure to bring these with.

Keeping a cool head and having a detailed plan complete with alternate routes or plans for different scenarios with greatly increase the chances of accomplishing your goals and help minimize wasting possibly precious moments trying to make a decision...


seeker
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: burntheships on April 12, 2014, 10:27:14 PM
a pair or two of cheap cotton gloves, a box of nitrile disposable gloves, and a good sturdy pair of leather gloves is a plus;


Great idea on the nitrile gloves, they take little room and weigh
nothing...yet could be a lifesaver....

Quote
complete with alternate routes or plans for different scenarios

Yep, great idea to have a map...I have one that has
my own explorations highlighted in yellow, I know
where I have been and what is what there.

This route map could also have emergency contact
numbers written in the borders...just for an extra just in case.

 ;)
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: ArMaP on April 13, 2014, 04:24:21 AM
Yep, great idea to have a map...
Would a military map be a better choice?

I ask because I have some (in digital format) that show many things that are not shown on a common road map, like water sources, type of terrain, etc.
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: burntheships on April 13, 2014, 05:03:18 AM
Would a military map be a better choice?

I ask because I have some (in digital format) that show many things that are not shown on a common road map, like water sources, type of terrain, etc.

The more, the better.  :D

Forest Service maps are also a plus, these may be similar.
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: The Seeker on April 13, 2014, 05:59:30 AM
The more, the better.  :D

Forest Service maps are also a plus, these may be similar.
Armap, BTS, both very good suggestions... it depends on if you are attempting to return home from work during SHTF, or going to a safe haven apart from your home domicile...

the plan for me is to be moving to a more remote (and secure) location in the future; it actually is only about 15 miles from where I live now but has many advantages over Booger Woods, being off the avenues of exspansion, running water,etc. (plus has a nice site to build an underground/earth sheltered bunker)...


seeker
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: sky otter on April 13, 2014, 07:33:11 AM


well if you are bugging out or staying put everyone should know some first aid like cpr
how to set a break, treat a burn, remove ticks..that sort of thing..also have some pain relief meds.. aspirin is probably the safest best bet there
if you are panning to use one of those silver blanets for warmth..make sure you have the right size
i have a friend who years ago bought a bunch cheap..only to find out they were 4X4 and not large enough for an adult to wrap up in..
so test whatever you plan on depending on


hey seeker..not much time left to dig that bunker  ;)
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: ArMaP on April 13, 2014, 09:49:05 AM
Armap, BTS, both very good suggestions... it depends on if you are attempting to return home from work during SHTF, or going to a safe haven apart from your home domicile...
I can get home from work with my eyes closed, my work place is some 50 metres from my home. ;D
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: rdunk on April 13, 2014, 09:34:51 PM
One of the things in the thoughts for planning - if the shtf happens to be an "EMP" hit, then we can expect the auto computer electronics to be fried, and thus inoperable. That will represent a "real inconvenience" to most of us, with no way to move about, except by foot - unless we have the old type of auto, that basically had no computer stuff - or cycles, pedal and/or powered.

Or of course, if we are a Knight in shining armor, then I suppose we could/should have at least one horse with wings anyway! :)
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: The Seeker on April 14, 2014, 11:02:44 AM
One of the things in the thoughts for planning - if the shtf happens to be an "EMP" hit, then we can expect the auto computer electronics to be fried, and thus inoperable. That will represent a "real inconvenience" to most of us, with no way to move about, except by foot - unless we have the old type of auto, that basically had no computer stuff - or cycles, pedal and/or powered.

Or of course, if we are a Knight in shining armor, then I suppose we could/should have at least one horse with wings anyway! :)
Tis a very good point over-looked by most nowadays;99% of all things electrical/electronic are susceptible to EMP unless shielded in a metal box or a Farraday cage...
which says 99% of everything is gonna go tits up...

bicycles and horses may be the next mainstay of travel once more along with older, tesla coil ignitions with points and no computers or sensors...

@sky otter: maybe late in the game to do what I am planning, but the geodesic dome I am going to build is simple in design, easy to build, has a built in Farraday cage with the rebar, and are extremely strong; once back filled and covered it will support 20 times what a conventional re-inforced flat slab will...

noise proof, storm(tornado) proof, and very energy efficient...


seeker
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: WarToad on April 14, 2014, 11:05:58 AM
I can get home from work with my eyes closed, my work place is some 50 metres from my home. ;D

HAHAHA!  I have you beat.  My work place is my office in my home.  I have about a 30 second commute time from bed to desk.
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: ArMaP on April 14, 2014, 01:31:36 PM
HAHAHA!  I have you beat.  My work place is my office in my home.  I have about a 30 second commute time from bed to desk.
Why do you take so long? ;D
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: The Seeker on April 17, 2014, 03:04:16 PM
OK part one was dealing with the BOB to get you home in a SHTF scenario; most peeps are going to have to evaluate whether to hunker down and ride it out at home or move to better accomidations; many have already planned their route and have prepped a safe haven; most haven't...

It bodes well to have Plan A, and B, and C...


seeker
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: Fruitbat on April 17, 2014, 04:31:19 PM
A little trick in this subject
Do you know if you take a 6 volt battery hack and you
disassembly it (with precaution) you'll find 32 AA batteries
very good investment. 8)

What is a 6volt battery hack?

Another handy hint, which I have used to good effect, is to make yourself a mains lead with 2 plugs on it.
Mark 1 plug "generator" mark the other plug "danger do not touch", then put it where only YOU can find it.
In the event of the mains supply going off, you can if you are careful, and remember to turn the BIG ISOLATING switch OFF you can then power your entire house quickly and simply from a portable generator by plugging it in to a wall socket..

Of course this is extremely dangerous to anyone who unplugs your carefully labelled "danger do not touch" plug, very hazardous if the power comes back on and you haven't isolated your house from the mains but if you can manage the hazard it's way better than sitting in the dark. 

IN our case, last time the electric went off we could just about run the fridge, household lighting and TV / laptops off my suitcase generator. All the rest of our street was in darkness except for one house which still had all it's lights on :c)

If you have invested in solar, make sure that it will actually power your house if the mains goes off, I believe that some "feed in" systems don't actually do that.. Also if you have solar, you still will want some batteries and and an invertor with a high current charger, if you want the fridge to run through the night...

In the winter your solar array gives 1/10th of what you get in the summer I am told, so if you have a 5KW array, you'll just about get 500watts in the winter. For true off grid living using todays technolgy I'm thinking that an auxiliary water cooled diesel generator is the way too go. (Diesel fuel can be improvised more easily than lighter fuels like gas and petrol) and by using a heat exchanger you can get hot water at the same time that you charge your batteries and run your house off the generator from the water jacket.

In a proper SHTF situation a years worth of suitable fuel should be easy enough to liberate from your nearest commercial airfield (jet fuel) and of course, diesel engines don't have ignition circuits to be fried by emp.

OF COURSE if hho ACTUALLY WORKED, You could just run your bubbler (which only uses a few hundred watts at the most) off the generator... But then we'd all be off grid all the time. (forget running your car off HHO, your house can be run properly off a far smaller motor than your car needs...)

FB.
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: The Seeker on April 17, 2014, 06:26:24 PM
Allright, fruitbat, the proper way to hook in the generator is to wire in a junction switch between the meter base and the main breaker in the panel; the one I prefer to use has 2 disconnects, the first one connects the meter feed to the main breaker with a tie in to the second switch that connects my 240v feed from the generator...

power goes off, I open the first switch, disconnecting the mains from the circuit; fire up the generator then close the second switch which feeds the current into the panel; I have enough wattage to run my fridges and freezer, power the well pump, and have lights in a couple of rooms, all on a heavy enough wire to carry the load; I do cut several things off like the stove and hot water heater; don't have enough wattage unless I run both generators...

one other item is to use LED lighting as a backup; they draw little current but provide a lot of light; I have seen several places that use 12v led rope lights and are quite well lit;
I have a 12x24 canopy that I park the boat under and also use it for my cookout area; 3 led ropelights and 3 small strands of led lights give me ample light at night...

another option is to use a dual power refrigerator; most are set up for motor homes and campers, operate off 12v or propane with automatic switching; voltage drops, it switches to gas; motor running so voltage goes up, switches to electric again; works very well, and does not consume a lot of gas or battery juice...


seeker
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: The Seeker on September 23, 2014, 07:10:57 PM
I have been pulled away from this thread for too long  8)

expedient shelter can be a necessary item when having to deal with storms or other chaos we encounter when away from home and in the situation where you are on your own; it's cold, wet, and you are getting tired...all you have is the items in your BOB and an hour or so before it gets dark...

I always have parachute cord and usually a length of light-weight nylon rope rolled up in the tarp in my pack; find a couple trees a few feet apart [6-8] and string the rope between them 4-5 feet off the ground;

fold the tarp over the rope and secure both ends; with an 12x12 that gives me enough room to sit or lie comfortably and have room for a small fire; I carry metal tent stakes to pin down the edges; 2 packs of them at wal-mart cost about 8 bucks and are worth it...

the ends of the tarp I will fold in to make a closed flap I can fasten with cord or plastic tie straps thru the grommets; it isn't pretty, but it does help keep the wind out and the heat in...
just remember to leave an opening for a smoke flap...

I use a space blanket for a ground cloth and with any luck can pick up enough limbs and branches to start and maintain a modest fire; try to avoid burning green wood if possible; you get a lot more smoke...

a few shavings of magnesium, some tinder and wood, and in no time I have warmth, i am in the dry, can heat food or drink, and rest with some protection from the elements...

seeker
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: The Seeker on September 24, 2014, 07:10:17 PM
I took a few minutes last night to take everything out of the bag i keep in my work truck and do inventory and discovered a few things i had forgotten about  8) must be old age creeping up on me...

in a small plastic tin i have a fishing tackle kit; just some hooks on leaders, weights, a small spool of line and a couple of floats, a multi-tool, and a small set of nail clippers...

in the same pocket there is also a compact set of binoculars and a magnifying glass, bottle of nail polish, super glue, a roll of electricians rubber tape...

Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: burntheships on September 24, 2014, 07:32:24 PM
in a small plastic tin i have a fishing tackle kit; just some hooks on leaders, weights, a small spool of line and a couple of floats, a multi-tool, and a small set of nail clippers..

Resourceful addition to a small tin, good idea on that fishing kit  8)

I also have added a few tiny sea salt packets, and same raw cane sugar
packets enclosed in a thin sandwich ziploc. If one can find them, a few tiny
mylar packets of olive oil would a good addition. Add in some similar packets
of liquid soap, shampoo, ointments, and a few Emergen-C packs.
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: The Seeker on December 07, 2016, 07:04:51 AM
my, how time flies; it has been 2 years since the last time I posted to this thread, and there have been a lot of changes since then...

back to expedient field shelter: location plays an important part in selecting your campsite especially in cold weather. A hilly area with trees is preferred to open or flat areas; cold air settles and warm rises so a nice spot midway between the high and low area is preferred. One thing to remember is Pine trees give off heat which is a plus, and a pile of pine straw makes a fairly comfortable mattress pad. A lot of your preps depend on if you are sheltering for just the night or for several days; for temporary use, try to find a large enough tree to be somewhat stable in windy conditions and with a medium sized limb within 3 or 4 feet of the ground that you can trim to put your tarp over,fastening that end to the tree. Scoop out a firepit at the other end and attempt to locate enough large stones to ring it with; these help to contain the flames and also serve to radiate heat once they become warm.

  I try to keep a ziploc baggie full of dryer lint in my backpack for it makes excellent tinder when combined with a few magnesium shavings and will quickly start a fire even with damp wood ; even in rainy conditions most of the fallen limbs and tree trunks will be dry on the bottom side. Try to avoid lying directly on the ground if possible; a pile of leaves, pine straw, or fresh cut pine boughs covered with a ground cloth or a trash bag plus a thermal blanket will help insulate you and help retain body heat.

Seeker
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: thorfourwinds on December 07, 2016, 12:14:54 PM
My wife thinks I'm crazy to save dryer lint...and I have a lot of it.

Vaseline-soaked cotton balls work pretty well, too.
Title: Re: Basic survival prep 101: the bug out bag
Post by: The Seeker on December 07, 2016, 12:55:31 PM
My wife thinks I'm crazy to save dryer lint...and I have a lot of it.

Vaseline-soaked cotton balls work pretty well, too.
Indeed they do,Thor, and can be used for medical purposes also if you keep them sealed in a sanitary manner. Apple cider vinegar is also a good thing to keep in the bag for it has a wide range of uses also, along with a bottle of iodine and mercurachrome; any cut or scratch needs to be tended to immediately in a survival situation, Bactine and Neosporin are need to have items also along with alcohol wipes and peroxide...

the nylon line in the fishing kit can be used for sutures if needed,along with the sewing kit and super glue

Seeker