Pegasus Research Consortium

Breaking News => World News - Current Events => Topic started by: sky otter on June 09, 2013, 07:23:42 AM

Title: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on June 09, 2013, 07:23:42 AM
 ??? ??? ??? >:(

did you really think there was any privacy left?








Series: Glenn Greenwald on security and libertyPrevious | Index Boundless Informant: the NSA's secret tool to track global surveillance dataRevealed: The NSA's powerful tool for cataloguing global surveillance data – including figures on US collection

l Glenn Greenwald and Ewen MacAskill

guardian.co.uk, Sunday 9 June 2013 10.08 EDT


(http://i81.servimg.com/u/f81/13/55/53/83/boundl10.jpg)
at the link you can enlarge areas



   The color scheme ranges from green (least subjected to surveillance) through yellow and orange to red (most surveillance). Note the '2007' date in the image relates to the document from which the interactive map derives its top secret classification, not to the map itself.
The National Security Agency has developed a powerful tool for recording and analysing where its intelligence comes from, raising questions about its repeated assurances to Congress that it cannot keep track of all the surveillance it performs on American communications.

The Guardian has acquired top-secret documents about the NSA datamining tool, called Boundless Informant, that details and even maps by country the voluminous amount of information it collects from computer and telephone networks.

The focus of the internal NSA tool is on counting and categorizing the records of communications, known as metadata, rather than the content of an email or instant message.

The Boundless Informant documents show the agency collecting almost 3 billion pieces of intelligence from US computer networks over a 30-day period ending in March 2013. One document says it is designed to give NSA officials answers to questions like, "What type of coverage do we have on country X" in "near real-time by asking the SIGINT [signals intelligence] infrastructure."

An NSA factsheet about the program, acquired by the Guardian, says: "The tool allows users to select a country on a map and view the metadata volume and select details about the collections against that country."

Under the heading "Sample use cases", the factsheet also states the tool shows information including: "How many records (and what type) are collected against a particular country."

A snapshot of the Boundless Informant data, contained in a top secret NSA "global heat map" seen by the Guardian, shows that in March 2013 the agency collected 97bn pieces of intelligence from computer networks worldwide.

 The heat map reveals how much data is being collected from around the world. Note the '2007' date in the image relates to the document from which the interactive map derives its top secret classification, not to the map itself. Iran was the country where the largest amount of intelligence was gathered, with more than 14bn reports in that period, followed by 13.5bn from Pakistan. Jordan, one of America's closest Arab allies, came third with 12.7bn, Egypt fourth with 7.6bn and India fifth with 6.3bn.

The heatmap gives each nation a color code based on how extensively it is subjected to NSA surveillance. The color scheme ranges from green (least subjected to surveillance) through yellow and orange to red (most surveillance).

The disclosure of the internal Boundless Informant system comes amid a struggle between the NSA and its overseers in the Senate over whether it can track the intelligence it collects on American communications. The NSA's position is that it is not technologically feasible to do so.

At a hearing of the Senate intelligence committee In March this year, Democratic senator Ron Wyden asked James Clapper, the director of national intelligence: "Does the NSA collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of Americans?"

"No sir," replied Clapper.

Judith Emmel, an NSA spokeswoman, told the Guardian in a response to the latest disclosures: "NSA has consistently reported – including to Congress – that we do not have the ability to determine with certainty the identity or location of all communicants within a given communication. That remains the case."

Other documents seen by the Guardian further demonstrate that the NSA does in fact break down its surveillance intercepts which could allow the agency to determine how many of them are from the US. The level of detail includes individual IP addresses.

IP address is not a perfect proxy for someone's physical location but it is rather close, said Chris Soghoian, the principal technologist with the Speech Privacy and Technology Project of the American Civil Liberties Union. "If you don't take steps to hide it, the IP address provided by your internet provider will certainly tell you what country, state and, typically, city you are in," Soghoian said.

That approximation has implications for the ongoing oversight battle between the intelligence agencies and Congress.

On Friday, in his first public response to the Guardian's disclosures this week on NSA surveillance, Barack Obama said that that congressional oversight was the American peoples' best guarantee that they were not being spied on.

"These are the folks you all vote for as your representatives in Congress and they are being fully briefed on these programs," he said. Obama also insisted that any surveillance was "very narrowly circumscribed".

Senators have expressed their frustration at the NSA's refusal to supply statistics. In a letter to NSA director General Keith Alexander in October last year, senator Wyden and his Democratic colleague on the Senate intelligence committee, Mark Udall, noted that "the intelligence community has stated repeatedly that it is not possible to provide even a rough estimate of how many American communications have been collected under the Fisa Amendments Act, and has even declined to estimate the scale of this collection."

At a congressional hearing in March last year, Alexander denied point-blank that the agency had the figures on how many Americans had their electronic communications collected or reviewed. Asked if he had the capability to get them, Alexander said: "No. No. We do not have the technical insights in the United States." He added that "nor do we do have the equipment in the United States to actually collect that kind of information".

Soon after, the NSA, through the inspector general of the overall US intelligence community, told the senators that making such a determination would jeopardize US intelligence operations – and might itself violate Americans' privacy.

"All that senator Udall and I are asking for is a ballpark estimate of how many Americans have been monitored under this law, and it is disappointing that the inspectors general cannot provide it," Wyden told Wired magazine at the time.

The documents show that the team responsible for Boundless Informant assured its bosses that the tool is on track for upgrades.

The team will "accept user requests for additional functionality or enhancements," according to the FAQ acquired by the Guardian. "Users are also allowed to vote on which functionality or enhancements are most important to them (as well as add comments). The BOUNDLESSINFORMANT team will periodically review all requests and triage according to level of effort (Easy, Medium, Hard) and mission impact (High, Medium, Low)."

Emmel, the NSA spokeswoman, told the Guardian: "Current technology simply does not permit us to positively identify all of the persons or locations associated with a given communication (for example, it may be possible to say with certainty that a communication traversed a particular path within the internet. It is harder to know the ultimate source or destination, or more particularly the identity of the person represented by the TO:, FROM: or CC: field of an e-mail address or the abstraction of an IP address).

"Thus, we apply rigorous training and technological advancements to combine both our automated and manual (human) processes to characterize communications – ensuring protection of the privacy rights of the American people. This is not just our judgment, but that of the relevant inspectors general, who have also reported this."

She added: "The continued publication of these allegations about highly classified issues, and other information taken out of context, makes it impossible to conduct a reasonable discussion on the merits of these programs."

Additional reporting: James Ball in New York and Spencer Ackerman in Washington

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jun/08/nsa-boundless-informant-global-datamining
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on June 09, 2013, 07:38:31 AM
it enough to make you go back to using the land lines..  :'( >:(

just a few articles on the tech page at huff post here


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tech/



What Is PalTalk? Video Chat Service Among Facebook, Google And Other Big Names Being Spied On
The Huffington Post  |  By Alexis Kleinman Posted: 06/07/2013 1:18 pm EDT  |  Updated: 06/07/2013 1:56 pm EDT

Late Thursday, major reports from The Washington Post and The Guardian revealed that the U.S. government is collecting data from nine of the biggest Internet companies in the country. The list of firms is composed of nearly all household names -- Microsoft, Yahoo, Google, Facebook, AOL, Skype, YouTube and Apple -- in addition to one lesser-known company: PalTalk.

So what exactly is PalTalk, and why is the government interested in accessing its servers along with those of the Silicon Valley bigwigs?  




NSA Spying: Whistleblowers Claim Vindication On Surveillance State Warnings
Posted: 06/06/2013 8:30 pm EDT  |  Updated: 06/06/2013 9:19 pm EDT


For years, four former National Security Agency analysts warned that the government was conducting widespread surveillance on domestic communications. Their warnings were largely ignored.

But on Thursday, after The Guardian newspaper reported that Verizon was turning over customer phone records to the intelligence agency as part of a secret court order, Kirk Wiebe had a “feeling of great gratification.”

“What we've been saying all along has proven to be so," the 68-year-old whistleblower told The Huffington Post. "Our worst fears are being realized.”

While at the NSA, Wiebe, along with Ed Loomis and Bill Binney, created a computer program that could isolate large amounts of information collected by the NSA while protecting Americans’ privacy. But the NSA ignored their program, saying “it was too invasive,” Loomis said.

"We had a solution to this entire problem that would have avoided this whole mess," Wiebe said.  




Obama Cyber Memo Is Just The Latest Sign That The U.S. Is Preparing For Cyberwar
The Huffington Post  |  By Gerry Smith Posted: 06/07/2013 5:43 pm EDT  |  Updated: 06/07/2013 6:07 pm EDT

 
 .A top-secret presidential memo published Friday marked the latest sign that the Obama administration is ready to go on the offensive in a potential cyberwar.

On Friday, the Guardian published a secret presidential directive calling on national security and intelligence officials to create a list of potential foreign targets for U.S. cyber attacks. The 18-page document, known as Presidential Policy Directive 20, aims "to put in place tools and a framework to enable government to make decisions" on cyber actions, a senior administration official told the Guardian.

The directive states that cyber attacks can be launched as part of "anticipatory action taken against imminent threats," but should comply with U.S. and international law and receive approval from the president if they are "reasonably likely to result in significant consequences," according to the Guardian.  




forgot this one....



Internet Shrugs Off NSA Data Mining: People 'Numb To The Fact That They're Being Watched'
Posted: 06/07/2013 7:06 pm EDT  |  Updated: 06/07/2013 9:08 pm EDT  


one more..different source


http://www.nbcnews.com/technology/facebook-forensics-what-feds-can-learn-your-digital-crumbs-6C10240840?ocid=msnhp&pos=5

Facebook forensics? What the feds can learn from your digital crumbs

Bits of you are all over the Internet. If you've signed into Google and searched, saved a file in your Dropbox folder, made a phone call using Skype, or just woken up in the morning and checked your email, you're leaving a trail of digital crumbs. People who have access to this information — companies powering your emails and Web searches, advertisers who are strategically directing ads at you — can build a picture of who you are, what you like, and what you will probably do next. Revelations about government counter-terrorism programs such as PRISM indicate that federal agents and other operatives may use this data, too.




and no one will yell real loud because they don't think it will matter
untill years down the road when we will wonder..

how the hell did we get here...


sigh
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Ellirium113 on June 09, 2013, 09:01:55 AM
People are complacent in letting the government trample on them so long as they think it is for the greater good.

(http://img835.imageshack.us/img835/6039/nowar21bc.jpg)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Gigas on June 09, 2013, 09:41:14 AM
Indeed they do............

The latest uncovered snoop tattle tale is called finspy or finfisher by a UK firm called gamma international ltd.


Government security officials were told it could be covertly installed on suspects' computers through exploiting security lapses in the update procedures of non-suspect software. They piggy backed it on mozilla firefox as some plugin using firefix credentials so anti-virus would not tag it suspicious when scanned.

Mozilla sent a cease and desist letter to Gamma to stop them from using firefox as a delivery system since it was found they integrate the trojan parasite in as a product of mozilla upon an update.

Anti-virus software developers have attempted to identify this bugger since previous anti-virus scans fail to detect it.

This thing was found by dissidents who ransacked the egyptian office of secret police and they found a contract for a license to run this software from gamma international ltd.

They now can see you by your wi fi as well. It is claimed the wi fi tells them where you are, what room and your movements. This is creepy but hey, we all now have smart appliances tellin them all about us.

Just a thing about smart appliances. My sister bought a smart washer and dryer. When we talk on the phone and she walks by the washer and dryer, the phone breaks up and her conversation chops so bad I cannot hear what she is saying.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Gigas on June 09, 2013, 09:59:49 AM
I forgot to ad this so want to take the opportunity to ratchet another post number to my profile, anyway.

That same sister who has the smart appliances, had the gas company out a few weeks ago. I went out to look over and see what the guy was doing and he had an extremely large wrench in hand as he walked back to his truck and tossed it in with a big bang.

I walk over look at her gas meter to see if I can detect what he was doing. I see nothing new added so she comes out and I ask, what was the gas guy doing. She says he showed up cause there was a gas leak. I go, how did he know that and she says I don't know.

Not saying he did anything nefarious but I did see soapy suds around a fitting but how did the gas guy and company know there was a leak way out here in the country.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 09, 2013, 10:13:29 AM
They now can see you by your wi fi as well. It is claimed the wi fi tells them where you are, what room and your movements.
I doubt it, I don't see any way of that being possible.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 09, 2013, 10:15:32 AM
Not saying he did anything nefarious but I did see soapy suds around a fitting but how did the gas guy and company know there was a leak way out here in the country.
Probably by noticing a constant consumption of a small (I suppose it was a small leak) amount of gas.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Gigas on June 09, 2013, 10:19:26 AM
I doubt it, I don't see any way of that being possible.


Keep tellin yourself that. I guess radar doesn't work in your realm either.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: deuem on June 09, 2013, 10:24:54 AM
My gas company now by law comes once or twice a year into the house and checks all the fittings for leaks. Maybe there they only check the outside. Big brother is watching everything. What a boring job some people must have. Sitting for countless hours reviewing endless data.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Gigas on June 09, 2013, 10:38:39 AM
Funny thing is, when the guy was done, he drove on down the road past other houses. Why did he stop only at this one house and how did he know there was a leak. Perhaps a smart device is on the meter.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on June 09, 2013, 10:39:38 AM
  ::)

and there's always more..isn't there... >:(



Glenn Greenwald On 'This Week': 'You Should' Expect More Revelations From Me
The Huffington Post  |  By Rebecca Shapiro Posted: 06/09/2013 11:48 am EDT  |  Updated: 06/09/2013 11:49 am EDT

The Guardian's Glenn Greenwald appeared on ABC's "This Week" on Sunday and told host George Stephanopoulos that the public should expect more revelations from him.

Last week, Greenwald broke the bombshell story about the NSA collecting phone data from millions of Verizon customers. Additional stories on major government surveillance programs followed, including news about the NSA program called Prism that allows officials to collect material from some of the country's largest Internet companies (including AOL, HuffPost's parent company). On Sunday, Greenwald published another story about an NSA datamining tool used for global surveillance called Boundless Informant.

"Should we be expecting more revelations from you?" Stephanopoulos asked Greenwald.

"You should," he said.

During the segment, Greenwald responded to criticisms from the Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, who called The Guardian's reports "reprehensible." Greenwald said:

"quote"
Every single time any major media outlet reports on something that the government is hiding, that political officials don't want people to know, such as the fact that they are collecting the phone records of all Americans, regardless of any suspicion of wrongdoing, the people in power do exactly the same thing. They attack the media as the messenger and they are trying to discredit the story. This has been going back decades, ever since the Pentagon papers were released by the New York Times, and political officials said you are endangering national security. The only thing we've endangered is the reputation of the people in power who are building this massive spying apparatus about any accountability who are trying to hide from the American people what it is that they are doing.
"quote"

Last week, NBC justice correspondent Pete Williams said that it was "very likely" the Justice Department would investigate the leak. Greenwald told The New York Times that his source was "a reader" of his. On "This Week," Greenwald said that there could have been more than one source. "Have you been contacted by the FBI or any law enforcement official yet?" Stephanopoulos asked.

"No. And any time they would like to speak to me, I would be more than happy to speak to them, and I will tell them that there is this thing called the Constitution, and the very first amendment of which guarantees a free press," Greenwald said. "As an American citizen, I have every right and even the obligation as a journalist to tell my fellow citizens and our readers what it is that the government is doing, that they don't want people in the United States to know about, and I'm happy to talk to them at any time, and the attempt to intimidate journalists and sources with these constant threats of investigation aren't going to work."

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/09/glenn-greenwald-this-week-should-expect-more-revelations_n_3411834.html
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 09, 2013, 10:45:14 AM

Keep tellin yourself that. I guess radar doesn't work in your realm either.
OK, then please explain how does that system it works.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on June 09, 2013, 10:49:27 AM


and I'm happy to talk to them at any time, and the attempt to intimidate journalists and sources with these constant threats of investigation aren't going to work."

no but his might

'4 Intelligence Officials' Allegedly Joke Of 'Disappearing' NSA Leaker, Reporter (UPDATED)
Posted: 06/08/2013 10:57 pm EDT  |  Updated: 06/09/2013 9:34 am EDT  


 Leading foreign policy analyst Steve Clemons said he witnessed a rather disturbing conversation while waiting for a flight at the Dulles airport on Saturday.

According to Clemons, four men sitting near him were discussing an intelligence conference they had just attended, and turned to the topic of the NSA leaks. One said that both the reporter and leaker should be "disappeared," a term used to describe secret murders and abductions carried out by authoritarian governments. Clemons said on Twitter the suggestion seemed to be "bravado" and a "disturbing joke." He said that the officials were talking loudly, "almost bragging."

HuffPost asked Clemons via Twitter how he could be sure they were in the intelligence community and he noted that "one wore a white knit national counterterrorism center shirt." But more importantly, he said, the conversation led him to conclude that they were certainly in the community, especially given the conference they talked about attending. They discussed former Ambassador John Negroponte as having been in attendance. (If you know what conference that was, email openreporting@huffingtonpost.com.)

Clemons, who is editor at large at The Atlantic, said he did not know who the officials were or what agency they were with. He recorded part of the conversation and took some photos, which he plans to post online.

The incident comes just days after news broke that the NSA had been obtaining millions of phone records daily. The story was first reported by Glenn Greenwald at the Guardian.

Later this week, it was also reported that the NSA program, PRISM, also tapped into data from several major tech companies, including Google, Apple and AOL (which owns The Huffington Post.)

UPDATE: Clemons has learned that the men were in town attending an event hosted by the Intelligence and National Security Alliance, which lists dress code for the dinner as "black tie or mess dress."

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/08/intelligence-officials-nsa-leak_n_3409726.html
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Gigas on June 09, 2013, 12:11:18 PM
OK, then please explain how does that system it works.


Same principle as radar. Now, because your first deficient response was of incredulity, affirming your position, you doubt it, look it up for your own self aware fulfillment. Google search, its out there.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: petrus4 on June 09, 2013, 12:13:04 PM
The NSA can record whatever they want, for all the good it will do them.  Unless they have literally human level artificial intelligence, they are never going to have even a quarter of the manpower necessary to audit or process all of it.  Yes, to a certain extent they can already do keyword searching, but that still doesn't make them anywhere near as omniscient as articles like this try and claim.

In a speech Naomi Wolf gave a few years back, she mentioned that under the German Stasi, 10% of the population actually had a Stasi file; for the reason of simple logistics.  Tyrants are always a tiny minority of the population; which in turn means that there are always going to be vastly more people to be spied on, than there are people doing the actual spying.

The reason why I bring up the Naomi Wolf speech, is to emphasise the point that the only way surveillance really works, or can work, is by making people think that the government is omniscient, and sees everything.  It never really does; but what they want to do, more than anything else, is to make people afraid of that idea.  It's the same way they've largely destroyed peer to peer file sharing; they were never able to sue or shut down more than 1% of the people doing it, tops, but the way they managed it was by making you feel that you never knew whether or not you were going to be part of that 1%.

If you really want to help people, I'd reconsider circulating articles like this.  By spreading it around and raising fear and paranoia with it, you're actually playing right into the government's hands.  The main thing they want to do is keep people afraid and feeling powerless; and making the public think that they can know everything we do, before we do it, is one of the most effective ways they can do that.

Wanting to keep people informed is admirable; but before you circulate something which you hope is going to do that, it's worth asking whether or not something is really going to have a constructive effect on someone and help them, or whether it's just going to keep them feeling powerless, depressed, and afraid.  That is ultimately all this sort of information is going to do.

The only reason why the Europeans have been able to throw out Monsanto, and Americans haven't, is not because Americans have less power than people living in Europe; it's rather that they think they have less.

Contemporary America is one of the most politically cowardly populations on the planet, in my observation; and what is even worse, is that more than most other people, Americans also literally worship the instruments of their own political repression.  The President, and the military etc.  The government is not going to stop being a problem, until you literally stop thinking it is one.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Elvis Hendrix on June 09, 2013, 12:22:50 PM
The NSA can record whatever they want, for all the good it will do them.  Unless they have literally human level artificial intelligence, they are never going to have even a quarter of the manpower necessary to audit or process all of it.  Yes, to a certain extent they can already do keyword searching, but that still doesn't make them anywhere near as omniscient as articles like this try and claim.

In a speech Naomi Wolf gave a few years back, she mentioned that under the German Stasi, 10% of the population actually had a Stasi file; for the reason of simple logistics.  Tyrants are always a tiny minority of the population; which in turn means that there are always going to be vastly more people to be spied on, than there are people doing the actual spying.

The reason why I bring up the Naomi Wolf speech, is to emphasise the point that the only way surveillance really works, or can work, is by making people think that the government is omniscient, and sees everything.  It never really does; but what they want to do, more than anything else, is to make people afraid of that idea.  It's the same way they've largely destroyed peer to peer file sharing; they were never able to sue or shut down more than 1% of the people doing it, tops, but the way they managed it was by making you feel that you never knew whether or not you were going to be part of that 1%.

If you really want to help people, don't circulate articles like this.  It's baseless fearporn; and by spreading it around and raising fear and paranoia with it, you're actually playing right into the government's hands.  The main thing they want to do is keep people afraid and feeling powerless; and making the public think that they can know everything we do, before we do it, is one of the most effective ways they can do that.

Wanting to keep people informed is admirable; but before you circulate something which you hope is going to do that, it's worth asking whether or not something is really going to have a constructive effect on someone and help them, or whether it's just going to keep them feeling powerless, depressed, and afraid.  That is ultimately all this sort of information is going to do.

The only reason why the Europeans have been able to throw out Monsanto, and Americans haven't, is not because Americans have less power than people living in Europe; it's rather that they think they have less.

Contemporary America is one of the most politically cowardly populations on the planet, in my observation; and what is even worse, is that more than most other people, Americans also literally worship the instruments of their own political repression.  The President, and the military etc.  The government is not going to stop being a problem, until you literally stop thinking it is one.

Shrewd, very shrewd.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Gigas on June 09, 2013, 12:40:00 PM
Petrus4, your analogy circles itself by telling us they did it in europe but in America we can't. So if they failed to talk about it, report news on it, how did they know to fight it.

That is how in America, the masses must be informed to whats happening, make decisions to stop it. We have to know about it, read news stories on it, hear first hand accounts of it in action to understand what's going on and the outside looking in collective minds now need to formulate a strategy to stop it from intruding further into the American life style of historical liberty.

This has to do with the global picture and one by one its happening. Its here now and we have to do something rather than stand by and letting it go on consuming the planet.

Americans, by worldly standards,  have it easy and people work for what they got. Not because we simply reach out and take it, we earn it by becoming responsible and raising families that takes money and consumer products to sustain that life style as life gets better by mankinds determination to keep the system propped up and running.

Power is knowledge and what you don't know will kill you.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Elvis Hendrix on June 09, 2013, 01:03:14 PM
Rise like Lions after slumber
In unvanquishable number,
Shake your chains to earth like dew
Which in sleep had fallen on you -
Ye are many - they are few.

Shelley.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on June 09, 2013, 01:38:29 PM


i do agree that spreading gloom and doom is playing into the wrong hands

obviously i don't feel posting these articles falls into that category

first off they are not trying to intimidate with knowledge of watching you..
they were keeping it secret so as to contol you.
.big difference
and if you think it is only happening here..well look closer

helping people is getting the info to them that there is a program we need to
step on
and shout NO to..in many ways...talking is usually the start

knowledge is power
and
without knowing what the gubs are doing why would you even think about it.
.let alone talk about it and then move on it...

i have read your disdain for this country and it's humans...that saddens me cause you have
never experienced americans and what really happens when they are shaken awake
and yes until the bottom fell out of the cushy middleclass  - apathy was king

but there is nothing like financial shake up to make folks look at why..and see what needs to be done to make a change

i laugh at them equating the social cesspool as a guage ...there are many of us not on f b and bird talk
but on important sites like conspiracy stuff ( ;)..dang wierd sense of humor - sigh  ;D)



if you look at history you will witness that until they had nothing to lose most folks don't do anything...folks here are losing what they worked hard for and believe me they are looking to make a change

i just hope it won't be too much longer that it is the majority looking to make that change


Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on June 09, 2013, 01:47:26 PM

back to the story

..this guy needs to be praised
and i am sending as much protective energy as possible to him



'I will be made to suffer for my actions': Self-identified source for NSA leaks comes forward
The Guardian

(http://)

Edward Snowden is the self-identified source of documents and information pertaining to government data collection programs.


By Andrew Rafferty, Staff Writer, NBC News
A 29-year-old former technical assistant for the CIA revealed in England's the Guardian newspaper Sunday that he is the source who leaked information about secret National Security Administration programs that revealed the widespread surveillance of U.S. citizens.

Edward Snowden, who currently works for defense contractor Booz Allen Hamilton, told the Guardian that he knows there will punishment for exposing the classified information, but said, “I'm willing to sacrifice all of that because I can't in good conscience allow the US government to destroy privacy, internet freedom and basic liberties for people around the world with this massive surveillance machine they're secretly building."

Advertise | AdChoicesNBC News has not independently confirmed that Snowden leaked the information.

Last week, the Guardian published a report revealing that the Obama administration had been monitoring Verizon customers phone records in the U.S. Shortly after, the Washington Post reported on a massive NSA program called PRISM, a surveillance program that gathered vast amounts of information from the world's largest web services.

The Post also identified Snowden as the source of the information on Sunday.

Snowden told the Guardian, "I understand that I will be made to suffer for my actions," but "I will be satisfied if the federation of secret law, unequal pardon and irresistible executive powers that rule the world that I love are revealed even for an instant."

The self-identified source of documents and information pertaining to government data collection program said he has been hiding in a hotel room in Hong Kong since divulging the government secrets. For the past three weeks he has only left his room three times and fears he is being spied on, he told the newspaper.

Snowden said he has been pleased so far with the fallout from making the information public, and has no regrets.

"You can't wait around for someone else to act," he said. "I had been looking for leaders, but I realized that leadership is about being the first to act

http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/06/09/18865637-i-will-be-made-to-suffer-for-my-actions-self-identified-source-for-nsa-leaks-comes-forward?lite
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 09, 2013, 01:51:08 PM
Not saying he did anything nefarious but I did see soapy suds around a fitting but how did the gas guy and company know there was a leak way out here in the country.

Probably by noticing a constant consumption of a small (I suppose it was a small leak) amount of gas.

Gas Sniffer Trucks...

(http://assets.bizjournals.com/story_image/1096541*304.jpg)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 09, 2013, 02:02:34 PM
The NSA can record whatever they want, for all the good it will do them.  Unless they have literally human level artificial intelligence, they are never going to have even a quarter of the manpower necessary to audit or process all of it.

Okay look.... first you need to ask WHY are they collecting all this data? What possible use could it be to know your aunt Gertrude's chicken soup recipe or what your girl friend said to you?

You say "Unless they have literally human level artificial intelligence" Well think about it for a second.. What would you need to create a true AI?  Any computer can do calculations at the speed of light and out do the human mind... BUT what they cannot do is reason. Human minds are scrambled yet we reason (well most do :P ) but at the same time we are always going off on tangents and irrelevant banter.

So if you want a true AI to emulate a human mind... you have to collect endless databases filled with trivial babble. THAT is how you can create an AI that can operate like a human mind. It has to first collect all our idiosyncrasies. Having only logical data would give you a Spock... you need all the trivial day to day activity of the modern human to create a true AI

As to having enough manpower? PUPPY POOP!  They don't need it. They just built a huge computer center in Georgia that houses supercomputers that do all the work. You have no concept of the POWER of these machines.

On Youtube there is a video of an older now obsolete and declassified computer. Have a look at this one and spot how many people are running it...

[youtube]A5RwZz9UPUs[/youtube]
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Edward on June 09, 2013, 02:21:50 PM
Here is the video link to the video with-in the article I'm posting below of the interview which is in text format following it.

Edward
-------------

NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden: 'I don't want to live in a society that does these sort of things' – video


http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/video/2013/jun/09/nsa-whistleblower-edward-snowden-interview-video   (Watch this Very good)


The individual responsible for one of the most significant leaks in US political history is Edward Snowden, a 29-year-old former technical assistant for the CIA and current employee of the defence contractor Booz Allen Hamilton. Snowden has been working at the National Security Agency for the last four years as an employee of various outside contractors, including Booz Allen and Dell.

The Guardian, after several days of interviews, is revealing his identity at his request. From the moment he decided to disclose numerous top-secret documents to the public, he was determined not to opt for the protection of anonymity. "I have no intention of hiding who I am because I know I have done nothing wrong," he said.

Snowden will go down in history as one of America's most consequential whistleblowers, alongside Daniel Ellsberg and Bradley Manning. He is responsible for handing over material from one of the world's most secretive organisations – the NSA.

In a note accompanying the first set of documents he provided, he wrote: "I understand that I will be made to suffer for my actions," but "I will be satisfied if the federation of secret law, unequal pardon and irresistible executive powers that rule the world that I love are revealed even for an instant."

Despite his determination to be publicly unveiled, he repeatedly insisted that he wants to avoid the media spotlight. "I don't want public attention because I don't want the story to be about me. I want it to be about what the US government is doing."

He does not fear the consequences of going public, he said, only that doing so will distract attention from the issues raised by his disclosures. "I know the media likes to personalise political debates, and I know the government will demonise me."

Despite these fears, he remained hopeful his outing will not divert attention from the substance of his disclosures. "I really want the focus to be on these documents and the debate which I hope this will trigger among citizens around the globe about what kind of world we want to live in." He added: "My sole motive is to inform the public as to that which is done in their name and that which is done against them."

He has had "a very comfortable life" that included a salary of roughly $200,000, a girlfriend with whom he shared a home in Hawaii, a stable career, and a family he loves. "I'm willing to sacrifice all of that because I can't in good conscience allow the US government to destroy privacy, internet freedom and basic liberties for people around the world with this massive surveillance machine they're secretly building."
'I am not afraid, because this is the choice I've made'

Three weeks ago, Snowden made final preparations that resulted in last week's series of blockbuster news stories. At the NSA office in Hawaii where he was working, he copied the last set of documents he intended to disclose.

He then advised his NSA supervisor that he needed to be away from work for "a couple of weeks" in order to receive treatment for epilepsy, a condition he learned he suffers from after a series of seizures last year.

As he packed his bags, he told his girlfriend that he had to be away for a few weeks, though he said he was vague about the reason. "That is not an uncommon occurrence for someone who has spent the last decade working in the intelligence world."

On May 20, he boarded a flight to Hong Kong, where he has remained ever since. He chose the city because "they have a spirited commitment to free speech and the right of political dissent", and because he believed that it was one of the few places in the world that both could and would resist the dictates of the US government.

In the three weeks since he arrived, he has been ensconced in a hotel room. "I've left the room maybe a total of three times during my entire stay," he said. It is a plush hotel and, what with eating meals in his room too, he has run up big bills.

He is deeply worried about being spied on. He lines the door of his hotel room with pillows to prevent eavesdropping. He puts a large red hood over his head and laptop when entering his passwords to prevent any hidden cameras from detecting them.

Though that may sound like paranoia to some, Snowden has good reason for such fears. He worked in the US intelligence world for almost a decade. He knows that the biggest and most secretive surveillance organisation in America, the NSA, along with the most powerful government on the planet, is looking for him.

Since the disclosures began to emerge, he has watched television and monitored the internet, hearing all the threats and vows of prosecution emanating from Washington.

And he knows only too well the sophisticated technology available to them and how easy it will be for them to find him. The NSA police and other law enforcement officers have twice visited his home in Hawaii and already contacted his girlfriend, though he believes that may have been prompted by his absence from work, and not because of suspicions of any connection to the leaks.

"All my options are bad," he said. The US could begin extradition proceedings against him, a potentially problematic, lengthy and unpredictable course for Washington. Or the Chinese government might whisk him away for questioning, viewing him as a useful source of information. Or he might end up being grabbed and bundled into a plane bound for US territory.

"Yes, I could be rendered by the CIA. I could have people come after me. Or any of the third-party partners. They work closely with a number of other nations. Or they could pay off the Triads. Any of their agents or assets," he said.

"We have got a CIA station just up the road – the consulate here in Hong Kong – and I am sure they are going to be busy for the next week. And that is a concern I will live with for the rest of my life, however long that happens to be."

Having watched the Obama administration prosecute whistleblowers at a historically unprecedented rate, he fully expects the US government to attempt to use all its weight to punish him. "I am not afraid," he said calmly, "because this is the choice I've made."

He predicts the government will launch an investigation and "say I have broken the Espionage Act and helped our enemies, but that can be used against anyone who points out how massive and invasive the system has become".

The only time he became emotional during the many hours of interviews was when he pondered the impact his choices would have on his family, many of whom work for the US government. "The only thing I fear is the harmful effects on my family, who I won't be able to help any more. That's what keeps me up at night," he said, his eyes welling up with tears.
'You can't wait around for someone else to act'

Snowden did not always believe the US government posed a threat to his political values. He was brought up originally in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. His family moved later to Maryland, near the NSA headquarters in Fort Meade.

By his own admission, he was not a stellar student. In order to get the credits necessary to obtain a high school diploma, he attended a community college in Maryland, studying computing, but never completed the coursework. (He later obtained his GED.)

In 2003, he enlisted in the US army and began a training program to join the Special Forces. Invoking the same principles that he now cites to justify his leaks, he said: "I wanted to fight in the Iraq war because I felt like I had an obligation as a human being to help free people from oppression".

He recounted how his beliefs about the war's purpose were quickly dispelled. "Most of the people training us seemed pumped up about killing Arabs, not helping anyone," he said. After he broke both his legs in a training accident, he was discharged.

After that, he got his first job in an NSA facility, working as a security guard for one of the agency's covert facilities at the University of Maryland. From there, he went to the CIA, where he worked on IT security. His understanding of the internet and his talent for computer programming enabled him to rise fairly quickly for someone who lacked even a high school diploma.

By 2007, the CIA stationed him with diplomatic cover in Geneva, Switzerland. His responsibility for maintaining computer network security meant he had clearance to access a wide array of classified documents.

That access, along with the almost three years he spent around CIA officers, led him to begin seriously questioning the rightness of what he saw.

He described as formative an incident in which he claimed CIA operatives were attempting to recruit a Swiss banker to obtain secret banking information. Snowden said they achieved this by purposely getting the banker drunk and encouraging him to drive home in his car. When the banker was arrested for drunk driving, the undercover agent seeking to befriend him offered to help, and a bond was formed that led to successful recruitment.

"Much of what I saw in Geneva really disillusioned me about how my government functions and what its impact is in the world," he says. "I realised that I was part of something that was doing far more harm than good."

He said it was during his CIA stint in Geneva that he thought for the first time about exposing government secrets. But, at the time, he chose not to for two reasons.

First, he said: "Most of the secrets the CIA has are about people, not machines and systems, so I didn't feel comfortable with disclosures that I thought could endanger anyone". Secondly, the election of Barack Obama in 2008 gave him hope that there would be real reforms, rendering disclosures unnecessary.

He left the CIA in 2009 in order to take his first job working for a private contractor that assigned him to a functioning NSA facility, stationed on a military base in Japan. It was then, he said, that he "watched as Obama advanced the very policies that I thought would be reined in", and as a result, "I got hardened."

The primary lesson from this experience was that "you can't wait around for someone else to act. I had been looking for leaders, but I realised that leadership is about being the first to act."

Over the next three years, he learned just how all-consuming the NSA's surveillance activities were, claiming "they are intent on making every conversation and every form of behaviour in the world known to them".

He described how he once viewed the internet as "the most important invention in all of human history". As an adolescent, he spent days at a time "speaking to people with all sorts of views that I would never have encountered on my own".

But he believed that the value of the internet, along with basic privacy, is being rapidly destroyed by ubiquitous surveillance. "I don't see myself as a hero," he said, "because what I'm doing is self-interested: I don't want to live in a world where there's no privacy and therefore no room for intellectual exploration and creativity."

Once he reached the conclusion that the NSA's surveillance net would soon be irrevocable, he said it was just a matter of time before he chose to act. "What they're doing" poses "an existential threat to democracy", he said.
A matter of principle

As strong as those beliefs are, there still remains the question: why did he do it? Giving up his freedom and a privileged lifestyle? "There are more important things than money. If I were motivated by money, I could have sold these documents to any number of countries and gotten very rich."

For him, it is a matter of principle. "The government has granted itself power it is not entitled to. There is no public oversight. The result is people like myself have the latitude to go further than they are allowed to," he said.

His allegiance to internet freedom is reflected in the stickers on his laptop: "I support Online Rights: Electronic Frontier Foundation," reads one. Another hails the online organisation offering anonymity, the Tor Project.

Asked by reporters to establish his authenticity to ensure he is not some fantasist, he laid bare, without hesitation, his personal details, from his social security number to his CIA ID and his expired diplomatic passport. There is no shiftiness. Ask him about anything in his personal life and he will answer.

He is quiet, smart, easy-going and self-effacing. A master on computers, he seemed happiest when talking about the technical side of surveillance, at a level of detail comprehensible probably only to fellow communication specialists. But he showed intense passion when talking about the value of privacy and how he felt it was being steadily eroded by the behaviour of the intelligence services.

His manner was calm and relaxed but he has been understandably twitchy since he went into hiding, waiting for the knock on the hotel door. A fire alarm goes off. "That has not happened before," he said, betraying anxiety wondering if was real, a test or a CIA ploy to get him out onto the street.

Strewn about the side of his bed are his suitcase, a plate with the remains of room-service breakfast, and a copy of Angler, the biography of former vice-president Dick Cheney.

Ever since last week's news stories began to appear in the Guardian, Snowden has vigilantly watched TV and read the internet to see the effects of his choices. He seemed satisfied that the debate he longed to provoke was finally taking place.

He lay, propped up against pillows, watching CNN's Wolf Blitzer ask a discussion panel about government intrusion if they had any idea who the leaker was. From 8,000 miles away, the leaker looked on impassively, not even indulging in a wry smile.

Snowden said that he admires both Ellsberg and Manning, but argues that there is one important distinction between himself and the army private, whose trial coincidentally began the week Snowden's leaks began to make news.

"I carefully evaluated every single document I disclosed to ensure that each was legitimately in the public interest," he said. "There are all sorts of documents that would have made a big impact that I didn't turn over, because harming people isn't my goal. Transparency is."

He purposely chose, he said, to give the documents to journalists whose judgment he trusted about what should be public and what should remain concealed.

As for his future, he is vague. He hoped the publicity the leaks have generated will offer him some protection, making it "harder for them to get dirty".

He views his best hope as the possibility of asylum, with Iceland – with its reputation of a champion of internet freedom – at the top of his list. He knows that may prove a wish unfulfilled.

But after the intense political controversy he has already created with just the first week's haul of stories, "I feel satisfied that this was all worth it. I have no regrets."



http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jun/09/edward-snowden-nsa-whistleblower-surveillance


Edward
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: The Matrix Traveller on June 09, 2013, 03:54:36 PM
Perhaps Intelligence Organisations may be Good rather than Not.

Yes mistakes are made but that is to be human...   :)


Intelligence:

Any "Processing System" (Including the Human Brain) which is able to evaluate anything
within the boundaries of the Rules applied or in such a "Processing System", is based on.


Reason:

Computers do have "Reason" but do NOT have LIFE i.e. AWARENESS (Consciousness).

http://www.howstuffworks.com/boolean.htm

Quote
Have you ever wondered how a computer can do something like balance a check book, or play chess,
or spell-check a document? These are things that, just a  few decades ago, only humans could do.

Now computers do them with apparent ease. How can a "chip" made up of silicon and wires do something
that seems  like it requires human thought?

­If you want to understand the answer to this question down at the very core, the first thing you need
to understand is something called Boolean logic.

Boolean logic, originally developed by George Boole in the mid 1800s, allows quite a few unexpected things
to be mapped into bits and bytes. The great thing about  Boolean logic is that, once you get the hang of things,
Boolean logic (or at least the parts you need in order to understand the operations of computers) is outrageously
simple.

In this article, we will first discuss simple logic "gates," and then see how to combine them into something useful.
Which can be expressed as in the form of "Boolean Algebra"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boolean_algebra


The human Brain however is based on a "Double Logic" System.

This is why the System beaks down and eventually Stops working ! (In human terms, Dies !)


What is being looked for Through the "Human Species" is NOT really "AI" at all, but rather
"Awareness" or LIFE !

There is NO such thing as Artificial "Intelligence", contrary to human belief.

It is either.....

a.     "Intelligent".
or
b.     It is NOT "Intelligent".

However WHAT is NOT Present in today’s Human Based Computer Systems, or other Logic Systems
is AWARENESS, i.e. (Consciousness) or LIFE !
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: petrus4 on June 09, 2013, 04:07:38 PM
Perhaps Intelligence Organisations may be Good rather than Not.

Yes mistakes are made but that is to be human...   :)

The thing that I have to remember about all of these sorts of groups; the CIA, the NSA, the Eye, and the shenanigans that they get up to...it's all the same thing.

It's all just an invitation to engage in fear, hatred, despair, hopelessness, and powerlessness.  It's all just them wanting me to accept their program, and for me to think that there is absolutely no possible alternative to their cage; when in reality, the alternative never ceases to exist, except in our heads.

The Eye wants to literally try to destroy people's connection with God; that is ultimately its' motivation, more than anything else.  It wants everyone else to be just as lost and hungry and alone as it is.  It has no ability whatsoever to truly obtain its' objective; the only way that it can, is to make us think that it can.

I'm going to ignore things like the OP, and the reason why, is because I refuse to give power to them, or more importantly, I refuse to believe that the people who want that level of brutal, totally involuntary control over everyone else, are capable of having it.  They are not capable of it.  The only way that they are capable of it, is with your consent; and publicising themselves doing things like what the OP describes, can be viewed as them literally begging and pleading for our fear, and hence our consent.  I am not going to give mine to them.

David Icke speaks in contradictions.  He tries to tell people that we are capable of having whatever we want, and that reality is completely subjective on the one hand, and yet he constantly beats the drum of fear on the other.  Which is it?  Which is the reality?

The one thing that I've been seeing on this forum recently, over and over, is an appeal to fear.  It's dressed up as increasing our awareness, but all it really does is perpetuate an apocalyptic mindset.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 09, 2013, 04:26:15 PM
The reason why I bring up the Naomi Wolf speech, is to emphasise the point that the only way surveillance really works, or can work, is by making people think that the government is omniscient, and sees everything.  It never really does; but what they want to do, more than anything else, is to make people afraid of that idea.
That's true, and to help them keep 90% of the population thinking that, they just need to use some 0.5% of the population as snitches. That way, people will be kept under the ideas that:
a) the government has "ears" everywhere
b) because of that, the government knows everything

That was the method used in Portugal until 1974.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 09, 2013, 04:33:27 PM
Power is knowledge and what you don't know will kill you.
Knowledge is power, one of the methods used in Portugal was to keep people almost illiterates, I think it was the Lisbon archbishop that use to say that the common person only needed to write their name and read the titles on the newspapers.

That's also why there is censorship, to stop the knowledge from spreading.

So, spreading the whole situation (they can know a lot of things, but not everything, and depend on people like us to do their job) is the best way to fight it. :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: petrus4 on June 09, 2013, 04:36:38 PM
That's true, and to help them keep 90% of the population thinking that, they just need to use some 0.5% of the population as snitches. That way, people will be kept under the ideas that:
a) the government has "ears" everywhere
b) because of that, the government knows everything

That was the method used in Portugal until 1974.

Yep; and that's the other part of this that makes me angry.  People justify fearmongering on the basis that by immersing ourselves in it, we are keeping ourselves informed; when the sad reality is that most of it is BS anyway.

I'm reminded of that video series that Amaterasu linked to on YouTube, which has predictably been deleted; but it was excellent, because it demonstrated that a very large number of the media stories that are designed to keep people afraid, actually involve a group of actors, who seem to be the same people pretty much every time.

What we consider to be the news, is completely subjective.  We can remain pre-occupied with the idea of the American government literally establishing the Fourth Reich, or we can instead choose to focus on something which is not going to have the end result of causing us to want to commit suicide.  I know which of those two alternatives I prefer.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 09, 2013, 04:43:04 PM

Same principle as radar. Now, because your first deficient response was of incredulity, affirming your position, you doubt it, look it up for your own self aware fulfillment. Google search, its out there.
So, do you mean that wi fi equipment acts like a radar system? ???

If that's the case then it would be the wi fi equipment that would be able to detect objects, not other equipments that would be able to detect the wi fi.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 09, 2013, 04:52:11 PM
People justify fearmongering on the basis that by immersing ourselves in it, we are keeping ourselves informed; when the sad reality is that most of it is BS anyway.
That's because that type of information is not "the whole truth".

Spreading half-truths is sometimes more effective than spreading a lie. A good example of that is the type of stories that come from Socha Faal; he/she/it/they take two or three real stories and make up a new story, with lots of imagined details and implications that, obviously, are not real, but if people look for confirmation they will find the information about the stories used as the base for the "creative writing".

What must be spread is the whole information, regardless of being too harsh, scary or whatever, if it's the truth then that's what people should know, not "half truths" or "white lies" or "rose tinted" versions of bad news.

I suppose that's why people say I'm cruel. :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Ellirium113 on June 09, 2013, 04:52:45 PM
So, do you mean that wi fi equipment acts like a radar system? ???

If that's the case then it would be the wi fi equipment that would be able to detect objects, not other equipments that would be able to detect the wi fi.

Enter: the TWIGHLIGHT ZONE....

Quote
Flipping off your television may gain a whole new meaning thanks to a technology being developed by a team of researchers at the University of Washington. The team, led by Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering Shyam Gollakota, developed a system dubbed WiSee, which uses radio waves from Wi-Fi to sense human body movements and detect command gestures from anywhere within a home or office.  The results of the WiSee team's research have been submitted to the ACM's 19th International Conference on Mobile Computing and Networking (Mobicom '13).

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/06/researchers-teach-wi-fi-to-see-identify-gestures/ (http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/06/researchers-teach-wi-fi-to-see-identify-gestures/)

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 09, 2013, 05:27:14 PM
Thanks for that, Ellirium113, it's much easier to read something than just go by some vague reference. :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: SarK0Y on June 09, 2013, 05:47:17 PM
The NSA can record whatever they want, for all the good it will do them.  Unless they have literally human level artificial intelligence, they are never going to have even a quarter of the manpower necessary to audit or process all of it.  Yes, to a certain extent they can already do keyword searching, but that still doesn't make them anywhere near as omniscient as articles like this try and claim.

In a speech Naomi Wolf gave a few years back, she mentioned that under the German Stasi, 10% of the population actually had a Stasi file; for the reason of simple logistics.  Tyrants are always a tiny minority of the population; which in turn means that there are always going to be vastly more people to be spied on, than there are people doing the actual spying.

The reason why I bring up the Naomi Wolf speech, is to emphasise the point that the only way surveillance really works, or can work, is by making people think that the government is omniscient, and sees everything.  It never really does; but what they want to do, more than anything else, is to make people afraid of that idea.  It's the same way they've largely destroyed peer to peer file sharing; they were never able to sue or shut down more than 1% of the people doing it, tops, but the way they managed it was by making you feel that you never knew whether or not you were going to be part of that 1%.

If you really want to help people, I'd reconsider circulating articles like this.  By spreading it around and raising fear and paranoia with it, you're actually playing right into the government's hands.  The main thing they want to do is keep people afraid and feeling powerless; and making the public think that they can know everything we do, before we do it, is one of the most effective ways they can do that.

Wanting to keep people informed is admirable; but before you circulate something which you hope is going to do that, it's worth asking whether or not something is really going to have a constructive effect on someone and help them, or whether it's just going to keep them feeling powerless, depressed, and afraid.  That is ultimately all this sort of information is going to do.

The only reason why the Europeans have been able to throw out Monsanto, and Americans haven't, is not because Americans have less power than people living in Europe; it's rather that they think they have less.

Contemporary America is one of the most politically cowardly populations on the planet, in my observation; and what is even worse, is that more than most other people, Americans also literally worship the instruments of their own political repression.  The President, and the military etc.  The government is not going to stop being a problem, until you literally stop thinking it is one.
Gold, Petrus, Gold :) but(!) it's fair to mention: most goal of efficient SA (special agency) always been to find/study/develop/influence/fake key persons (factors), thereby it minimizes needful resources down to very humble size. however, cia/nsa/dia/.. have liked minimal work w/ maximal budgets, so their efficiency hits bottoms.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: The Matrix Traveller on June 09, 2013, 06:18:33 PM
WHY is the human species so Paranoid ?

Perhaps it has something to do with the "Double Logic" in the human Genome ?

Does the Gov. know everything ?

NO it knows very, very little about anything, when you consider "The ALL".

If Gov. did know everything, then "Intelligence Services" would NOT be required now would they ?   :)

Such is the Paranoia of the human species.   :(
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 09, 2013, 06:30:46 PM
Does the Gov. know everything ?
No, the government doesn't know everything, but he doesn't need to.

From my indirect experience with such things, it's done at several levels, from street or city block level up to national level. Each level gathers all the possibly relevant information, analysis it and passes what they think is important to the level immediately above, where the same thing happens.

That way, if you say something to a neighbour that may sound like a menace to the government, that information can be passed through all the levels until you get an unexpected visit.

That was what happened with my father, when someone told the political police that he was reading forbidden books. In that case, when the information reached the responsible of the political police for that town, he thought it was important enough to have the police taking him to the police station to be interrogated. As they found nothing he was only one night on the police station (and they even let my grandmother give him a blanket, as one of the policemen knew her. Never underestimate the power of knowing someone. :) ).
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Gigas on June 09, 2013, 06:30:59 PM
Thanks for that, Ellirium113, it's much easier to read something than just go by some vague reference. :)


See that, Ellirium113 did exactly what I suggested you do. Check it out.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: The Matrix Traveller on June 09, 2013, 06:52:51 PM

Quote from: The Matrix Traveller on Today at 06:18:33 PM

Quote
Does the Gov. know everything ?
NO it knows very, very little about anything, when you consider "The ALL".


Quote from ArMap

Quote
No, the government doesn't know everything, but he doesn't need to.

From my indirect experience with such things, it's done at several levels, from street or city block level up to national level. Each level gathers all the possibly relevant information, analysis it and passes what they think is important to the level immediately above, where the same thing happens.

That way, if you say something to a neighbour that may sound like a menace to the government, that information can be passed through all the levels until you get an unexpected visit.

Correct !

If this did NOT take place then Anarchy would rule.   :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: robomont on June 09, 2013, 08:09:06 PM
ive heard the fear mongering of anarchy .what we really fear is chaos not anarchy.we already have chaos in government.anarchy would be a blessing.
at least with anarchy we have an understanding .
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 10, 2013, 05:50:18 AM

See that, Ellirium113 did exactly what I suggested you do. Check it out.
I did. :)

For some reason, I was thinking about wi-fi as used by the computer, so I wasn't seeing how it could be used to know where the user is.

Thinking from the wi-fi router point of view it makes sense. :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Ellirium113 on June 10, 2013, 07:17:22 AM
 :P I strive to always have a reference handy because I didn't want to get into a habit of blurting out stuff if I can't produce anything to back it up.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on June 10, 2013, 07:32:51 AM


anyway

if this happening has the result of cancelling the patriot act..or limiting it's scope
it will be a very good thing
letting folks know what their apathy has led to is not doom and gloom

and as with everything that comes into your view..you have the choice to read or not read..to focus on to not focus on.. to move towards or away from..or to ignore having a choice
every tiny piece of everything presents you with a choice....

sadly, with some individuals the choice is to voice a bitching opinion and never do anything but  ~ that especially if it involves folks in other places



You remember the Patriot Act. We had to strip away our rights as guaranteed under the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution to preserve our rights … whaaa? It was reminiscent of the Vietnam War “logic” first uttered by an un-named Army major to Associated Press Reporter Peter Arnett in 1968: “It became necessary to destroy the town to save it.”

The Fourth Amendment in our Bill of Rights: “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”  http://baltimorepostexaminer.com/patriot-act-is-the-most-bipartisan-legislation-in-12-years/2013/06/10
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 10, 2013, 07:45:34 AM
The Fourth Amendment in our Bill of Rights: “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.” [/color] http://baltimorepostexaminer.com/patriot-act-is-the-most-bipartisan-legislation-in-12-years/2013/06/10
I guess it depends on the definition of "unreasonable", so they just changed what was considered unreasonable.

I don't think this will have any real effect. :(
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Ellirium113 on June 10, 2013, 07:47:58 AM
The funny thing about all this spying in my mind is that the MORE they snoop and learn, the MORE paranoid they get.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Cosmic4life on June 10, 2013, 09:12:32 AM
I did. :)

For some reason, I was thinking about wi-fi as used by the computer, so I wasn't seeing how it could be used to know where the user is.

Thinking from the wi-fi router point of view it makes sense. :)

Allow me to add some filler here ...

Cell phone and WiFi all operate on radio frequencies .. usually Microwaves .

The radio frequencies are propagated through the Cell Tower grid ... it is a simple matter of trigonometry to deduce the location of any transceiver .. all transceivers WiFi/Cell Phones have unique individual identifiers .. most if not all Wifi/Smart phones also have GPS built-in on chip .. you may be aware of the ability and get to use it ..like GPS Smart phones or it may be there as a (redundant) component.

You should all be aware that location systems are now on-chip and in all communication electronics .. chips are now manufactured at 45 nm / 32 nm and 22 nm ....

What once filled a whole warehouse .. can now be manufactured onto a chip as small as a grain of sand .. think about that and related electronic systems .. Radar/Microwaves/Television/Credit Cards/Passports.

Also keep in mind the expansion of Silicon memory .. one small chip can now hold several Gigabytes of information.

The Beast has been up and running ever since PC's and electronic Telecoms started to progress in the 80's.

The key is the Cell Tower grid .. If you are anywhere near the Cell Matrix it can be used to track, listen and watch you.

If that fails you can still be tracked by Satellite ... GPS remember... and if a Satellite can lock on to your phone for location purposes you should be aware that it's not to difficult for it to access all the other systems present on that phone or device.

Most people are blissfully unaware of just how many systems now exist on their Smart devices .. because access is denied with the exception of GPS.

Think of Iphone apps .. for example .. a G-meter / a Compass / a protractor ... all infer an electronic gyro built into your phone .. just one system present on-chip in your phone .. think of the possibilities .. and know that somebody else has already thought of it and integrated it.

C.. 
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Amaterasu on June 10, 2013, 10:25:55 AM
In re: Snowden, Jon Rappaport has an interesting column piece:

http://jonrappoport.wordpress.com/2013/06/10/nsa-leaker-are-there-serious-cracks-in-ed-snowdens-story/

Quote
New post on Jon Rappoport's Blog   
   
   
NSA leaker: are there serious cracks in Ed Snowden’s story?
by Jon Rappoport

NSA leaker: are there serious cracks in Ed Snowden's story?

 

By Jon Rappoport

June 10, 2013

www.nomorefakenews.com

 

First, I'm not doubting the documents Ed Snowden has brought forward. I'm not doubting the illegal reach of the NSA in spying on Americans and the world.

 

But as to how this recent revelation happened, and whether Ed Snowden's history holds up...I have questions.

 

Could Snowden have been given extraordinary access to classified info as part of a larger scheme? Could he be a) an honest man and yet b) a guy who was set up to do what he's doing now?

 

If b) is true, then Snowden fits the bill perfectly. He wants to do what he's doing. He isn't lying about that. He means what he says.

 

Okay. Let's look at his history as reported by The Guardian.

 

In 2003, at age 19, without a high school diploma, Snowden enlists in the Army. He begins a training program to join the Special Forces. The sequence here is fuzzy. At what point after enlistment can a new soldier start this training program? Does he need to demonstrate some exceptional ability before Special Forces puts him in that program?

 

Snowden breaks both legs in a training exercise. He's discharged from the Army. Is that automatic? How about healing and then resuming Army service? Just asking.

 

If he was accepted in the Special Forces training program because he had special computer skills, then why discharge him simply because he broke both legs?

 

Circa 2003 (?), Snowden gets a job as a security guard for an NSA facility at the University of Maryland. He specifically wanted to work for NSA? It was just a generic job opening he found out about?

 

Also in 2003 (?), Snowden shifts jobs. He's now in the CIA, in IT. He has no high school diploma. He's a young computer genius?

 

In 2007, Snowden is sent to Geneva. He's only 23 years old. The CIA gives him diplomatic cover there. He's put in charge of maintaining computer-network security. Major job. Obviously, he has access to a very wide range of classified documents. Sound a little odd? Again, just asking. He's just a kid. Maybe he has his GED by now. Otherwise, he still doesn't have a high school diploma.

 

Snowden says that during this period, in Geneva, one of the incidents that really sours him on the CIA is the “turning of a Swiss banker.” One night, CIA guys get a banker drunk, encourage him to drive home, the banker gets busted, the CIA guys help him out, then with that bond formed, they eventually get the banker to reveal deep banking secrets to the Agency.

 

Snowden is this naïve? He doesn't know by now that the CIA does this sort of thing all the time? He's shocked? He “didn't sign up for this?”

 

In 2009, Snowden leaves the CIA. Why? Presumably because he's disillusioned. It should noted here that Snowden claimed he could do very heavy damage to the entire US intelligence community in 2008, but decided to wait because he thought Obama, just coming into the presidency, might make good changes.

 

After two years with the CIA in Geneva, Snowden really had the capability to take down the whole US intelligence network, or a major chunk of it? He had that much access to classified data?

 

Anyway, in 2009, Snowden leaves the CIA and goes to work for a private defense contractor. Apparently, by this time, he knows all about the phony US war in Iraq, and yet he chooses to work for a sector that relentlessly promotes such wars. Go figure.

 

This defense contractor (unnamed) assigns him to work at an NSA facility in Japan. Surely, Snowden understands what the NSA is. He knows it's a key part of the whole military-intelligence network, the network he opposes.

 

But he takes the job anyway. Perhaps he's doing it so he can obtain further access to classified data, in advance of blowing a big whistle. Perhaps.

 

Snowden goes on to work for two private defense contractors, Dell and Booze Allen Hamilton. In this latter job, Snowden is again assigned to work at the NSA.

 

He's an outsider, but he claims to have so much sensitive NSA data that he can take down the whole US intelligence network in a single day. Hmm.

 

These are red flags. They raise questions. Serious ones.

 

If The Guardian, which has such close access to Snowden, wants to explore these questions, they might come up with some interesting answers.

 

Again, I'm not doubting that the documents Snowden has brought forward are real. I have to assume they are. I certainly don't doubt the reach and the power and the criminality of the NSA.

 

Although I'm sure someone will write me and say I'm defending the NSA. I'M NOT.

 

But if Snowden was maneuvered, in his career, without his knowing it, to arrive at just this point, then we have a whole new story. We have a story about unknown forces who wanted this exposure to occur.

 

Who would these forces be? I could make lots of guesses. But they would just be guesses.

 

Perhaps all the anomalies in the career of Ed Snowden can be explained with sensible answers. I realize that. But until they are, I put the questions forward. And leave them there.

 

Jon Rappoport
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Gigas on June 10, 2013, 10:48:33 AM
I did. :)

For some reason, I was thinking about wi-fi as used by the computer, so I wasn't seeing how it could be used to know where the user is.

Thinking from the wi-fi router point of view it makes sense. :)

The router is sending a signal out in a omni directional circle, bouncing off things, absorbed by things and reflecting that signal as well as receiving. An external receiver picks that signal up and that receiver broadcast as well. Software can detect fluctuation variations in that wi-fi signal to draw a pattern reflected back onto the router first giving an image of how the signal returns and if that return signal is changing as a person moves about, it can graph that movement.

Reading wi-fi specs one will see how that signal is affected by walls and people moving around. By software calculations, it should be rather easy to map a location and track movement within from the wi-fi signal variations.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 10, 2013, 11:09:13 AM
The funny thing about all this spying in my mind is that the MORE they snoop and learn, the MORE paranoid they get.
The problem is that the more paranoid they get, the more they want to know.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Gigas on June 10, 2013, 11:12:32 AM
One time back 2002 Mr president bush jr paid a visit to our community and cops were told to stay off their cellphones because it was being monitored during the event. The cops were also given a document of the routing Mr President would be rollin. The cops were told if you loose this paper or give it out, you will be arrested for treason and go bye bye.

The little people were warned to stay away from the motorcade route and do not stand out by the road as it passed. Couple a people felt they had the right to stand out there and they said the motorcade came by and the SS had machine guns sticking out the windows.

One off duty cop wanted to see the action and hustled over to the cop shop where the prez was heading to doing his business and a gunship chopper came over the cop shop, reported the guy arriving and there was debate whether they were going to blow this stupid cop off the planet. Lucky for this guy, they stood down but the ground SS rushed in and got him.

So, they are listening to cell traffic and can shut it down if they need to cause they know what your doing.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 10, 2013, 11:13:45 AM
The router is sending a signal out in a omni directional circle, bouncing off things, absorbed by things and reflecting that signal as well as receiving. An external receiver picks that signal up and that receiver broadcast as well. Software can detect fluctuation variations in that wi-fi signal to draw a pattern reflected back onto the router first giving an image of how the signal returns and if that return signal is changing as a person moves about, it can graph that movement.

Reading wi-fi specs one will see how that signal is affected by walls and people moving around. By software calculations, it should be rather easy to map a location and track movement within from the wi-fi signal variations.
Better late than never, you just had to post that before instead of telling me to Google something. :)

Thanks anyway. :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 10, 2013, 11:15:32 AM
So, they are listening to cell traffic and can shut it down if they need to cause they know what your doing.
Cell phones must be the most controlled thing on the planet, I'm glad I don't have one. :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Elvis Hendrix on June 10, 2013, 11:19:47 AM
So you've never played Angry Birds?
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Gigas on June 10, 2013, 11:32:12 AM
Better late than never, you just had to post that before instead of telling me to Google something. :)

Thanks anyway. :)


Hey, I'm not easy!

But to clue you in, never come off the line saying "I doubt it". Wise thinkers never fall for that.  ;)














Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: petrus4 on June 10, 2013, 11:40:18 AM
Cell phones must be the most controlled thing on the planet, I'm glad I don't have one. :)

Same.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Gigas on June 10, 2013, 11:40:23 AM
Cell phones must be the most controlled thing on the planet, I'm glad I don't have one. :)


Some intelligence agency had my landline and clearly let me know they monitored my conversations and when they didn't want me talking, they cut the line and disconnected conversations I would be having.

I wanted to shut off my phone and called the phone company. I told them to shut it off and the CS said NO, I can't and will not. The CS said I had to give a password or come into the office. I had been to the office before and paid my phone bill with cash but before they would take the cash, they said I have to show picture ID.

Someone was keeping an eye on me.

As for the landline being shut off, they were told I will not pay for service after the date I called them to shut it off. It was on another month or so before I got a notice they will cut service unless I paid. Since I told the CS girl I will not be paying the bill anymore and to shut it off, they still had some weird idea to keep hooked in.

My landline is cut off now but somebody didn't want it to be off cause they liked to listen to information coming and going.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 10, 2013, 12:14:35 PM
The BIG QUESTIONS

Okay so  the NSA has been shown that they monitor us..  so why the big deal NOW?  I (and many others) have been saying this for years ever since ECHELON first came out.

2007-8 Cryptome eyeballing the new super computer snoop center at Fort Gordon
http://www.thelivingmoon.com/45jack_files/02archives/Eyeball_NSA_Fort_Gordon.htm

Watching the Watchers Intelligence Gathering New NSA Facility Fort Gordon, Georgia
www.thelivingmoon.com/forum1/index.php?action=post;topic=4534.15;last_msg=61535

Echelon Stations around the world
http://www.thelivingmoon.com/45jack_files/index.html#ECHELON_MOUS

Intelligence Gathering
http://www.thelivingmoon.com/45jack_files/index.html#Intelligence%20Gathering

Documented over 120 (so far) spook agencies
Information Gatherers Page 01 - Pegasus Collection - (Work in Progress)
http://www.thelivingmoon.com/45jack_files/03files/Information_Gatherers_01.html
Information Gatherers Page 02 - Pegasus Collection - (Work in Progress)
http://www.thelivingmoon.com/45jack_files/03files/Information_Gatherers_02.html

Yet now suddenly its like this is a new discovery?

And WHY are the spooks saying thyat this leak now compromises the world intel hunting?


I smell a rat  something is not right here

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 10, 2013, 12:17:49 PM
PRISM fallout: Hague says UK citizens have ‘nothing to fear’ from GCHQ surveillance

(http://rt.com/files/news/1f/5b/50/00/hague-prism-intelligence-sharing.si.jpg)
British Foreign Secretary William Hague (AFP Photo / Abbas Momani)

Quote
Law-abiding citizens need not fear intelligence sharing between the US and UK, Britain’s Foreign Secretary promised. His comments follow reports data gathered in the US-run PRISM program was shared with the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ).

British Foreign Secretary William Hague affirmed that a “lot of information was shared with the United States,” adding that the two countries shared "an exceptional intelligence sharing relationship."

However, Hague would neither confirm nor deny GCHQ, Britain’s electronic eavesdropping and security agency,  had received information clandestinely obtained via the United States National Security Agency’s (NSA) ‘PRISM’ electronic surveillance program.

The Foreign Secretary is set to appear before the House of Commons to provide a statement on Monday following media reports that since June 2010, GCHQ has had access to PRISM, which grants the NSA a direct line to data stored on the servers of Google, Facebook, Apple, Yahoo and five other tech giants.

GCHQ generated 197 intelligence reports from data obtained via the program last year, allegedly allowing the agency to bypass the legal checks normally required to obtain such information.

The GCHQ was also reportedly given access to so-called “telephony metadata” culled from the telephone records of millions of US customers of Verizon –  one of the largest telecommunication companies in the United States in a separate NSA-run program.

The Foreign Secretary dismissed as “nonsense” claims that GCHQ “are sitting around working out how to circumvent a UK law with another agency.”

Hague continued that any information arriving in the UK from the US is “governed by our laws,” insisting that efforts to thwart terrorism did not endanger civil liberties.   

"If you are a law-abiding citizen of this country ... you'll never be aware of all the things those (intelligence) agencies are doing to stop your identity being stolen or to stop a terrorist blowing you up tomorrow," Reuters cites Hague as saying.

"But if you are a would-be terrorist or the center of a criminal network or a foreign intelligence agency trying to spy on Britain you should be worried because that is what we work on and we are on the whole quite good at it," he continued.

The Foreign Secretary stressed that any intelligence gathering was “authorized, necessary, proportionate and targeted,” adding that he personally signed off on GCHQ intercepts “most days of the week.”

(http://rt.com/files/news/1f/5b/50/00/-1.jpg)
Britain's Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) in Cheltenham (Reuters)

Quote
However, Business Secretary Vince Cable, speaking on Sky News’ Murnaghan program, said that PRISM may have allowed the government to operate a covert sort of ‘snoopers charter’ by the back door.

Douglas Alexander, the opposition Labour party's spokesman for foreign affairs, expressed his intention to ask Hague in the House of Commons how exactly his department oversees the legal frameworks governing such intelligence gathering operations.   

"It is vital that the Government now reassures people who are rightly concerned about these reports," Alexander said in a statement.

Parliament's Intelligence and Security Committee Committee (ISC) has demanded a report from GCHQ on the matter “and will decide what further action needs to be taken as soon as it receives that information," chairman Malcom Rifkind said.

ISC Committee members are set to discuss the issue with US security officials during a planned visit to Washington on Monday.

Courtesy of the Russian Times (http://rt.com/news/hague-prism-intelligence-sharing-437/)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 10, 2013, 12:21:53 PM
Whistleblower hunt: NSA launches criminal inquiry into PRISM leak
Published time: June 09, 2013 13:56


(http://rt.com/files/news/1f/5a/a0/00/nsa-prism-witch-hunt.si.jpg)
The National Security Agency (NSA) headquarters at Fort Meade, Maryland (AFP Photo)

Quote
The National Security Agency (NSA) has requested a criminal probe to track down those responsible for the leak of the PRISM global internet surveillance program.

The US American intelligence community is reeling over the revelation of the NSA’s massive Internet spy tool PRISM, the most high-profile public leak since WikiLeaks, and is taking action against those who publicized the top-secret program.

Washington has mounted a public defense of its right to monitor and record all personal information that passes through or is stored on the servers of nine leading tech companies through PRISM.

Shawn Turner, a spokesperson for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, told the AP via email on Saturday that the NSA filed a criminal report with the Justice Department earlier this week over media leaks on PRISM.

US intelligence services are “doing an assessment of the damage that is being done to US national security by the revelation of this information, which is necessarily secret because the United States needs to be able to conduct intelligence activities without those methods being revealed to the world,” US Deputy National Security Adviser Ben Rhodes said.

The investigation, which is “in early stages”, would imply close cooperation between the intelligence community and the Justice Department, Rhodes explained. A joint team of intelligence officers and government attorneys will evaluate the potential damage caused by these “very disturbing leaks of national security information.”

(http://admin.new.rt.com/files/news/1f/5a/a0/00/1.jpg)
US Deputy National Security Advisor Ben Rhodes (AFP Photo / Mandel Ngan)

Quote
This follows President Barack Obama's public justification on Friday for the NSA’s extensive spying program.  Obama declared the scheme helps to identify “folks who might engage in terrorism.”

“You can’t have 100 per cent security and also then have 100 per cent privacy and zero inconvenience,” Obama said.

Following Obama's statement, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper spoke out Saturday, calling the revelation of the previously top-secret program “reckless.” Clapper stressed that PRISM was authorized by Congress and has been strictly supervised by a secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act Court to avoid the intentional targeting of American citizens.

He said that reports by The Guardian and The Washington Post failed to put the program in context, stressing that PRISM is overseen by a secret court under laws approved by the US Congress.

PRISM is “one of our most important tools for the protection of the nation’s security,” he insisted. “PRISM is not an undisclosed collection or data mining program.”

“It is an internal government computer system to facilitate the government’s statutorily authorized collection of foreign intelligence information from electronic communication service providers under court supervision,” Clapper said without specifying, however, how non-Americans should regard being targeted by PRISM or similar programs created by the US.

(http://rt.com/files/news/1f/5a/a0/00/s1.jpg)

Speaking in Palm Springs on Sunday, Deputy National Security Adviser Rhodes pointed out that Americans should understand that the US government “is not listening to anybody's phone calls” or “seeking to read people's electronic communications.” Only if PRISM detects a “nexus to terrorism” will they “pursue a warrant to try to investigate that lead, just as we would in any other intelligence or criminal procedure,” he said.

It remains unclear how the governmental accesses private data. Companies like Google and Facebook cooperating with PRISM vow that they never granted intelligence services “direct access” to their servers, though they may be making a semantic point.

Chris Soghoian, a tech expert and privacy researcher at the American Civil Liberties Union, explained to Foreign Policy that the "direct access" term “connotes a very specific form of access in the IT world: Unrestricted, unfettered access to information stored on servers.” For a system like PRISM, such access is not necessarily required. The same applies to the term “back door,” which describes a secret point of access to a system unknown to the owner.

Both Google and Facebook have not denied their participation in PRISM, saying that they provided “user data to government only in accordance with the law.”


(http://admin.new.rt.com/files/news/1f/5a/a0/00/02.jpg)
Experts man their stations at the Threat Operations Center inside the National Security Agency (NSA) in suburban Fort Mead, Maryland (AFP Photo)

Quote
The defense of PRISM by top US officials, including President Obama, strongly suggests that the surveillance program will remain in use.

The USA Patriot Act adopted by the George W. Bush administration has made global surveillance and tapping fully legal for US intelligence agencies. However, those who leaked the existence of PRISM may soon be treated similarly to US soldier Bradley Manning, accused of leaking diplomatic cables and the infamous 'Collateral Murder' video to WikiLeaks.

The prosecution for Manning's court martial are seeking life imprisonment on charges of "aiding the enemy," alleging that he intended to harm the US by leaking secrets to its enemies.

Courtesy of the Russian Times (http://rt.com/usa/nsa-prism-witch-hunt-426/)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 10, 2013, 12:27:04 PM
Boundless Informant: NSA’s complex tool for classifying global intelligence
Published time: June 09, 2013 01:50


(http://rt.com/files/news/1f/5a/70/00/picture-4.si.jpg)
Slide from a classified NSA presentation leaked by the Guardian

Quote
A new batch of classified NSA docs leaked to the media reveals the details of a comprehensive piece of software used by NSA to analyze and evaluate intelligence gathered across the globe as well as data extraction methods.

The top-secret documents released by the Guardian shed light on the National Security Agency’s data-mining tool being used for counting and categorizing metadata gathered and stored in numerous databases around the world.

Known as Boundless Informant, the software provides its operator a graphical insight on how many records were collected for a specific “organizational unit” or country, what type of data was collected and what type of collection was used. The program also allows determining trends in data collection for both strategic and tactical decision making, according to the slides.

One of the slides contains a part of the Informant’s user interface showing a world map with countries color-coded ranging from green to red depending on the amount of records collected there. While Iran, Pakistan and other some other states are predictably “hottest” according to the map, the agency collected almost 3 billion intelligence pieces in the US in March 2013 alone.

(http://admin.rt.com/files/news/1f/5a/70/00/picture-1.jpg)
The map showing how much data is being collected in different countries across the globe (image from the Guardian)

Quote
The insight on the software being used by the NSA comes amid the agency spokesperson Judith Emmel’s claims that the NSA cannot at the moment determine how many Americans may be accidentally included in its surveillance.

“Current technology simply does not permit us to positively identify all of the persons or locations associated with a given communication,” Emmel said Saturday adding that “it is harder to know the ultimate source or destination, or more particularly the identity of the person represented by the TO:, FROM: or CC: field of an e-mail address or the abstraction of an IP address.”
NSA data sources

Another slide from the internal NSA presentation redacted by the Guardian editors details the data gathering methods used in the NSA global surveillance program.

The first method suggests interception of data from “fiber cables and infrastructure as data flows past” under the FISA Amendments Act (FAA) of 2008, Section 702.

The second distinguished method is data collection “directly from the servers of the US service providers.”

(http://admin.rt.com/files/news/1f/5a/70/00/picture-2.jpg)
The slide detailing methods of data extraction under the FISA Amendment Act (image from the Guardian)

Quote
The presentation encourages analysts to use both methods for better results.
Google, Facebook negotiated ‘secure portals’ to share data with NSA?

Meanwhile, a report by the New York Times revealed that Internet giants, including Google and Facebook, have been in negotiations with the US security agency over ‘digital rooms’ for sharing the requested data. The companies still insist there is no “back door” for a direct access to user data on their servers.

The Internet companies seem more compliant with the spy agencies than they want to appear to their users, and are cooperating on “behind-the-scenes transactions” of the private information, according to a report that cites anonymous sources “briefed on the negotiations.”

According to the report, Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, Facebook, AOL, Apple and Paltalk have “opened discussions with national security officials about developing technical methods to more efficiently and securely share the personal data of foreign users in response to lawful government requests,” sometimes “changing” their computer systems for this purpose.

These methods included a creation of “separate, secure portals” online, through which the government would conveniently request and acquire data from the companies.

(http://admin.rt.com/files/news/1f/5a/70/00/picture-3.jpg)
A slide from a classified NSA presentation leaked by the Guardian

Quote
Twitter was the only major Internet company mentioned in the report that allegedly declined to facilitate the data transfer to the NSA in a described way. As opposed to a legitimate FISA request, such a move was considered as not “a legal requirement” by Twitter.

The sources claim the negotiations have been actively going in the recent months, referring to a Silicon Valley visit of the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Martin E. Dempsey. Dempsey is said to have met the executives of Facebook, Microsoft, Google and Intel to secretly discuss their collaboration on the government’s “intelligence-gathering efforts.”
NSA pressured to declassify more PRISM details

In response to the fury over US government’s counterterrorism techniques, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper for the second time in three days revealed some details of the PRISM data-scouring program.

Being one of the “most important tools for the protection of the nation's security” the PRISM is an internal government computer system for collecting “foreign intelligence information from electronic communication service providers under court supervision,” Clapper said.

He also said that PRISM seeks foreign intelligence information concerning foreign targets located outside the US and cannot intentionally target any US citizen or any person known to be in the US. As for “incidentally intercepted” information about a US resident, the dissemination of such data is prohibited unless it is “evidence of a crime”, “indicates” a serious threat, or is needed to “understand foreign intelligence or assess its importance.”

Clapper also stressed that the agency operates with a court authority and that it does not unilaterally obtain information from the servers of US telecoms and Internet giants without their knowledge and a FISA Court judge approval.

Courtesy of the Russian Times (http://rt.com/news/boundless-informant-nsa-prism-423/)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 10, 2013, 12:28:15 PM
So you've never played Angry Birds?
Me? No, I have never even seen it, I only know its name.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 10, 2013, 12:29:28 PM

Hey, I'm not easy!

But to clue you in, never come off the line saying "I doubt it". Wise thinkers never fall for that.  ;)
That was what I was thinking, so that's what I wrote. Wise or not, that was the truth at the time. :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 10, 2013, 12:31:24 PM
I told them to shut it off and the CS said NO, I can't and will not.
What's a "CS"? ???
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 10, 2013, 12:31:55 PM
Assange on PRISM: US justice system in ‘calamitous’ collapse
Published time: June 08, 2013 10:25


(http://rt.com/files/news/1f/59/10/00/000_dv1087367.si.jpg)
ikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (AFP Photo / Geoff Caddick)

Quote
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has slammed a recently exposed NSA mass-surveillance scheme as a "calamitous collapse in the rule of law." Google, Facebook and other tech giants apparently involved have denied giving the NSA access to their servers.

Assange accused the US government of trying to "launder" its activities concerning the large-scale spying program PRISM. The system was made public after a leaked classified National Security Agency (NSA) document was revealed earlier this week.

"The US administration has the phone records of everyone in the United States and is receiving them daily from carriers to the National Security Agency under secret agreements. That's what's come out," he said.

President Barack Obama earlier defended PRISM, saying it was a key part of the country’s counterterrorism efforts and that privacy was a necessary sacrifice for the sake of security. He also lashed out at the media, and those who leaked information on the massive spying program.

(http://rt.com/files/news/1f/59/10/00/000_170120656.jpg)
U.S. President Barack Obama (AFP Photo / Stephen Lam)

Quote
“If every step that we are taking to try to prevent a terrorist act is on the front page of the newspapers or any television, then presumably the people that are trying to do us harm are going to be able to get around our preventative measures,” Obama said.

Quote
Critics of the Obama Administration have accused it of an unprecedented crackdown on whistleblowers – more government officials are being prosecuted for leaks under Obama than all previous administrations combined. News of PRISM comes just after reports that the Justice Department secretly obtained two months of AP reporters' telephone records and tapped Fox News reporter James Rosen’s private email.

"Over the last 10 years, the US justice system has suffered from a collapse, a calamitous collapse, in the rule of law,” Assange said.

The US tech giants apparently involved in PRISM have rushed to deny they participated in the program; their logos were visible on each the 41 PowerPoint slides of the leaked NSA document.

(http://rt.com/files/news/1f/59/10/00/2.jpg)

Quote
“Indeed, the US government does not have direct access or a 'back door' to the information stored in our data centers. We had not heard of a program called PRISM until yesterday,” Google CEO Larry Page and Chief Legal Officer David Drummond said in a statement.

Google's remarks mirrored those by Apple, Facebook, Microsoft, Yahoo. All have claimed they have no knowledge of whether the NSA had direct access to their servers, and that only upon legal orders do they provide the government with data on specific persons.

While activists debate the legality and ethics of online espionage and high-tech firms try to distance themselves from the revelations, a former NSA official believes PRISM is largely ineffective, as the amount of data it collects cannot be effectively digested by a surveillance system.

“In fact it adds more of a problem because what that means, quite simply, is that if you go into a larger database, you get more data back no matter what the query is. It’s like making a query with Google. If you go in with a Google query you can get tens of thousands, or hundreds of thousands or even a million returns. Well, there’s no way you can go through that, all of that, to see what you’re really interested in. So what that does is make them less proficient at doing their jobs,” former NSA analyst William Binney told RT.

Courtesy of the Russian Times (http://rt.com/news/assange-nsa-surveillance-program-401/)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: rdunk on June 10, 2013, 12:36:43 PM
I guess it depends on the definition of "unreasonable", so they just changed what was considered unreasonable.

I don't think this will have any real effect. :(

YES IT DOES HAVE A REAL AND LASTING EFFECT!

This crap represents direct violations of what is in our Constitution and in our Bill of Rights. These are foundational documents for this country, and they do not change every time someone has a different idea about how they think it should be. All elected officials are in office to "uphold the Constitution", and that doesn't allow government to take actions that violate it and impinge upon the rights of we the people.

For any requirement that needs direct attention, that attention must be executed in such a way as to not conflict with Constitutional law, irregardless of difficulty for accomplishing it right, and regardless of how easy it might be to do it while violating Constitutional law. DUMB IS AS DUMB DOES - if the law is violated, then such action should be swiftly and severely dealt with, at the highest levels.

If we the people accept any responsible actions less than that, then we can kiss this country bye bye. Obama is the POTUS, and he should be held responsible for all infractions of the Constitution by his governing. With all that has occurred during his presidency, and all that is continuing to be brought into the "daylight", there should be more than reasonable grounds for impeachment. At the same time, grounds should be established for the declaration of Joe Biden as being "unfit to serve as President", as it is so obvious that he is unfit.

We need to get people out of governing that are not voted in by the people. Everyone in governing positions should answer directly to the people!  Lower level hired workers are ok. But, only the governing (voted in) positions would/should be held directly responsible for all actions.

There also should be a law established that in essence says, "Security Classification of Any Type of Data, Project. Process, and et al, Has No Foundation If Any Such is Deemed To Be In Violation of The Constitution and/Or Existing Laws". In short, let's make it a Federal offense to even classify (make "secret) and thing, just because it violates/might violate existing law!!!

uuhmmmm - my opinion of course!  :o
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 10, 2013, 12:37:48 PM
NSA whistleblower: ‘Mass surveillance makes intelligence community less efficient’
Published time: June 08, 2013 01:46


 
Quote
While the intelligence community has succeeded in duping the US administration into allowing mass surveillance, it did not help improve national security at all, former NSA analyst William Binney told RT.

William Binney, who worked for the NSA for over 30 years as a cryptanalyst-mathematician but resigned in 2001 as a whistleblower, explained why the notion that mass surveillance is necessary in order to combat terrorism is false.

RT: You have first hand knowledge on how the NSA works, is this just the tip of the iceberg?

William Binney: Well, in terms of the number of companies in the amount of data, yes that’s pretty much the case. It’s a direct violation of the constitution, that’s why I left the NSA in 2001. They started to do this, and that’s why I left. I could not stay there and be a party to the violation of my constitution, plus it was in violation of any number of laws at the time.

RT: President Obama has said that the invasion of privacy is done in the name of security, is he right about that? Does mass surveillance help security?

WB: No, it doesn’t. In fact it adds more of a problem because what that means, quite simply, is that if you go into a larger database, you get more data back no matter what the query is. It’s like making a query with Google. If you go in with a Google query you can get tens of thousands, or hundreds of thousands or even a million returns. Well, there’s no way you can go through that, all of that, to see what you’re really interested in. So what that does is make them less proficient at doing their jobs.

RT: And what about the cost of this to the taxpayer?

WB: Well all of that is being borne by the taxpayer. We had proposed to them a number of years ago, about 2004, that we design a system and build it for them for about $250 thousand, where it would select only the relevant data that they wanted to look at, out of the entire worldwide system. And we did it based on a simple two-degree principle - that is, if you had a terrorist calling somebody in the United States that was one degree, and that person in the US calling others in the US was the second degree. So, in other words what you would’ve been looking at was being able to find the cells inside the country, as well as being able to monitor terrorists worldwide. You would get it all, the rest of it was just extra information.

RT:  Do you think that the impact of 9-11 and the war on terror is so great that Americans are content to allow security to trample over anything else, even personal privacy?

WB: I think, initially, it began that way. People were trusting their government, I think that’s basically the case. Congress and the administration at the time was being bamboozled by the intelligence community, saying that you have to collect all this data to find the bad guys, and if we don’t do that you won’t be able to achieve that, which is absolutely false.

RT: Now there have been ongoing controversies surrounding the US spying on its citizens, is anything likely to make the government rein in its security services now?

WB: It’s going to be very difficult, because they have so much invested in doing what they’re doing. It costs a lot of money to do this, and their budgets have been almost tripled, I think, since 9-11, so that kind of spending is hard to waste. So what they’re really doing is saying we have to use what we have, which is the problem with power -- when you give power to an organization or to people they tend to use it. And assembling this kind of information about all the citizens in the United States, or anybody else for that matter, gives you power against them, you have leverage, and you can use that power against them. Or you can use other agencies of the US like the IRS to investigate people, and use your knowledge about people in the country to use the IRS to target them. For example, if they wanted to know who was in the Tea Party, they already have that from the telephone and email networks. The communities built from that data will tell them who’s participating in the Tea Party, the central figures, and who are not central to the Tea Party, and then from that if they are asking for tax exempt status, you can send the IRS after them to harass them. That’s what's possible, that’s what this power of knowledge does, it gives them that power to do that.

RT: In your experience with the NSA, is there a culture of surveillance which is prevailing there?

WB: No, I’m pretty sure there are a lot of people who are upset, at least from the ones who are retired. I’m getting feedback from them that they’re really upset at what NSA has been doing. And, of course, just the disclosure of the FISA warrants and this PRISM program says there are others who are working in government and in NSA who are upset by what they’re doing, otherwise they wouldn’t have been leaked.

RT: If this was practice, in both George W Bush’s administration and now apparently president Obama's, it suggests both seem to agree on this surveillance of its citizens, what does this mean for the future, where is this all going?

WB: Well, what that simply means is that we have to start electing people who are smart enough to realize when they’re being bamboozled by the intelligence community or anybody else, we can’t just take people and elect them who accept what they’re being told by departments of government. You have to have people who do real oversight, from not only the courts -- because after all, the courts, the judge that signed the orders for Verizon, he didn’t know any more than the government told him. So, he was totally dependent on what the government was telling him to justify their warrant, or their order. And that’s not acceptable.

Courtesy of the Russian Times (http://rt.com/news/nsa-whistleblower-mass-surveillance-398/)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 10, 2013, 12:43:49 PM
Obama on NSA surveillance: Can't have 100% security and 100% privacy
Published time: June 07, 2013 16:30


(http://rt.com/files/news/1f/58/10/00/9.si.jpg)
US President Barack Obama makes a statement to reporters on the Affordable Care Act at Fairmont Hotel in San Jose, California, on June 7, 2013 (AFP Photo / Jewel Samad)

Quote
The NSA’s extensive spying program is justified as it allows agents to identify “leads with respect to folks who might engage in terrorism,” claimed US President Barack Obama, adding that no one promised Americans both total security and total privacy.

Obama weighed in Friday morning on an evolving series of scandals surrounding an apparent National Security Agency program designed to allow real-time online surveillance of US citizens.

Obama was concluding remarks about his Affordable Health Care Act during an address in Northern California Friday morning when he fielded a single question about the NSA and the recently disclosed domestic spying programs.

“I think it’s important to recognize that you can’t have 100 per cent security and also then have 100 per cent privacy and zero inconvenience,” the president told the crowd while delivering several minutes of unscripted remarks about the NSA.

Earlier this week, civil liberties-focused lawyer-turned-journalist Glenn Greenwald of The Guardian published a document disclosing that the NSA orders the phone records of millions of American subscribers on a regular basis, and that American telecom firms have been compelled to provide the US government with numbers dialed, duration of call and other metadata.

One day later, The Guardian and the Washington Post nearly simultaneously disclosed a program named PRISM. According to Greenwald, PRISM allows the NSA to connect directly to data servers controlled by the biggest names on the Web, essentially providing Uncle Sam with backdoor access to the bulk of the country’s communications.

“The National Security Agency has obtained direct access to the systems of Google, Facebook, Apple and other US internet giants, according to a top secret document obtained by the Guardian,” Greenwald wrote late Thursday.

(http://admin.rt.com/files/news/1f/58/10/00/obama-4.jpg)
US President Barack Obama makes a statement to reporters on the Affordable Care Act at Fairmont Hotel in San Jose, California, on June 7, 2013 (AFP Photo / Jewel Samad)

Quote
Obama dismissed allegations that both NSA programs have been spying on Americans, instead calling them critical aspects of the country’s continuously expanding counterterrorism efforts. He also rejected the notion that the programs are as vast in scope as has been reported, at the same time shifting blame away from his administration and towards the lawmakers he said have been privy to both operations every step of the way.

“The programs,” said Obama, “are secret in the sense that they are classified, but they are not secret in the sense that when it comes to telephone calls, every member of Congress has been briefed on this program.”

“With respect to all of these programs, the relevant intelligence committees are fully briefed on these programs. These are programs that have been authorized by broad bipartisan majorities repeatedly since 2006. And so I think at the onset it is important to understand that your duly elected representatives have been consistently informed on exactly what we’re doing,” insisted Obama.

“When it comes to telephone calls, nobody is listening to your telephone calls. That’s not what this program was about. As indicated, what the intelligence community is doing is looking at phone numbers and durations of calls. They are not looking at people’s names and they are not looking at content. But, by sifting through this so-called metadata, they may identify potential leads with respect to folks who might engage in terrorism,” he said.

In regards to PRISM, Obama also downplayed reports of a widespread domestic surveillance operation.

“With respect to the Internet and emails, this does not apply to US citizens and it does not apply to people living in the United States,” he said. “And again in this instance, not only is Congress fully appraised of it, but what is also true is that the FISA [Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act] court has to authorize it.”

Congress reauthorized FISA last year, giving federal investigators another five-year window to wiretap the communications of Americans citizens if one of the parties involved is thought to be outside of the US. Google began publishing statistics about FISA's court-penned requests for user data in recent months, but the actual scope of the government’s spying prowess has gone unreported. Last year, two members of Congress even wrote the NSA for a rough estimate of how many Americans were having their communications intercepted — a request which was refuted.

(http://rt.com/files/news/1f/58/10/00/obama-5.jpg)
US President Barack Obama makes a statement to reporters on the Affordable Care Act at Fairmont Hotel in San Jose, California, on June 7, 2013 (AFP Photo / Jewel Samad)

Quote
“What you've got is two programs that were originally authorized by Congress, had been repeatedly authorized by Congress; bipartisan majorities have approved of them – Congress is continually briefed on how they are conducted. There is a whole range of safeguards involved, and federal judges are overseeing the entire program throughout,” Obama said.

Obama also suggested that under former president George W. Bush, discussions of the programs might never have surfaced. “Five years ago, six years ago, we might not have been having this debate,” he said, calling the discourse an example of “maturity.”

That didn’t keep Obama from condoning the leaked reports, though, and he made sure to speak in that connection as well.

“I don’t welcome leaks, because there are a reason these programs are classified,” Obama said. “I think that there is a suggestion that somehow any classified program is a quote-unquote ‘secret program,’ which means it is somehow suspicious. But the fact of the matter is in our modern history, there are a whole range of programs that have been classified, because when it comes to, for example, fighting terrorism, our goal is to stop folks from doing us harm. And if every step that we are taking to try to prevent a terrorist act is on the front page of the newspapers or any television, then presumably the people that are tying to do us harm are going to be able to get around our preventative measures. That’s why these things are classified. But that’s also why we set up congressional oversight. These are the folks that you all vote for as your representatives in Congress, and they are being fully briefed on these programs.”

“In the abstract you can complain about Big Brother and how this is a potential program run amok, but when you actually look at the details then I think we’ve struck the right balance,” he said.

The White House had failed to respond directly to The Guardian and Washington Post articles before the comments in California. He is currently traveling in the state and plans to meet with the president of China there this weekend.

Obama said he would continue to take questions through the week.

Courtesy of the Russian Times (http://rt.com/usa/obama-surveillance-nsa-monitoring-385/)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 10, 2013, 12:47:47 PM
'Everyone in US under virtual surveillance' - NSA whistleblower
Published time: December 04, 2012 14:01


 
Quote
The FBI records the emails of nearly all US citizens, including members of congress, according to NSA whistleblower William Binney. In an interview with RT, he warned that the government can use this information against anyone.

Binney, one of the best mathematicians and code breakers in the history of the National Security Agency, resigned in 2001. He claimed he no longer wanted to be associated with alleged violations of the Constitution, such as how the FBI engages in widespread and pervasive surveillance through powerful devices called 'Naris.'

This year, Binney received the Callaway award, an annual prize that recognizes those who champion constitutional rights and American values at great risk to their personal or professional lives.

RT: In light of the Petraeus/Allen scandal while the public is so focused on the details of their family drama, one may argue that the real scandal in this whole story is the power, the reach of the surveillance state. I mean if we take General Allen – thousands of his personal e-mails have been sifted through private correspondence. It’s not like any of those men was planning an attack on America. Does the scandal prove the notion that there is no such thing as privacy in a surveillance state?

William Binney: Yes, that’s what I’ve been basically saying for quite some time, is that the FBI has access to the data collected, which is basically the emails of virtually everybody in the country. And the FBI has access to it. All the congressional members are on the surveillance too, no one is excluded. They are all included. So, yes, this can happen to anyone. If they become a target for whatever reason – they are targeted by the government, the government can go in, or the FBI, or other agencies of the government, they can go into their database, pull all that data collected on them over the years, and we analyze it all. So, we have to actively analyze everything they’ve done for the last 10 years at least.

RT: And it’s not just about those, who could be planning, who could be a threat to national security, but also those, who could be just…

WB: It’s everybody. The Naris device, if it takes in the entire line, so it takes in all the data. In fact they advertised they can process the lines at session rates, which means 10-gigabit lines. I forgot the name of the device (it’s not the Naris) – the other one does it at 10 gigabits. That’s why they're building Bluffdale [database facility], because they have to have more storage, because they can’t figure out what’s important, so they are just storing everything there. So, emails are going to be stored there in the future, but right now stored in different places around the country. But it is being collected – and the FBI has access to it.

RT: You mean it’s being collected in bulk without even requesting providers?

WB: Yes.

RT: Then what about Google, you know, releasing this biannual transparency report and saying that the government’s demands for personal data is at an all-time high and for all of those requesting the US, Google says they complied with the government’s demands 90 percent of the time. But they are still saying that they are making the request, it’s not like it’s all being funneled into that storage. What do you say to that?

WB: I would assume that it’s just simply another source for the same data they are already collecting. My line is in declarations in a court about the 18-T facility in San Francisco, that documented the NSA room inside that AST&T facility, where they had Naris devices to collect data off the fiber optic lines inside the United States. So, that’s kind of a powerful device, that would collect everything it was being sent. It could collect on the order over of 100 billion 1,000-character emails a day. One device.

RT: You say they sift through billions of e-mails. I wonder how do they prioritize? How do they filter it?

WB: I don’t think they are filtering it. They are just storing it. I think it’s just a matter of selecting when they want it. So, if they want to target you, they would take your attributes, go into that database and pull out all your data.

RT: Were you on the target list?

WB: Oh, sure! I believe I’ve been on it for quite a few years. So I keep telling them everything I think of them in my email. So that when they want to read it they’ll understand what I think of them.

RT: Do you think we all should leave messages for the NSA mail box?

WB: Sure!

RT: You blew the whistle on the agency when George W. Bush was the president. With President Obama in office, in your opinion, has anything changed at the agency, in the surveillance program? In what direction is this administration moving?

WB: The change is it’s getting worse. They are doing more. He is supporting the building of the Bluffdale facility, which is over two billion dollars they are spending on storage room for data. That means that they are collecting a lot more now and need more storage for it. That facility by my calculations that I submitted to the court for the Electronic Frontiers Foundation against NSA would hold on the order of 5 zettabytes of data. Just that current storage capacity is being advertised on the web that you can buy. And that’s not talking about what they have in the near future.

RT: What are they going to do with all of that? Ok, they are storing something. Why should anybody be concerned?

WB: If you ever get on the enemies list, like Petraeus did or… for whatever reason, than you can be drained into that surveillance.

RT: Do you think they would… General Petraeus, who was idolized by the same administration? Or General Allen?

WB: There are certainly some questions, that have to be asked, like why would they target it to begin with? What law were they breaking?

RT: In case of General Petraeus one would argue that there could have been security breaches. Something like that. But with General Allen  – I don’t quite understand, because when they were looking into his private emails to this woman.

WB: That’s the whole point. I am not sure what the internal politics is… That’s part of the program. This government doesn’t want things in the public. It’s not a transparent government. Whatever the reason or the motivation was, I don’t really know, but I certainly think that there was something going on in the background that made them target those fellows. Otherwise why would they be doing it? There is no crime there.

RT: It seems that the public is divided between those, who think that the government surveillance program violates their civil liberties, and those who say, 'I’ve nothing to hide. So, why should I care?' What do you say to those who think that it shouldnt concern them.

WB: The problem is if they think they are not doing anything that’s wrong, they don’t get to define that. The central government does, the central government defines what is right and wrong and whether or not they target you. So, it’s not up to the individuals. Even if they think they aren't doing something wrong, if their position on something is against what the administration has, then they could easily become a target.

RT: Tell me about the most outrageous thing that you came across during your work at the NSA.

WB: The violations of the constitution and any number of laws that existed at the time. That was the part that I could not be associated with. That’s why I left. They were building social networks on who is communicating and with whom inside this country. So that the entire social network of everybody, of every US citizen was being compiled overtime. So, they are taking from one company alone roughly 320 million records a day. That’s probably accumulated probably close to 20 trillion over the years.

The original program that we put together to handle this to be able to identify terrorists anywhere in the world and alert anyone that they were in jeopardy. We would have been able to do that by encrypting everybody’s communications except those who were targets. So, in essence you would protect their identities and the information about them until you could develop probable cause, and once you showed your probable cause, then you could do a decrypt and target them. And we could do that and isolate those people all alone. It wasn’t a problem at all. There was no difficulty in that.

RT: It sounds very difficult and very complicated. Easier to take everything in and…

WB: No. It’s easier to use the graphing techniques, if you will, for the relationships for the world to filter out data, so that you don’t have to handle all that data. And it doesn’t burden you with a lot more information to look at, than you really need to solve the problem.

RT: Do you think that the agency doesn’t have the filters now?

WB: No.

RT: You have received the Callaway award for civic courage. Congratulations! On the website and in the press release it says: “It is awarded to those, who stand out for constitutional rights and American values at great risk to their personal or professional lives.” Under the code of spy ethics – I don’t know if there is such a thing – your former colleagues, they probably look upon you as a traitor. How do you look back at them?

WB: That’s pretty easy. They are violating the foundation of this entire country. Why this entire government was formed? It’s founded with the Constitution and the rights were given to the people in the country under that Constitution. They are in violation of that. And under executive order 13526, section 1.7 – you can not classify information to just cover up a crime, which this is, and that was signed by President Obama. Also President Bush signed it earlier as an executive order, a very similar one. If any of this comes into Supreme Court and they rule it unconstitutional, then the entire house of cards of the government falls.

RT: What are the chances of that? What are the odds?

WB: The government is doing the best they can to try to keep it out of court. And, of course, we are trying to do the best we can to get into court. So, we decided it deserves a ruling from the Supreme Court. Ultimately the court is supposed to protect the Constitution. All these people in the government take an oath to defend the Constitution. And they are not living up to the oath of office.         

Courtesy of the Russian Times (http://rt.com/usa/surveillance-spying-e-mail-citizens-178/)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: petrus4 on June 10, 2013, 12:50:33 PM
(http://rt.com/files/news/1f/58/10/00/9.si.jpg)

His face is changing.  That is what immediately jumped out at me, from the two photos in this post.  He's a lot more pale than usual, he's becoming more lined, and his hair has receded more than most images of him that I've seen.  The Presidency is apparently aging him rapidly.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 10, 2013, 12:51:35 PM
So you've never played Angry Birds?

Angry Birds is a brainwashing control tool :P as is Gangdam Style :D
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 10, 2013, 12:56:52 PM
This is the one that got me... the LOGOS.

We all knew here that Facebook was associated with the spooks from DAY ONE.. but now it is explained why google and Youtube are pushing so hard to get you to change your account to your real name.
AOL on that list no surprize...

Skype... I remember well the fiasco we had through them. Erased that crap long ago

Odd though I do not see ATS logo on there :P Wazzupwitdat?

But here is one thing to consider... now we all get to say...

WE TOLD YOU SO!!

Conspiracy nuts 10  Skeptics: 0

Also there is a clearance on there I am not familiar with  TS SI and NOFORN I kow  but what is ORCON

(http://rt.com/files/news/1f/59/10/00/2.jpg)

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 10, 2013, 01:00:34 PM
ORCON

ORCON or Orcon may refer to:

    Orcon Internet Limited, a New Zealand internet service provider
    ORCON, a U.S. intelligence code word used to mark information as "originator controlled"
    Operational Research CONsultancy (ORCON), a UK government initiative to improve ambulance response times
    Project Pigeon, later Project Orcon, a World War II project to use pigeons to control guided missiles

"pigeons to control guided missiles"  REALLY? WOW


Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 10, 2013, 01:04:09 PM
Courtesy of the Russian Times (http://rt.com/news/hague-prism-intelligence-sharing-437/)
Not really, RT means "Russia Today". :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 10, 2013, 01:10:32 PM
YES IT DOES HAVE A REAL AND LASTING EFFECT!
My comment was a response to Sky Otter's post:"if this happening has the result of cancelling the patriot act..or limiting it's scope it will be a very good thing letting folks know what their apathy has led to is not doom and gloom"

Sorry for not being clear. :)

Quote
These are foundational documents for this country, and they do not change every time someone has a different idea about how they think it should be.
The problem with the US constitution is that it lets many things open to interpretation, like the "unreasonable". One person's definition of "unreasonable" may not be the same as other person's definition, that's why, many times, things like that end up being decided by the supreme court or, in specific cases, by a court judging a case related to the interpretation.

But this is my opinion, I am not a lawyer and I am not familiar with the US judicial system. :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: rdunk on June 10, 2013, 01:11:01 PM
“In fact it adds more of a problem because what that means, quite simply, is that if you go into a larger database, you get more data back no matter what the query is. It’s like making a query with Google. If you go in with a Google query you can get tens of thousands, or hundreds of thousands or even a million returns. Well, there’s no way you can go through that, all of that, to see what you’re really interested in. So what that does is make them less proficient at doing their jobs,” former NSA analyst William Binney told RT".

It is easy to think that, but in the world of today, the super computers (Crays & etc) can do in seconds - 1000 trillion+ transactions per second -  what man could never do no matter the number of people,  and what could take years for standard computers to do. Nope, large volume searches are just simple child's play for the computers that our government uses on a daily basis.

Super computers are now measured in "peteflops" - 1 petaflop = 1000 trillion calculations per second.

So, just because there is much data associated with this subject, that would not equate to an enormous amount of people needed for the results.

JUst FYI: an over two year old news item on super computer stuff.

http://www.csmonitor.com/Innovation/Latest-News-Wires/2010/1028/Chinese-Supercomputer-How-fast-is-a-petaflop
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: rdunk on June 10, 2013, 01:18:02 PM
ORCON

ORCON or Orcon may refer to:

    Orcon Internet Limited, a New Zealand internet service provider
    ORCON, a U.S. intelligence code word used to mark information as "originator controlled"
    Operational Research CONsultancy (ORCON), a UK government initiative to improve ambulance response times
    Project Pigeon, later Project Orcon, a World War II project to use pigeons to control guided missiles

"pigeons to control guided missiles"  REALLY? WOW

ORCON is just another classification caveat, like NORFORN.

ORCON: Originator controls dissemination and/or release of the document.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: thorfourwinds on June 10, 2013, 01:21:29 PM
(http://www.thelivingmoon.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10005/skype-crypto-640x512.jpg)



Think your Skype messages get end-to-end encryption? Think again : Federal Jack (http://www.federaljack.com/think-your-skype-messages-get-end-to-end-encryption-think-again/)


(ARS TECHNICA)   If you think the private messages you send over Skype are protected by end-to-end encryption, think again. The Microsoft-owned service regularly scans message contents for signs of fraud, and company managers may log the results indefinitely, Ars has confirmed.

And this can only happen if Microsoft can convert the messages into human-readable form at will. With the help of independent privacy and security researcher Ashkan Soltani, Ars used Skype to send four Web links that were created solely for purposes of this article.

Two of them were never clicked on, but the other two—one beginning in HTTP link and the other HTTPS—were accessed by a machine at 65.52.100.214, an IP address belonging to Microsoft (http://www.whois.net/ip-address-lookup/65.52.100.214).

For those interested in the technical details, the log line looked like this:

'65.52.100.214 - - [16/May/2013 11:30:10] "HEAD /index.html?test_never_clicked HTTP/1.1" 200 -'


The results—which were similar but not identical to those reported last week (http://www.h-online.com/security/news/item/Skype-with-care-Microsoft-is-reading-everything-you-write-1862870.html) by The H Security—prove conclusively that Microsoft not only has ability to peer at the plaintext sent from one Skype user to another, but that the company regularly flexes that monitoring muscle.


Quote
Anyone who uses Skype has consented to the company reading everything they write. The H's associates in Germany at heise Security have now discovered that the Microsoft subsidiary does in fact make use of this privilege in practice. Shortly after sending HTTPS URLs over the instant messaging service, those URLs receive an unannounced visit from Microsoft HQ in Redmond...

Back in January, civil rights groups sent an open letter (http://www.skypeopenletter.com/) to Microsoft questioning the security of Skype communication since the takeover. The groups behind the letter, which included the Electronic Frontier Foundation (https://www.eff.org/) and Reporters without Borders (http://en.rsf.org/) expressed concern that the restructuring resulting from the takeover meant that Skype would have to comply with US laws on eavesdropping and would therefore have to permit government agencies and secret services to access Skype communications.


In one sense, this shouldn't come as news. Skype's privacy policy clearly states that it may (emphasis added) use automated scanning within Instant Messages and SMS (http://www.skype.com/en/legal/privacy/#protectionOfPersonalInformation) to identify spam and links to sites engaged in phishing and other forms of fraud.

And as Ars reported last year, since Skype was acquired by Microsoft, the network running the service has been drastically overhauled from its design of the preceding decade (http://arstechnica.com/business/2012/05/skype-replaces-p2p-supernodes-with-linux-boxes-hosted-by-microsoft/).


(http://www.thelivingmoon.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10005/skype-topology-4fa0137-intro.png)


Gone are the peer-to-peer "supernodes" made up of users with sufficient amounts of bandwidth and processing power; in their place are some 10,000 Linux machines hosted by Microsoft. In short, the decentralization that had been one of Skype's hallmarks was replaced with a much more centralized network. It stands to reason that messages traveling over centralized networks may be easier to monitor.


Perception, meet reality
Still, there's a widely held belief—even among security professionals, journalists, and human rights activists—that Skype somehow offers end-to-end encryption, meaning communications are encrypted by one user, transmitted over the wire, and then decrypted only when they reach the other party and are fully under that party's control. This is clearly not the case if Microsoft has the ability to read URLs transmitted back and forth.

"The problem right now is that there's a mismatch between the privacy people expect and what Microsoft is actually delivering," Matt Green, a professor specializing in encryption at Johns Hopkins University, told Ars.

"Even if Microsoft is only scanning links for 'good' purposes, say detecting malicious URLs, this indicates that they can intercept some of your text messages. And that means they could potentially intercept a lot more of them."


Specifics of the Microsoft scanning remain unclear; one possibility is that the scanning and spam-checking happen on Microsoft servers as communications pass through supernodes. Another possibility is that the Skype client on each end-user machine uses "regular expression" programming techniques built into the software and sends only the links to Microsoft servers.

"Either way, the finding does confirm that somewhere along the stream, Microsoft/Skype has the ability to intercept/extract content from your communications though we can't conclusively say where," Soltani wrote in an e-mail to Ars. "For example, even if the scanning was happening client side, it's plausible that MS could be compelled to push a ruleset to the Skype client that just logs/transmits all our activity (similar to what CarrierIQ was doing (http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2011/11/mobile-rootkit-maker-tries-to-silence-critical-android-dev-1/) on the HTC phones)."

Helping to feed this confusion about exactly what measures are taken to protect Skype messages is Microsoft's management, which remains vague about the precise type of encryption its service uses. Asked for comment on this story, a spokeswoman offered a statement that was identical to a single sentence in the privacy policy.

The statement didn't address my other question that's equally important: does Microsoft record the links and other content sent over Skype? Eventually I found the answer, and unfortunately it gives Microsoft all the wiggle room it needs. It states (http://www.skype.com/en/legal/privacy/#retentionOfPersonalData): "Skype will retain your information for as long as is necessary to: (1) fulfill any of the Purposes (as defined in article 2 of this Privacy Policy) or (2) comply with applicable legislation, regulatory requests and relevant orders from competent courts."


(http://www.thelivingmoon.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10005/facebook_report.jpg)


To be fair, Microsoft's scanning of Skype messages isn't too different from techniques Facebook reportedly employs (http://mashable.com/2012/07/12/facebook-scanning-chats/), and what any number of other online services do, too. As Green notes, these companies have a duty to make sure their services aren't abused to circulate malware.

What's different in the case of Skype is the misunderstanding among many users that links and other content sent over the service are private. This misunderstanding is all the more unfortunate given the possibility that this information plucked out of private messages could be logged and retained for as long as some nameless, faceless Microsoft manager deems appropriate.

Add to that the fact that a server bearing a Microsoft IP address very well may click on any link you send over Skype and it may not be such a good option for dissidents trying to lay low.
So the next time you use Skype, enjoy the clarity of the voice communications, its generally slick user interface, and its many other benefits.

Just don't think the service can't peer into your messages and store indefinitely what Microsoft managers want. It can, and until officials specifically disclose their practices, users should assume it does.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 10, 2013, 01:25:42 PM
WOW  Fox news calls for execution!!!

But on the flip side a NEW SERVICE EMERGES

REPOST IT for free  http://www.repost.us/article-preview/hash/b967a1f853cf16edb218812708bb6a3d/

Trying it now.....

Fox News analyst: ‘Bring back the death penalty’ for NSA leaker (via Raw Story )

Fox News strategic analyst Ralph Peters on Monday said that the man behind the biggest leak in the history of the National Security Agency (NSA) deserved to be executed for his crimes. Peters asserted on Monday’s Fox & Friends that no Americans had been hurt by the NSA programs exposed by 29-year…

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 10, 2013, 01:27:02 PM
Okay so it works but comes with the ads :P
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Gigas on June 10, 2013, 01:47:46 PM
This skype thing, I no use that spy script and noticed a lot of places in the ufo/alien arena are going to skype call ins and video conferencing. I don't chat, video chat, factbook, twitter or any of that screen scrape scripting.

I have to make an observation from what I see so far. That movie terminator three where we see the military industrial complex gone skynet and those drones are flying around firing missiles and stuff, we have that goin on now.

We are being ID'd by video drones, listened to by open wi-fi mics, followed by our banking, followed by store cam, followed by vehicle reporting technology, stalked on the internet by spookz and spies and information gathering techniques.

Were told its nothing to worry about. There are bad guys out there they have to watch but unfortunately that means you to.

I absolutely believe there are synthetics walking amongst humans and this creature has no moral compass to stop it from killing and hunting humans. Look at all the suicides that are clearly killings but obscured by the puppet masters manipulating reality blurring the real with the unreal forming an abstract consciousness change shaping whats morally human into a zombie.

I wanna know all of it and what I do with it is my decision.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 10, 2013, 01:53:51 PM
It is easy to think that, but in the world of today, the super computers (Crays & etc) can do in seconds - trillion+  transactions per second -  what man could never do no matter the number of people,  and what could take years for standard computers to do. Nope, large volume searches are just simple child's play for the computers that our government uses on a daily basis.
Database work is mostly limited by memory available to load the datasets, not the speed of the processors. While having a computer with 1 terabyte of memory would help, it can only use that memory once, so if they are two "clients" asking something from a dataset that occupies the whole memory the computer cannot use the memory to server both requests, and the performance of the server is greatly decreased by that.

That's part of the problems I face in my work, as I have to design (and redesign) databases, manage servers, create programs and web pages that use those databases, etc., etc.

One of the current trends in databases is "big data", as that problem also happens to private companies, and as those don't have the cash coming from the government or from hidden sources, they are the ones in the forefront of how to solve the problem.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 10, 2013, 01:56:17 PM
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc3/971222_4910420000798_731311869_n.jpg)


Facebook And It's Connections To The C.I.A. And D.A.R.P.A. by Brian S Staveley
01/19/2012


Quote
Facebook was setup by the C.I.A. Try telling that to most people and they laugh at it. People seem to think its a coincidence that Facebook seems to be so intrusive over and over again. Privacy policies that would make anyone scratch their head. I'm not going to beat around the bush with this blog post. Facebook was setup by the C.I.A. as a data mining project to collect as much information on as many people as they could. Not only that but it also has very strong ties to D.A.R.P.A. . The purpose of this data mining project that became Facebook was to find out a boat load of things on people. Where they are going. What they are doing. What airline are they using Who do they associate with What type of books or movies have you been reading. How you feel about things politically. The list goes on and on. Before I elaborate let me say that my prior statement about Facebook being setup by the C.I.A. isn't a theory or a hunch. If you simply follow the money its quite easy to see what is going on. Before we follow this money trail, just think about this.

                 If Facebook was setup by the C.I.A. (and it was) its a pretty brilliant plan. Never before have the people they want to watch actually given up so much information VOLUNTARILY! The C.I.A. doesn't even have to dig for most of it. People put it right out there. Think about how descriptive some people's status updates are. They tell you where they are going, who they are with sometimes, what they like. All these things. Did you know that once Facebook has you tagged in ONE PHOTO they have you identified anytime an image of you is uploaded whether it is tagged, labeled, or anything else to ID it? Facebook runs facial recognition on all photos and can even ID you by running it on some really low resolution shots, and its done for free! Does that sound like something a website would do for free? There are some much more intrusive things Facebook does to track you and every site you visit that you probably don't know about. All this without visiting Facebook or even needing to be a member!! After I tell you about the money trail and the start of Facebook we will get into more of these privacy issues and there are a lot. The facial recognition is just the tip of the iceberg. Before we do all that let's have a quick history lesson, the way I do history. With the ACTUAL TRUTH. The movie "The Social Network" was a big hit. It was supposedly all about the start of Facebook from a college dorm room to a multi billion dollar corporation in Palo Alto California. They left out some very interesting things that you all should know. That movie in itself was not about entertainment. It was propaganda to fortify the Facebook lie. Let us go back to the year 2003.

                  2003 is the year before Facebook officially launched outside of just the dorms at Harvard University. It launched in early 2004. Now in the movie and in the I guess what you could call the "official story" Mark Zuckerberg gets a 500,000 dollar investment from Peter Thiel some big shot exec out on the west coast. With this 500,000 investment Peter Thiel became some thing like a 7-8% owner of Facebook. So for Thiel obviously seeing as Facebook is valued at over 30 billion dollars he made quite the sound investment. This was a huge deal to Mark Zuckerberg. Now he had all the startup money he would need and then some. 500,000 dollars is a lot more than he needs to start a website, buy some servers, and hire some programmers, and it was supposed to be. It was Peter Thiel buying his way into the company. He had to pay something. Now supposedly in the process they screwed one of the other friends of Mark, gave him a tiny percentage and took his name of the mast head. Which they made a big deal about and we will talk about why. Peter Thiel made a huge investment and he wanted his name displayed on the site as one of the owners and rightfully so. Eduardo Saverin made a big stink because his name was taken off. So you see its kind of a big deal. Remember this for later. So they take the money and relocate to California. Facebook takes off so fast. This was in Early 2004. This all happened within a couple of months of Mark launching the site. So they were building it in 2003 in their dorm room and it launched in the beginning of 2004 . This 500,000 investment would also be in early 2004.That's how they got the money to move out to California. Well you know what would have been a lot better than a 500,000 dollar investment? How about a 12.7 million dollar investment? How about a 12.7 million dollar investment from Uncle Sam? Funny how we didn't hear about this one huh? That's 25 times greater of an investment than the one the make a big deal about in the movie.

                 This huge investment of $12.7 million came from James Breyer who is closely associated with a venture capital company called InQtel established by the CIA in 1999 and he served on the board of BBN. InQtel deals in information technology and intelligence most notably “nurturing data mining technologies”.

             So Zuckerberg actually got an investment over 25x greater than the 500,000 dollar investment and there is no mention of it anywhere! Remember we talked about how much pride these guys took in having their names on the mast head. It makes sense. You put in all that money to help someone get a project off the ground you deserve some recognition.

              James Breyer's name is not mentioned anywhere. Now remember Thiel put in 500,000 and got 7% of the company. So what would almost 13 million get you? Well if my math is right it, if you used the same scale as Thiel it would be over 140% of the company. Something doesn't add up here huh? Starting to think the Thiel investment is complete BS. Either way that is certainetly not the important point. The point is they only mention Thiel and not the guy who threw in over 25 x more money. Almost 13 million put on a college kid's dreams? Sounds kinda far fetched doesn't it? Why soooooo much money?  That is enough to statup a 1000 social networks! Now why would he want to invest that much? Well look at where he is coming from.  He sits on the board of a C.I.A. front company that specialized in using the internet to data mine and find out what people are doing. Where they are going. Who they are with. etc,etc,etc.... What's that sound like to you?

                       Then there is the D.A.R.P.A. connection.  A brief summary on D.A.R.P.A. for those that don't know. They invented the internet. They are under the dept of defense. They are actually working on liquid metal robots like in Terminator 2. These are the types of things they do. They would be the most cutting edge inventors for the government and military. Super high tech stuff. Things we can't even imagine exist, they play with every day. D.A.R.P.A. is tied into all this as well.

http://www.therealnewsonline.com/2/post/2012/01/facebook-and-its-connections-to-the-cia-and-darpa.html


SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: About a month after posting this a new article was put out by Lifehacker that actually shows you how to STOP Facebook from tracking you via these other sites! It's a really good article. Here is a link to it.  http://lifehacker.com/5843969/facebook-is-tracking-your-every-move-on-the-web-heres-how-to-stop-it
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 10, 2013, 02:00:41 PM

Think your Skype messages get end-to-end encryption? Think again : Federal Jack (http://www.federaljack.com/think-your-skype-messages-get-end-to-end-encryption-think-again/)
Nobody worried about privacy should think that any software they are using uses encryption that cannot be "opened" by the software creator or anyone with the right "key", they should trust only encryption applied by them.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: rdunk on June 10, 2013, 02:17:02 PM
"Fox News analyst: ‘Bring back the death penalty’ for NSA leaker".

And I say, let's make the penalty equally severe for making something classified that is un-Constitutional by fact determination.

And, let us "let the people", in some way, decide on the fate/reward of whistleblowers, not political administrations, and not the military, and not the Intelligence agencies, and etc.

I don't like people releasing classified information which has reasonably accepted cause for classification. But, when it comes to our own government spying on the people, and the such-like, I sure as hell want to know about it, so reasnable Americans can do something about it!

Maybe we need to set up "another department" in our country's government, to be the first receiver for classified whistleblower information. This department, with the appropriate security levels, would be the point of determination for handling the information, as necessary.  Probably a segment of the Justice department, or a segment of Congress. This would be a way to open the door for whistle-blowing, without fear of reprisals!!

As long as we have this huge government, we really need something like this.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Gigas on June 10, 2013, 02:30:06 PM
For kicks, I vb6 coded a software program back in 2000 to encrypt messages. I was going to develop it for email messages so it would be a stand alone email program for people to send encrypted messages back and forth with the program unencrypting incoming messages.

Here it is:

(http://s21.postimg.org/smy1trso7/encreep.jpg)


I studied how the encryption method can be broke and lost interest in further development.

Another method of interest is steganography. I had a program where you can insert text messages within a photo and covertly post it on the beep webz for someone to decode the message embeded in the image code.

The story later broke this was being used by foreign operatives and they scanned ebay and found secret messages being deployed on their auction site from within ads.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 10, 2013, 03:08:59 PM
LOL they think this is NEWS 


US Navy Caught Monitoring UFO Web-Sites

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-V7v3wpymqpU/Ua4dIasAFkI/AAAAAAAATEc/xTJvHZMHhvs/s400/US+Navy+Caught+Monitoring+UFO+Web-Sites.jpg)

By Anthony Bragalia
The UFO Iconoclast(s)
6-2-13

      A little-known US Navy agency employing some of the nation’s top information technology experts has been selectively monitoring websites that carry articles that relate to UFO crashes, Roswell and related events.

For at least five years this small Navy organization has found, visited and reviewed certain blogs, writers and forums that discuss such subjects, including this blog -- The UFO Iconoclast(s).

This agency employs personnel with Top Secret clearance that manage all Navy computer networks. They also manage the entire IP database for the US Navy, direct classified telecommunications networks, and support cyber defense and cyber warfare projects. They also provide the servers and networks for other government agencies including NASA.

This agency collaborates with those in DoD military and intelligence. And the name of the agency caught in UFO site surveillance is the Navy Network Information Center (NNIC) within the “Navy Circuit Management Office.”

That agency has also targeted this author.

UFO Bloggers Reporting Navy Interest

I have located several examples of Navy Network Information Center (NNIC) visits to online UFO articles and whose visitor logs are available for review:

- UFO-Blogger.com reported that on December 8, 2010 their visitor tracking program indicated a visit by the NNIC. Such programs can often provide further details about the visit: There were a total of 3 “Page Views” and the visit was for 1 minute and 22 seconds. The “Entry Page” and “Exit Page” (or the title and keywords that brought them to the site) was: “Wikileaks UFO Disclosure: Cables Contain UFO Info, Claims Assange.”

- Mel Fabregas of VeritasRadio.Blogspot.com reported on January 29, 2009 that a UFO website author had contacted him to report that immediately after posting an article entitled “UFO Sighting Over President Barack Obama Inauguration,” the NNIC came “visiting.” Fabregas reported that he contacted Italian researcher Paola Harris about this who told him, “I have gotten several emails citing intelligence groups who are logging on to (UFO) websites.”

- Even patently “fake” UFO-Alien encounter tales can apparently catch the interest of NNIC. As far back as five years ago (on July 5, 2008) the Open Minds Forum commented on “Sources That are Reading Serpo.org Releases” and mentioned that among the first visitors to the Serpo site was NNIC. A tale put forth by a man named Victor Martinez (likely with the help of Air Force flunky Richard Doty) had proposed that open contact was made between our government and an alien race some decades ago and that an “exchange program” called “Serpo” was created, carrying of a dozen earth people to a distant star.

More on the Navy Network Information Center

Finding information of any type on this agency proves very difficult. Using LinkedIn I learned of an individual who works with a major government classified work contractor, URS. She is the Financial Manager for the NNIC and manages a $300 million budget. From another professional on LinkedIn who is a security-cleared Network Engineer some information could be gleaned about the agency’s mission.

According to the website URL Monitor, the NNIC acts as the server for other government agencies, including NASA’s Global Ocean Data Experiment website and network. The server was found to be faster than most measured websites.

The Navy Network Information Center seems to be “headquartered” in Norfolk, VA based two employee and contractor profiles found on LinkedIn. IP address information provided by the website IPF1.com shows that location as well as IP addresses in Pensacola, FL and three in Portsmouth, VA. UFO-Blogger.com reported that their NNIC site visitor was located at Camp Pendleton.

The NNIC and Me

At least once the NNIC has visited me. In an article that was carried on Frank Warren’s The UFO Chronicles website entitled “Roswell Officer Speaks from the Grave” appearing on December 10, 2012, sure enough, the NNIC was a cyber-visitor according to Frank’s Stat Counter.

This article featured a taped confession of viewing an ET corpse by Walter Haut, the Public Information Officer at Roswell Army Air Field in July, 1947.

Frank reports that there were several federal government visitors with military and intelligence agencies, among them one for which no information has been found available: the “US Department of Defense Network” in Severn, MD with another location in Texarkana, TX.

Other Government UFO Site Visitors

There are indeed other government UFO site visitors according to those who are tracking their visitors, These include NASA, Department of Homeland Security and the US State Department. But there is always one consistent visitor who often visits first: the Navy through its little-mentioned Navy Network Information Center.

Private Interest or Government Spying

At least some of these government “website hits” are surely resultant from private interest. The US government employs hundreds of thousands with work-a-day routines. Sitting in front of their computers are they merely playing “digital hooky” from work and “playing on the computer” of their employer – or is it something deeper? Is their employer directing them to keep a watch on the UFO watchers?

Posted by Frank Warren at 12:01 AM
http://www.theufochronicles.com/2013/06/us-navy-caught-monitoring-ufo-web-sites.html


I think Frank is registered here somewhere :D

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: rdunk on June 10, 2013, 03:09:25 PM
Database work is mostly limited by memory available to load the datasets, not the speed of the processors. While having a computer with 1 terabyte of memory would help, it can only use that memory once, so if they are two "clients" asking something from a dataset that occupies the whole memory the computer cannot use the memory to server both requests, and the performance of the server is greatly decreased by that.


We are not talking about home computers here, nor home computer type processing needs.

With super computers processing capabilities in the 1000's of trillions instructions per second range, I don't think 1T of storage would cut it. My home computer has a 1TB hard drive, and a 3TB external hard drive, but the processing speeds are laughable, as compared to the super computers.

For comparison, my computer has a 3.02 GHZ processor, which means my processor can execute 3.02 billion instructions per second. As noted prior above, the super computers are in the 1,000 Trillions per second (petaflop) range.

Here is another article dated Nov. 2012, that announces the U.S, has a supercomputer at the speed of 17.59 petaflops/s. And here is a list of the top supercomputers, and their processing speeds.

Peta-Flop

A petaflop is a measure of a computer's processing speed and can be expressed as a thousand trillion floating point operations per second.

The top five supercomputers in the world are:

Titan Cray XK47 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (17.59 petaflops/s)

Sequoia BlueGene/Q at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (16.33 petaflops/s)

Fujitsu's K computer at the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science in Kobe, Japan (10.51 petaflops/s)

The Mira BlueGene/Q computer at Argonne National Laboratory in Lemont, Ill. (8.16 petaflops/s)

The JUQUEEN BlueGene/Q computer at the Forschungszentrum Juelich in Germany. (4.14 petaflops/s)

http://news.yahoo.com/worlds-fastest-supercomputer-crowned-us-192428438.html
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 10, 2013, 03:18:17 PM
For kicks, I vb6 coded a software program back in 2000 to encrypt messages.
Some of the programs in which I participated had their passwords encrypted with a method created in the company where I work. As the program was not supposed to be that secure, it was a simple encryption, but not as simple as a simple substitution (I only used simple substitution with my brother, and he was never able to decipher it :) ).

Quote
I studied how the encryption method can be broke and lost interest in further development.
Some methods cannot be broken. :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 10, 2013, 03:27:26 PM
Edward Snowden: Ex-CIA leaker drops out of sight, faces legal battle

Quote
In Washington, several lawmakers called for the extradition and prosecution of the ex-CIA employee behind one of the most significant security leaks in U.S. history. Members of the U.S. Congress said they would be briefed on the topic on Tuesday; the U.S. Justice Department is in the initial stages of a criminal investigation.

"If anyone were to violate the law by leaking classified information outside the legal avenues, certainly that individual should be prosecuted to the full extent of the law," Eric Cantor, the No. 2 Republican in the House of Representatives, said on CBS's "This Morning."

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-edward-snowden-nsa-leaks-20130610,0,5107295.story
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 10, 2013, 03:36:02 PM
Assange on Snowden: He's a hero, we've been in contact

(http://rt.com/files/news/1f/5e/40/00/assange-snowden-wikileaks-nsa2.si.jpg)
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (AFP Photo)

Quote
Julian Assange says that he was in “indirect” contact with ex-CIA staffer Edward Snowden, who leaked details of US top-secret Internet snooping programs, and that the whistleblower stood for the same goals as the WikiLeaks organization.

Follow RT's LIVE UPDATES on NSA leak fallout (http://rt.com/usa/nsa-leak-snowden-live-updates-482/)

“What [Snowden] has revealed is what I have been speaking about for years, that the [US] National Security Agency and its allies have been involved in a mass interception program of Google, Facebook, the various telecommunications data…,” Assange stated in an interview with Australian news program Lateline on ABC.

(http://rt.com/files/news/1f/5e/40/00/000_hkg8679423_copy_copy.jpg)

 Snowden, 29, is behind one of the biggest leaks in US political history. He revealed to The Guardian top-secret documents including those about the US National Security Agency’s (NSA) massive spy tool, the PRISM. It gave US intelligence agencies access to data servers maintained by some of the country’s biggest Internet companies – and therefore an ability to spy on Americans’ emails, video chats, search history, and so on.

Assange – who has been holed up in the Ecuadorian embassy in the UK and is running for a seat in the Australian senate later this year – approved of Snowden’s actions calling him “a hero who has informed the public about one of the most serious events of the decade, which is the creeping formulation of a mass surveillance state”.

He added that the WikiLeaks political party shares a similar stance on warrantless spying, seeing it as “unacceptable.”

“We run the danger here of the West more broadly drifting into a state where there are two systems. There's one law for the average person and there's another law if you're inside the national intelligence complex,” he said. “You can intercept whoever you want, you're completely unaccountable for your actions, there's no judicial review.”

Assange believes that neither Australians, nor Americans find such an approach acceptable.

“Snowden clearly didn't find that acceptable and he was even someone in the system,” he observed.

Assange also admitted that he had an “indirect communication” with Snowden’s people. However, he refused to disclose any further details.

“Let's look at the case and let's look at what he's revealed,” Assange said.

Last week, commenting on the NSA scandal, the WikiLeaks founder slammed the US government spying scheme as a “calamitous collapse in the rule of law.”

The disclosure of the two massive secret US surveillance programs – the PRISM and also a program under which a division of telecommunications provider Verizon was ordered to hand over records to the NSA – caused huge public uproar. American intelligence confirmed that they collect the private messages of millions of Internet users, but insist that the mass surveillance only targeted “non-US persons outside the US”.

President Barack Obama said last Friday that the NSA program is justified as it allows agents to identify “leads with respect to folks who might engage in terrorism” and noted that one “can’t have 100 per cent security and also then have 100 per cent privacy.”

However, American tech giants – Google and FaceBook – continued to deny that they knew about the PRISM program.

Courtesy of Russian Times (http://rt.com/news/assange-snowden-wikileaks-nsa-484/)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: rdunk on June 10, 2013, 03:47:18 PM
Of course, Obama will try to make the story "about the whistleblower", and not take responsibility of the wholesale spying upon all Americans by his administration et al they all work for him - Justice, NSA, FBI, IRS, State, Treasur, etc.

The action of Obama always is to make the story/negative news about somebody else or something else. Never let the story stick to himself!
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 10, 2013, 03:59:16 PM
We are not talking about home computers here, nor home computer type processing needs.
Obviously.

Quote
With super computers processing capabilities in the 1 to 2 trillion calculations per second range, I don't think 1T of storage would cut it. My home computer has a 1TB hard drive, and a 3TB external hard drive, but the processing speeds are laughable, as compared to the super computers.
I said "memory", not disk space.

Quote
For comparison, my computer has a 3.02 GHZ processor, which means my processor can execute 3.02 billion instructions per second. As noted prior above, the super computers are in the 1,000 Trillions per second (petaflop) range.
A 3.02 GHz processor means that the clock that makes the processor work runs at that speed, that's not the number of instructions it can execute per second, that depends on the way the processor is made.

A simple processor may need several operations to execute a simple instruction, as it has first to read the code and interpret it, fetch any data used by the command (like a memory address and a value to add to that address) and finally execute the command, so it takes several CPU cycles to execute one instruction.

The floating point operations are some of the most complex operations, usually done by a specific part of the processor (or even a different processor), and they may need several CPU cycles to be executed, if the CPU doesn't use any parallelism.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 10, 2013, 04:01:53 PM
Of course, Obama will try to make the story "about the whistleblower", and not take responsibility of the wholesale spying upon all Americans by his administration et al they all work for him - Justice, NSA, FBI, IRS, State, Treasur, etc.
They do not work for Obama, they work for whoever runs the country. :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Cosmic4life on June 10, 2013, 05:00:04 PM
Well first we had Echelon running the PROMIS program ...

Now we have PRISM.

Is it just me or is PRISM a newer version of PROMIS ?  a rhetorical question.

Michael Riconosciuto is an interesting person to search for .. as is the late Danny Casolaro.

C..
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Gigas on June 10, 2013, 05:41:56 PM
Well first we had Echelon running the PROMIS program ...

Now we have PRISM.

Is it just me or is PRISM a newer version of PROMIS ?  a rhetorical question.

Michael Riconosciuto is an interesting person to search for .. as is the late Danny Casolaro.

C..


Michael Riconosciuto is a very very interesting guy. So interesting in fact, the tptb had to put him away in prison till 2024. This guy is not just some guy and from what I have gathered, he may not be human.

Danny Casolaro is dead but Michael Riconosciuto is not. That man and his ilk are suspiciously untouchable. Most of those who worked with MR are dead but some are not.

Cabazon indian reservation was their play ground in the 80s and the chief and several friends were murdered while sitting out in their yard by a guy we know now was the head of security at the Cabazon casino. This guy, James Hughes, got away, went to south america and lived for 20 some years till they got him in miami on a warrant.

This guy was sought by the daughter of one of those murdered and she knew he did it but law enforcement would not go after him till some years ago.

James Hughes confessed to murdering those three people on the Cabazon reservation and they let him go. Imagine that in the world of spooks.

Another good read is called the last circle by sherrie seymour where even more names like spooky John Nickles come out of the wood work. Google that title and its online to be read for free. Talk about spooky and spooks, its in there.


http://aconstantineblacklist.blogspot.com/2009/10/octopus-murders-victims-daughter.html


To read online sherries book the last circle: http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/sociopolitica/last_circle/0.htm
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: rdunk on June 10, 2013, 05:47:02 PM
They do not work for Obama, they work for whoever runs the country. :)

That is a very incorrect statement. The President is like the CEO of any corporation. The "CEO" is ultimately held responsible, by the board of the corporation, for everything that happens relative to the corporation's conduct of business. Any President should receive the same consideration for the good or bad execution of the Executive Branch of the Government.

I am going to try to post a link to an organizational chart for you that depicts the President's areas of responsibilities.

In most of the US gov. org. charts I have looked at, it is noticeable that "The Constitution" is the top box on the chart, being the "head" of our country's government.


http://www.flickr.com/photos/rob_goodspeed/3020963540/
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Amaterasu on June 10, 2013, 05:47:42 PM
YES IT DOES HAVE A REAL AND LASTING EFFECT!

This crap represents direct violations of what is in our Constitution and in our Bill of Rights. These are foundational documents for this country, and they do not change every time someone has a different idea about how they think it should be. All elected officials are in office to "uphold the Constitution", and that doesn't allow government to take actions that violate it and impinge upon the rights of we the people.

Might point out that it does not stipulate whether it is the original constitution or the CORPORATE constitution that nullified the original in 1871:

http://www.dailypaul.com/138686/the-act-of-1871-is-this-the-source-of-all-our-problems

Quote
The following article explains how the original
"Constitution for the united states for America"
was in 1871, changed to the
"THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA".

If this impostor is the source of our modern day problems, repealing it could be the simple solution as well.

I am a neophyte of this topic but find it most interesting. Hopefully, some other DPs will help confirm the accuracy of this historical event and bring additional understanding to the fore.

Excerpt:
The Congress realized our country was in dire financial straits, so they cut a deal with the international bankers — (in those days, the Rothschilds of London were dipping their fingers into everyone's pie) thereby incurring a DEBT to said bankers.

If we think about banks, we know they do not just lend us money out of the goodness of their hearts. A bank will not do anything for you unless it is entirely in their best interest to do so. There has to be some sort of collateral or some string attached which puts you and me (the borrower) into a subservient position. This was true back in 1871 as well.

The conniving international bankers were not about to lend our floundering nation any money without some serious stipulations. So, they devised a brilliant way of getting their foot in the door of the United States (a prize they had coveted for some time, but had been unable to grasp thanks to our Founding Fathers, who despised them and held them in check), and thus, the Act of 1871 was passed.

In essence, this Act formed the corporation known as THE UNITED STATES. Note the capitalization, because it is important. This corporation, owned by foreign interests, moved right in and shoved the original "organic" version of the Constitution into a dusty corner. With the "Act of 1871," our Constitution was defaced in the sense that the title was block-capitalized and the word "for" was changed to the word "of" in the title. The original Constitution drafted by the Founding Fathers, was written in this manner:

"The Constitution for the united states of America".

http://www.serendipity.li/jsmill/us_corporation.htm
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 10, 2013, 05:57:21 PM
That is a very incorrect statement.
What I meant was that today is Obama, after him it will be someone else.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: The Matrix Traveller on June 10, 2013, 06:20:47 PM
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=osoF7nzSy2A[/youtube]

Enjoy...   :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: rdunk on June 10, 2013, 06:23:34 PM
Might point out that it does not stipulate whether it is the original constitution or the CORPORATE constitution that nullified the original in 1871:

That matters not. While it does seem to bother just a few, The Constitution is the Constitution! We have plenty of people well versed in all aspect of the Constitution and Constitutional Law, so no need to be concerned with whatever theorists might try to throw around in this regard. There are certain areas in our government that do need to be eliminated, like the Federal Reserve, and the IRS, etc.. But such action will simply be a matter of doing the things necessary to "gitter done"! :))
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Amaterasu on June 10, 2013, 06:26:39 PM
Might point out that it does not stipulate whether it is the original constitution or the CORPORATE constitution that nullified the original in 1871:

That matters not. While it does seem to bother just a few, The Constitution is the Constitution! We have plenty of people well versed in all aspect of the Constitution and Constitutional Law, so no need to be concerned with whatever theorists might try to throw around in this regard. There are certain areas in our government that do need to be eliminated, like the Federal Reserve, and the IRS, etc.. But such action will simply be a matter of doing the things necessary to "gitter done"! :))

What do You mean, "That matters not???"  The Constitution as originally written is GONE.  And if You take oath to "protect the constitution," and the constitution is NOT the one everyOne THINKS it is...  Yeah.  It MATTERS.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: The Matrix Traveller on June 10, 2013, 06:28:16 PM
The English "Yes Minister" Series puts any PM in its true Context... Tongue in Cheek..

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=osoF7nzSy2A[/youtube]
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: rdunk on June 10, 2013, 07:14:42 PM
What do You mean, "That matters not???"  The Constitution as originally written is GONE.  And if You take oath to "protect the constitution," and the constitution is NOT the one everyOne THINKS it is...  Yeah.  It MATTERS.

Prove it with indisputable proof! Not just someones theory about this and that. At the present, I flat do not accept this theory, that all has changed, other than what changed about Washington D.C., by this act. And most on the internet that I looked at do not accept the Act as being any sort of real problem either.

Many things are wrong with our government, but it is not because the Constitution has been nulled and voided, because it definitely has not been!!

Talk with someone who really knows what they are talking about, relative to the Constitution!! I wouldn't bother listening to unlearned conspiracy theorists on the subject of the Constitution.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: rdunk on June 10, 2013, 07:34:09 PM
Matrix, that is a funny video :D - funny only because it depicts just how stupid people can be in situational mechanics. And this video pretty well covers the intended various scenarios - from disinterested, to good, to bad, to how can I not interfere with my potential promotion, and to being analyzed with whiskey, on the couch.

Watching man in the role of life can be a real hoot, and at the same time be very sad, knowing how the story of man ends.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: petrus4 on June 10, 2013, 07:40:13 PM
Talk with someone who really knows what they are talking about, relative to the Constitution!! I wouldn't bother listening to unlearned conspiracy theorists on the subject of the Constitution.

Obama would likely never formally rescind the Constitution; anyone who did would be suicidal, at least before the Vietnam generation are extinct.  After that it probably won't matter.

Formal Constitutional suspension, however, is entirely unnecessary.  Laws already exist on the books, which are entirely capable of overriding everything it grants in practice; at which point it becomes irrelevant.

Rdunk, you currently have a government which knows only one law; superior force.  There have been members of the police talking about the possibility of Constitutional suspension in certain cases, even if Obama himself hasn't.  The reason why cops can talk about that, however, is because America is now a country where police can kill people and get away with it.

Again, you can talk about what laws are or are not theoretically on the books, as much as you want.  As far as the Obama administration is concerned, the law does not matter.  It will do whatever it wants to do, and most of the time it will get away with it, because the American population are too busy watching porn or cat videos, telling themselves that they are powerless, or engaging in mindless, reflexive worship of the military to do anything about it.

[youtube]MtN1YnoL46Q[/youtube]

This video is a good example, of what has replaced political debate or oversight in contemporary Western society.  We are cowardly, morally degenerate 4 year olds, for the most part; and the rare exceptions who exist, like Snowden or Bradley Manning, simply end up dead.

There is your vaunted Constitutional Republic.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: rdunk on June 10, 2013, 07:59:52 PM
Actually Petrus4, I believe you and we are only beginning to see the very scratchings on the surface, for what this country can do, when the people decide that something must be done.

That which we have seen to be started in just the past few weeks is pretty amazing. As Drudge said today, "Every day a new scandal"! Even some of the mainstream news sources are beginning to directly make anti-administration comments. The people are getting very involved, and will more and more as this develops. Even I have sent specific messages to "involved" senators and congressmen, as I am certain others are doing.

The outcomes are going to get even more interesting! There is already a strong voice for the elimination of the IRS. And that might just be a good first step!! Lots of "steps" need to be taken to get this country back to where we need it to be.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: burntheships on June 10, 2013, 10:17:12 PM
Kentucky Senator Rand Paul calling the spying an astounding
assault on The Constitution.

[youtube]-5lgvxcMkS4[/youtube]
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=-5lgvxcMkS4

Paul sees this just the opposite of Obama, who describes the
latest spy scandal a modest encroachments on privacy.
What does Obama know about modesty?  >:(

Quote
"I'm going to be seeing if I can challenge this at the Supreme Court level," Paul said.
 
"I'm going to be asking all the internet providers and all of the phone companies: ask your customers to join me in a class action lawsuit," Paul told host Chris Wallace. "If we get ten million Americans saying we don't want our phone records looked at, then maybe someone will wake up and something will change in Washington."
http://www.activistpost.com/2013/06/rand-paul-calls-of-mass-class-action.html?m=1

Help him reach his 10 million signatures, join the class action suit!

http://randpaul2016.com. help him reach ten million signatures!
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on June 10, 2013, 10:49:13 PM


Edward Snowden Is A Ron Paul Supporter
The Huffington Post  |  By Amanda Terkel Posted: 06/10/2013 9:46 am EDT  |  Updated: 06/10/2013 11:04 pm EDT

AUMF Repeal Bill Would End Extraordinary War Powers Granted After 9/11
Posted: 06/10/2013 3:12 pm EDT  |  Updated: 06/10/2013 7:39 pm EDT

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/politics/
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 11, 2013, 01:38:41 AM
Obama on NSA surveillance: "Can't have 100% security and 100% safety"
Published time: June 07, 2013 16:30


(http://rt.com/files/news/1f/58/10/00/9.si.jpg)


They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety

(http://www.hulsestrength.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/ben_franklin.jpg)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: robomont on June 11, 2013, 01:42:52 AM
remember when the constitution was something we understood.now its a jumble of lies.
the only true rule of law is mutualy assured destruction.
otherwise some wordsmith will turn your patriotism into terrorism.

thats why we each should have a nuclear bomb.peace through fear is the only way.thats why guns work.
why bother with laws.live your life.laws are for stooges.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 11, 2013, 03:01:53 AM
AUMF Repeal Bill Would End Extraordinary War Powers Granted After 9/11


Now THAT would be awesome  ;D
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: robomont on June 11, 2013, 03:23:00 AM
call me a pesimist but congress shall pass no law as long as the house and senate hate each other.and even if they agreed.olbummer would veto.
olbummer is a dictator.i just hope he runs out of money and congress doesnt give him anymore.then he will be almost powerless.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 11, 2013, 03:39:33 AM
Just found this on facebook a few minutes ago LOL

(https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/601916_10151441578966884_23560823_n.jpg)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 11, 2013, 04:01:15 AM
call me a pesimist

Okay :D

Quote
then he will be almost powerless.

Already a lame duck. This NSA stuff will keep him occupied for a while


(https://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/992994_10151641010327726_1322205063_n.jpg)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 11, 2013, 04:28:59 AM
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-a-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/1001148_10152886143585368_1458540621_n.jpg)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Amaterasu on June 11, 2013, 05:51:59 AM
Prove it with indisputable proof! Not just someones theory about this and that. At the present, I flat do not accept this theory, that all has changed, other than what changed about Washington D.C., by this act. And most on the internet that I looked at do not accept the Act as being any sort of real problem either.

Many things are wrong with our government, but it is not because the Constitution has been nulled and voided, because it definitely has not been!!

Talk with someone who really knows what they are talking about, relative to the Constitution!! I wouldn't bother listening to unlearned conspiracy theorists on the subject of the Constitution.

[sigh]

www.freerepublic.com/focus/fnews/813840/posts
http://theunjustmedia.com/Banking%20&%20Federal%20Reserve/The%20united%20states%20Of%20America%20%20is%20a%20corporation%20owned%20by%20fore.htm
http://teamlaw.net/Mythology-CorpUS.htm
http://coupmedia.org/politics-2609
http://realitybloger.wordpress.com/tag/constitution-act-of-1871/
http://www.newciv.org/nl/newslog.php/_v308/__show_article/_a000308-000266.htm
http://expose1933.weebly.com/44-the-act-of-1871.html
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gABSat3N7xg[/youtube]
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z-gmVZgjcUY&feature=player_embedded[/youtube]

I could go on and on...
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Amaterasu on June 11, 2013, 05:56:33 AM
remember when the constitution was something we understood.now its a jumble of lies.
the only true rule of law is mutualy assured destruction.
otherwise some wordsmith will turn your patriotism into terrorism.

thats why we each should have a nuclear bomb.peace through fear is the only way.thats why guns work.
why bother with laws.live your life.laws are for stooges.

"If You want peace, take the profit out of war."

Peace through elimination of accounting for meaningful energy expended works better.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: thorfourwinds on June 11, 2013, 06:24:13 AM
Obama would likely never formally rescind the Constitution;

anyone who did would be suicidal, at least before the Vietnam generation are extinct...

Greetings friend petrus4:

Again, very astute observation.

That Vietnam generation (our generation) is quite aware, watching, and biding our time.    :P

In the meantime, we occupy ourselves with things like this:

711 days after Fukushima changed the world forever on 3/11/11 (http://www.thelivingmoon.com/forum1/index.php?topic=3822.msg51737#msg51737)

EARTH AID - The Concert to Save All Life On Earth (http://www.thelivingmoon.com/forum1/index.php?topic=1405.0)

FukuGate - We've Been Conned (http://www.thelivingmoon.com/forum1/index.php?topic=3007.0)

Operation Thunderdome: Obama's cyber warriors are preparing for collapse (http://www.thelivingmoon.com/forum1/index.php?topic=3992.msg53188#msg53188)

(http://www.thelivingmoon.com/43ancients/04images/Bluebird/lg50aa500a.gif) (http://)

tfw
Peace Love Light
Liberty & Equality or Revolution
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: rdunk on June 11, 2013, 09:25:22 AM
"I could go on and on..."

lol! Reminds me of the TAP stuff. As a Texan would say, "All hat and no cattle". The Constitution stands, just as it always has!
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Cosmic4life on June 11, 2013, 10:05:15 AM
I think to blame Obama is a bit of a stretch ... he's not the Boss ...  the last real President was JFK as you all know.

Barry does what he is told ... or he dies ... period .

The technology to spy on communications and also what is on your screen ... what you are typing .. and even what is in the room your screen is in has been in development since the 60's.

NSA codeword TEMPEST .. Van Eck phreaking , Walsh functions as a part of EMSEC .. Emission Security and Surveillance.

PROMIS .. AI .. PRISM .. ECHELON is just the tip of the Iceberg .. these are just the information processing and distribution systems.

C..
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: SarK0Y on June 11, 2013, 03:32:42 PM
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-a-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/1001148_10152886143585368_1458540621_n.jpg)
Yes, Amicus, you shot right out the :D it's been very problem of such work: lot of personnel gone badly bad after cherries. 
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Edward on June 11, 2013, 04:15:08 PM
Just found this on facebook a few minutes ago LOL

(https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/601916_10151441578966884_23560823_n.jpg)



z,  give me a link for this. I wanna post this to FB as well get the word out and to let people see the comparisons, for those who don't have a clue yet and a stiff reminder to those who do  know but just say "well what can we do, cant fight city hall".   


Edward
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: The Matrix Traveller on June 11, 2013, 04:43:19 PM
Does it really matter if everything is known about ourselves ?

Why are some so "Paranoid" about this ?

After all LIFE knows ALL anyway.

You can't HIDE anything !   :)

We only fear that everything is known about us, IF we have something to hide !

If everything is known about ME... then I am seen in TRUTH !

IF NOT then I am misunderstood !

The human species in fact has NO Control over LIFE at all.   :)

It is LIFE which Controls ALL, through its Written Programs,
yet to be understood in its True Context by most on Earth.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Edward on June 11, 2013, 05:51:26 PM
I understand what your are saying. 

There is how ever veils of many kinds around. When we start dropping some of these, your sentiments will echo all that much more clearer.


Edward


Edit: that should make some sense. I came back and read it and I'm like wtf did I just say???  LOL   :o ;)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: vril on June 11, 2013, 07:25:58 PM
Does it really matter if everything is known about ourselves ?

Why are some so "Paranoid" about this ?

After all LIFE knows ALL anyway.

You can't HIDE anything !   :)

We only fear that everything is known about us, IF we have something to hide !

If everything is known about ME... then I am seen in TRUTH !

IF NOT then I am misunderstood !

The human species in fact has NO Control over LIFE at all.   :)

It is LIFE which Controls ALL, through its Written Programs,
yet to be understood in its True Context by most on Earth.

It's not so much that everything is known, obviously our entire life is recorded by the powers that be (read: aliens) and I am completely fine with that.  The problem is what humans do with this knowledge (law enforcement, government).  Of course, people just have been living in an illusion of civil liberty, the government has been doing this for decades if not centuries, it's just so pervasive now that the system cannot even be dismantled.

This is about my feeling on it too.  It was also pretty obvious to me that this has been happening for decades.  I guess the fear is just what law enforcement and government will do w The facade of terrorism has just made the majority of people accept it too. 
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Sgt.Rocknroll on June 11, 2013, 07:43:29 PM
Does it really matter if everything is known about ourselves ?

Why are some so "Paranoid" about this ?

After all LIFE knows ALL anyway.

You can't HIDE anything !   :)

We only fear that everything is known about us, IF we have something to hide !

If everything is known about ME... then I am seen in TRUTH !

IF NOT then I am misunderstood !

The human species in fact has NO Control over LIFE at all.   :)

It is LIFE which Controls ALL, through its Written Programs,
yet to be understood in its True Context by most on Earth.

I don't think it's so much people knowing about us, it's the realization that you might be watched and probed without your outright consent.

Anyone that thinks they have any kind of personal privacy, should not use a computer, cell phones, or any digital media,. Ie Facebook and the like. I'm not a bit surprised that the NSA is envolved. They had their name stamped on every piece of equipment I've ever been around. You should have seen the crypto equipment and keying material they had in the 70's. man it'd make your head swim.  Sorry rambling a bit. Time for bed.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: The Matrix Traveller on June 11, 2013, 07:44:48 PM
It's not so much that everything is known, obviously our entire life is recorded by the powers that be (read: aliens) and I am completely fine with that.  The problem is what humans do with this knowledge (law enforcement, government).  Of course, people just have been living in an illusion of civil liberty, the government has been doing this for decades if not centuries, it's just so pervasive now that the system cannot even be dismantled.

This is about my feeling on it too.  It was also pretty obvious to me that this has been happening for decades.  I guess the fear is just what law enforcement and government will do w The facade of terrorism has just made the majority of people accept it too.

We must remember our whole experience (Individual Body & Environment) is being produce by something
(LIFE) other than the human Species.

This is done through a "Processing System" known by some.

And used in every day Life by those NOT from the Earth !

This "Technology" is used in just about everything by other Civilisations from outside the Earth,
in "Transport Systems", "Communication", "Manufacture", "Accessing Knowledge" and "Entertainment" etc..

Your/our Individual Experience is produced before, you/we enter into the experience (vril & Environment
i.e. Earth or Universe Experience) but we are about to know, how to change (Edit our own Experience)

The human species is the Result of "Reading" (A Computer Term) a "Program Book".

This experience (re. Body and Universe) is a bit like what we have today in the form of a "1st Person"
Video or Computer Game played on the net.

Except what we believe to be "Reality", is merely a more sophisticated "1st Person" Game
than what is played on the Net.   :)

So Gov. have NO "Control", over anything at all...  It is just an Illusion....   :)  But a very well executed One.   :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: The Matrix Traveller on June 11, 2013, 07:48:00 PM
Privacy is only an "Illusion", some wish to believe in...   :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Amaterasu on June 11, 2013, 11:08:06 PM
"I could go on and on..."

lol! Reminds me of the TAP stuff. As a Texan would say, "All hat and no cattle". The Constitution stands, just as it always has!

You keep believing that, rdunk, but I propose to You that it surely explains why so many "representatives" do NOT uphold the constitution as WE might believe it to be.  They took oaths...but to what?
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 12, 2013, 03:53:50 AM
Obama Demands Court Uphold His “Right” To Ignore Constitution

(http://www.westernjournalism.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/obama-speech-7-SC.jpg)

Quote
Obama’s Department of Justice is demanding a federal judge dismiss the injunction with which she sought to uphold the constitutional rights of the American people.

On May 16th, federal judge Kathleen Forrest granted a preliminary injunction to plaintiffs in a lawsuit filed against Barack Obama and the National Defense Authorization Act of 2012 (NDAA), striking down those sections of the Act that provide the president the power to indefinitely detain American citizens without benefit of their 5th and 6th Amendment rights.

Under the terms of the Act, Obama had been given exclusive authority to direct members of the US military to arrest and imprison anyone he believed to have “substantially supported” al Qaeda, the Taliban, or “associated forces.” When pressed by plaintiff’s attorneys about the practical extent of this authority, government lawyers admitted “…the NDAA does give the president the power to lock up people like journalist Chris Hedges and peaceful activists,” admitting that “…even war correspondents could be locked up indefinitely under the NDAA.”

And when asked by the judge what it meant to be an “associated force”, Obama’s lawyers “…claimed the right to refrain from offering any clear definition of [the] term, or clear boundaries of the president’s power under [the] law.” In short, it is the federal government’s scheme that the Act remain so vague that a corrupt and power-hungry Administration may imprison virtually anyone it considers a threat to its pursuit of absolute power.

On July 25th, Administration lawyers filed papers demanding Judge Forrest’s preliminary injunction NOT be made permanent. In the filing, Obama made it clear his Administration would ignore the court and its injunction regardless of what the judge may decide, claiming incorrectly that “…[the] injunction would have ‘nil’ effect, for the government would continue to possess the identical detention authority under the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force…” Of course, that is a lie, as the AUMF applies only to known members of al Qaeda or the Taliban.

Most indicative of the Obama Administration’s contempt for Judge Forrest, the law, and the American people was government attorney Benjamin Torrance’s claim that it was “the Obama Administration’s position” NDAA detention provisions do not apply to American citizens living in the US. Judge Forrest responded by quoting Chief Justice Roberts, who wrote in a 2010 case that the Supreme Court “…would not uphold an unconstitutional statute merely because the government promised to use it reasonably.” So much for Judge Forrest’s faith in the validity and value of Obama’s signing statement promise to not employ his Section 1021 authority to indefinitely detain the American public!

Yet incredibly, when pressed on the issue, this Obama mouthpiece suggested to Forrest that concerns about the president’s detention powers were excessive as American citizens would, after all, have the ability to file  a writ of habeas corpus should they be illegally or improperly jailed! “How long does [such a] petition take,” asked Forrest? When Torrance refused to answer, the Judge continued, “Several years, right”?

So not only did Obama’s attorney lie about his Marxist boss’s corrupt intentions; he actually claimed that the abuse of American citizens was somehow acceptable because those unconstitutionally imprisoned might ask that the charges against them be produced after ONLY a few years behind bars!

Judge Forrest will soon decide whether to make the injunction permanent. Every citizen must watch very carefully for that ruling, as the “mainstream” media has ignored the story completely. We must all hope the Judge will not be intimidated by this corrupt Regime as so many of her colleagues have been before her.

Follow Coach at twitter.com @KcoachcCoach

http://www.westernjournalism.com/obama-demands-court-uphold-his-right-to-ignore-constitution/
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 12, 2013, 04:07:00 AM
Now Russia set to offer whistleblower asylum: Putin 'considers' giving Edward Snowden refuge as NSA leaker vanishes in Hong Kong

Quote
Russia today hinted that Vladimir Putin would grant political asylum to Edward Snowden, the NSA whistleblower who leaked the secret information about a classified U.S. government surveillance program.

'We will take action based on what actually happens. If we receive such a request, it will be considered,' said the Russian president's official spokesman Dmitry Peskov.

The former CIA undercover operative is on the run after checking out of his luxury Hong Kong hotel on Sunday - his whereabouts is unknown.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2339329/Russia-hints-Putin-grant-political-asylum-whistleblower-Edward-Snowden-NSA-leaker-vanishes-Hong-Kong.html

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: petrus4 on June 12, 2013, 04:25:33 AM
Obama Demands Court Uphold His “Right” To Ignore Constitution

The great irony, however, is that while Americans continue their reflexive worship of the Constitution, they fail to recognise that part of the reason for the mess in which they currently find themselves, can be attributed to weaknesses in said Constitutional system.

I will explain here, by saying that, in Western (and particularly American) society, we are held to derive our philosophy, and the very fabric of our thought itself, from Greece and Rome.  This is the first point.

The second point, however, is that while American Presidents often throw the word "democracy," around as though they know what it means, what they of course do not mention, is that democracy in the direct and genuine sense of the word, was a Greek invention, specifically.  The Republican system which America currently has, was modelled on Rome.

Why is this a problem?  Simply because the core element of this political system, is a legislature.  That is, you do not have direct democracy; you have representative democracy via said legislature.

I will contend that there has never been a representative, or non-direct legislature in human history, which did not rapidly degenerate into a corrupt, fascist gerontocracy, virtually the moment after its' inception.  Rome's legislature did not escape that fate, and neither has America.

The American Senate can rightfully be considered a mausoleum.  It is populated by a body of ghouls, none of whom are less than 50 years old at a bare minimum, and all of whom are subject to vast bribes from the corporate establishment.  This is precisely as it was in Rome's day, as well; and it is a crucial element of the cause of Rome's fall.  If Americans were going to consider trying to implement genuine political reform, my first suggestion would probably be to employ the services of Buffy the vampire slayer.

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_CqPXN1_5w4k/TTzX-56QJKI/AAAAAAAAAaQ/b91JOZDGdDU/s400/Buffy+-+Buffy+with+Axe.jpg)

If you want to learn about a form of government that truly involved the people, however, then for that you would need to study Sparta, and to a lesser extent Athens.  The Spartans had direct democracy; and more importantly, they recognised that a quality education was vital for the survival and effective functioning of real participatory government.

America, by contrast, is ruled by a plutocracy of geriatric psychopaths; and said psychopaths have no interest in promoting public education or critical thought whatsoever.  John Rockefeller said it directly; that he did not want a nation of thinkers, but a nation of workers.

The political situation will not improve, until people are willing to become politically self-responsible; and in order for them to do that, they must (particularly in the case of Americans, as mentioned) cease believing that the best system they can have, is one in which they deliberately forfeit said responsibility to someone else, rather than exercising it themselves.  With a legislature, that is what you do.

If you want political integrity back, there are two ways you can get it.

a}  The legislative branch must be abolished completely.  The people must vote directly on laws themselves, rather than them delegating a geriatric fascist cabal to do so for them.  The only truly democratic means of passing laws is by referendum.  Anything else is psychopathic fraud.  Anyone who responds to this point, by quoting any of the Constitution's authors to the effect that democracy is "mob rule," will be summarily and contemptuously ignored, as a victim of plutocratic mind control.

The judges can stay where they are; I have no grievance with them for the most part, and indeed we often see the judicial branch acting as the people's last line of defense, while the legislature are busy enjoying their bribes.  That is not to say that the judges themselves are incorruptible, either; but they do genuinely seem to be less prone to it than the Congress.

b}  If you are going to keep an executive, then the executive must be informed in no uncertain terms that his role is to serve the people; meaning said general population that is responsible for voting on said laws, and that if he does not execute the people's will, the people will execute him. 

I suspect that impeachment also carrying the death penalty would create a much stronger incentive for appropriate Presidential behaviour, and in point of fact, that has been the practice since JFK; it is simply that the Eye have executed Presidents who have attempted to deviate from their will, rather than said law being held and exercised by the people themselves.  Regicide may be a moral crime, but at times it is also a social virtue.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on June 12, 2013, 07:19:00 AM

interesting history on the whistleblower Snowden within  this fraction of an interview


http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jun/09/edward-snowden-nsa-whistleblower-surveillance


Snowden did not always believe the US government posed a threat to his political values. He was brought up originally in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. His family moved later to Maryland, near the NSA headquarters in Fort Meade.

By his own admission, he was not a stellar student. In order to get the credits necessary to obtain a high school diploma, he attended a community college in Maryland, studying computing, but never completed the coursework. (He later obtained his GED.)

In 2003, he enlisted in the US army and began a training program to join the Special Forces. Invoking the same principles that he now cites to justify his leaks, he said: "I wanted to fight in the Iraq war because I felt like I had an obligation as a human being to help free people from oppression".

He recounted how his beliefs about the war's purpose were quickly dispelled. "Most of the people training us seemed pumped up about killing Arabs, not helping anyone," he said. After he broke both his legs in a training accident, he was discharged.

After that, he got his first job in an NSA facility, working as a security guard for one of the agency's covert facilities at the University of Maryland. From there, he went to the CIA, where he worked on IT security. His understanding of the internet and his talent for computer programming enabled him to rise fairly quickly for someone who lacked even a high school diploma.

By 2007, the CIA stationed him with diplomatic cover in Geneva, Switzerland. His responsibility for maintaining computer network security meant he had clearance to access a wide array of classified documents.

That access, along with the almost three years he spent around CIA officers, led him to begin seriously questioning the rightness of what he saw.

He described as formative an incident in which he claimed CIA operatives were attempting to recruit a Swiss banker to obtain secret banking information. Snowden said they achieved this by purposely getting the banker drunk and encouraging him to drive home in his car. When the banker was arrested for drunk driving, the undercover agent seeking to befriend him offered to help, and a bond was formed that led to successful recruitment.

"Much of what I saw in Geneva really disillusioned me about how my government functions and what its impact is in the world," he says. "I realised that I was part of something that was doing far more harm than good."

He said it was during his CIA stint in Geneva that he thought for the first time about exposing government secrets. But, at the time, he chose not to for two reasons.

First, he said: "Most of the secrets the CIA has are about people, not machines and systems, so I didn't feel comfortable with disclosures that I thought could endanger anyone". Secondly, the election of Barack Obama in 2008 gave him hope that there would be real reforms, rendering disclosures unnecessary.

He left the CIA in 2009 in order to take his first job working for a private contractor that assigned him to a functioning NSA facility, stationed on a military base in Japan. It was then, he said, that he "watched as Obama advanced the very policies that I thought would be reined in", and as a result, "I got hardened."

The primary lesson from this experience was that "you can't wait around for someone else to act. I had been looking for leaders, but I realised that leadership is about being the first to act."

Over the next three years, he learned just how all-consuming the NSA's surveillance activities were, claiming "they are intent on making every conversation and every form of behaviour in the world known to them".

He described how he once viewed the internet as "the most important invention in all of human history". As an adolescent, he spent days at a time "speaking to people with all sorts of views that I would never have encountered on my own".

But he believed that the value of the internet, along with basic privacy, is being rapidly destroyed by ubiquitous surveillance. "I don't see myself as a hero," he said, "because what I'm doing is self-interested: I don't want to live in a world where there's no privacy and therefore no room for intellectual exploration and creativity."

Once he reached the conclusion that the NSA's surveillance net would soon be irrevocable, he said it was just a matter of time before he chose to act. "What they're doing" poses "an existential threat to democracy", he said.

A matter of principle
As strong as those beliefs are, there still remains the question: why did he do it? Giving up his freedom and a privileged lifestyle? "There are more important things than money. If I were motivated by money, I could have sold these documents to any number of countries and gotten very rich."

For him, it is a matter of principle. "The government has granted itself power it is not entitled to. There is no public oversight. The result is people like myself have the latitude to go further than they are allowed to," he said.

His allegiance to internet freedom is reflected in the stickers on his laptop: "I support Online Rights: Electronic Frontier Foundation," reads one. Another hails the online organisation offering anonymity, the Tor Project.

Asked by reporters to establish his authenticity to ensure he is not some fantasist, he laid bare, without hesitation, his personal details, from his social security number to his CIA ID and his expired diplomatic passport. There is no shiftiness. Ask him about anything in his personal life and he will answer.

He is quiet, smart, easy-going and self-effacing. A master on computers, he seemed happiest when talking about the technical side of surveillance, at a level of detail comprehensible probably only to fellow communication specialists. But he showed intense passion when talking about the value of privacy and how he felt it was being steadily eroded by the behaviour of the intelligence services.

His manner was calm and relaxed but he has been understandably twitchy since he went into hiding, waiting for the knock on the hotel door. A fire alarm goes off. "That has not happened before," he said, betraying anxiety wondering if was real, a test or a CIA ploy to get him out onto the street.

Strewn about the side of his bed are his suitcase, a plate with the remains of room-service breakfast, and a copy of Angler, the biography of former vice-president Dick Cheney.

Ever since last week's news stories began to appear in the Guardian, Snowden has vigilantly watched TV and read the internet to see the effects of his choices. He seemed satisfied that the debate he longed to provoke was finally taking place.

He lay, propped up against pillows, watching CNN's Wolf Blitzer ask a discussion panel about government intrusion if they had any idea who the leaker was. From 8,000 miles away, the leaker looked on impassively, not even indulging in a wry smile.

Snowden said that he admires both Ellsberg and Manning, but argues that there is one important distinction between himself and the army private, whose trial coincidentally began the week Snowden's leaks began to make news.

"I carefully evaluated every single document I disclosed to ensure that each was legitimately in the public interest," he said. "There are all sorts of documents that would have made a big impact that I didn't turn over, because harming people isn't my goal. Transparency is."

He purposely chose, he said, to give the documents to journalists whose judgment he trusted about what should be public and what should remain concealed.

As for his future, he is vague. He hoped the publicity the leaks have generated will offer him some protection, making it "harder for them to get dirty".

He views his best hope as the possibility of asylum, with Iceland – with its reputation of a champion of internet freedom – at the top of his list. He knows that may prove a wish unfulfilled.

But after the intense political controversy he has already created with just the first week's haul of stories, "I feel satisfied that this was all worth it. I have no regrets."
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on June 12, 2013, 09:47:57 AM


NSA Spying Controversy Highlights Embrace Of Big Data
 Posted: 06/12/2013 7:36 am EDT  |  Updated: 06/12/2013 10:28 am EDT

Even within the infrastructure of the American surveillance apparatus, the National Security Agency is notoriously secretive. The spy agency jealously guards from public view practically all aspects of its operations, from the information it collects to its plans for a massive 100,000-square-foot building being constructed in the Utah desert.
http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2013/06/11/inside-nsas-secret-utah-data-center/

But when it comes to the agency's primary tool for making sense of all that data, the NSA hasn't been secretive at all. Indeed, two years ago, it made public the very code for a key program it uses to analyze the firehose of information pouring into its computer servers.

The NSA’s decision to give away that code to developers has helped fuel what is now a booming trend in technology known as "big data." The technology, Accumulo, makes it possible for companies to sift through massive amounts of information with essentially the same degree of sophistication and security as the country's top spy agency.

The use of computers to spot connections along a trail of digital breadcrumbs is hardly new. For years, major companies, from Amazon to Facebook to Google, have analyzed customer information to suggest books, friends or search results.

But the NSA’s use of such computing power was not widely understood until last week, when The Guardian and The Washington Post reported the agency was collecting and crunching huge amounts of Internet, phone and financial data in a bid to predict terrorist activity.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jun/06/us-tech-giants-nsa-data



The revelation that the NSA was collecting a massive trove of phone and Internet records from Americans highlights privacy concerns around the use of data analysis to draw conclusions from a wide of variety of information.

“There are all sorts of things you can do with this technology,” said Matthew Turck, managing director in FirstMark Capital, a venture capital firm. “Now it’s up to society to decide what’s acceptable and what’s not acceptable.”

The same cheap data storage and free open-source software used by the NSA now allows companies to conduct the kind of sophisticated data analysis once was only available to Internet giants like IBM and Google.

“Ten years ago, if you wanted to store and process that much data you would have to spend millions of dollars buying really expensive servers,” said Ben Siscovick, general partner at IA Ventures, a venture capital firm that invests in big data companies. “Now, the tools are out there, and they’re accessible in a low-cost way to just about anybody who wants it.”

For advocates of big data -- an industry with an estimated value approaching $100 billion -- the potential for technology like Accumulo has barely been tapped.

"This is the first technological innovation since the Internet with the potential to change the world," said Christopher Lynch, an investor that has bankrolled 10 Boston-area big data companies.

One of those companies is Sqrrl, which Lynch helped launch two years ago after poaching from the NSA six engineers who developed Accumulo. Sqrrl markets its technology to companies in the telecom, health care and financial sectors who need extra security when dealing with sensitive customer data. The database sorts through enormous amounts of information and restricts access to users with high-level security clearances, said Ely Kahn, the company's co-founder.

Its technology is used by major banks to predict whether customers will pay off their credit cards based on information like the demographic characteristics of their neighborhoods. It is also used by a telecom provider to spot damage on its network by searching for keywords like “broken” in a database of customer service calls, Kahn said.

“It’s similar to the way Amazon or eBay use databases to predict what you might want to buy next,” he said.



But the growing reliance on databases and software to draw conclusions has raised privacy concerns before. Target, for example, sparked controversy last year when an employee told The New York Times how the company could determine whether a woman was pregnant based on her purchasing history and demographic information.
http://www.forbes.com/fdc/welcome_mjx.shtml


Lenders have started assessing the creditworthiness of borrowers by doing big-data analysis on their social media connections.
http://www.economist.com/news/finance-and-economics/21571468-lenders-are-turning-social-media-assess-borrowers-stat-oil
 And some health insurers have started buying massive databases to potentially flag people for being at risk of obesity if they have a history of buying plus-sized clothing, according to The Wall Street Journal.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323384604578326151014237898.html

FirstMark Capital's Turck predicted that the ability for both the NSA and companies to unlock secrets from the data they collect “is only going to get more powerful and more precise."

“The genie is out of the bottle,” he said.http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/12/nsa-big-data_n_3423482.html
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: robomont on June 12, 2013, 10:09:49 AM
lets say im a pot smoker and grower.my  gov doesnt need that info.
lets say i want to hedge against the dollar.some nsa agent could use that to bankrupt me.and make himself filthier rich than he already is.
its time to end big gov.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 12, 2013, 10:55:15 AM
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/999534_470013589752654_1691621056_n.jpg)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 12, 2013, 10:59:49 AM
"The Government Spooks Are Drunk With Power!" Congressman Ted Poe

[youtube]6Z968_74B98[/youtube]
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Somamech on June 12, 2013, 11:31:10 AM
I found this Doc a few years ago on the Aussie Gov Website linked to Defense Research, and oddly they haven't taken this one off the web unlike that Lithium Dump into Atmosphere Doc I found when I was more happy yesteryear ;)  ;D

The Use of Systemic-Functional Linguistics in Automated Text Mining.

Quote
Scientific Publication

Report Number:
    DSTO-RR-0339
Authors:
    Kappagoda, A.
Issue Date:
    2009-03
AR Number:
    AR-014-419
Classification:
    Unclassified
Report Type:
    Research Report
Division:
    Command, Control, Communication and Intelligence Division (C3ID)
Release Authority:
    Chief, Command, Control, Communication and Intelligence Division
Task Sponsor:
    ASCP; EXEC DIR CTSTC
Task Number:
    INT 07/020
File Number:
    2009/1016253/1
Pages:
    82
References:
    38
Terms:
    Information extraction; Machine learning
URI:
    http://hdl.handle.net/1947/9900

Abstract

Quote
Systemic-functional linguistics is a linguistic framework for the analysis of grammatical and semantic information in text, with a potential role in automated text mining. This report outlines essential features of the theory, its application in computational work, and the rationale for use in automated text mining, and develops a grammatical annotation scheme– word functions– to enrich a mixed text corpus of newspaper articles and e-mails, for machine learning of semantically-oriented grammatical patterns. Testing demonstrates high accuracy in predicting word functions in unseen text in co-training with other grammatical information, providing the basis for further grammatical and semantic text processing.


Executive Summary

Quote
Using grammatical and semantic patterns as the basis for large-scale text processing has wide potential to improve the quality and speed of information management and analytical tasks in the defence and intelligence domains. It is proposed that a robust linguistic model is needed to support the automation of these tasks, which is achieved by co-training semantic and grammatical information with unstructured text, and that systemic-functional linguistics (SFL) provides a prime means for achieving this. SFL is a linguistic theory that has had a substantial presence in natural language processing work for the past 40 years, with recent developments in rule-based and machine learning (ML)- based text processing. An outline of the theoretical apparatus of SFL is presented, focusing on a detailed treatment of the functional structure of word groups and phrases. This is used to derive a grammatical annotation scheme for the labelling of the functions of single tokens in unstructured text (WFG). A justification for using this scheme is presented, and a method is outlined for the preprocessing of unstructured text and for annotation with the WFG scheme, in order to produce training and testing corpora for a ML system employing the 'conditional random fields' algorithm. It is demonstrated via this system that automated WFG annotation can be achieved with high accuracy, and that such labelling supports the automated recognition of other grammatical information such as chunk labelling. It is proposed that WFG annotation provides a robust semantically-oriented foundation for other kinds of semantically-based text processing, such as information extraction and text categorisation, which are important elements in information management in defence and intelligence tasks.



SOURCE:


http://www.dsto.defence.gov.au/publications/scientific_record.php?record=9900



Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 12, 2013, 11:39:54 AM
Michael Savage Defends NSA Whistleblower, Edward Snowden, Hero and True Patriot,

[youtube]4C9ALGjG-Iw[/youtube]
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Somamech on June 12, 2013, 11:41:06 AM
Local councils snooping on phone use

LOCAL councils are seizing data from residents' mobile phones without warrants to chase unregistered pets, illegal rubbish dumping and unauthorised advertising.

Quote
Federal surveillance laws enable enforcement agencies -- such as police, corruption watchdogs and the Australian Taxation Office -- to seize telecommunications data to conduct criminal investigations, enforce fines or protect public revenue. But the laws are increasingly being used by other public bodies, such as local governments and Australia Post, which have collectively made more than 800 self-authorisations for personal data in the past three financial years.

Telecommunications data, which is often described as "metadata", includes the names and addresses of telephone users and lists of their calls, text messages and emails. It also includes users' locations at the time they make a call, but does not include the text or audio of communications.

SOURCE:

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/australian-it/councils-snooping-on-phone-use/story-e6frgakx-1226579848017

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 12, 2013, 12:12:14 PM
Obama Holds Secret Press Meeting to Control Reports About NSA Leak

(http://www.occupycorporatism.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/susanne_posel_news_-enhanced-buzz-12095-1370975431-8-300x216.jpg)

Quote
Susanne Posel
Occupy Corporatism
June 12, 2013



Reporters were invited to a secret meeting with President Obama to corroborate how the leak concerning the NSA’s PRISM program will be dealt with in the mainstream media (MSM).

Referred to as a routine “background briefing session”; however the details of this meeting were to remain unspoken and reporters who attended the meeting was not forthcoming with details of what was discussed.

Reporters from many of the most influential MSM outlets were in attendance:

• New York Times
• Washington Post
• Huffington Post
• Time
• McClatchy
• Politico
• Tribune
• NPR
• Bloomberg
• USA Today
• AFP
• Yahoo

At an annual banquet of the Intelligence and national Security Alliance, James Clapper, director of National Intelligence, joked about recent comments he made regarding the NSA leak.

Clapper called it the “elephant in the room” regarding ““the unauthorized leaks as reprehensible and egregious.”

Clapper joked that: “Some of you expressed surprise that I showed up—so many emails to read!”

Russian President Vladimir Putin remarked that data surveillance “methods are in demand. But you can’t just listen to the phone call in Russia; you need a special order from court. This is how this should be done in civilized society while tackling terrorism with the use of any technical means. If it is in the framework of the law, then it’s ok. If not it is unacceptable.”

Dmitry Peskov, press secretary for Putin said that should his government receive a request from Edward Snowden, National Security Agency (NSA) whistleblower, for asylum “we will consider it.”

Snowden remarked that it is his “predisposition is to seek asylum in a country with shared values.”

House Speaker John Boehner said that Snowden is a “traitor. “The disclosure of this information puts Americans at risk. It shows our adversaries what our capabilities are. And it’s a giant violation of the law.”

Boehner said that the NSA surveillance programs being used by the Obama administration are “important national security programs to help keep Americans safe, and give us tools to fight the terrorist threat that we face. The president also outlined that there are appropriate safeguards in place to make sure that there’s no snooping, if you will, on Americans here at home.”

Boehner claims that there is “heavy oversight of this program by the House Intelligence Committee on a bipartisan basis and the Senate Intelligence Committee. And that’s why I feel comfortable that we can operate this program and protect the privacy rights of our citizens.”

http://www.occupycorporatism.com/obama-holds-secret-press-meeting-to-control-reports-about-nsa-leak/

[youtube]GIgUVExgDeo[/youtube]

Quote
The MSM portrays the revelation that the NSA is monitoring Americans through digital communications as a divide between Republican and Democrat ideology.

House Representative Steny Hoyer stands with the Obama administration and the surveillance programs fronted by the NSA. In response to whistleblower Snowden, Hoyer said: “This certainly compromises the intelligence gathering abilities of the United States and to that extent is helpful to … those who would cause us harm.”

David Drummond, lawyer for Google, wrote a letter to Attorney General Eric Holder and Robert Mueller, director of the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) that demanded the federal government publically disclose the number of National Security Letters sent to Google that request user data for surveillance purposes.

According to the letter: “Assertions in the press that our compliance with these requests gives the U.S. government unfettered access to our users’ data are simply untrue. However, government nondisclosure obligations regarding the number of FISA national security requests that Google receives, as well as the number of accounts covered by those requests, fuel that speculation.”

The letter continues: “We therefore ask you to help make it possible for Google to publish in our Transparency Report aggregate numbers of national security requests, including FISA disclosures—in terms of both the number we receive and their scope. Google’s numbers would clearly show that our compliance with these requests falls far short of the claims being made. Google has nothing to hide.”

Senators Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley have introduced a bill to force the Obama administration to declassify Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) opinions that legalize the monitoring of Americans.

MSM reports that this bill is dead before it is given a chance for review because elected officials will “just say no” to having such legislation on the books.

http://www.occupycorporatism.com/obama-holds-secret-press-meeting-to-control-reports-about-nsa-leak/
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 12, 2013, 12:17:49 PM
Snowden saw what I saw: surveillance criminally subverting the constitution

(http://i.guim.co.uk/n/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2013/6/12/1370992426900/tomdrake_460x276.jpg)
Thomas Drake, NSA whistleblower, in a still from the Robert Greenwald documentary War on Whistleblowers. Photograph: guardian.co.uk

Quote
So we refused to be part of the NSA's dark blanket. That is why whistleblowers pay the price for being the backstop of democracy

What Edward Snowden has done is an amazingly brave and courageous act of civil disobedience.

Like me, he became discomforted by what he was exposed to and what he saw: the industrial-scale systematic surveillance that is scooping up vast amounts of information not only around the world but in the United States, in direct violation of the fourth amendment of the US constitution.

The NSA programs that Snowden has revealed are nothing new: they date back to the days and weeks after 9/11. I had direct exposure to similar programs, such as Stellar Wind, in 2001. In the first week of October, I had an extraordinary conversation with NSA's lead attorney. When I pressed hard about the unconstitutionality of Stellar Wind, he said:

    "The White House has approved the program; it's all legal. NSA is the executive agent."

It was made clear to me that the original intent of government was to gain access to all the information it could without regard for constitutional safeguards. "You don't understand," I was told. "We just need the data."

http://m.guardiannews.com/commentisfree/2013/jun/12/snowden-surveillance-subverting-constitution
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 12, 2013, 12:20:29 PM
Bush Lets U.S. Spy on Callers Without Courts

(http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2005/12/16/international/16program_650.jpg)


Quote
By JAMES RISEN and ERIC LICHTBLAU
Published: December 16, 2005

 WASHINGTON, Dec. 15 - Months after the Sept. 11 attacks, President Bush secretly authorized the National Security Agency to eavesdrop on Americans and others inside the United States to search for evidence of terrorist activity without the court-approved warrants ordinarily required for domestic spying, according to government officials.

Under a presidential order signed in 2002, the intelligence agency has monitored the international telephone calls and international e-mail messages of hundreds, perhaps thousands, of people inside the United States without warrants over the past three years in an effort to track possible "dirty numbers" linked to Al Qaeda, the officials said. The agency, they said, still seeks warrants to monitor entirely domestic communications.

The previously undisclosed decision to permit some eavesdropping inside the country without court approval was a major shift in American intelligence-gathering practices, particularly for the National Security Agency, whose mission is to spy on communications abroad. As a result, some officials familiar with the continuing operation have questioned whether the surveillance has stretched, if not crossed, constitutional limits on legal searches.

"This is really a sea change," said a former senior official who specializes in national security law. "It's almost a mainstay of this country that the N.S.A. only does foreign searches."

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/12/16/politics/16program.html?scp=1&sq=James%20Risen%20nsa%20surveillance&st=cse&_r=1&
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on June 12, 2013, 01:27:08 PM


12 June 2013 Last updated at 13:38 ET Share this pageEmail Print Share this page

US whistleblower Edward Snowden 'will fight extradition'

Edward Snowden (picture courtesy of the Guardian) says he wants Hong Kong to decide his fate


The ex-CIA employee who leaked secret US surveillance details has vowed in an interview to fight any attempt to extradite him from Hong Kong.

Edward Snowden told the South China Morning Post: "I'm neither traitor nor hero. I'm an American."

It is the first interview he has given since disappearing from his hotel room in Hong Kong on Monday.

His leaks led to revelations that the US is systematically seizing vast amounts of phone and web data.

Mr Snowden left Hawaii for Hong Kong shortly before the highly sensitive leaks surfaced.

I do not currently feel safe due to the pressure the US government is applying to Hong Kong”
 
Edward Snowden
 "I am not here to hide from justice; I am here to reveal criminality," Mr Snowden told the Post, which said the interview was carried out in a secret location in Hong Kong.

"My intention is to ask the courts and people of Hong Kong to decide my fate."

US 'bullying'

The information leaked by Mr Snowden has undoubtedly angered the US government, but so far he has not been charged by the authorities, nor is he the subject of an extradition request.

Hong Kong has an extradition treaty with the US, although analysts say any attempts to bring Mr Snowden to America may take months and could be blocked by Beijing.

The Post quoted Mr Snowden as saying that he had several opportunities to leave Hong Kong, but that he "would rather stay and fight the United States government in the courts, because I have faith in Hong Kong's rule of law."

He also accused Washington of "bullying the Hong Kong government".

"I do not currently feel safe due to the pressure the US government is applying to Hong Kong, but I feel that Hong Kong itself has a strong civil tradition that whistleblowers should not fear," he said.

And when asked whether he had been offered asylum by Russia, he replied: "My only comment is that I am glad there are governments that refuse to be intimidated by great power".

After Mr Snowden's leaks, which led to a series of articles in the Guardian and Washington Post newspapers, US officials confirmed the existence of a secret programme to draw data from the internet, codenamed Prism.

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence gave details of the programme last week.

According to the office's statement, Prism is simply an internal computer system, and not a data-mining programme.

But Washington is coming under increasing pressure from many different quarters to end the practice.

The American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit on Tuesday, challenging the legality of the programme.

Separately, a coalition of more than 80 rights groups and internet companies have launched a website, StopWatching.Us, which has called on Congress to launch a full investigation.

And the EU's justice commissioner has written to the US attorney general, questioning him about Prism, and saying she was concerned America's efforts "could have grave adverse consequences for the fundamental rights of EU citizens".

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-china-22878591

......................................................



https://optin.stopwatching.us/

Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.
Benjamin Franklin


 [The National Security Agency's] capability at any time could be turned around on the American people, and no American would have any privacy left, such is the capability to monitor everything: telephone conversations, telegrams, it doesn’t matter. There would be no place to hide.
Senator Frank Church, 1975


Stop Watching Us.
The revelations about the National Security Agency's surveillance apparatus, if true, represent a stunning abuse of our basic rights. We demand the U.S. Congress reveal the full extent of the NSA's spying programs.
Read the full letter to US Congress


Dear Members of Congress,

We write to express our concern about recent reports published in the Guardian and the Washington Post, and acknowledged by the Obama Administration, which reveal secret spying by the National Security Agency (NSA) on phone records and Internet activity of people in the United States.

The Washington Post and the Guardian recently published reports based on information provided by an intelligence contractor showing how the NSA and the FBI are gaining broad access to data collected by nine of the leading U.S. Internet companies and sharing this information with foreign governments. As reported, the U.S. government is extracting audio, video, photographs, e-mails, documents, and connection logs that enable analysts to track a person's movements and contacts over time. As a result, the contents of communications of people both abroad and in the U.S. can be swept in without any suspicion of crime or association with a terrorist organization.

Leaked reports also published by the Guardian and confirmed by the Administration reveal that the NSA is also abusing a controversial section of the PATRIOT Act to collect the call records of millions of Verizon customers. The data collected by the NSA includes every call made, the time of the call, the duration of the call, and other "identifying information" for millions of Verizon customers, including entirely domestic calls, regardless of whether those customers have ever been suspected of a crime. The Wall Street Journal has reported that other major carriers, including AT&T and Sprint, are subject to similar secret orders.

This type of blanket data collection by the government strikes at bedrock American values of freedom and privacy. This dragnet surveillance violates the First and Fourth Amendments of the U.S. Constitution, which protect citizens' right to speak and associate anonymously, guard against unreasonable searches and seizures, and protect their right to privacy.

We are calling on Congress to take immediate action to halt this surveillance and provide a full public accounting of the NSA's and the FBI's data collection programs. We call on Congress to immediately and publicly:

Enact reform this Congress to Section 215 of the USA PATRIOT Act,

the state secrets privilege, and the FISA Amendments Act to make clear that blanket surveillance of the Internet activity and phone records of any person residing in the U.S. is prohibited by law and that violations can be reviewed in adversarial proceedings before a public court;
Create a special committee to investigate, report, and reveal to the public the extent of this domestic spying. This committee should create specific recommendations for legal and regulatory reform to end unconstitutional surveillance;

Hold accountable those public officials who are found to be responsible for this unconstitutional surveillance.

Thank you for your attention to this matter.

Sincerely,


   
 * I agree to Mozilla's privacy policy and to having my information presented to US Congress in the form of a letter to be delivered by Fight for the Future (see its privacy policy).   I would like to receive e-mails from OpenMediaabout this and related issues. The OpenMediaprivacy policy is available here.  



.......................................................


11 June 2013 Last updated at 14:50 ET

Profile: Edward Snowden

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-22837100
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Somamech on June 12, 2013, 01:55:39 PM
Does it really matter if everything is known about ourselves ?

Why are some so "Paranoid" about this ?

After all LIFE knows ALL anyway.

You can't HIDE anything !   :)

We only fear that everything is known about us, IF we have something to hide !

If everything is known about ME... then I am seen in TRUTH !

IF NOT then I am misunderstood !

The human species in fact has NO Control over LIFE at all.   :)

It is LIFE which Controls ALL, through its Written Programs,
yet to be understood in its True Context by most on Earth.

Hey Matrix Dude, in the context of what you are talking about OFC it doesn't matter ;)

But in this context, these people like to "Hinder" people like you who speak out!   ;D

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: petrus4 on June 12, 2013, 02:21:30 PM
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/999534_470013589752654_1691621056_n.jpg)

It's true.  The really amazing thing, is how someone with that level of integrity, ended up with that girlfriend and income in the first place. ;)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 12, 2013, 04:39:18 PM
a}  The legislative branch must be abolished completely.  The people must vote directly on laws themselves, rather than them delegating a geriatric fascist cabal to do so for them.  The only truly democratic means of passing laws is by referendum.  Anything else is psychopathic fraud.  Anyone who responds to this point, by quoting any of the Constitution's authors to the effect that democracy is "mob rule," will be summarily and contemptuously ignored, as a victim of plutocratic mind control.
As far as I know, Switzerland is the only country that has frequent referendums, but even them, I suppose, do not use them for all their legislation.

PS: good post, some virtual gold for you. :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on June 12, 2013, 05:00:57 PM

hey  some of you computer folk might even have known him before...


Edward Snowden As A Teen Online
Reuters  |  Posted: 06/12/2013 3:46 pm EDT  |  Updated: 06/12/2013 5:22 pm EDT

By Kristina Cooke and John Shiffman

SAN FRANCISCO/WASHINGTON, June 12 (Reuters) - Long before he became known worldwide as the NSA contractor who exposed top-secret U.S. government surveillance programs, Edward Snowden worked for a Japanese anime company run by friends and went by the nicknames "The True HOOHA" and "Phish."

In 2002, he was 18 years old, a high-school dropout and his parents had just divorced. On the tiny anime company's website, he wrote of his skills with video games and popularity with women.

As an adult, the former CIA employee has not left much of a digital trail on the Internet. Snowden, who turns 30 later this month, does not appear to be active on social media sites like Facebook or Twitter - at least not under his own name.

But the website of Ryuhana Press, a now defunct start-up that had sold anime art, offers a glimpse of Snowden as a youth. As its web editor, Snowden's profile page is a mix of truth, sarcasm and silly jokes.

For example, he listed his correct birthday - June 21, 1983 - and noted that it falls on the Summer Solstice, the longest day of the year. But he also claimed to be 37 years old and to have fathered two preteen children.

"I really am a nice guy," Snowden wrote on his profile page. "You see, I act arrogant and cruel because I was not hugged enough as a child, and because the public education system turned it's (sic) wretched, spiked back on me."

Reuters viewed the website on Tuesday and contacted former company employees for comment. On Wednesday, the website had been taken down.

Snowden wrote that he favored purple sunglasses and praised the Baltimore Orioles baseball team.

"I like my girlish figure that attracts girls," he wrote, "and I like my lamer friends. That's the best biography you'll get out of me, coppers!"

Photographs uploaded by friends for Snowden's 19th birthday show a young man pulling down his pants for his colleagues, putting a clothespin on his chest, and dancing. A blog entry from a company employee teased, "Who is he? What does he do? Does he really love himself as much as his shameless marketing would have you believe?"

Snowden wrote on his profile that he liked online role-playing games (RPG). "I always wanted to write RPG campaigns with my spare time, but I'll get about three missions in and scrap the world for my next, better, powergamin' build."

He joked that he "got bullied" into being an editor on the website by a gaggle of artists and "beautiful nubile young girls."

Snowden said he liked playing the popular fighting video game Tekken. He was so skilled that he attracted a gathering of fans at the 2002 Anime USA convention, wrote a co-worker on another part of the site. "He tends to spontaneously be a ray of sunshine and inspiration. He's a great listener, and he's eager to help people improve themselves."

The co-worker did not reply to inquiries from Reuters on Wednesday. Ryuhana closed in 2004 as the primary proprietors went off to college and opened a new business in California, according to the website. Other contributors to the site could not be reached for comment.

The defunct company listed an address in Fort Meade, Md., next door to the National Security Agency. (Editing by Tiffany Wu and Marilyn W. Thompson)



Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: SarK0Y on June 12, 2013, 05:46:47 PM
I found this Doc a few years ago on the Aussie Gov Website linked to Defense Research, and oddly they haven't taken this one off the web unlike that Lithium Dump into Atmosphere Doc I found when I was more happy yesteryear ;)  ;D

The Use of Systemic-Functional Linguistics in Automated Text Mining.

Abstract


Executive Summary



SOURCE:


http://www.dsto.defence.gov.au/publications/scientific_record.php?record=9900
such systems been very dummy dumb, it can be easily misleading & avoided. :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: petrus4 on June 12, 2013, 08:57:58 PM
As far as I know, Switzerland is the only country that has frequent referendums, but even them, I suppose, do not use them for all their legislation.

PS: good post, some virtual gold for you. :)

Thank you, Armap. :D
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: The Matrix Traveller on June 13, 2013, 12:38:05 AM
We also, have had referendums in NZ...   :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 13, 2013, 01:06:24 AM
So....

This guy made $200,000  a year for snooping on "We the peeps...
?

Where does I sign up?

 ::)

And now he is a hero for telling people what us poor conspiracy nuts have been saying and showing for over two decades

Life STINKS

LOL
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 13, 2013, 01:37:43 AM
ACLU sues Obama administration over NSA surveillance

http://videos.huffingtonpost.com/aclu-sues-over-nsa-phone-records-program-517814133

http://videos.huffingtonpost.com/aclu-sues-obama-administration-over-phone-surveillance-517814178


David Jackson, USA TODAY 6:47 p.m. EDT June 11, 2013

Quote
National Security Agency surveillance programs came under more scrutiny Tuesday as the American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit and a prominent senator and Internet giant Google called on the Obama administration to disclose more information.

In its lawsuit, the ACLU said an NSA program that harvests phone calls violates the rights of all Americans.

"The program goes far beyond even the permissive limits set by the Patriot Act and represents a gross infringement of the freedom of association and the right to privacy," said Jameel Jaffer, the ACLU's deputy legal director.

Meanwhile, Google sought permission to disclose more details about another contested NSA program, one that allows the government to collect online information from non-U.S. citizens.

And Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., who chairs the Senate Intelligence Committee, told reporters she has asked Gen. Keith Alexander — the head of the NSA and U.S. Cyber Command — to declassify more information about its phone and Internet surveillance programs.

The goal is "so that we can talk about them, because I think they're really helpful," she said.

The Guardian and Washington Post disclosed these programs last week, based on leaks from a former NSA contract employee.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2013/06/11/obama-aclu-lawsuit-national-security-agency-surveillance/2412885/

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 13, 2013, 01:42:39 AM
Daniel Ellsberg On NSA Spying: 'We're A Turnkey Away From A Police State'

(http://i.huffpost.com/gen/1187851/thumbs/r-DANIEL-ELLSBERG-large570.jpg)

Quote
BERKELEY, Calif. -- Famed Pentagon Papers leaker Daniel Ellsberg had harsh words for the Obama Administration during an event here Tuesday evening, charging that the rapid expansion of government surveillance since 9/11 has left the country "a turnkey away from a police state."

"We're not a police state yet, but the foundation has been set," he continued. "It could happen overnight."

Ellsberg, 82, is a former military analyst who became one of the most famous men in America when he leaked a top-secret government report on the Vietnam War to The New York Times in 1971. He has since been a patron saint to the civil liberties movement and is viewed by many as a predecessor of modern-day leakers like Bradley Manning and now Edward Snowden, the man who recently released evidence of the National Security Agency's covert phone records collection and Internet data mining.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/12/daniel-ellsberg-nsa-spying_n_3429694.html
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: SarK0Y on June 13, 2013, 01:45:14 AM
So....

This guy made $200,000  a year for snooping on "We the peeps...
?

Where does I sign up?

 ::)

And now he is a hero for telling people what us poor conspiracy nuts have been saying and showing for over two decades

Life STINKS

LOL
it's no so huge monies :) + his payroll was $122k per annum, afaik.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 13, 2013, 02:17:19 AM
it's no so huge monies :) + his payroll was $122k per annum, afaik.

Well its more than I have :P and I have been spying ion the spooks for free :D

Nice to see you back :D
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: robomont on June 13, 2013, 05:24:08 AM
ive made 10000$ a month before.i can vouche.life is sweet.now i make 10000$a year and life almost sux bigtime.
that is the true haves and have nots.
thats why most wont ever leave the nsa.
i guess at the rate we are going,daddy when i grow up,i want to be government shill.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Gigas on June 13, 2013, 08:03:51 AM
Clapper told some senate investigative committee, when asked if the NSA will be spying on citizens, no they will not, clapper responds.

SURPRISE!, yes they will. How they get around that question is they contract the spying out and simply inhale the information to a database program.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: stealthyaroura on June 13, 2013, 10:19:46 AM
A few years ago it was revealed that here in the UK at listening stations like Menwith hill & RAF irton moor where the echelon data mining computers/software are housed.

TPTB got really rich abusing the system to listen in on competing companies and there clients. They took the data they got and made Billions using insider Trading help.

I'm sure I read the people involved also used the computing power to play the stock markets to make even more cash.

One such company we're ENRON.Just read how they lived it up! obscene really.

I find it hard to believe this practice ever ceased!

Skipped a lot of the post's so sorry if it's been posted about.

ENRON: The Untold Story (http://archive.democrats.com/view.cfm?id=6076)

Menwith Hill it's so big it's actually a self contained village. UK owned and UK civilian residents help alongside the USA who RUN the site for the likes of NSA & GEOINT (space spooks).


(http://www.thelivingmoon.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10005/menwith700.jpg)

Menwith Hill (http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?safe=off&hl=en&biw=1241&bih=577&tbm=isch&tbnid=EDS97ImSGc08hM:&imgrefurl=http://www.fas.org/irp/facility/menwith.htm&docid=zFdfItqVgp3KfM&imgurl)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on June 13, 2013, 01:57:34 PM


no fat lady singin yet...


Loretta Sanchez, Dem Rep, Says NSA Revelations Only 'The Tip Of The Iceberg' (VIDEO)
The Huffington Post  |  By Melissa Jeltsen Posted: 06/13/2013 4:11 pm EDT  |  Updated: 06/13/2013 4:16 pm EDT

Loretta Sanchez, Dem Rep, Says NSA Revelations Only 'The Tip Of The Iceberg' (VIDEO)
The Huffington Post  |  By Melissa Jeltsen Posted: 06/13/2013 4:11 pm EDT  |  Updated: 06/13/2013 4:16 pm EDT

Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-Calif.) warned that the recent revelations on the government's clandestine national surveillance programs, brought to light by an NSA whistleblower, are just the "tip of the iceberg."
Sanchez spoke to CSPAN's "Washington Journal"
http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/313247-4

 on Wednesday, after attending a briefing Tuesday with intelligence officials. While she said she couldn't repeat much of what she and other House members were told, she said they learned "significantly more" than what is currently being reported in the media.

"I believe it's just the tip of the iceberg," she said.

Last week, The Guardian published a bombshell report
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jun/06/nsa-phone-records-verizon-court-order

 detailing how the U.S. government has been secretly collecting phone and Internet data. Edward Snowden, who came out as the individual responsible for the explosive leaks, is currently hiding in Hong Kong.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/13/edward-snowden-nsa_n_3433011.html

"I think it's just broader than most people even realize," Sanchez went on.

(h/t The Hill)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 15, 2013, 02:19:35 AM
(https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/969653_521028217944979_1849978083_n.jpg)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 15, 2013, 02:44:55 AM
Old article but VERY interesting...

How NSA access was built into Windows
 Duncan Campbell 04.09.1999


Quote
A CARELESS mistake by Microsoft programmers has revealed that special access codes prepared by the US National Security Agency have been secretly built into Windows. The NSA access system is built into every version of the Windows operating system now in use, except early releases of Windows 95 (and its predecessors). The discovery comes close on the heels of the revelations earlier this year that another US software giant, Lotus, had built an NSA "help information" trapdoor into its Notes system, and that security functions on other software systems had been deliberately crippled.

The first discovery of the new NSA access system was made two years ago by British researcher Dr Nicko van Someren. But it was only a few weeks ago when a second researcher rediscovered the access system. With it, he found the evidence linking it to NSA.

Computer security specialists have been aware for two years that unusual features are contained inside a standard Windows software "driver" used for security and encryption functions. The driver, called ADVAPI.DLL, enables and controls a range of security functions. If you use Windows, you will find it in the C:\Windows\system directory of your computer.

http://www.heise.de/tp/artikel/5/5263/1.html
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 15, 2013, 02:45:13 AM
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-c-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc3/969709_574302132609717_1328571704_n.jpg)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on June 16, 2013, 06:38:44 AM


in the beginning there was this...grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr


U.S. surveillance architecture includes collection of revealing Internet, phone metadata
848Share to FacebookShare on TwitterAdd to PersonalPostSave to KindleShare via EmailPrint ArticleMoreBy Barton Gellman, Barton Gellman Jun 16, 2013 12:59 AM EDT


The Washington Post
Published: June 15E-mail the writer
On March 12, 2004, acting attorney general James B. Comey
http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/comey-in-line-to-become-fbi-director-officials-say/2013/05/29/7a730b0a-c8af-11e2-9f1a-1a7cdee20287_story.html
and the Justice Department’s top leadership reached the brink of resignation over electronic surveillance orders that they believed to be illegal.

President George W. Bush backed down, halting secret foreign-
intelligence-gathering operations that had crossed into domestic terrain. That morning marked the beginning of the end of STELLARWIND, the cover name for a set of four surveillance programs that brought Americans and American territory within the domain of the National Security Agency for the first time in decades. It was also a prelude to new legal structures that allowed Bush and then President Obama to reproduce each of those programs and expand their reach.

What exactly STELLARWIND did has never been disclosed in an unclassified form. Which parts of it did Comey approve? Which did he shut down? What became of the programs when the crisis passed and Comey, now Obama’s expected nominee for FBI director, returned to private life?

Authoritative new answers to those questions, drawing upon a classified NSA history of STELLARWIND and interviews with high-ranking intelligence officials, offer the clearest map yet of the Bush-era programs and the NSA’s contemporary U.S. operations.

STELLARWIND was succeeded by four major lines of intelligence collection in the territorial United States, together capable of spanning the full range of modern telecommunications, according to the interviews and documents.

Foreigners, not Americans, are the NSA’s “targets,” as the law defines that term. But the programs are structured broadly enough that they touch nearly every American household in some way. Obama administration officials and career intelligence officers say Americans should take comfort that privacy protections are built into the design and oversight, but they are not prepared to discuss the details.

The White House, the NSA and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence declined to comment on the record for this article. A senior intelligence official agreed to answer questions if not identified.

“We have rich oversight across three branches of government. I’ve got an [inspector general] here, a fairly robust legal staff here .?.?. and there’s the Justice Department’s national security division,” the official said. “For those things done under court jurisdiction, the courts are intrusive in my business, appropriately so, and there are two congressional committees. It’s a belts-and-suspenders-and-Velcro approach, and inside there’s rich auditing.”

But privacy advocates, such as Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), said the intelligence committee on which he serves needs “straight answers” to do vigorous oversight.

He added: “The typical person says, ‘If I am law-abiding and the government is out there collecting lots of information about me — who I call, when I call, where I call from’ .?.?. I think the typical person is going to say, ‘That sure sounds like it could have some effect on my privacy.’?”

Two of the four collection programs, one each for telephony and the Internet, process trillions of “metadata” records for storage and analysis in systems called MAINWAY
http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/call-records-of-fewer-than-300-people-were-searched-in-2012-us-says/2013/06/15/5e611cee-d61b-11e2-a73e-826d299ff459_story.html
and MARINA, respectively.

 Metadata
http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/metadata-reveals-the-secrets-of-social-position-company-hierarchy-terrorist-cells/2013/06/15/5058647c-d5c1-11e2-a73e-826d299ff459_story.html
includes highly revealing information about the times, places, devices and participants in electronic communication, but not its contents. The bulk collection of telephone call records from Verizon Business Services, disclosed this month by the British newspaper the Guardian, is one source of raw intelligence for MAINWAY.


The other two types of collection, which operate on a much smaller scale, are aimed at content. One of them intercepts telephone calls and routes the spoken words to a system called ­NUCLEON.

For Internet content, the most important source collection is the PRISM project

http://www.washingtonpost.com/investigations/us-intelligence-mining-data-from-nine-us-internet-companies-in-broad-secret-program/2013/06/06/3a0c0da8-cebf-11e2-8845-d970ccb04497_story.html

 reported on June 6 by The Washington Post and the Guardian. It draws from data held by Google, Yahoo, Microsoft and other Silicon Valley giants, collectively the richest depositories of personal information in history.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/investigations/us-surveillance-architecture-includes-collection-of-revealing-internet-phone-metadata/2013/06/15/e9bf004a-d511-11e2-b05f-3ea3f0e7bb5a_story_1.html

Former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, 29, who unmasked himself as the source behind the PRISM and Verizon revelations, said he hoped for a systematic debate about the “danger to our freedom and way of life” posed by a surveillance apparatus “kept in check by nothing more than policy.”

For well over a week, he has had his wish. Startling disclosures have poured out of the nation’s largest and arguably tightest-lipped spy agency at an unprecedented pace. Snowden’s disclosures have opened a national conversation about the limits of secret surveillance in a free society and an outcry overseas against U.S. espionage.

The debate has focused on two of the four U.S.-based collection programs: PRISM, for Internet content, and the comprehensive collection of telephone call records, foreign and domestic, that the Guardian revealed by posting a classified order from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court to Verizon Business Services.

The Post has learned that similar orders have been renewed every three months for other large U.S. phone companies, including Bell South and AT&T, since May 24, 2006. On that day, the surveillance court made a fundamental shift in its approach to Section 215 of the Patriot Act, which permits the FBI to compel production of “business records” that are relevant to a particular terrorism investigation and to share those in some circumstances with the NSA. Henceforth, the court ruled, it would define the relevant business records as the entirety of a telephone company’s call database.

The Bush administration, by then, had been taking “bulk metadata” from the phone companies under voluntary agreements for more than four years. The volume of information overwhelmed the MAINWAY database, according to a classified report from the NSA inspector general in 2009. The agency spent $146 million in supplemental counterterrorism funds to buy new hardware and contract support — and to make unspecified payments to the phone companies for “collaborative partnerships.”

When the New York Times revealed the warrantless surveillance of voice calls, in December 2005, the telephone companies got nervous. One of them, unnamed in the report, approached the NSA with a request. Rather than volunteer the data, at a price, the “provider preferred to be compelled to do so by a court order,” the report said. Other companies followed suit. The surveillance court order that recast the meaning of business records “essentially gave NSA the same authority to collect bulk telephony metadata from business records that it had” under Bush’s asserted authority alone.






five pages..contnues here ..only two copied here


http://www.washingtonpost.com/investigations/us-surveillance-architecture-includes-collection-of-revealing-internet-phone-metadata/2013/06/15/e9bf004a-d511-11e2-b05f-3ea3f0e7bb5a_story.html?hpid=z1



Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: RUSSO on June 16, 2013, 07:33:02 AM
Daniel Ellsberg On NSA Spying: 'We're A Turnkey Away From A Police State'


really?

(http://www.thelivingmoon.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10005/Domesticated-turkey-485x728.jpg)

 :o
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: robomont on June 16, 2013, 08:26:24 AM
maybe but i saw a post somewhere else that said thatvsnowden hasnt revealed anything.
i would say the politicians and the msm has released all the secret info so far.snowden has just consolidated it and repeated it.

thats why im very sceptical of the whole situation.plus this distracts us from irs ,bengaz,i ap reporters ,fast and furious ,to infinity and beyond at this rate.
and really pissed off our allies citizens.

then you add in that israel is being paid to spy on us.really?
time to send somebody packin along with israel.a bunch of fleas suckin the life out of this country.germany 2.0   .

never forget uss liberty.what kinda fools are running our country?
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Ellirium113 on June 16, 2013, 08:46:19 AM

then you add in that israel is being paid to spy on us.really?
time to send somebody packin along with israel.a bunch of fleas suckin the life out of this country.germany 2.0   .


In Canada I believe we are also being spied on by Israel, My internet service provider uses an active firewall/antivirus so I wanted to know what it was they used. I contacted a buddy of mine that says they use ZONEALARM which is an ACTIVE antivirus program meaning it always is being monitored by a server.

Quote
Check Point was established in Ramat-Gan, Israel in 1993, by Gil Shwed (Chairman and CEO as of 2012[update]), Marius Nacht (Vice Chairman as of 2012[update]) and Shlomo Kramer (who left Check Point in 2003). Shwed had the initial idea for the company’s core technology known as stateful inspection, which became the foundation for the company's first product, FireWall-1; soon afterwards they also developed one of the world’s first VPN products, VPN-1.[2] Shwed developed the idea while serving in the Israel Defense Forces, where he worked on securing classified networks. [3][4]


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zone_Labs (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zone_Labs)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on June 16, 2013, 09:53:42 AM
I know a guy that has a company that sells an email proxy service, making it available to the clients with a web mail interface, along with some organisational goodies.

The software used is from an Israeli company, so I guess Israel has the Internet spying market (at least partially) controlled. :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 16, 2013, 10:54:57 AM
I contacted a buddy of mine that says they use ZONEALARM which is an ACTIVE antivirus program meaning it always is being monitored by a server.

I use ZoneAlarm... it is free and stops all OUTGOING until you assign permission. Many aps and malware put files and scripts on your comp that attempt to dial out. If your firewall doesn't block outgoing yer SCREWED :P

Since I used ZoneAlarm free version I have never had a virus or malware issue. I also did the checks and my comp passes in full stealth mode :D

So I will stick with ZoneAlarm

If the Mossad really wants to know what I am up to... they can log in like the NAVY did :P Maybe I can get some advertizing from them too :D
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on June 16, 2013, 08:41:48 PM


of course there is more ..so much more that most will get bored and turn away saying
so what!!!!    :(





UK Spies Hacked Diplomats' Phones, Emails, Guardian Report Claims
By RAPHAEL SATTER 06/16/13 09:12 PM ET EDT 

 
 LONDON -- The Guardian newspaper says the British eavesdropping agency GCHQ repeatedly hacked into foreign diplomats' phones and emails when the U.K. hosted international conferences, even going so far as to set up a bugged Internet café in an effort to get an edge in high-stakes negotiations.

The report – the latest in a series of revelations which have ignited a worldwide debate over the scope of Western intelligence gathering – came just hours before Britain was due to open the G-8 summit Monday, a meeting of the seven biggest economies plus Russia, in Northern Ireland. The allegation that the United Kingdom has previously used its position as host to spy on its allies and other attendees could make for awkward conversation as the delegates arrive for talks.

"The diplomatic fallout from this could be considerable," said British academic Richard J. Aldrich, whose book "GCHQ" charts the agency's history.

GCHQ declined to comment on the report.

The Guardian cites more than half a dozen internal government documents provided by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden as the basis for its reporting on GCHQ's intelligence operations, which it says involved, among other things, hacking into the South African foreign ministry's computer network and targeting the Turkish delegation at the 2009 G-20 summit in London.

The source material – whose authenticity could not immediately be determined – appears to be a mixed bag. The Guardian describes one as "a PowerPoint slide," another as "a briefing paper" and others simply as "documents."

Some of the leaked material was posted to the Guardian's website with heavy redactions. A spokesman for the newspaper said that the redactions were made at the newspaper's initiative, but declined to elaborate.

It wasn't completely clear how Snowden would have had access to the British intelligence documents, although in one article the Guardian mentions that source material was drawn from a top-secret internal network shared by GCHQ and the NSA. Aldrich said he wouldn't be surprised if the GCHQ material came from a shared network accessed by Snowden, explaining that the NSA and GCHQ collaborated so closely that in some areas the two agencies effectively operated as one.

One document cited by the Guardian – but not posted to its website – appeared to boast of GCHQ's tapping into smartphones. The Guardian quoted the document as saying that "capabilities against BlackBerry provided advance copies of G20 briefings to ministers." It went on to say that "Diplomatic targets from all nations have an MO (a habit) of using smartphones," adding that spies "exploited this use at the G-20 meetings last year."


Another document cited – but also not posted – concerned GCHQ's use of a customized Internet cafe which was "able to extract key logging info, providing creds for delegates, meaning we have sustained intelligence options against them even after conference has finished." No further details were given, but the reference to key logging suggested that computers at the café would have been pre-installed with malicious software designed to spy on key strokes, steal passwords, and eavesdrop on emails.

Aldrich said that revelation stuck out as particularly ingenious.

"It's a bit `Mission Impossible,'" he said.


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/16/uk-spies-hacked-diplomats-phones-emails_n_3451680.html
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on June 17, 2013, 02:49:19 AM

of course there is more ..so much more that most will get bored and turn away saying
so what!!!!    :(

I think THAT is the plan :D
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: robomont on June 17, 2013, 04:13:14 AM
i wonder if that program would work on android?

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: stealthyaroura on June 17, 2013, 08:34:24 AM
Iv'e just installed the Mozilla Firefox browser just as an experiment after I read there had been an extension called "Dark side of the Prism" Now what it does is every time you hit a web site that is being monitored by prism software it plays a track from Pink Floyd's Dark Side Of The Moon album.

Well something like that anyway (I don't understand all of it)

A bit like this. PRC=nothing,facebook=song,youtube=song,ATS=nothing, etc .
I'm just playing with it really as I have zone alarm too.
http://vimeo.com/68185625 (http://vimeo.com/68185625)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on June 21, 2013, 06:30:54 PM
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/21/edward-snowden-charged_n_3480984.html


Edward Snowden Charged With Espionage Over NSA Leaks
Reuters  |  Posted: 06/21/2013 6:53 pm EDT  |  Updated: 06/21/2013 9:16 pm EDT

 
 WASHINGTON, June 21 (Reuters) - The U.S. government has filed sealed criminal charges against former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden, who admitted leaking secrets about classified U.S. surveillance programs, U.S. sources said on Friday.

A U.S. Justice Department official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said a criminal complaint had been filed against Snowden, who disclosed documents detailing U.S. telephone and internet surveillance efforts.

Another U.S. source, also speaking on condition of anonymity, said the United States was preparing to seek Snowden's extradition from Hong Kong, where he is believed to be in hiding.

Earlier, the Washington Post reported that U.S. prosecutors have filed a sealed criminal complaint charging Snowden with espionage, theft and conversion of government property. The Post also reported that the United States has asked Hong Kong to detain Snowden on a provisional arrest warrant.

The criminal complaint was filed in the Eastern District of Virginia, where Snowden's former employer, Booz Allen Hamilton, is located, the Post reported.

Documents leaked by Snowden revealed that U.S. security services had monitored data about phone calls from Verizon and Internet data from large companies such as Google and Facebook as part of counterterrorism efforts.

U.S. federal prosecutors, by filing a criminal complaint, lay claim to a legal basis to make the request of the authorities in Hong Kong, the Post reported. The prosecutors now have 60 days to file an indictment and can then take steps to secure Snowden's extradition from Hong Kong for a criminal trial in the United States, the newspaper reported.


Snowden would be able to challenge the U.S. request for his extradition in court in Hong Kong, the Post reported.

The newspaper noted the U.S. extradition treaty with Hong Kong has an exception for political offenses, and that espionage has been viewed as a political offense.

An Icelandic businessman linked to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks said on Thursday he had readied a private plane in China to fly Snowden to Iceland if Iceland's government would grant asylum.

Iceland refused on Friday to say whether it would grant asylum to Snowden. (Reporting by Mark Hosenball and Tabassum Zakaria; Editing by Jim Loney and Will Dunham)

... . . . . . . . . . . . . .




hey someone can make money here..you guys any good at finding bugs..?




Facebook Bug Exposed Email Addresses, Phone Numbers Of 6 Million Users
The Huffington Post  |  By Alexis Kleinman Posted: 06/21/2013 7:04 pm EDT  |  Updated: 06/21/2013 9:09 pm EDT

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez) .381Share116Tweet7Email83CommentGet Technology Alerts:
 
 Sign Up ..Follow:Facebook, Facebook Bug, Facebook Contact Info, Facebook Email Addresses, Technology News .

On Friday, Facebook admitted that a bug made the private contact information -- either email addresses or phone numbers -- of 6 million users accidentally accessible to Facebookers who downloaded their account histories onto their own computers. Compared to Facebook's over 1 billion total members, 6 million isn't much. But any security flaw has the potential to frighten people away from a website.

A bug allowed "some of a person’s contact information (email or phone number) to be accessed by people who either had some contact information about that person or some connection to them," Facebook wrote in a note on its security page. Using the network's "Download Your Information" tool, some Facebook members were inadvertently sent the phone numbers or email address of Facebook friends that were otherwise private. Facebook assured users that the bug was fixed within a day, and that there is no evidence that the information was used maliciously.

The bug was found not by Facebook's team, but by someone going through Facebook's "white hat" hacker program, which offers a bounty for anyone who can find bugs on the site, paying a minimum reward of $500 per bug. The bounty is awarded "based on [the bug's] severity and creativity," according to Facebook's White Hat page. In April, HuffPost profiled one of Facebook's most prolific bug finders, Nir Goldshlager.


rest at link tells you how to do it
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/21/facebook-bug_n_3480739.html
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on June 23, 2013, 07:22:58 AM


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/21/uk-spying-scandal_n_3479942.html


UK Spying Scandal Even Bigger Than In U.S., According To GCHQ Documents Obtained By The Guardian
By RAPHAEL SATTER 06/21/13 04:42 PM ET EDT 

LONDON — British spies are running an online eavesdropping operation so vast that internal documents say it even outstrips the United States' international Internet surveillance effort, the Guardian newspaper reported Friday.

The paper cited British intelligence memos leaked by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden to claim that U.K. spies were tapping into the world's network of fiber optic cables to deliver the "biggest internet access" of any member of the Five Eyes – the name given to the espionage alliance composed of the United States, Britain, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand.

That access could in theory expose a huge chunk of the world's everyday communications – including the content of people's emails, calls, and more – to scrutiny from British spies and their American allies. How much data the Brits are copying off the fiber optic network isn't clear, but it's likely to be enormous. The Guardian said the information flowing across more than 200 cables was being monitored by more than 500 analysts from the NSA and its U.K. counterpart, GCHQ.

"This is a massive amount of data!" the Guardian quoted a leaked slide as boasting. The paper said other leaked slides, including one labeled "Collect-it-all," gave hints as to the program's ambition.

"Why can't we collect all the signals all the time?" NSA chief Lt. Gen. Keith Alexander was quoted as saying in another slide. "Sounds like a good summer project for Menwith" – a reference to GCHQ's Menwith Hill eavesdropping site in northern England.

The NSA declined to comment on Friday's report. GCHQ also declined to comment on the report, although in an emailed statement it repeated past assurances about the legality of its actions.

"Our work is carried out in accordance with a strict legal and policy framework which ensures that our activities are authorized, necessary, and proportionate," the statement said.

The Guardian, whose revelations about America and Britain's globe-spanning surveillance programs have reignited an international debate over the ethics of espionage, said GCHQ was using probes to capture and copy data as it crisscrossed the Atlantic between Western Europe and North America.

It said that, by last year, GCHQ was in some way handling 600 million telecommunications every day – although it did not go into any further detail and it was not clear whether that meant that GCHQ could systematically record or even track all the electronic movement at once.


Fiber optic cables – thin strands of glass bundled together and strung out underground or across the oceans – play a critical role in keeping the world connected. A 2010 estimate suggested that such cables are responsible for 95 percent of the world's international voice and data traffic, and the Guardian said Britain's geographic position on Europe's western fringe gave it natural access to many of the trans-Atlantic cables as they emerged from the sea.

The Guardian said GCHQ's probes did more than just monitor the data live; British eavesdroppers can store content for three days and metadata – information about who was talking to whom, for how long, from where, and through what medium – for 30 days.

The paper quoted Snowden, the leaker, as saying that the surveillance was "not just a US problem. The U.K. has a huge dog in this fight ... They (GCHQ) are worse than the U.S."

Snowden, whose whereabouts are unknown, faces the prospect of prosecution in the United States over his disclosures, and some there have called on him to be tried for treason. Snowden has expressed interest in seeking asylum in Iceland, where a local businessman said he was prepared to fly the leaker should he request it.

Attempts by The Associated Press to reach Snowden have so far been unsuccessful.

___

Kimberly Dozier in Washington contributed to this report.



.....................................................................................


         
 
Edward Snowden Leaves Hong Kong:

Plane Believed To Be Carrying Leaker Lands In Moscow


 By LYNN BERRY and KELVIN CHAN 06/23/13 09:43 AM ET EDT 

 http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/23/edward-snowden-hong-kong_n_3486459.html?utm_hp_ref=politics

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Ellirium113 on June 23, 2013, 09:15:14 AM
EXCLUSIVE: US spies on Chinese mobile phone companies, steals SMS data: Edward Snowden


Quote
The US government is hacking Chinese mobile phone companies to steal millions of text messages, Edward Snowden has told the South China Morning Post. And the former National Security Agency contractor claims he has the evidence to prove it.

The former CIA technician and NSA contractor, hiding in Hong Kong after the US sought his arrest, made the claims after revealing to the Post that the NSA had snooped on targets in Hong Kong and on the mainland.

“There’s far more than this,” Snowden said in an interview on June 12. “The NSA does all kinds of things like hack Chinese cell phone companies to steal all of your SMS data.”

Text messaging is the most preferred communication tool in mainland China, used widely by ordinary people and government officials from formal work exchanges to small chats.

Quote
The US and UK also had technology which gave them unauthorised access to Blackberry phones of delegates at two G20 summits in London in 2009, Snowden said.


http://www.scmp.com/news/china/article/1266821/us-hacks-chinese-mobile-phone-companies-steals-sms-data-edward-snowden (http://www.scmp.com/news/china/article/1266821/us-hacks-chinese-mobile-phone-companies-steals-sms-data-edward-snowden)

To me it looks like they don't really give a S#!t who are, where you are or if it is legal or not. They are going to spy on you in any way shape or form. Love it or hate it.  >:(

At least I don't have to tell them how I feel about it because they already have it on record!
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: stealthyaroura on June 23, 2013, 11:17:55 AM
what do you all think to this tube on snowdon? I don't know as these are USA folk and i'm UK.
some of you may be able to connect the dots if there are any. this could be rubbish too.
[youtube]9q2G-5xfFrA#t[/youtube]

WAIT it's WELLAWARE.COM ::) the guy who says obama is bush etc. he makes some crazy assumptions.
Whilst SOME of the people may have triple identities as in the sandy hook/Boston bomb false flags
He takes these false identities to far. some are just silly.
sorry if it's garbage. I just don't know the USA players like i would the UK.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on June 23, 2013, 11:47:43 AM


yeah, garbage probably.. went one site like this (before news) trashes it..it becomes pretty funny


 
(Before It's News)

A reader asked me to look into the site wellaware.com, the owners of which have been spreading spurious nonsense about ‘actors’ at Sandy Hook (amongst several other notable historical events and persons).

It took just a few minutes of perusing the various ‘investigations’ at wellaware.com to conclude that the ‘researchers’ that run that site are:

registered blind

or

equipped with an IQ of around 50

or

deliberately spreading nonsense to get attention.

or

a combination of all three.

I won’t go into debunking all of their blatant BS because it is so obvious and would be  a waste of time
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: stealthyaroura on June 23, 2013, 12:08:14 PM
Hmm is there a delete button otter :-[
yes the site is scary crazy stupid. it does beg the question WHY. what a waste of time.
the people don't even resemble who he says they are. well 99% of them anyhow.
I can only say sorry my mistake. jumped the gun there.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on June 23, 2013, 03:21:21 PM
 ;D



hey Stealthy...I call zorro..opps.. I mean zorgon for that

but no worries.. let it stand as an example of how easy it is to be drawn in
just think of all those folks who actually believe it..and even argue that it is true

my opinion is this type of site is the real disinfo...

 ::)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: stealthyaroura on June 23, 2013, 05:42:04 PM
I reckon your rite there otter I mean the guy has put an awful lot of work into
that site and he believes 100% that he is correct. it's ether disinfo or the
guy has far to much time on his hands.I bet he refuses to be wrong too.
hate that.   ::)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on June 27, 2013, 10:51:22 AM

ok.. if yoiu weren't aware of this before .. then you just haven't been paying attention to the world as it now is...smile you're constantly on candid camera..ggggggggggrrrrrrrrrrr




http://money.msn.com/now/12-ways-you-could-be-tracked

Here's looking at you

Surprising revelations emerged recently about the extent to which federal agencies are tracking our phone calls, Internet usage and other information. And while President Obama and members of Congress have tried to downplay the issue -- and as the tech companies involved, including Apple (AAPL), Microsoft (MSFT) and Google (GOOG), try to restore the trust of their customers -- many Americans remain concerned about the balance between national security and personal privacy. (Microsoft owns and publishes MSN Money.)

It also raises questions about how far the snooping could go. How many ways could we be tracked, if the government -- or perhaps even a company -- wanted to follow our movements, our habits and our interests? How much of our daily lives are on the grid?

Don't pull out the tin-foil hats just yet. We aren't suggesting that you are being tracked in all these ways. Instead, we set out to look at how a person's life could be chronicled.

Read on to see 12 parts of your life that could be an open book:

Your location
The National Security Agency could collect the "geolocational" information that shows the location of cellphone calls made or received, but it chooses not to, The Wall Street Journal reported.

One official told the newspaper that the location information doesn't give enough good intelligence to justify the money and agent hours spent on it.



Your groceries
Grocery stores know what customers are buying by analyzing purchases tied to shopper loyalty cards. But the federal government can see the information as well. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has analyzed past grocery purchases to track the source of salmonella outbreaks, The Denver Post reports.

The CDC used information from Costco (COST) membership cards in one case.



Your daily errands
Automatic license plate readers are becoming increasingly popular with law enforcement around the country, Slate reports.

These plate recognition cameras are mounted in public places and sometimes on police patrol cars, and take pictures of every car that passes by. The technology is good for tracking stolen vehicles, toll evaders or criminals, but privacy advocates worry about the data being collected.

Oh, and if you're "checking in" at different places through social networking sites like Foursquare or Facebook (FB), that information can be easily accessed by the government as well.



Your phone calls
The National Security Agency has been gathering the telephone records of millions of Verizon (VZ) customers, The Guardian reported in June. The NSA receives daily updates of all phone calls within the U.S. and international calls made to and from the U.S.

Verizon wasn't the only carrier caught up in this. AT&T (T) and Sprint Nextel (S) also reportedly handed over data.

The information was reportedly metadata in most cases -- such as whom people called, where, when and for how long -- rather than the contents of actual conversations. Weeks after the bombshell report, experts were still wondering if the NSA's actions were legal.



Your driving patterns
Some insurance companies are offering discounts to customers willing to allow monitors in their cars. The data from GPS systems and other devices tell the company if drivers are going the speed limit or braking too hard, and safe drivers are rewarded with lower premiums.

Progressive (PGR) says its Snapshot device doesn't capture GPS location data, but General Motors' (GM) OnStar does, according to E-Commerce Times. That means a driver's location at a specific time could be requested by a subpoena.



Your credit card purchases
The NSA also watches credit-card transactions, The Wall Street Journal reports.

But the agency is very tight-lipped about this, and it's unclear whether the NSA has an ongoing credit card monitoring program or just performs individual investigations here and there. And, not surprisingly, the credit card companies aren't talking about this either.



Your online activity
Oh yeah, they're on to you. Right now. The NSA has requested information from Google (GOOG), Facebook (FB) and other tech companies about what people are doing online.

The Guardian and The Washington Post said that the NSA received information about Internet users' email messages, file transfers and live chats, but several tech companies said they didn't know anything about this practice.

Internet service providers have also given federal officials information about what websites customers visit, The Wall Street Journal reports.



Your electricity usage
Why would anyone care how much power you use? Some authorities are very interested in high electricity bills because they can signal nefarious activity.

Just ask the former South Carolina state trooper who found himself on the wrong side of the law after his utility company called the authorities about his high electricity use last year. Police raided the property and found an indoor marijuana farm.



Your hobbies
New York newspaper The Journal News sparked outrage last year when it published a map showing the locations of all handgun owners in two counties. The information is public record, the newspaper said, and it found the data with a simple Freedom of Information Act request.

Other permits could be accessed as well, including hunting and fishing licenses, making your favorite pastime a possible subject of interest.



Your real estate purchases
When you buy a house, the information is a matter of public record. The government (or anyone else, for that matter) can look up the sale amount and closing date, a description of your home and what the property is currently valued at.

Real-estate websites like Zillow (Z) make this information freely available to all.



Your political donations
Political candidates must report the names of donors giving more than $200 total to a campaign, according to the Federal Election Campaign Act. The donations are a matter of public record and can be accessed on sites such as OpenSecrets.

While this doesn't impact most of the voting public -- fewer than 0.5% of Americans gave $200 or more to federal candidates in 2008, according to Americans for Campaign Reform -- the political leanings of over a million people are easily discovered.



Your library records
Privacy has been a hot-button subject for librarians for years, many of whom don't believe in sharing their patrons' checkout records. The issue headed to the courts in 2006, after the federal government asked a library for records that could be used in a counterterrorism probe, according to The New York Times.

The furor over library records now seems so quaint, doesn't it? The fact that someone might know you checked out "50 Shades of Grey" seems of less consequence these days, when the government might very well be listening in on your phone calls.  
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: dreb13 on June 29, 2013, 12:04:18 AM
Funny how life imitates art.  Just like the xfiles spinoff show that pretty much described the 9/11 attacks, now we have HBO's drama series The Newsroom.  This is an episode that originally aired a year ago.

[youtube]BeztenbI4T8[/youtube]
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on June 30, 2013, 08:37:20 PM


Edward Snowden Can't Leave Moscow Without Consent Of Russian Authorities, Says Ecuadorean President
By MICHAEL WEISSENSTEIN 06/30/13 03:56 PM ET EDT 

PORTOVIEJO, Ecuador -- Edward Snowden is "under the care of the Russian authorities" and can't leave Moscow's international airport without their consent, Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa told The Associated Press Sunday in an interview telegraphing the slim and diminishing possibility that the National Security Agency leaker will end up in Ecuador.

Correa portrayed Russia as entirely the master of Snowden's fate and said Ecuador is still awaiting an asylum request from Snowden before deciding its next moves.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has distanced himself from the case since Snowden arrived in Moscow last week, insisting the 30-year-old former NSA contractor remains in the transit zone of the capital's Sheremetyevo Airport and that as long as he has not legally entered Russia, he is out of the Kremlin's control.

At the same time, the Kremlin said Sunday that it will take public opinion and the views of human rights activists into account when considering Snowden's case, a move that could lay the groundwork for him to seek asylum in Russia.

"This is the decision of Russian authorities," Correa told the AP during a visit to this Pacific coast city. "He doesn't have a passport. I don't know the Russian laws, I don't know if he can leave the airport, but I understand that he can't. At this moment he's under the care of the Russian authorities. If he arrives at an Ecuadorean Embassy we'll analyze his request for asylum."

Last week, several members of Russia's Presidential Council for Human Rights spoke out in support of Snowden, saying he deserved to receive political asylum in the country of his choice and should not be handed over to the United States. And a handful of protesters picketed outside the Moscow airport in what appeared to be an orchestrated demonstration on Friday, holding signs reading "Edward, Russia is your second motherland" and "Russia is behind Snowden."

Putin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told Ekho Moskvy radio that while Snowden is not Russia's concern, the Kremlin is aware of the viewpoints of Russian experts and representatives of human rights organizations.

"Public opinion on the subject is very rich," Peskov said in the radio interview. "We are aware of this and are taking it into account."

Correa said he had no idea Snowden's intended destination was Ecuador when he fled Hong Kong for Russia last week. He said the Ecuadorean consul in London committed "a serious error" by not consulting officials in Ecuador's capital when the consul issued a letter of safe passage for Snowden. He said the consul would be punished, although he didn't specify how.


Analysts familiar with the workings of the Ecuadorean government said Correa's claims that the decision was entirely Russia's appeared to be at least partly disingenuous. They said they believed Correa's administration at first intended to host Snowden, then started back-tracking this week when the possible consequences became clearer.

"I think the government started to realize the dimensions of what it was getting itself into, how it was managing things and the consequences that this could bring," said Santiago Basabe, an analyst and professor of political sciences at the Latin American School of Social Sciences in the Ecuadorean capital, Quito. "So it started pulling back, and they'll never tell us why, but I think the alarm bells started to go off from people very close to the government, maybe Ecuador's ambassador in Washington warned them about the consequences of asylum for Snowden."

Correa said Snowden must assume responsibility if he broke U.S. laws, but added the broader legitimacy of Snowden's action must be taken into consideration. He said Ecuador would still consider an asylum request but only if Snowden is able to make it to Ecuador or an Ecuadorean Embassy to apply.

The U.S. is seeking the former NSA contractor's extradition for leaking secret documents that, among other things, detail U.S. surveillance of international online activity. On Sunday, German magazine Der Spiegel reported that classified documents taken by Snowden also revealed U.S. spies had allegedly bugged European Union offices.

Correa never entirely closed the door to Snowden, whom he said had drawn vital attention to the U.S. eavesdropping program and potential violations of human rights. But Correa appeared to be sending the message that it is unlikely Snowden will ever end up in Ecuador. He repeatedly emphasized the importance of the U.S. legal process and praised Vice President Joe Biden for what he described as a courteous and appreciated half-hour call about the Snowden case on Friday.

He similarly declined to reject an important set of U.S. trade benefits for Ecuadorean exports, again a contrast with his government's unilateral renunciation of a separate set of tariff benefits earlier in the week.

"If he really could have broken North American laws, I am very respectful of other countries and their laws and I believe that someone who breaks the law must assume his responsibilities," Correa said. "But we also believe in human rights and due process."

He said Biden had asked him to send Snowden back to the United States immediately because he faces criminal charges, is a fugitive from justice and has had his passport revoked.

"I told him that we would analyze his opinion, which is very important to us," Correa said, adding that he had demanded the return of several Ecuadoreans who are in the United States but face criminal charges at home.

"I greatly appreciated the call," he said, contrasting it with threats made by a small group of U.S. senators to revoke Ecuadorean trade privileges. "When I received the call from Vice President Biden, which was with great cordiality and a different vision, we really welcomed it a lot."

Ecuadorean officials believe Russian authorities stymied the country's efforts to approve a political asylum application from the former NSA systems analyst, according to government officials with direct knowledge of the case.

Those officials said Ecuador had been making detailed plans to receive and host Snowden. One of the officials said Russia's refusal to let Snowden leave or be picked up by Ecuadorean officials had thwarted the plans. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they weren't authorized to discuss the case by name.

One of the officials said Snowden had intended to travel from Moscow to the Ecuadorean capital of Quito. The official said Ecuador had also asked Russia to let Snowden take a commercial flight to meet Foreign Minister Ricardo Patino in Vietnam or Singapore, where Patino was on an official trip.

The Russians rejected all of Ecuador's requests to let Snowden leave Moscow, or to let an Ecuadorean government plane pick him up there, the official said.

Asked Sunday about those accounts, Correa responded, without elaborating, "We don't have long-range aircraft. It's a joke."

Snowden's path to Ecuador would have gone through Cuba, which said little about the case all week, including whether it would have allowed him to use its territory to transit.

Cuban leader Fidel Castro praised Correa's rejection of U.S. trade pressure, expressing his "sympathies" for the Ecuadorean leader in a Sunday editorial in the state press.

_______ Gonzalo Solano contributed from Quito, Ecuador. Lynn Berry in Moscow contributed to this report.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/30/edward-snowden-ecuador_n_3526167.html?utm_hp_ref=world
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Ellirium113 on July 01, 2013, 08:10:38 AM
Quote
July 1, 2013 - French President Francois Hollande told the United States on Monday to immediately cease spying on European institutions, after reports of covert US surveillance of EU diplomatic missions.

"We cannot accept this kind of behaviour between partners and allies," Hollande told journalists during a visit to the northwestern city of Lorient. "We ask that this immediately stop."

http://www.disclose.tv/news/Ultimatum_France_tells_US_to_immediately_stop_spying/90485 (http://www.disclose.tv/news/Ultimatum_France_tells_US_to_immediately_stop_spying/90485)

Thanks to Canada's Security and Prosperity agreement with the U.S. information is shared much more easily through the legal loopholes...

Quote
Canada has its own version of the NSA as well -- the Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC), an extremely secretive government agency responsible for monitoring foreign communications related to Canada’s national security. The agency can officially only monitor Canadian communications when a foreign party is involved.

But CSEC’s no-spying-on-Canadians rule apparently disappears when the agency is asked for help from other agencies, such as the RCMP, border services or CSIS, according to CSEC expert Bill Robinson, as quoted at the Ottawa Citizen.

No one can say for sure how much spying on Canadians CSEC may be doing, but Geist argues that the agency’s own explanations of how Canadians can end up under surveillance “sound awfully similar to the powers in the U.S. Given the lack of transparency, it certainly seems possible that there are similar activities taking place here.”

CSEC’s budget and staff have more than doubled since 9/11, to 2,000 people and $400 million annually. And the agency recently got even more secretive, to the point that an annual report on the agency’s priorities is now classified.


http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/06/08/nsa-spying-canada_n_3408662.html (http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/06/08/nsa-spying-canada_n_3408662.html)

Quote
The Canada -US Smart Border Declaration was signed December 12, 2001 by John Manley when he was Deputy Prime Minister and Tom Ridge US Homeland Security Director. Point 24 of this 30 point action plan refers to Joint Enforcement Coordination- a comprehensive and permanent coordination of law enforcement , anti terrorism efforts and information sharing. Point 25 is about Integrated Intelligence- joint teams to analyze and disseminate information and intelligence, and to produce threat and intelligence assessments.

This internet, e mail, cell phone spying is not about pornography as Anne McLellan whitewashes to sell it. Her hypocrisy here is as guilty as the duplicity found out it the Gomery report on fiscal corruption in the system.

The 9/11 justification is wearing more than thin. What the ministers call "architecture", I call the trappings of a police state. I do not want it. No Canadians were asked if we wanted it. No Canadians were asked if we wanted a regime change into an unaccountable unelected North American Union ruled by Orwellian laws that imprison us. The Empire of Surveillance must be struck down! All Canadians are entitled to security and prosperity, not imprisonment and poverty.


http://actionparty.ca/news/civil-rights-freedoms/canadas-sweeping-law-to-spy-on-canadians/ (http://actionparty.ca/news/civil-rights-freedoms/canadas-sweeping-law-to-spy-on-canadians/)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: stealthyaroura on July 01, 2013, 03:57:11 PM
[youtube]hnMPQmIPibE#t[/youtube]
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 01, 2013, 04:08:05 PM


i smell a big rat


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-23138073

1 July 2013 Last updated at 18:07 ET Share this pageEmail Print Share this page

Edward Snowden 'applies for asylum in Russia'

Vladimir Putin: "He should cease his work aimed at damaging our American partners"

US intelligence leaker Edward Snowden has applied to Russia for political asylum, a Russian official says.

Foreign ministry consul Kim Shevchenko said the request was made on Sunday night. The Kremlin has made no comment.

The 30-year-old former CIA analyst is believed to be holed up in a Moscow airport hotel. He is wanted by the US.

Earlier, Russian President Vladimir Putin said Moscow "never hands over anybody anywhere and has no intention of doing so".

"If [Snowden] wants to go somewhere and there are those who would take him, he is welcome to do so," he told a news conference.

"If he wants to stay here, there is one condition: He must stop his activities aimed at inflicting damage on our American partners, no matter how strange it may sound coming from my lips."

The US, where Mr Snowden faces charges of espionage, has not yet made any comment on the latest developments.

It was thought Mr Snowden had been seeking asylum in Latin America, possibly Ecuador whose embassy in London is sheltering Wikileaks founder Julian Assange.

Details have emerged of a letter from Mr Snowden to Ecuador's President Rafael Correa, thanking the country for guaranteeing "my rights would be protected upon departing Hong Kong - I could never have risked travel without that".

He tells President Correa of his "great personal admiration of your commitment to doing what is right rather than what is rewarding".

US 'hopeful'
 
President Barack Obama, speaking earlier in Tanzania, said Washington and Moscow had held "high level" discussions about Mr Snowden.



Analysis
 
Steve Rosenberg
 
BBC News, Moscow
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
If it was up to the Russian parliament, Edward Snowden's asylum application might already have been signed and sealed. Fuelled by anti-US sentiment, Russian MPs have been queuing up to support it.

But it will not be parliament that decides: it will be the Kremlin. Earlier, President Putin appeared to suggest it was unlikely Mr Snowden would remain in Russia. The 30-year-old American could stay, he said, on one condition: that he stops damaging Russia's "American partners" with his leaks. The Kremlin leader added that Mr Snowden probably would not agree to that, and therefore should choose an onward destination and go there.

Might that destination be Venezuela? The Venezuelan president is currently in Moscow attending a gas exporters' summit. He is due to meet President Putin for talks on Tuesday. It is hard to imagine Edward Snowden's fate would not be on the agenda.
"We don't have an extradition treaty with Russia," he said. "On the other hand, Mr Snowden, we understand, has travelled there without a valid passport and legal papers.

"And we are hopeful the Russian government makes decisions based on the normal procedures regarding international travel and the normal interactions law enforcement have."

Some Russian politicians and human rights campaigners are publicly backing Mr Snowden's request, the BBC's Steve Rosenberg reports from Moscow.

If it is granted, the US will be furious but President Putin could claim it is simply the will of the Russian people, he adds.

'Ironclad assurances'
 
According to Russia's Interfax news agency, Mr Snowden's application for asylum was handed to a consular official at Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport late on Sunday evening.

The application was delivered by Sarah Harrison, a member of the Wikileaks legal team acting as Mr Snowden's representative, Kim Shevchenko was quoted by the news agency saying.

Russia's Federal Migration Service has denied the reports.

The LA Times quoted a Russian foreign ministry official as saying Mr Snowden had applied to 15 countries for asylum.

Mr Snowden has reportedly been in the transit area of Sheremetyevo Airport since arriving there from Hong Kong on 23 June.




Start Quote
We cannot accept this kind of behaviour between partners and allies”
End Quote
Francois Hollande
 
French President
 
Is it OK to spy on your friends?
He flew there soon after revealing himself to be the source behind the leaking of thousands of classified documents showing the extent of US email and telephone surveillance.

His father, Lon Snowden, in a letter to the attorney general seen by the BBC at the weekend, said he thought his son would return voluntarily to the US if there were "ironclad assurances that his constitutional rights would be honoured".

'Bugging friends unacceptable'
 
Meanwhile, Washington is facing the fall-out over claims published at the weekend of alleged spying by the US security services on the embassies and missions of its EU allies, including France, Italy and Greece.

The European Commission called the claims "disturbing news if proven true" and said it expected "clarity and transparency" about the issue from Washington.

President Obama: "We have gone through regular law-enforcement channels"
A spokesman for German Chancellor Angela Merkel said "bugging friends is unacceptable... We are no longer in the Cold War".

French President Francois Hollande indicated that a major US-EU trade deal - to be negotiated next week - was under threat unless the US could give a guarantee that its surveillance of the EU had ended.

"We cannot accept this kind of behaviour between partners and allies. We ask that this immediately stop," he told journalists during a visit to western France.

Responding to the claims, President Obama said that all nations with intelligence services tried to understand what other nations were thinking, but that if he wanted to know what a European leader was thinking, he would call that person himself.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: burntheships on July 01, 2013, 04:34:03 PM

i smell a big rat



Yes, I had that waft across my keyboard this morning.

All I can say is spy games are dangerous, I would not
want to end up in Russia ever.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: stealthyaroura on July 01, 2013, 05:01:32 PM


want to end up in Russia ever.
(https://si0.twimg.com/profile_images/2318382796/1qoecy0o207kvgf6041v.jpeg)

speak for yaself LOL
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 01, 2013, 07:33:41 PM

it's not looking good for snowden..i wander what putin will ask for in exchange..?



http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-23139980

1 July 2013 Last updated at 20:31 ET Share this pageEmail Print Share this page

Snowden accuses Obama of blocking asylum requests
 
just what did he think would happen..they would throw him a going away party..hummmmmmmmm
well they might yet...

Edward Snowden is believed to be staying at Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport

US intelligence leaker Edward Snowden has accused President Barack Obama of denying him his right to asylum, in a statement published by Wikileaks.

It is his first public announcement since flying to Russia on 23 June, where he has applied for asylum.

The former CIA analyst, who is holed up in a Moscow airport hotel, is wanted by the US on charges of espionage.

He says President Obama is putting pressure on the countries from which he has requested political asylum.

"The president ordered his vice president to pressure the leaders of nations from which I have requested protection to deny my asylum petitions," he is quoted by Wikileaks as saying.

"This kind of deception from a world leader is not justice, and neither is the extralegal penalty of exile. These are the old, bad tools of political aggression. Their purpose is to frighten, not me, but those who would come after me."

In the statement, Mr Snowden describes himself as "a stateless person", accusing the US government of stopping him from exercising the "basic right...to seek asylum".

On Sunday night, the 30-year-old fugitive applied for asylum in Russia, according to foreign ministry consul Kim Shevchenko.

Vladimir Putin: "He should cease his work aimed at damaging our American partners"
The request was reportedly submitted by Sarah Harrison, a British member of the Wikileaks legal team acting as Mr Snowden's representative.

However, the Kremlin has so far made no comment.

Earlier, Russian President Vladimir Putin said Moscow "never hands over anybody anywhere and has no intention of doing so".

He suggested Mr Snowden could stay on the condition he stops damaging Russia's "American partners" with his leaks.

The leaking of thousands of classified intelligence documents has led to revelations that the US is systematically seizing vast amounts of phone and web data.

'High-level discussions'
 
Mr Snowden is thought to be seeking asylum in Latin America, particularly in Ecuador whose embassy in London is sheltering Wikileaks founder Julian Assange.

 
Steve Rosenberg
 
BBC News, Moscow
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
If it was up to the Russian parliament, Edward Snowden's asylum application might already have been signed and sealed. Fuelled by anti-US sentiment, Russian MPs have been queuing up to support it.

But it will not be parliament that decides: it will be the Kremlin. Earlier, President Putin appeared to suggest it was unlikely Mr Snowden would remain in Russia. The 30-year-old American could stay, he said, on one condition: that he stops damaging Russia's "American partners" with his leaks. The Kremlin leader added that Mr Snowden probably would not agree to that, and therefore should choose an onward destination and go there.

Might that destination be Venezuela? The Venezuelan president is currently in Moscow attending a gas exporters' summit. He is due to meet President Putin for talks on Tuesday. It is hard to imagine Edward Snowden's fate would not be on the agenda.
Ecuador's President Rafael Correa told the Agence France-Presse news agency on Monday that his country would process Mr Snowden's asylum request if he manages to enter an Ecuadorean embassy.

However, if he can complete his asylum request on Russian territory , then "the situation can be processed and resolved there," President Correa adds.

Details have also emerged of a letter from Mr Snowden to President Correa, thanking Ecuador for guaranteeing "my rights would be protected upon departing Hong Kong - I could never have risked travel without that".

He tells President Correa of his "great personal admiration of your commitment to doing what is right rather than what is rewarding".

Speaking in Tanzania on Monday, President Barack Obama said Moscow and Washington had held "high level discussions" about Mr Snowden.

"We don't have an extradition treaty with Russia," he said. "On the other hand, Mr Snowden, we understand, has travelled there without a valid passport and legal papers."

Mr Snowden has reportedly been in the transit area of Sheremetyevo Airport since arriving there from Hong Kong on 23 June.

While it remains unclear in which other countries he has applied for asylum, the LA Times recently quoted a Russian foreign ministry official as saying Mr Snowden had applied to some 15 countries.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: spacemaverick on July 01, 2013, 07:41:46 PM
I have no proof for what I am about to say and it is just  a wild opinion or speculation.  His continued leaking of information could reveal cooperation between the highest levels of Russia and the highest levels of America and would be embarrassing to both powers.  Collaboration maybe?  For what you might ask?  Look at the road the US Government has been taking in past years and the slide towards a different political slant or ideal.  Makes me wonder about how close to a Russian style of government we are becoming.  Like I said....wild speculation on my part.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: burntheships on July 01, 2013, 08:57:58 PM
Makes me wonder about how close to a Russian style of government we are becoming. 

I think you have a valid insight here, look at Obama
and Putin. Mr. O....aka known as Mr. Flexibility.

Now Putin says sure Snowden can come on in if he stops
leaking our American freinds intel.

Spy vs Spy.

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Gigas on July 01, 2013, 10:11:54 PM
If snowden fails to shut up, putin will shut snowden away with pussy riot. Well maybe, I don't really know cause this is a made for TV show and anythings going to happen with this
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 02, 2013, 04:03:12 AM

ahh now it is getting curiouser and curiouser..nobody wants him

on a side note can anyone access huff post?..i can't  - not even from older links..i wonder what that is about


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-23139980

2 July 2013 Last updated at 05:56 ET

Edward Snowden 'broadens asylum requests' - Wikileaks
 Edward Snowden is believed to be staying at Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport
Fugitive US intelligence leaker Edward Snowden has sent asylum requests to 21 countries, according to a statement published by Wikileaks.

They include China, France, Ireland and Venezuela. But seven European countries said the requests were invalid.

And Russia said Mr Snowden later withdrew the application to Moscow as the Kremlin had set conditions.

He accuses US President Barack Obama of putting pressure on the countries to which he has applied.

The former intelligence systems analyst, who is holed up at Moscow airport, is wanted by the US on charges of leaking secrets.

Vladimir Putin's warning to Mr Snowden that he should stop "harming our American partners" is indicative of a significant shifting of gear. Russia now has ownership of the Snowden affair. What happens to Mr Snowden will depend upon Russia's calculations and what serves Russia's interests.

The authorities in Moscow could have moved Mr Snowden on quickly, joining the diplomatic game of pass-the-parcel that began in Hong Kong. But the longer the errant US intelligence analyst stays in limbo at the Moscow airport, so the more Russia has become a central actor in this drama.

Russia must balance a range of factors in seeking to determine Mr Snowden's fate - the risk of a serious rift with Washington and Russia's own standing as an international actor that upholds the legal order must be set against the strong vein of sympathy for Mr Snowden amongst Russian public opinion.

US Secretary of State John Kerry raised Mr Snowden's case in talks with his Russian counterpart Sergei Lavrov on the sidelines of the Asean summit in Brunei.But Mr Kerry said the two did not discuss the matter substantively ."I did raise the issue of Mr Snowden but that is not his portfolio, nor is it mine, but it is being handled within the justice department," he said, quoted by Reuters news agency.

'Not an agent'
 
The Wikileaks press release said that most of the asylum requests - including to Russia itself - were handed to the Russian consulate at Sheremetyevo airport late on Sunday for delivery to the relevant embassies in Moscow.

The requests were submitted by Sarah Harrison, a British member of the Wikileaks legal team acting as Mr Snowden's representative, the statement added.But Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov later said Mr Snowden withdrew the application to Russia because Moscow had said he should give up "anti-American activity"."After learning of Russia's position yesterday, voiced by President Putin ... he abandoned his intention [of staying] and his request to be able to stay in Russia," he said.

Russian President Vladimir Putin had said that while Moscow "never hands over anybody anywhere", Mr Snowden could only stay on condition that he stopped damaging Russia's "American partners" with his leaks.

Mr Snowden has reportedly been in the transit area of Sheremetyevo since arriving there from Hong Kong on 23 June.

Mr Peskov confirmed he was still there and had not crossed into Russian territory, adding that the former analyst had never been a Russian agent and had never worked with its intelligence services.

Norway, Poland, Germany, Austria, Finland, Spain and Switzerland said asylum requests could only be made on their soil.

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, who is on a visit to Moscow, said Caracas had not yet received an asylum application from Mr Snowden but that he had "done something very important for humanity" and "deserved the world's protection".

"The world's conscience should react, the world youth should react, the decent people who want a peaceful world should react, everyone should react and find solidarity with this young man who has denounced and altered the world that they [the US] pretend to control."

Mr Snowden had previously submitted an application to Ecuador, whose embassy in London is sheltering Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, and to Iceland.

 Ecuador's President Rafael Correa told the Agence France-Presse news agency on Monday that his country would process Mr Snowden's asylum request if he managed to enter an Ecuadorean embassy.

However, if he can complete his asylum request on Russian territory , then "the situation can be processed and resolved there," President Correa added.

Details have also emerged of a letter from Mr Snowden to President Correa, thanking Ecuador for guaranteeing "my rights would be protected upon departing Hong Kong - I could never have risked travel without that".

'Stateless person'
 
Speaking in Tanzania on Monday, President Barack Obama said Moscow and Washington had held "high level discussions" about Mr Snowden, who he said had travelled to Moscow without valid documents.

Mr Snowden describes himself as "a stateless person", accusing the US government of stopping him from exercising the "basic right...to seek asylum".

"The president ordered his vice president to pressure the leaders of nations from which I have requested protection to deny my asylum petitions," he is quoted by Wikileaks as saying.

"This kind of deception from a world leader is not justice, and neither is the extralegal penalty of exile. These are the old, bad tools of political aggression. Their purpose is to frighten, not me, but those who would come after me."

The leaking of thousands of classified intelligence documents has led to revelations that the US is systematically seizing vast amounts of phone and web data.

..........

Analysis
 
Jonathan Marcus
 
BBC diplomatic correspondent
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Vladimir Putin's warning to Mr Snowden that he should stop "harming our American partners" is indicative of a significant shifting of gear. Russia now has ownership of the Snowden affair. What happens to Mr Snowden will depend upon Russia's calculations and what serves Russia's interests.

The authorities in Moscow could have moved Mr Snowden on quickly, joining the diplomatic game of pass-the-parcel that began in Hong Kong. But the longer the errant US intelligence analyst stays in limbo at the Moscow airport, so the more Russia has become a central actor in this drama.

Russia must balance a range of factors in seeking to determine Mr Snowden's fate - the risk of a serious rift with Washington and Russia's own standing as an international actor that upholds the legal order must be set against the strong vein of sympathy for Mr Snowden amongst Russian public opinion.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: deuem on July 02, 2013, 07:36:33 AM

i smell a big rat


(http://i1198.photobucket.com/albums/aa458/deuem/ShortHairGif.gif) (http://s1198.photobucket.com/user/deuem/media/ShortHairGif.gif.html)
 
Deuem
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: spacemaverick on July 02, 2013, 09:06:29 AM
This is a portion of a story from the Daily Beast.

"This whole Snowden charade is entirely in keeping with Putin’s technique of having it both ways. He gets to look like a tough guy for standing up to Obama on an issue that matters to Putin not at all while at the same time he pretends he is cooperating as best he can. If Snowden were actually valuable there would be no public show. He’d be in a bunker deep under KGB headquarters, and the Kremlin would be in full denial mode. Or he’d likely never have been let out of China. And as at the G8 meeting, other leaders are too afraid to challenge this flagrant hypocrisy, which further emboldens Putin."

For the entire story click on the link.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/07/02/putin-toys-with-obama-as-syria-burns-and-snowden-runs-free.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+thedailybeast%2Farticles+%28The+Daily+Beast+-+Latest+Articles%29

Snowden is a political pawn.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: burntheships on July 02, 2013, 10:32:16 AM
At this point, I have to say it seems Snowden was a bit
naive in the foresight of his options once he went
public.

Yes, the violation of our civil rights with the intrusive
surveillance by the NSA in the name of the war on terror
(which in itself is a complete lie) is unconstitutional,
however even thinking that "leaking" this stuff to the press
was going to change that was rather unrealistic.

Not that we dont have a terrorist problem,
as we do. But...howcome they miss the real
perps so much?

I wonder if he was looking at Julian Assange and thinking
he could also get away with this to a large degree?
Thing is Assange was not an American Citizen.

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 02, 2013, 03:32:10 PM
   :'( :'(             i'm thinking nsa =  tip of an iceberg
          :'(           usa = titanic

i'm also thinking infighting of known and secret agencies within the gub

we might need to find us some prepper friends soon





http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/02/glenn-greenwald-fox-news-world-shocked_n_3533536.html

Glenn Greenwald To Fox News: 'The World Will Be Shocked' By New NSA Stories (VIDEO)
The Huffington Post  |  By Jack Mirkinson Posted: 07/02/2013 9:23 am EDT  |  Updated: 07/02/2013 9:40 am EDT



Glenn Greenwald told Fox News on Tuesday that the "world will be shocked" by upcoming revelations about the National Security Agency's surveillance.

Greenwald spoke to the network's Eric Bolling, who has been a defender of Edward Snowden, the leaker who passed the NSA documents to the Guardian. Bolling asked him to divulge some information about what he has planned next, but Greenwald was coy.

"You're going to have to wait along with everybody else," he said. "I will say that there are vast programs, both domestic and international spying, that the world will be shocked to learn about, that the NSA is engaged in with no democratic accountability and that's what driving our reporting."

Greenwald also said that he has not been in touch with Snowden since he left Hong Kong.



Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: burntheships on July 02, 2013, 03:42:00 PM
Uh oh...

Well, Mr. Greenwald, please get 24 hour surveillance with
RFID tracking, and body gaurds.

You are going to need it.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Sgt.Rocknroll on July 02, 2013, 05:25:24 PM
(http://i1135.photobucket.com/albums/m623/Sgt_Rocknroll/IMG_0554_zps7f5b3b59.jpg) (http://s1135.photobucket.com/user/Sgt_Rocknroll/media/IMG_0554_zps7f5b3b59.jpg.html)

Drinking my coffee this morning at work and I hadn't noticed the key before....hhhmmmmm ::)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: burntheships on July 02, 2013, 06:24:53 PM
 8)

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on July 02, 2013, 06:26:40 PM
I have a CIA Lapel pin...  :D

(https://www.vetfriends.com/catalog/images/3795_CIA_Hat_lapel_Pin_2.jpg)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: spacemaverick on July 02, 2013, 06:48:17 PM
Beyond Snowden: US General Cartwright has been indicted for espionage
JULY 2, 2013 BY 21WIRE

While the world focuses on Washington’s pursuit of NSA whistleblower Ed Snowden, another much more high ranking member of the US power structure has been indicted for espionage this week…

US General James Cartwright was regarded by Washington insiders as ‘Obama’s General’, and now he’s facing prosecution for blowing the whistle on ‘Operation Olympic Games’ which planted the Stuxnet and Flame viruses in Iranian nuclear facilities in order derail Iran’s civilian nuclear program. At closer examination, it appears that Cartwright’s revelations didn’t so much harm US interests per say, but they hindered Israeli ambitions towards a war with Iran.

But why espionage? What is the line between “whistleblowing” and “espionage” in America today?

Journalist Thierry Meyssan give us a historical perspective and tells is what it really means…

http://21stcenturywire.com/2013/07/02/beyond-snowden-us-general-cartwright-has-been-indicted-for-espionage/

It appears everything is starting to come out of the bag...well not everything...people are getting thrown under the bus.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: burntheships on July 02, 2013, 07:09:45 PM
Espionage

[youtube]cfbajYYNEdY[/youtube]
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 02, 2013, 08:45:59 PM


wow..you couldn't make up this stuff..

do you remember the old game of hot potato..?


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/02/bolivia-snowden_n_3536962.html

Bolivian Minister: Morales' Plane Rerouted On Suspicion Snowden On Board

By PHILIPP-MORITZ JENNE and CARLOS VALDEZ 07/02/13 10:41 PM ET EDT 



VIENNA — The plane carrying Bolivian President Evo Morales was rerouted to Austria after France and Portugal refused to let it cross their airspace because of suspicions that NSA leaker Edward Snowden was on board, Bolivian officials said Tuesday.

Officials in both Austria and Bolivia said that Snowden was not on the plane, which was taking Morales home from a summit in Russia, where he had suggested that his government would be willing to consider granting asylum to the American.

A furious Bolivian Foreign Minister David Choquehuanca said France and Portugal would have to explain why they canceled authorization for the plane, claiming that the decision had put the president's life at risk.

"We don't know who invented this lie" that Snowden was traveling with Morales, Choquehuanca said in La Paz. "We want to denounce to the international community this injustice with the plane of President Evo Morales."

He said that after France and Portugal canceled authorization for the flight, Spain's government allowed the plane to be refueled in its territory. From there the plane flew on to Vienna.

French government officials reached overnight said they could not confirm whether Morales' plane was denied permission to fly over France.

Officials at Portugal's Foreign Ministry and National Civil Aviation Authority could not be reached to comment.

Leaks by Snowden, a former NSA systems analyst, have revealed the NSA's sweeping data collection of U.S. phone records and some Internet traffic, though U.S. intelligence officials have said the programs are aimed at targeting foreigners and terrorist suspects mostly overseas.

He is believed to be in a Moscow airport transit area, seeking asylum from one of more than a dozen countries.

"This is a plot by the U.S. government to destroy president Morales' image," said Bolivian Defense Minister Ruben Saavedra at the VIP terminal of Vienna's airport. "We want to declare very firmly that it was an American story that Edward Snowden was on this flight."

Morales himself was present during the improvised press conference but chose not to speak to reporters. Morales will remain at the airport until his plane has been cleared for take-off.

Austrian Foreign Ministry spokesman Alexander Schallenberg told The Associated Press that Snowden was not with Morales.

Snowden has applied for asylum in Venezuela, Bolivia and 18 other countries, according to WikiLeaks, a secret spilling website that has been advising him. Many European countries on the list – including Austria, Finland, Ireland, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain and Switzerland – said he would have to make his request on their soil.

One of Snowden's best chances of finding refuge outside the United States may hinge on Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, who was also in Russia on Tuesday.

Maduro told Russian reporters that his country has not received an application for asylum from Snowden and dodged the question of whether he would take him with him when he left.

But Maduro also defended the former National Security Agency systems analyst.

"Who must protect Snowden? This is the question. This young man of 29 was brave enough to say that we need to protect the world from the American imperial elite, so who should protect him?" Maduro said in response to a question from journalists covering a ceremony to rename a Moscow street after Chavez. "All of mankind, people all over the world must protect him."

Maduro was scheduled to spend Wednesday in neighboring Belarus before returning to Venezuela.

In Venezuela, Foreign Minister Elias Jaua said that changing the flight's route without checking on how much fuel it had put the endangered Morales.

"All the countries that have denied permission for the flight of our brother president, Evo Morales, must be held responsible for his life and his dignity as president."

Another possible landing spot for Snowden is Ecuador, where Wikileaks founder and publisher Julian Assange has been seeking asylum.

"We are willing to analyze Mr. Snowden's request for asylum and this position has not changed," said Ecuadorean Foreign Minister Ricardo Patino on Tuesday. "What we have said is that we will be able to analyze the request when Mr. Snowden is in Ecuadorean territory or in an Ecuadorean mission."

Patino added that two weeks ago a hidden microphone was found in Ecuador's embassy in London, where Assange is holed up. "We want to find out with precision what the origin of the apparatus is."

Snowden, who recently turned 30, withdrew a bid for asylum in Russia when he learned the terms Moscow had set out, according to Putin's spokesman Dmitry Peskov. Putin said on Monday that Russia was ready to shelter Snowden as long as he stopped leaking U.S. secrets.

At the same time, Putin said he had no plans to turn over Snowden to the United States.

Rebuffed by Russia's president, the Obama administration has recently toned down demands Snowden be expelled from the Moscow airport in a sign that the U.S. believes he is not worth scuttling diplomatic relations between the former Cold War enemies.

On Monday, WikiLeaks posted a statement attributed to Snowden on its website, in which he slams Obama for "using citizenship as a weapon."

"Although I am convicted of nothing, (the United States) has unilaterally revoked my passport, leaving me a stateless person," Snowden says in the statement. "Without any judicial order, the administration now seeks to stop me exercising a basic right. A right that belongs to everybody. The right to seek asylum.

"Their purpose is to frighten, not me, but those who would come after me."

____

Associated Press writer George Jahn contributed to this report from Vienna, Austria, and Carlos Valdez from La Paz, Bolivia.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: spacemaverick on July 02, 2013, 09:12:23 PM
Hot potato or 3 card monte or Where's Waldo?  Why in the world all this confusion?  Nobody wants to give him asylum.  What are they afraid of or who are they afraid of that might cause countries to say "no?"  If by revealing more he may be revealing that all heads of state or at least major heads of state are manipulating the rest of the world....just wild speculation on my part.  Or could it be as simple as "we are afraid of what the US may do to us?  This is becoming more complex by the hour.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: burntheships on July 02, 2013, 09:27:28 PM
Hot potato or 3 card monte or Where's Waldo?  Why in the world all this confusion? 

It is just my opinion here: I think they are going to put the heat on this
way. Out of one side of the mouth Obama says he is not going to
expend energy in pursuit - on the other hand anyone who aids
him there will be hell to pay.

Its a way of making the target become a burden to anyone who wishes
to aid him. Again, imo.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on July 02, 2013, 09:36:07 PM
Extra Extra Read all about it!!

Hot off the NSA press

Read all about it!

Get your copy NOW before they are all gone



NSA PRISM LEAKS
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/zfznsi5h2l54oqj/fqMeilBSVT
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on July 02, 2013, 09:39:23 PM
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/q71/993910_626497614036460_82233257_n.jpg)


Michelle Obama: Being First Lady is like living in a ‘really nice prison’ (http://washingtonexaminer.com/michelle-obama-being-first-lady-is-like-living-in-a-really-nice-prison/article/2532604)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: burntheships on July 02, 2013, 09:45:47 PM
Michelle Obama: Being First Lady is like living in a ‘really nice prison’ (http://washingtonexaminer.com/michelle-obama-being-first-lady-is-like-living-in-a-really-nice-prison/article/2532604)

This has to be meant to foment...or is she that ungrateful, that
blind, that callous? Even the word "Prison" ....does she even
think before she speaks?

 :o
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: spacemaverick on July 02, 2013, 10:18:50 PM
It is just my opinion here: I think they are going to put the heat on this
way. Out of one side of the mouth Obama says he is not going to
expend energy in pursuit - on the other hand anyone who aids
him there will be hell to pay.

Its a way of making the target become a burden to anyone who wishes
to aid him. Again, imo.

I believe you may be right.  That's the only thing that seems to be along his line of thinking.  Make it hot for everyone else and his administration does not have to expend that much energy or manpower and everyone else will do his bidding.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: petrus4 on July 02, 2013, 10:43:54 PM
NSA PRISM LEAKS
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/zfznsi5h2l54oqj/fqMeilBSVT


I'm looking through these pdfs now.  It's exactly what we got with the supposedly sensational Wikipedia cable dump; the sorts of boring, largely inconsequential memoranda that military and government peons bounce back and forth between each other on a daily basis.  There's nothing really juicy here at all, that I can see.

I suppose you could say that the "Net Ops Strategic Vision," document is vaguely interesting, but again, all it's really saying is that the DoD feels it needs to be more "agile," and it needs to "consolidate command and control."  Yawn.

That is hardly groundbreaking material.  If Snowden felt this stuff was worth risking his life over, and if the American government feels that it is worth risking international diplomatic cred for, then I think rather a lot of people need to seriously rethink their priorities.  The only time Uncle Sam needs to be concerned about me reading this, is if I'm in need of a good cure for insomnia. ;)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: petrus4 on July 02, 2013, 10:59:30 PM
This has to be meant to foment...or is she that ungrateful, that
blind, that callous? Even the word "Prison" ....does she even
think before she speaks?

 :o

With respect, burntheships, your naivete is showing, here.  The single greatest problem that most who seek power have, is that they fail to realise that they will still be unhappy (if not become even moreso) once they get it.

Michelle Obama could definitely be considered fortunate in physical and logistical terms.  I'm sure she eats luxuriously, never has to worry about hypothermia, and is in visually gorgeous surroundings, most of the time. 

Yet the needs of the body and the needs of the spirit, are very often diametrically opposed.  She would never be able to go anywhere unscheduled, and whenever she did so, would have to be attended to by the Secret Service (America's Praetorians (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Praetorian_Guard)) at all times, to avoid the possibility of abduction or assassination.  I also could not be paid enough, to live subjected to the negative aetheric bombardment which you can be sure that she and her husband are constantly under, due to the anger of the people.

To conclude, if Michelle Obama's position is judged purely in terms of physical requirements, then yes, it could be said that she is in a good position.  If we are to look at a person's less tangible needs, on the other hand, then the opposite becomes true.  A gilded cage can be just as much torture as a non-guilded one, in its' own ways.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 03, 2013, 01:46:36 PM


ohhh  did you really think this was over?..


U.S. Postal Service Logging All Mail for Law Enforcement
By RON NIXON
Published: July 3, 2013

 http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/04/us/monitoring-of-snail-mail.html?_r=0

WASHINGTON — Leslie James Pickering noticed something odd in his mail last September: A handwritten card, apparently delivered by mistake, with instructions for postal workers to pay special attention to the letters and packages sent to his home.

“Show all mail to supv” — supervisor — “for copying prior to going out on the street,” read the card. It included Mr. Pickering’s name, address and the type of mail that needed to be monitored. The word “confidential” was highlighted in green.
“It was a bit of a shock to see it,” said Mr. Pickering, who owns a small bookstore in Buffalo. More than a decade ago, he was a spokesman for the Earth Liberation Front, a radical environmental group labeled eco-terrorists by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Postal officials subsequently confirmed they were indeed tracking Mr. Pickering’s mail but told him nothing else.

As the world focuses on the high-tech spying of the National Security Agency, the misplaced card offers a rare glimpse inside the seemingly low-tech but prevalent snooping of the United States Postal Service.

Mr. Pickering was targeted by a longtime surveillance system called mail covers, but that is only a forerunner of a vastly more expansive effort, the Mail Isolation Control and Tracking program, in which Postal Service computers photograph the exterior of every piece of paper mail that is processed in the United States — about 160 billion pieces last year. It is not known how long the government saves the images.

Together, the two programs show that snail mail is subject to the same kind of scrutiny that the National Security Agency has given to telephone calls and e-mail.

The mail covers program, used to monitor Mr. Pickering, is more than a century old but is still considered a powerful tool. At the request of law enforcement officials, postal workers record information from the outside of letters and parcels before they are delivered. (Actually opening the mail requires a warrant.) The information is sent to whatever law enforcement agency asked for it. Tens of thousands of pieces of mail each year undergo this scrutiny.

The Mail Isolation Control and Tracking program was created after the anthrax attacks in late 2001 that killed five people, including two postal workers. Highly secret, it seeped into public view last month when the F.B.I. cited it in its investigation of ricin-laced letters sent to President Obama and Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg. It enables the Postal Service to retroactively track mail correspondence at the request of law enforcement. No one disputes that it is sweeping.

“In the past, mail covers were used when you had a reason to suspect someone of a crime,” said Mark D. Rasch, the former director of the Justice Department’s computer crime unit, who worked on several fraud cases using mail covers. “Now it seems to be ‘Let’s record everyone’s mail so in the future we might go back and see who you were communicating with.’ Essentially you’ve added mail covers on millions of Americans.”

Bruce Schneier, a computer security expert and an author, said whether it was a postal worker taking down information or a computer taking images, the program was still an invasion of privacy.

“Basically they are doing the same thing as the other programs, collecting the information on the outside of your mail, the metadata, if you will, of names, addresses, return addresses and postmark locations, which gives the government a pretty good map of your contacts, even if they aren’t reading the contents,” he said.

But law enforcement officials said mail covers and the automatic mail tracking program are invaluable, even in an era of smartphones and e-mail.

In a criminal complaint filed June 7 in Federal District Court in Eastern Texas, the F.B.I. said a postal investigator tracing the ricin letters was able to narrow the search to Shannon Guess Richardson, an actress in New Boston, Tex., by examining information from the front and back images of 60 pieces of mail scanned immediately before and after the tainted letters sent to Mr. Obama and Mr. Bloomberg showing return addresses near her home. Ms. Richardson had originally accused her husband of mailing the letters, but investigators determined that he was at work during the time they were mailed.

In 2007, the F.B.I., the Internal Revenue Service and the local police in Charlotte, N.C., used information gleaned from the mail cover program to arrest Sallie Wamsley-Saxon and her husband, Donald, charging both with running a prostitution ring that took in $3 million over six years. Prosecutors said it was one of the largest and most successful such operations in the country. Investigators also used mail covers to help track banking activity and other businesses the couple operated under different names.

Other agencies, including the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Department of Health and Human Services, have used mail covers to track drug smugglers and Medicare fraud.

“It’s a treasure trove of information,” said James J. Wedick, a former F.B.I. agent who spent 34 years at the agency and who said he used mail covers in a number of investigations, including one that led to the prosecution of several elected officials in California on corruption charges. “Looking at just the outside of letters and other mail, I can see who you bank with, who you communicate with — all kinds of useful information that gives investigators leads that they can then follow up on with a subpoena.”

But, he said: “It can be easily abused because it’s so easy to use and you don’t have to go through a judge to get the information. You just fill out a form.”
For mail cover requests, law enforcement agencies simply submit a letter to the Postal Service, which can grant or deny a request without judicial review. Law enforcement officials say the Postal Service rarely denies a request. In other government surveillance program, such as wiretaps, a federal judge must sign off on the requests.

The mail cover surveillance requests are granted for about 30 days, and can be extended for up to 120 days. There are two kinds of mail covers: those related to criminal activity and those requested to protect national security. The criminal activity requests average 15,000 to 20,000 per year, said law enforcement officials who spoke on the condition of anonymity because they are prohibited by law from discussing the requests. The number of requests for antiterrorism mail covers has not been made public.

Law enforcement officials need warrants to open the mail, although President George W. Bush asserted in a signing statement in 2007 that the federal government had the authority to open mail without warrants in emergencies or foreign intelligence cases.

Court challenges to mail covers have generally failed because judges have ruled that there is no reasonable expectation of privacy for information contained on the outside of a letter. Officials in both the George W. Bush and Obama administrations, in fact, have used the mail-cover court rulings to justify the N.S.A.’s surveillance programs, saying the electronic monitoring amounts to the same thing as a mail cover. Congress briefly conducted hearings on mail cover programs in 1976, but has not revisited the issue.

The program has led to sporadic reports of abuse. In May 2012, Mary Rose Wilcox, a Maricopa County supervisor, was awarded nearly $1 million by a federal judge after winning a lawsuit against Sheriff Joe Arpaio, known for his immigration raids in Arizona, who, among other things, obtained mail covers from the Postal Service to track her mail. The judge called the investigation into Ms. Wilcox politically motivated because she had been a frequent critic of Mr. Arpaio, objecting to what she considered the targeting of Hispanics in his immigration sweeps. The case is being appealed.

In the mid-1970s the Church Committee, a Senate panel that documented C.I.A. abuses, faulted a program created in the 1950s in New York that used mail covers to trace and sometimes open mail going to the Soviet Union from the United States.

A suit brought in 1973 by a high school student in New Jersey, whose letter to the Socialist Workers Party was traced by the F.B.I. as part of an investigation into the group, led to a rebuke from a federal judge.

Postal officials refused to discuss either mail covers or the Mail Isolation Control and Tracking program.

Mr. Pickering says he suspects that the F.B.I. requested the mail cover to monitor his mail because a former associate said the bureau had called with questions about him. Last month, he filed a lawsuit against the Postal Service, the F.B.I. and other agencies, saying they were improperly withholding information.

A spokeswoman for the F.B.I. in Buffalo declined to comment.

Mr. Pickering said that although he was arrested two dozen times for acts of civil disobedience and convicted of a handful of misdemeanors, he was never involved in the arson attacks the Earth Liberation Front carried out. He said he became tired of focusing only on environmental activism and moved back to Buffalo to finish college, open his bookstore, Burning Books, and start a family.

“I’m no terrorist,” he said. “I’m an activist.”

Mr. Pickering has written books sympathetic to the liberation front, but he said his political views and past association should not make him the target of a federal investigation. “I’m just a guy who runs a bookstore and has a wife and a kid,” he said.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 06, 2013, 09:25:16 AM


another country heard from...i wonder if there are any gub's
that aren't spying on the peoples..


France Intelligence Agency Spies On Phone Calls, Emails, Social Media Activity: Report
Reuters  |  Posted: 07/04/2013 10:16 am EDT  |  Updated: 07/05/2013 12:20 pm EDT

 PARIS, July 4 (Reuters) - France's external intelligence agency spies on the French public's phone calls, emails and social media activity in France and abroad, the daily Le Monde said on Thursday.

It said the DGSE intercepted signals from computers and telephones in France, and between France and other countries, although not the content of phone calls, to create a map of "who is talking to whom". It said the activity was illegal.

"All of our communications are spied on," wrote Le Monde, which based its report on unnamed intelligence sources as well as remarks made publicly by intelligence officials.

"Emails, text messages, telephone records, access to Facebook and Twitter are then stored for years," it said.

The activities described are similar to those carried out by the U.S. National Security Agency, as described in documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

The documents revealed that the NSA has access to vast amounts of Internet data such as emails, chat rooms and video from large companies such as Facebook and Google, under a programme known as Prism.

They also showed that the U.S. government had gathered so-called metadata - such as the time, duration and numbers called - on all telephone calls carried by service providers such as Verizon.


France's DGSE was not immediately available for comment.

Le Monde said the French national security commission whose job it is to authorise targeted spying, and the parliamentary intelligence committee, had challenged the paper's report and said it worked in accordance with the law. It said the only body that collected communications information was a government agency controlled by the prime minister's office that monitors for security breaches.

Le Monde's report comes amid a storm over media allegations that Washington regularly spies on European citizens and embassies. The allegations, made in the German magazine Der Spiegel, sparked concern from data protection watchdogs and irked European governments just as major transatlantic trade talks are about to start.

Le Monde said France's DGSE was more interested in finding out who was speaking to whom than in combing through the content of private communications. It said the DGSE stored a mass of such metadata in the basement of its Paris headquarters.

France's seven other intelligence services, including domestic secret services and customs and money-laundering watchdogs, have access to the data and can tap into it freely as a means to spot people whose communications seem suspicious, whom they can then track with more intrusive techniques such as phone-tapping, Le Monde wrote.

The Guardian newspaper reported last month that Britain had a similar spying programme on international phone and Internet traffic and was sharing vast quantities of personal information with the American NSA. (Reporting by Natalie Huet; Editing by Catherine Bremer and Kevin Liffey)

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/04/france-spying_n_3546226.html?ir=Technology&ref=topbar
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 08, 2013, 07:42:23 AM
Edward Snowden Encouraged By Russian Official To Accept Venezuela's Offer Of Asylum

By LYNN BERRY 07/07/13 04:05 PM ET EDT 

In this handout photo provided by The Guardian, Edward Snowden speaks during an interview in Hong Kong. (Photo by The Guardian via Getty Images) .112Share195Tweet6Email1383CommentGet World Newsletters:
 
 Subscribe ..Follow:Russia, Venezuela, Edward Snowden Venezuela, National Security Agency, edward snowden, Edward Snowden Nsa, Edward Snowden Russia, nsa, Nsa Surveillance, Surveillance, World News .MOSCOW -- An influential Russian parliament member who often speaks for the Kremlin encouraged NSA leaker Edward Snowden on Sunday to accept Venezuela's offer of asylum.

Alexei Pushkov, who heads the international affairs committee in Russia's parliament, posted a message on Twitter saying: "Venezuela is waiting for an answer from Snowden. This, perhaps, is his last chance to receive political asylum."

Venezuelan Foreign Minister Elias Jaua said Saturday his country hasn't yet been in contact with Snowden, who Russian officials say has been stuck in the transit area of Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport since arriving on a flight from Hong Kong two weeks ago. He has been unable to travel further because the U.S. annulled his passport.

Jaua said he expects to consult with Russian officials on Monday about Snowden's situation.

Pushkov's comments appeared to indicate that the Kremlin is now anxious to be rid of the former National Security Agency systems analyst, whom the U.S. wants returned to face espionage charges.

There has been no response from the Kremlin or Russian Foreign Ministry to the asylum offer made by Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro in the early hours of Saturday, Moscow time.

For Snowden to leave for South America, he would need for Venezuela to issue him travel documents and he would need to find a way to get there. The only direct commercial flight from Moscow goes to Havana, Cuba, and Snowden had booked a seat on this flight the day after arriving from Hong Kong, but failed to show up.

The Moscow-Havana flight goes over Europe and the U.S., which could cause complications. Some European countries refused to allow Bolivian President Evo Morales to fly through their airspace on his way home from Moscow last week because of suspicions that Snowden was onboard his plane.

Pushkov joked that if Snowden doesn't find shelter in Venezuela, "he will have to stay and marry Anna Chapman," the redheaded Russian spy who was among 10 sleeper agents deported from the U.S. in 2010. The 31-year-old Chapman proposed to Snowden, who just turned 30, on Twitter last week.


The presidents of Bolivia and Nicaragua also said over the weekend that Snowden was welcome in their countries. Bolivia's foreign minister, David Choquehuanca, said Sunday on state television that his country hasn't yet received a formal petition for asylum from Snowden. Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega said his country's embassy in Moscow has received Snowden's application and is studying the request.

Snowden has applied for asylum in more than two dozen countries, including Bolivia, Nicaragua and Venezuela, according to WikiLeaks, the secret-spilling website that has been advising him.

U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, said he wasn't surprised that those three Latin American nations were offering asylum.

"They like sticking it to the United States," Menendez told NBC's "Meet the Press."

He also mentioned re-examining U.S. trade policies and foreign aid to any country that might take in Snowden.

Brazil's foreign minister said his government is worried by a newspaper report the U.S. has collected data on billions of telephone and email conversations in his country and promised an effort for international protection of Internet privacy.

"The Brazilian government has asked for clarifications" through the U.S. Embassy in Brazil and Brazil's embassy in Washington, Foreign Minister Antonio Patriota said.

The spokesman for the U.S. Embassy in Brazil's capital, Dean Chaves, said diplomats there wouldn't have any comment.

___

Associated Press writers Fabiola Sanchez in Caracas, Venezuela, Carlos Valdez in La Paz, Bolivia, and Jenny Barchfield in Paraty, Brazil, contributed to this report.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/07/edward-snowden-venezuela-russia_n_3558780.html
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 10, 2013, 02:54:55 PM


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/10/edward-snowden-russia_n_3573844.html

video at link

Michael Calderone                michael.calderone@huffingtonpost.com

  Edward Snowden: Russia, China Did Not Get Any Documents From Me

Posted: 07/10/2013 1:11 pm EDT  |  Updated: 07/10/2013 4:53 pm EDT



NEW YORK -– Former U.S. national security contractor Edward Snowden has refuted media speculation that he provided classified documents to China and Russia, or that those governments seized them.

"I never gave any information to either government, and they never took anything from my laptops," Snowden said in new interviews with Glenn Greenwald, the Guardian columnist who has broken several stories based on documents Snowden obtained and leaked from the National Security Agency.

Snowden’s remarks come after major news outlets promoted anonymous claims suggesting that Chinese and Russian authorities had likely obtained the documents, helping support a narrative that the 30-year-old fugitive committed espionage, rather than simply leaking documents to journalists and a filmmaker in hopes of shedding light on U.S. surveillance practices.

The Huffington Post earlier examined how the U.S. government was building a public case against Snowden through the media by passing along unverifiable or unsubstantiated claims about two instances where national security was supposedly jeopardized by his disclosures.

A half-dozen news outlets -– the Associated Press, Reuters, ABC News, the Washington Post, CNN and the Los Angeles Times –- all published strikingly similar claims from anonymous officials that Snowden’s leaks had prompted terrorists to change the way they communicated.

The officials’ claims about changing tactics were given little scrutiny in the recent slew of articles, which either neglected to mention or played down the fact that al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula had reportedly altered its communications back in 2009 because of NSA concerns.

The media was also responsible for widely circulated assumptions that China and Russia had likely seen all of Snowden’s documents while he was in Hong Kong or in a Moscow airport, where he remains while seeking asylum.


“That stuff is gone,” a former senior U.S. intelligence official who served in Russia told the Washington Post on June 24. “I guarantee the Chinese intelligence service got their hands on that right away. If they imaged the hard drives and then returned them to him, well, then the Russians have that stuff now.”

"Given his stay in Hong Kong and the number of days he was there, the assumption has to be everything he had was compromised," an anonymous official told CNN on June 25. The same official also “didn't dismiss the notion that Russia may have done the same thing."

On June 23, The New York Times cited “two western intelligence experts” as saying “they believed that the Chinese government had managed to drain the contents of the four laptops that Mr. Snowden said he brought to Hong Kong.”

Cable news programs also joined in the assumptions about what Snowden, China or Russia may have done. CNN analyst Jeffrey Toobin -- who described Snowden a "grandiose narcissist" in The New Yorker -- suggested the following night on air that Russia would do what’s in its government’s interest, which "presumably includes taking everything in his briefcase and making copies of it."

"Why wouldn't they?" Toobin asked. "They'd be crazy not to."

It’s understandable for journalists to grant anonymity in order to get verifiable information or details that governments, agencies and companies cannot or will not provide publicly. But in granting anonymity to officials and experts to speculate about how Snowden interacted with Chinese and Russian authorities -- without evidence -- the media is amplifying the government’s arguments that he damaged national security, without any accountability.

Greenwald wrote Wednesday that "Snowden's denial is not dispositive and shouldn't be treated as such," but noted that it’s “the only actual evidence on this question thus far.”

Snowden may or may not be telling the full story about his time in Hong Kong or Russia. But without names attached to those claims he handed over intelligence, there's no one to call up to refute him.

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 11, 2013, 01:46:02 PM


it's not looking too good for him  in my opinion..

is Snowden Trapped?

http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2013/07/10/196362/trapped-an-air-escape-from-moscow.html#.Ud7ep2Q6XKA
totally copyrighted and no copying ..but very interesting article.

.......................................................


http://www.cnn.com/2013/07/10/world/americas/nsa-snowden-venezuela

Is Snowden ready to take flight? WikiLeaks hints at next moveBy Ed Payne, CNN

updated 6:48 AM EDT, Thu July 11, 2013
(CNN) -- As speculation grows over Edward Snowden's path to freedom, WikiLeaks teased that his "flight of liberty" campaign starts Wednesday, promising further details.

But so far, WikiLeaks has not lived up to the Twitter promise to provide more details. And the questions are piling up.

Is the future of the U.S. intelligence leaker, grounded at Moscow's airport for more than two weeks, no longer up in the air?

Not so fast.

It's unclear whether Snowden has accepted anyone's offer of asylum. And if he has, how does he intend to get there?

Speculation centers on Venezuela, which was the first to offer asylum. With both sides expressing interest, it only appeared to be a matter of time before it is confirmed.

Venezuela extended the asylum offer to Snowden last week, and on Monday President Nicolas Maduro received a formal asylum request from Snowden.

...............................................................


Is Snowden worth the risk? Latin America weighs pros and consBy Catherine E. Shoichet, CNN
updated 2:40 PM EDT, Thu July 11, 2013

http://www.cnn.com/2013/07/11/world/americas/latin-america-snowden-asylum/index.html
CNN) -- It's been days since three Latin American presidents offered to give Edward Snowden a safe place to hide out from U.S. authorities.

But the man who's admitted leaking classified documents about U.S. surveillance programs remains holed up at Moscow's Sheremetyevo International Airport. And the global guessing game over his next steps hasn't stopped.

It's still unclear where Snowden will go, and how he'll get there.

What's the holdup?

Sure, we've heard fiery speeches offering asylum from leftist leaders who are eager to criticize the United States. But supporting Snowden's cause and wanting to make Uncle Sam look bad aren't the only parts of the equation, with so many trade and diplomatic relations hanging in the balance, said Michael Shifter, president of the Inter-American Dialogue think tank in Washington.

"They want to make a point," he said, "but I think they're concerned about suffering the consequences, which I think would be serious. The United States has made that pretty clear."

Here's a look at the pros and cons that leaders are facing in five Latin American nations that are among the 27 countries where Snowden is seeking asylum.

Venezuela

President Nicolas Maduro was the first leader to say he'd give Snowden asylum. Officials have said they're waiting to hear whether Snowden accepts the offer.

Pros:

• Maduro regularly alleges U.S. imperialism, has accused the U.S. government of trying to destabilize his country and even suggested that U.S. officials may have infected late Venezuelan leader Hugo Chavez with the cancer that eventually killed him. Taking in a high-profile fugitive wanted in the United States would give him another platform to criticize the country.

• It's been months since the death of Chavez, who earned major political points at home and a place in the global spotlight with his fierce criticisms of America, including a notorious United Nations General Assembly speech where he called President George W. Bush the devil. Maduro describes himself as Chavez's son. But while he might have the same speechwriters as his predecessor, he doesn't have the same charisma, and it seems like fewer people are listening to his words. Giving Snowden asylum would be politically popular in Venezuela, shoring up support for Maduro among Chavez loyalists.

It also has regional and global implications. "This for Maduro, I think, really provides an opportunity for him to show himself on the world stage as a regional leader, as the true successor of Chavez," said David Smilde, a senior fellow at the Washington Office on Latin America.

Cons:

• Relations with the United States have been slowly thawing since Maduro's election in April. Last month, things were looking up when U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry met with Venezuelan Foreign Minister Elias Jaua. That would change if Venezuela granted asylum to Snowden. "This will clearly freeze the warming of relations with Venezuela," Smilde said.

• Despite years of tense Venezuela-U.S. relations, economic ties between the two countries remain strong. Imports and exports between the United States and Venezuela totaled more than $56 billion last year, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Venezuela's state-run oil company makes tens of billions of dollars annually from exports to the United States. Venezuela is the United States' fourth-largest supplier of imported crude oil, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

Would offering Snowden asylum put that relationship in jeopardy? It might. But this isn't the first time Venezuela has run afoul of the United States. Smilde argues that in offering Snowden asylum, Maduro gains more than he loses.

"Surely there's going to be legislators in the Senate who are going to want sanctions against Venezuela, but I don't think it's going to get very far," Smilde said.

Shifter says it's unclear whether the benefits are worth the costs.

Bolivia

President Evo Morales says he's furious about what happened last week with his presidential jet, which had to land in Austria after European countries allegedly closed their airspace amid suspicions that Snowden was aboard. Now Morales says he's willing to give Snowden asylum as a "fair protest" of the incident.

Pros:

• Morales has long slammed what he calls U.S. imperialism, kicking out the Drug Enforcement Administration, the U.S. ambassador, and the U.S. Agency for International Development. Accepting Snowden would fall in line with the Bolivian president's argument that his country would be better off without any U.S. interference. And in terms of its relationship with the United States, Bolivia has little goodwill left to lose.

• The United States' trade ties with Bolivia are weaker than its links with other countries in the region. "Bolivia's a country that I think has the least real economic interest with the United States," Shifter said.

Cons:

• Still, there's some economic connection. Exports and imports between the United States and Bolivia totaled more than $2.4 billion last year, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

• Despite Morales' fierce criticism of European countries and the United States after the plane incident, Shifter said, it's unclear whether he really wants Snowden to come to Bolivia.

Nicaragua

President Daniel Ortega says his country will grant asylum to Snowden "if circumstances permit." Was that a way to sound supportive, but give himself a way out? It's unclear.

Pros:

• Like Maduro and Morales, Ortega is a vocal critic of the United States, and his allegations of U.S. imperialism play well with his supporters.

Cons:

• Business is big for Ortega's government, and it's about to get a lot bigger. Chinese investors and Nicaraguan leaders have just signed a deal to build a $40 billion canal through the country. Does that mean Nicaragua is now looking East but not West when it comes to business? Quite the opposite, Shifter said. "I think the canal project is another factor that makes them even more interested in staying on the good side of the United States," he said.

• That's not all. Exports and imports between the United States and Nicaragua totaled more than $3.8 billion last year, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. And Nicaragua gets trade preferences from the United States. As concerns about Snowden from business leaders mount, they won't fall on deaf ears with Ortega, Shifter said. "Ortega has good relations with the business community in Nicaragua. He's somebody that I think also has a pragmatic streak in him," Shifter said. "Rhetorically, at times, he's confrontational, but behind the scenes, he's making deals."

Ecuador

Snowden set his sights on Ecuador with his first asylum request after leaving Hong Kong on June 23. President Rafael Correa railed against the United States in fiery speeches over the issue earlier this month. But the government has said it's still weighing the request, but can't act until Snowden's in Ecuadorian territory. Some speculate that the delay in getting a clear response from Ecuador is what inspired Snowden to apply for asylum in dozens more countries.

Pros:

• Ecuador granted asylum to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange last year, and has touted the decision as a clear sign that the South American nation is a defender of human rights. Giving Snowden asylum would give officials another platform to make that case.

• Defiant authorities in Ecuador said last month that they wouldn't bow to U.S. pressure in Snowden's case, vowing to reject trade benefits so U.S. officials couldn't manipulate them.

Cons:

• When Ecuadorian officials said they didn't need U.S. trade preferences, business leaders issued a swift response: Not so fast.

And with about half of Ecuador's exports heading to the United States and trade between the two nations totaling more than $16 billion last year, Correa probably will weigh their comments carefully, Shifter said. "Correa is a guy who on the one hand, he's very defiant of the United States and wants to be the rhetorical leader of the left in Latin America," Shifter said. "On the other hand, he's got a very broad coalition in Ecuador and is trying to be more pragmatic and attract foreign investment."

• After speaking with U.S. Vice President Joe Biden last month, Correa adopted a more measured tone. "We have to act very carefully but with courage," he said, "without contradicting our principles but with a lot of care, responsibility and respect, of course, towards the U.S. but also respect for the truth."

Cuba

President Raul Castro hasn't shied away from talking about the Snowden case. He's hailed the former National Security Agency contractor's revelations and stressed that he supports fellow Latin American countries' right to grant Snowden asylum. But there are two key things he hasn't said: whether Cuba will grant asylum to Snowden and whether he'd allow a plane carrying the U.S. intelligence leaker to make a stopover in Cuba on the way to South America.

Pros:

• Decades of hostile relations between the United States and Cuba and a tough economic embargo could mean that Cuba would have less to lose than other Latin American nations when it comes to granting asylum. With so many sanctions in place, said Philip Peters, president of the Cuba Research Center in Washington, "I don't know what more the United States could add."

• Official media in Cuba have painted Snowden as a hero. Cuba could decide to step in, Shifter said, "if there's an issue where it would have to do with Latin American pride and dignity and sovereignty."

• While granting Snowden asylum might be a step too far, letting a connecting flight carrying him land in Cuba might be an option. "I think there's a measure of risk in that for Cuba, but it may be OK if he doesn't stay there, if they're facilitating it as a transit stop," Shifter said. "But I think it would make them uneasy."

Cons:

• There are signs that Washington's relationship with Havana is improving, such as a recent agreement to hold talks over bringing back direct mail between the two nations. And Cuba is hopeful about more developments in U.S. President Barack Obama's second term.

"I think that maybe Cuba does not want to complicate this process and risk the advances that have been made recently," Peters told CNN en Español. "I would guess that Cuba does not have an interest in receiving this man, and does not want to complicate the relationship with Washington. Even though it isn't a very good relationship, it is a relationship that has gotten a little better in recent months."

CNN's Mariano Castillo, Patrick Oppmann and Patricia Janiot and journalist Samantha Lugo contributed to this report.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 12, 2013, 05:44:23 AM

ohhhhhhhh poor baby.. i wonder if he can spell naive...


http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/07/12/19430597-nsa-leaker-edward-snowden-accuses-us-of-threatening-behavior-plans-to-meet-rights-groups




NSA leaker Edward Snowden accuses US of 'threatening behavior,' plans to meet rights groups


The NSA leaker is reportedly planning to meet with human rights groups in Moscow today, and there is a possibility he may accept asylum there, despite withdrawing his petition after Putin said he would be required to stop sharing secrets. NBC's Michelle Kosinski reports.

By Jim Maceda and Alastair Jamieson, NBC News
MOSCOW -- Fugitive Edward Snowden accused U.S. officials of “threatening behavior” and waging “an unlawful campaign” against his attempts to seek asylum on Friday.

The self-declared leaker of classified NSA documents made the comments in an open letter given to human rights groups in Moscow, where he is believed to be holed up in the transit zone of Sheremetyevo Airport.

One of the groups, Amnesty International, confirmed it had received an invitation to meet Snowden privately later Friday.

Snowden, wanted by Washington on espionage charges, flew to Moscow from Hong Kong on June 23, and is not believed to have left the airport transit area despite offers of asylum from three countries.

“I have been extremely fortunate to enjoy and accept many offers of support and asylum from brave countries around the world,” Snowden wrote in the letter. “These nations have my gratitude, and I hope to travel to each of them to extend my personal thanks to their people and leaders.

“By refusing to compromise their principles in the face of intimidation, they have earned the respect of the world. Unfortunately, in recent weeks we have witnessed an unlawful campaign by officials in the U.S. government to deny my right to seek and enjoy this asylum under Article 14 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

It's believed NSA leaker Edward Snowden is holed up inside this hotel at Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport. NBC's Jim Maceda reports.
“The scale of threatening behavior is without precedent: never before in history have states conspired to force to the ground a sovereign president's plane to effect a search for a political refugee," he added, referring to the grounding of Bolivian President Evo Morales' jet in Austria last week amid suspicions that the leaker was on board.

“This dangerous escalation represents a threat not just to the dignity of Latin America or my own personal security, but to the basic right shared by every living person to live free from persecution,” Snowden said.

Russia news agency Interfax reported that Human Rights Watch and Transparency International were also invited by Snowden to Friday’s meeting. It was not immediately clear how the groups would meet Snowden inside the transit zone.

Amnesty International last week called on the U.S. not to "persecute" Snowden by pressuring other countries into handing him over to authorities.

"Yes, I have received a brief email. It said that he would like to meet with a representative of a human rights organization - there was not much information there. I'm planning to go," Sergei Nikitin, the head of Amnesty International Russia, told Reuters.

Russia has already indicated it would like Snowden to accept one of the asylum offers and leave the airport as soon as possible. Experts say it is possible Snowden could refuse all the offers and formally enter Russia, creating a potential diplomatic headache for Putin who would have to choose whether to hand the leaker over to U.S. prosecutors.

 
A crowd of reporters in Cuba greeted an Aeroflot flight from Moscow on Thursday after its flight path appeared to avoid U.S. airspace, prompting speculation Snowden was on board, en route to Venezuela.

However, airline officials later confirmed Snowden had not been on the flight.

Speculation over the flight's potential passenger coincided with a visit to Cuba by 20 international journalists, who had been invited to see the country's economic reforms and rushed to the airport.

"It was a normal flight," one male crew member told reporters as he pushed past the cameras.

CNBC's Justin Solomon and Reuters contributed to this report.

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: deuem on July 12, 2013, 08:57:08 AM
After reading that I need a break
 
(http://i1198.photobucket.com/albums/aa458/deuem/OhNoGif.gif) (http://s1198.photobucket.com/user/deuem/media/OhNoGif.gif.html)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Somamech on July 12, 2013, 12:04:58 PM
One of my few story's I have been consistent with is that Telstra have been a pivotal part in this Spying/data collection here in Australia well before Snowden said so :D


Telstra storing data on behalf of US government


SOURCE:

http://www.theage.com.au/it-pro/security-it/telstra-storing-data-on-behalf-of-us-government-20130712-hv0w4.html
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: starwarp2000 on July 12, 2013, 12:20:18 PM
Yes, you are spot on Soma!

http://delimiter.com.au/2013/06/13/australia-gets-deluge-of-data-from-prism-claims-fairfax/ (http://delimiter.com.au/2013/06/13/australia-gets-deluge-of-data-from-prism-claims-fairfax/)

http://delimiter.com.au/2013/06/12/attorney-general-rejects-metadata-warrants-law-enforcement-would-grind-to-a-halt/ (http://delimiter.com.au/2013/06/12/attorney-general-rejects-metadata-warrants-law-enforcement-would-grind-to-a-halt/)

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Somamech on July 12, 2013, 12:31:01 PM
You too Starwarper ;)

But no-one listen's to us :D

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 15, 2013, 08:31:53 PM


do you think there is anyone NOT spying on us?....sigh




http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/15/business/attention-shopper-stores-are-tracking-your-cell.html?pagewanted=all&_r=1&

Attention, Shoppers: Store Is Tracking Your Cell

Like dozens of other brick-and-mortar retailers, Nordstrom wanted to learn more about its customers — how many came through the doors, how many were repeat visitors — the kind of information that e-commerce sites like Amazon have in spades. So last fall the company started testing new technology that allowed it to track customers’ movements by following the Wi-Fi signals from their smartphones.

 
Tina Fineberg for The New York Times
Shelley Kohan, a vice president for RetailNext, with her company’s customer-tracking system, which employs video cameras.

But when Nordstrom posted a sign telling customers it was tracking them, shoppers were unnerved. Ya think?

“We did hear some complaints,” said Tara Darrow, a spokeswoman for the store. Nordstrom ended the experiment in May, she said, in part because of the comments.

Nordstrom’s experiment is part of a movement by retailers to gather data about in-store shoppers’ behavior and moods, using video surveillance and signals from their cellphones and apps to learn information as varied as their sex, how many minutes they spend in the candy aisle and how long they look at merchandise before buying it.

All sorts of retailers — including national chains, like Family Dollar, Cabela’s and Mothercare, a British company, and specialty stores like Benetton and Warby Parker — are testing these technologies and using them to decide on matters like changing store layouts and offering customized coupons.

But while consumers seem to have no problem with cookies, profiles and other online tools that let e-commerce sites know who they are and how they shop, some bristle at the physical version, at a time when government surveillance — of telephone calls, Internet activity and Postal Service deliveries — is front and center because of the leaks by Edward J. Snowden.

“Way over the line,” one consumer posted to Facebook in response to a local news story about Nordstrom’s efforts at some of its stores. Nordstrom says the counts were made anonymous. Technology specialists, though, say the tracking is worrisome.

“The idea that you’re being stalked in a store is, I think, a bit creepy, as opposed to, it’s only a cookie — they don’t really know who I am,” said Robert Plant, a computer information systems professor at the University of Miami School of Business Administration, noting that consumers can rarely control or have access to this data.

Some consumers wonder how the information is used.

“The creepy thing isn’t the privacy violation, it’s how much they can infer,” said Bradley Voytek, a neuroscientist who had stopped in at Philz Coffee in Berkeley, Calif. Philz uses technology from Euclid Analytics, of Palo Alto, Calif., the company that worked on the Nordstrom experiment, to measure the signals between a smartphone and a Wi-Fi antenna to count how many people walk by a store and how many enter.

Still, physical retailers argue that they are doing nothing more than what is routinely done online.

“Brick-and-mortar stores have been disadvantaged compared with online retailers, which get people’s digital crumbs,” said Guido Jouret, the head of Cisco’s emerging technologies group, which supplies tracking cameras to stores. Why, Mr. Jouret asked, should physical stores not “be able to tell if someone who didn’t buy was put off by prices, or was just coming in from the cold?” The companies that provide this technology offer a wide range of services.

One, RetailNext, uses video footage to study how shoppers navigate, determining, say, that men spend only one minute in the coat department, which may help a store streamline its men’s outerwear layout. It also differentiates men from women, and children from adults.

RetailNext, based in San Jose, Calif., adds data from shoppers’ smartphones to deduce even more specific patterns. If a shopper’s phone is set to look for Wi-Fi networks, a store that offers Wi-Fi can pinpoint where the shopper is in the store, within a 10-foot radius, even if the shopper does not connect to the network, said Tim Callan, RetailNext’s chief marketing officer.

The store can also recognize returning shoppers, because mobile devices send unique identification codes when they search for networks. That means stores can now tell how repeat customers behave and the average time between visits.

RetailNext also uses data to map customers’ paths; perhaps the shopper is 70 percent likely to go right immediately, or 14 percent likely to linger at a display, Mr. Callan said.

Brickstream uses video information to watch shoppers. The company, based near Atlanta, sells a $1,500 stereoscopic camera that separates adults from children, and counts people in different parts of a store to determine which aisles are popular and how many cash registers to open.

“Watching where people go in a store is like watching how they looked at a second or third Web page” on an online retailer, said Ralph Crabtree, Brickstream’s chief technical officer.

Cameras have become so sophisticated, with sharper lenses and data-processing, that companies can analyze what shoppers are looking at, and even what their mood is.

For example, Realeyes, based in London, which analyzes facial cues for responses to online ads, monitors shoppers’ so-called happiness levels in stores and their reactions at the register. Synqera, a start-up in St. Petersburg, Russia, is selling software for checkout devices or computers that tailors marketing messages to a customer’s gender, age and mood, measured by facial recognition.

“If you are an angry man of 30, and it is Friday evening, it may offer you a bottle of whiskey,” said Ekaterina Savchenko, the company’s head of marketing.

Nomi, of New York, uses Wi-Fi to track customers’ behavior in a store, but goes one step further by matching a phone with an individual.

When a shopper has volunteered some personal information, either by downloading a retailer’s app or providing an e-mail address when using in-store Wi-Fi, Nomi pulls up a profile of that customer — the number of recent visits, what products that customer was looking at on the Web site last night, purchase history. The store then has access to that profile.

“I walk into Macy’s, Macy’s knows that I just entered the store, and they’re able to give me a personalized recommendation through my phone the moment I enter the store,” said Corey Capasso, Nomi’s president. “It’s literally bringing the Amazon experience into the store.”

Nomi then uses Wi-Fi signals to follow the customer throughout the store, adding to the information it maintains. “If I’m going and spending 20 minutes in the shoe section, that means I’m highly interested in buying a pair of shoes,” Mr. Capasso said, and the store might send a coupon for sneakers.

If these methods seem intrusive, at least some consumers seem happy to trade privacy for deals. Placed, a company based in Seattle, has an app that asks consumers where they are in a store in exchange for cash and prepaid gift cards from Amazon and Google Play, among others. More than 500,000 people have downloaded the app since last August, said a company spokeswoman, Sarah Radwanick, providing information like gender, age and income, and agreeing to be tracked over GPS, Wi-Fi and cellular networks. Placed then sells the data to store owners, online retailers and app developers.

“I would just love it if a coupon pops up on my phone,” said Linda Vertlieb, 30, a blogger in Philadelphia, who said that she was not aware of the tracking methods, but that the idea did not bother her. Stores are “trying to sell, so that makes sense,” she said.


A version of this article appeared in print on July 15, 2013, on page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: Attention, Shoppers: Store Is Tracking Your Cell.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 16, 2013, 10:08:39 AM


ok.. this is interesting..
I was reading this article

North Korean ship carrying hidden 'missile equipment' detained after leaving Cuba
http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/07/16/19497159-north-korean-ship-carrying-hidden-missile-equipment-detained-after-leaving-cuba?lite=

when I got to this sentence  I was curious so looked up lloyd’s

The Lloyd’s List Intelligence service tracks ships’ movements via satellite and Meade said its "reporting service has flagged up the fact it was arrested.”




and got this..lol..very clever cookie policy they have

http://www.lloydslistintelligence.com/llint/index.htm

Our Cookie policy

In order to deliver a personalised, responsive service and to improve the site, we remember and store information about how you use it. This is done using simple text files called cookies which sit on your computer.

By continuing to use this site and access its features, you are consenting to our use of cookies. To find out more about the way lloydslistintelligence.com uses cookies please go to our Cookies page.

Close  

i just copied it and left..it was on top of all kinds of neat info if you are curious
and they might be curious also so ..

ah rats the best part didn't show up
it says by clicking close you agree to their policy.. ;D


HI GUYS ;)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on July 16, 2013, 02:30:55 PM
More Insanity...

DHS to employees: reading newspaper coverage of Snowden's NSA leaks is "classified data spillage"


Quote
The US Department of Homeland Security is warning its employees that they can be punished for opening up this Washington Post article, which includes a classified slide (above) illustrating how the National Security Agency spies on communications:

An internal memo from DHS headquarters told workers on Friday that viewing the document from an “unclassified government workstation” could lead to administrative or legal action. “You may be violating your non-disclosure agreement in which you sign that you will protect classified national security information,” the communication said.

The memo said workers who view the article through an unclassified workstation should report the incident as a “classified data spillage.”

http://boingboing.net/2013/07/16/dhs-to-employees-reading-news.html
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 16, 2013, 08:36:05 PM

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/federal-eye/wp/2013/07/15/dhs-warns-employees-not-to-read-leaked-nsa-information/


Below is the full text of the memo:

 From: LARSEN, MARK R

Sent: Friday, July 12, 2013 9:50 AM

Subject: SECURITY ALERT ***Washington Post Article***

Importance: High

FYSA…From DHS HQ

Per the National Cybersecurity Communications Integration Center:

There is a recent article on the Washington Post’s Website that has a clickable link titled “The NSA Slide you never seen” that must not be opened on an Unclassified government workstation.  This link opens up a classified document which will raise the classification level of your Unclassified workstation to the classification of the slide which is reported to be TS/NF.

If opened on an Unclassified system, you are obligated to report this to the SSO as a Classified Data Spillage (Opssecurity@hq.dhs.gov <mailto:Opssecurity@hq.dhs.gov> <mailto:Opssecurity@hq.dhs.gov <mailto:Opssecurity@hq.dhs.gov> >).

Again, please exercise good judgment when visiting these webpages and clicking on such links. You may be violating your Non-Disclosure Agreement in which you sign that you will protect Classified National Security Information. You may be subject to any administrative or legal action from the Government.

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 17, 2013, 08:23:02 AM
 :D


looks like Snowden has been snowed in .. ;D
 I want to know what he is doing for money over there..they aren’t going to keep him for nothing
even though putin calls him an unwanted christmas present..



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/17/edward-snowden-russia_n_3609672.html


Edward Snowden Has No Plans To Leave Russia: Lawyer
Reuters  |  Posted: 07/17/2013 7:15 am EDT  |  Updated: 07/17/2013 9:44 am EDT



MOSCOW, July 17 (Reuters) - Former U.S. spy agency contractor Edward Snowden has no plans to leave Russia soon and does not rule out eventually applying for citizenship, a lawyer helping the American with his bid for temporary asylum in Russia said on Wednesday.

Russian lawyer Anatoly Kucherena said Snowden believed it would be unsafe to try to travel to Latin America soon because of U.S. efforts to return him to the United States to face espionage charges. (Reporting by Alexei Anishchuk; Writing by Steve Gutterman, editing by Elizabeth Piper)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 20, 2013, 08:32:53 PM
http://investigations.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/07/20/19585366-report-germany-used-key-nsa-surveillance-program?lite

Report: Germany used key NSA surveillance program
Michael Dalder / REUTERS

A former monitoring base of the U.S. National Security Agency in Bad Aibling south of Munich, Germany, is seen in a July 10 photo. Chancellor Angela Merkel has defended Germany's cooperation with U.S. intelligence, dismissing comparisons of its techniques to those used in communist East Germany.
By Andrew Rafferty, Staff Writer, NBC News

German intelligence agencies have used a secret National Security Agency program as part of a U.S. effort to detect possible terrorist activities across the globe, the German magazine Der Spiegel reported Saturday.


 Germany’s foreign intelligence service and its domestic intelligence agency were equipped with a program called XKeyScore that, according to documents seen by Der Spiegel reporters, was meant to “expand their ability to support NSA as we jointly prosecute CT [counter-terrorism] targets.”

The German news outlet reported that a 2008 NSA presentation described the program as an effective espionage tool that gathers metadata and can retroactively reveal any terms a target has typed into an online search engine.

The program is also capable of receiving all unfiltered data that a target has accessed over several days, including, in part, the content of communications, the magazine said.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Der Spiegel reported that documents reviewed by its writers said Germany has shown an “eagerness and desire” to aid in U.S. global intelligence gathering efforts.

Another document describes Germany's foreign intelligence service as the NSA’s “most prolific partner” in its intelligence gathering efforts.

The German intelligence agencies and NSA declined to comment to Der Spiegel when asked about the newly reported revelations.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel has said the country is not a "surveillance state" and has pushed back on questions on whether Germany engages in the broad sweeping intelligence gathering programs that alleged NSA leaker Edward Snowden has revealed to the media.

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on July 20, 2013, 08:41:47 PM
Bad Aibling DE Echelon Station - NSA - Supposedly Closed but Google shows it active 2008

(http://www.thelivingmoon.com/45jack_files/04images/Echelon/Bad_Aibling.jpg)

Bad Aibling DE Echelon Station NSA
Bavaria, Germany
+47° 52' 49.46", +11° 58' 44.03"

In 1804, Bad Aibling was mentioned for the first time as "Epininga". In mediaeval times it was an administrative centre in the lordship of the Counts of Falkenstein. After the obliteration of the Neuburg-Falkenstein dynasty it became part of the realm of the Wittelsbach family. In 1845 the first treatments with peat pulp were offered by the physician Desiderius Beck. Bad Aibling received the title "Bad" (spa or springs) in 1895. In the year 1933 Bad Aibling became a city. After the second World War Bad Aibling evolved into a major centre for intelligence organizations and secret services.

In 2004 the American Bad Aibling ECHELON station closed after several decades of operation.

Bad Aibling DE Echelon Station
Closed in 2004?
Not according to Google Earth 2008

(http://www.thelivingmoon.com/45jack_files/04images/Bases/Bad_Aibling_01.png)

(http://www.thelivingmoon.com/45jack_files/04images/Bases/Bad_Aibling_02.png)
Main Antenna Array

(http://www.thelivingmoon.com/45jack_files/04images/Bases/Bad_Aibling_03.png)
Bad Aibling DE Echelon Station - Main Complex

(http://www.thelivingmoon.com/45jack_files/04images/Echelon/Bad_Aibling_01.jpg)
Echelon Field Station 81: Bad Aibling [RSOC] - BAS

http://www.thelivingmoon.com/45jack_files/03files/ECHELON_Bad_Aibling.html
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 21, 2013, 06:42:44 AM


https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2013/07/18/aclu-j18.html

US government using license plates to track movements of millions
By Eric London
18 July 2013

A report issued by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) on Wednesday [ http://www.aclu.org/alpr ] details an immense operation through which nearly 1 billion license plate records of hundreds of millions of drivers are tracked and huge databases are amassed, providing the American government with access to the history and recent whereabouts of the majority of the US population.

For years, a network of federal security agencies, local police departments and private companies have been using automatic license plate readers on police cruisers, in parking lots, at traffic intersections—even through smartphone apps—to photograph cars and their drivers and to record license plate numbers with the matching time, date and location.

“More and more cameras, longer retention periods, and widespread sharing allow law enforcement agents to assemble the individual puzzle pieces of where we have been over time into a single, high-resolution image of our lives,” the report says.

“The systems can also plot all vehicles at a particular location, such as the location where a crime—or a political protest—took place” through a procedure called “geofencing,” whereby “law enforcement or private companies can construct a virtual fence around a designated geographical area, to identify each vehicle entering that space.”

The use of this technology for such authoritarian procedures gives the lie to the claims of the government and security apparatus that the purpose of the license-tracking program is to stop crime.

In Maryland, for example, where license plate trackers stored over 85 million license plate reads in 2012 alone, only 0.2 percent of those license plates were matched to any suspected unlawful activity. Of the 0.2 percent, 97 percent of those were for violation of state registration or smog check programs.

However, the data on the whereabouts of all 85 million plates in Maryland is stored in a state fusion center, the Maryland Coordination and Analysis Center (MCAC), which is then shared with a regional database called the National Capital Region License Plate Reader Project (NCR). According to the NCR, “any law enforcement agency” can take license plate data and “retain it indefinitely.”

Regional databases similar to the NCR exist across the country to help circumvent individual state limitations on the length of time for which license plate and travel data can be held. Though not referenced in the ACLU report, the aggregated license plate data from all state and regional databases are likely compiled and stored indefinitely by the National Security Agency alongside the DNA and ID photograph records and Internet and phone communications of the vast majority of people in the US.

The depth of the involvement of the national security apparatus is evidenced by the “billions of dollars in grants” that the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has provided through the DHS Security Grant Program and the Infrastructure Protection Program. Remarkably, license plate tracker manufacturers claim that the DHS is outdone by the Justice Department, which is the “lead Federal funding agency” for the license-tracking program.

License plate readers are also increasingly used to militarize the US-Mexico and US-Canada borders.

According to DHS reports, license plate readers are also used by the Customs and Border Protection agency to scan “nearly 100 percent of land border traffic.” In addition, Immigration and Customs Enforcement has admitted to routinely using license plate readers, as has the Drug Enforcement Agency.

In collaboration with the national security apparatus, local police departments are being mobilized to build massive databases at the grassroots level.

In 2011, the license plate tracking program was used by 75 percent of police agencies, with an additional 10 percent stating they planned to increase use of license plate readers in the near future.

And the program is not limited to use in the US. Two license plate reader manufacturers, ELSAG and PIPS Technology, claim they have sold readers to thousands of agencies abroad as well as to police agencies in all 50 states.

In addition to use by local and federal security agencies, the ACLU reports that private companies have created “numerous privately owned databases containing the location information of vast numbers of Americans” by “scan[ning] thousands of plates each day and stor[ing] information indefinitely, creating huge databases of Americans’ movements.”

The ACLU writes that “MVTrac, one of the biggest companies in this industry, claims to have photographs and location data on ‘a large majority’ of registered vehicles in the United States, while the Digital Recognition Network (DRN) boasts of ‘a national network of more than 550 affiliates’ ” that are “located in every major metropolitan area of the United States.”

“DRN affiliates,” the ACLU report continues, “feed location data on up to 50 million vehicles each month…into DRN’s national database. This database now contains over 700 million datapoints on where American drivers have been.”

Data collected from law enforcement, at parking lots, and by other private access control monitoring systems have been aggregated into the National Vehicle Location Service (NVLS), run by Vigilant Solutions, a partner of DRN. According to Vigilant Solutions, the NVLS “is the largest [license plate] data sharing initiative in the United States.”

The amassing of such an immense database is a blatant violation of the Fourth Amendment of the US Constitution, which states:

“The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated.…”

In its 2012 ruling in United States v. Jones, a five-justice majority of the Supreme Court agreed that a police department’s warrantless, month-long monitoring of the defendant’s whereabouts through a GPS monitoring device constituted an unconstitutional search because “[f]or such offenses, society’s [reasonable] expectation [of privacy] has been that law enforcement agents and others would not—and indeed, in the main, simply could not—secretly monitor and catalogue every single movement of an individual’s car, for a very long period.”

But local law enforcement agencies use plate readers without limitation and in blatant violation of the US constitution. The ACLU report describes the practice of the Pittsburg Police Department in California as “typical.” Pittsburg police claim that “[r]easonable suspicion or probable cause is not required,” for use of license plate readers, which can be operated during “any routine patrol operation.”

In setting up these vast databases, the US government has mobilized the private sector and local law enforcement to set up a police-state mechanism whereby it is possible to track the whereabouts of a majority of people in close to real time and to monitor political dissidents by tracking attendance at meetings and rallies.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 21, 2013, 10:11:54 AM



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/19/fisa-court-approves-surveillance_n_3625610.html


FISA Court Approves Continued U.S. Phone Surveillance

By LARA JAKES 07/19/13 06:13 PM ET EDT 

WASHINGTON — A secret U.S. intelligence court renewed an order Friday to continue forcing Verizon Communications to turn over hundreds of millions of telephone records to the government each day in its search for foreign terror or espionage suspects.

The order by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court has been in place for years but must be renewed every three months. It was exposed in June after former National Security Agency systems analyst Edward Snowden leaked details of two top secret U.S. surveillance programs that critics say violate privacy rights.

The order was set to expire Friday, and its renewal shows that the Obama administration and the court of 11 federal judges stand behind its legality.

In a statement, the office of National Intelligence Director James Clapper said it was confirming the Verizon renewal as part of an ongoing effort to make more information about the recently declassified programs as public as possible.

Clapper "has decided to declassify and disclose publicly that the government filed an application with the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court seeking renewal of the authority to collect telephony metadata in bulk, and that the court renewed that authority," the statement said.

The two programs, both run by the NSA, pick up millions of telephone and Internet records that are routed through American networks each day. Intelligence officials say they have helped disrupt dozens of terrorist attacks, and target only foreign suspects outside the United States while taking close care not to look at the content of conversations or messages by American citizens.

But they have raised sharp concerns about whether the U.S. is improperly – or even illegally – snooping on people at home and abroad.

Other major U.S. telephone carriers are similarly ordered to give records of their customers' calls to the NSA, which also is able to reach into the data streams of U.S. companies such as Yahoo, Facebook Inc., Microsoft Corp., Google Inc. and others, and grab emails, video chats, pictures and more. The technology companies say they turn over information only if required by court order.

Snowden has been charged with espionage and is seeking asylum from several countries, including Russia. He has been holed up for three weeks in a transit zone at Moscow's international airport since arriving from Hong Kong, and Russian customs inspectors say they do not have jurisdiction to seize him.

At a discussion earlier Friday touching on privacy and security, DNI counsel Robert Litt maintained that "these programs are legal" because they are authorized by Congress, the courts and the White House. He said their exposure could curb the government's ability to detect threats against the U.S.

"Only time will tell the full extent of the damage caused by the unlawful disclosures of these lawful programs," Litt said.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: A51Watcher on July 21, 2013, 10:43:01 AM

WASHINGTON — A secret U.S. intelligence court renewed an order Friday to continue forcing Verizon Communications to turn over hundreds of millions of telephone records to the government each day in its search for foreign terror or espionage suspects.

AND of course the domestic ones as well.

Espionage suspects huh, you mean like ones who take cameras to secret military bases and film what they see going on, and then share it with the public.


Maybe it's time I come out of hiding.




Quote
"Only time will tell the full extent of the damage caused by the unlawful disclosures of these lawful programs," Litt said.

Yeah the terrestrial ones may be lawful, but the ET ones?, no way, sorry you don't own that.


Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 21, 2013, 02:37:26 PM



http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-23374867


Apple, Google and other tech giants demand spying openness


19 July 2013 Last updated at 07:13 ET

Apple, Google and dozens of other technology companies have urged US authorities to let them divulge more details about security requests.
The companies want to be able to report regular statistics about the nature and scope of what data is being asked for.

Whistle-blower Edward Snowden's revelations about US spying capabilities has left the tech firms keen to assert their independence.
Authorities are said to be considering the companies' request.
"We just want to make sure we do it right," said Gen Keith Alexander, director of the National Security Agency.

"We don't impact anything ongoing with the FBI. I think that's the reasonable approach."

Limited scope
 
The companies sent a letter outlining their request on Thursday to Gen Alexander, as well as President Obama and Congress.
It was co-signed by some of the most influential companies in the tech world, including Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

Campaign groups such as the Electronic Frontier Foundation and Human Rights Watch are also backing the action.

Companies are currently allowed to release limited data regarding security requests and their nature.
But as it stands those disclosures must be limited in scope, and in many cases require that the firms ask the courts for permission to make the information public.

Many users of popular services, particularly social networks, reacted angrily to the news that companies regularly make available information about users when requested to do so.

"They don't have a choice. Court order, they have to do this," Mr Alexander from the NSA said, suggesting that security authorities could be open to the idea.

"What they want is the rest of the world to know that we're not reading all of that email, so they want to give out the numbers.

"I think there's some logic in doing that."





Related Stories
Microsoft calls for NSA transparency
Microsoft's work with NSA 'revealed'
Why for the NSA every call matters
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 23, 2013, 07:58:20 AM



ah now this could get interesting


huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/23/keith-alexander-justin-amash_n_3639329.html

NSA's Keith Alexander Calls Emergency Private Briefing To Lobby Against Justin Amash Amendment Curtailing Its Power

Ryan Grim


Posted: 07/23/2013 10:00 am EDT  |  Updated: 07/23/2013 10:10 am EDT

WASHINGTON -- The National Security Agency kicked its lobbying into high gear after an amendment from Rep. Justin Amash, a libertarian Republican from Michigan, was ruled in order and will get a vote sometime this week.

NSA head Gen. Keith Alexander scheduled a last-minute, members-only briefing in response to the amendment, according to an invitation distributed to members of Congress this morning and forwarded to HuffPost. "In advance of anticipated action on amendments to the DoD Appropriations bill, Ranking Member C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger of the House Intelligence Committee invites your Member to attend a question and answer session with General Keith B. Alexander of the National Security Agency," reads the invitation.

The Amash amendment would put the House on record when it comes to NSA snooping. The language of the measure, which would be attached to the Pentagon's spending bill "Ends authority for the blanket collection of records under the Patriot Act. Bars the NSA and other agencies from using Section 215 of the Patriot Act to collect records, including telephone call records, that pertain to persons who are not subject to an investigation under Section 215."

The amendment could draw support from both Democrats and Republicans.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 23, 2013, 08:54:30 PM

oh yeah.. interesting..let's see if the peoples really have anything to say

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/23/justin-amash-nsa-amendment_n_3642228.html

Justin Amash NSA Amendment Earns White House Condemnation
Posted: 07/23/2013 10:06 pm EDT

Matt Sledge


WASHINGTON -- In a sign of growing concern over Congress's reaction to the revelations of National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden, the White House publicly announced its opposition to a House push to block the spy agency's bulk collection of ordinary Americans' phone records on Tuesday.

Reacting to a defense appropriations amendment sponsored by Rep. Justin Amash (R-Mich.) to curb the NSA's vast program of collecting and storing phone records, White House press secretary Jay Carney said, "We oppose the current effort in the House to hastily dismantle one of our Intelligence Community’s counterterrorism tools.

"This blunt approach is not the product of an informed, open, or deliberative process," Carney continued in a statement.

The White House rarely comments on an amendment before it reaches the floor of even one chamber of Congress. That, coupled with an emergency briefing NSA Director Keith Alexander held for members of Congress on Tuesday, appears to show that senior administration officials are seriously worried about the possibility of congressional action to stop the mass domestic surveillance.

Amash's amendment has attracted bipartisan supporters, including Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich.). Debate on his measure is likely to begin on Wednesday, with a vote on Wednesday or Thursday.

Taking to Twitter, Amash suggested it was ironic for the Obama administration to call the debate over his amendment insufficiently "informed" or "open." After Snowden's revelations, members of Congress said they were astonished at the breadth of the NSA's collection of data on ordinary, law-abiding Americans.

David Segal, the executive director of the online advocacy group Demand Progress, which supports Amash's amendment, said the White House statement shows the administration is scared it may pass. The House floor vote this week will be Congress's first chance to weigh in directly on NSA surveillance since Snowden's leaks began.

"It's been an extraordinary day on Capitol Hill, as insiders scramble to block the growing chorus of support for the Amash anti-surveillance amendment," Segal said in an email. "Just as the NSA's domestic spying apparatus is evidence of some of our leaders' fear of the American people, these extraordinary actions by the White House and the NSA evidence their fear that the will of Americans will be codified in the law tomorrow."
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 24, 2013, 07:00:17 PM


it figures..sigh :(


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/24/justin-amash-amendment_n_3647893.html?utm_hp_ref=politics

Matt Sledge


  Justin Amash Amendment To Stop NSA Data Collection Voted Down In House (UPDATE)
Posted: 07/24/2013 7:05 pm EDT  |  Updated: 07/24/2013 8:47 pm EDT

WASHINGTON -- The House of Representatives on Wednesday evening narrowly defeated an amendment from Rep. Justin Amash (R-Mich.) meant to halt the National Security Agency's bulk collection of phone record data.

"We're here today for a very simple reason: to defend the Fourth Amendment, to defend the privacy of each and every American," Amash said as he introduced his measure. Lawmakers' votes, he said, would answer one simple question, "Do we oppose the suspicionless collection of every American's phone records?"

On Wednesday, at least, the answer was no. The House voted 217-205 to defeat the amendment after intense last-minute lobbying from the White House and the NSA.

Democrats voted for the amendment by a 111-to-83 margin. Republicans, meanwhile, split 134 to 93 against it.

The closeness of the vote, the first on the surveillance programs since the revelations of NSA leaker Edward Snowden, gave civil liberties groups like the American Civil Liberties Union, which has been a vigorous critic of that surveillance, some reason for optimism that future reforms will be possible.

Amash's measure, offered as an amendment to the Department of Defense appropriations bill, would have prevented the government from invoking Section 215 of the Patriot Act to scoop up phone call metadata -- information about whom people are calling and when, but not the content of the calls -- unless the government had a reasonable suspicion that a specific target was involved in terrorism.

While the bill was co-sponsored by liberals, including Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich.), Amash warned that "opponents of this amendment will use the same tactic that every government throughout history has used to justify its violation of rights: fear." And the measure's foes -- even those within his own party -- did not disappoint.

Arguing that phone records collection helps protect a "nation under siege," Rep. Mike Rogers (R-Mich.), chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, said, "Passing this amendment takes us back to September 10."

Pointing to a Wall Street Journal editorial that came out Wednesday, Rep. Mac Thornberry (R-Texas) contended that passing the amendment would reward Snowden.

"The only people who have benefited from the revelation of classified information ... the only result is that those who are engaged in Islamic jihad will have been benefited," said Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.). "Those that we seek to protect have not."

Bachmann's position on the bill, identical to that of the Obama administration, showed the strange bedfellows that Snowden's bombshell leaks have created.

Although Amash's amendment was defeated, civil liberties advocates found something to cheer in the closeness of the vote. Just two years ago, the House voted by a comfortable 250-153 margin to reauthorize the Patriot Act, which the administration uses to justify its phone metadata collection. On Wednesday, by contrast, a swing of just seven votes would have put Amash's amendment over the top.

Back then, said Conyers, "we didn't know about it."

Conyers also noted that this time, on the Democratic side, members up to and including House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) pressured members to vote against the Amash amendment.

In 2005, Pelosi was stridently opposed to the section of the Patriot Act under debate now. She called the provisions being reauthorized a "massive invasion of privacy." But on Wednesday, she voted against reining in the Patriot Act.

A sign of how dimly the Democratic leadership viewed Amash's amendment could be seen in an email from the office of House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.). The email described the sweeping NSA program approvingly as merely collecting phone records "that pertain to persons who may be in communication with terrorist groups but are not already subject to an investigation."

Conyers said the lobbying "was heavy. They were very worried about it."

But, he added, "the fact that they won this narrowly means they still are worried -- because this thing isn't over yet. This is just the beginning."

This story has been updated with reaction after the House vote.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 24, 2013, 08:18:31 PM

whoa..he's just now getting a change of clothes..yikes..bet he has had some second thoughts


http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/07/24/us-russia-snowden-idUSBRE96N0KH20130724

[size=14pt]Fugitive Snowden's hopes of leaving Moscow airport dashed[/size]
By Lidia Kelly

MOSCOW | Wed Jul 24, 2013 7:45pm EDT

MOSCOW (Reuters) - Fugitive U.S. spy agency contractor Edward Snowden's hopes of leaving Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport for the first time in a month on Wednesday were dashed when he failed to secure permission from Russia to leave.

An airport source said Snowden, who is wanted by the United States on espionage charges for revealing details of government intelligence programs, was handed documents by his lawyer that were expected to include a pass to leave the transit area.

But Snowden did not go through passport control, and lawyer Anatoly Kucherena, who is helping him with his request for temporary asylum in Russia until he can reach a country that will shelter him, said the American did not have the pass he needed.

It was not clear whether there had been last-minute political intervention or a hitch, or whether the pass had never been in his possession.

Kucherena said he hoped Snowden's status would be resolved soon. "I must say he is of course anxious about it and I hope that this situation will be resolved in the nearest future," Kucherena said at Sheremetyevo.

"This is the first time Russia is facing such a situation, and this issue of course requires time for the immigration workers."

In Washington, the White House said it was seeking clarification of Snowden's status, the State Department made clear that allowing him to leave the airport would be "deeply disappointing" and Secretary of State John Kerry telephoned Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov about the situation.

"The secretary spoke with Foreign Minister Lavrov this morning," said State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki. "He reiterated our belief ... that Mr. Snowden needs to be returned to the United States where he will have a fair trial."

Bolivia, Nicaragua and Venezuela have said they could offer sanctuary to Snowden, who arrived on June 23 from Hong Kong, where he had fled to escape capture and trial in the United States on espionage charges.

None of the three Latin American countries can be reached by a direct commercial flight from Moscow, so Snowden has requested temporary asylum in Russia until he believes he can safely reach one of them.

The United States wants him extradited to face prosecution and has revoked his passport.

Russia has refused to send him home and risks damage to its relations with the United States if it grants him temporary asylum - a process that could take three months.

Kucherena confirmed Snowden was staying somewhere in the many corridors and rooms of the transit area between the runway and passport control - an area Russia considers neutral territory - and that he had learned the Russian for "Hi", "Bye-bye" and "I'll ring you."

The 30-year-old had received calls from across Russia, with offers to give him money and a place to stay, and even a suggestion by one woman to adopt him. He said he had enough money to get by for now.

Kucherena said he had brought him fresh underwear and shirts and added that he had given him the novel "Crime and Punishment" by 19th-century writer Fyodor Dostoevsky and short stories by Anton Chekhov.

President Vladimir Putin signaled last week that he did not want the dispute to derail Russia's relations with the United States, and the decision on temporary asylum could be delayed until after U.S. President Barack Obama visits Moscow for a summit in early September.

It will be Putin's first summit with Obama since the former KGB spy started a new term last year,

and precedes a subsequent G20 summit in St. Petersburg.

DIPLOMATIC FALLOUT FROM LEAKS

Both Russia and the United States have signaled they want to improve ties, strained by issues ranging from the Syrian conflict to Putin's treatment of opponents and Western-funded non-governmental organizations since he started a third term in 2012.

Putin has said Snowden must stop anti-U.S. activities. Snowden has said he does not regard his activities as hostile to the United States, but Kucherena said last week that he had agreed to halt such actions.

Snowden, who has been assisted by the WikiLeaks anti-secrecy group, has not been seen in public since June 23, although he had a meeting at the airport with human rights groups on July 13.

He fears the United States will persuade its allies to prevent him using their airspace, or that his plane might be forced down so that he can be taken into custody and extradited.

Kucherena said earlier this week that he did not rule out Snowden seeking Russian citizenship.

There has already been diplomatic fallout from Snowden's leaks, which included information that the U.S. National Security Agency bugged European Union offices and gained access to EU internal computer networks, although the EU is an ally.

China, Brazil and France have also voiced concern over the spying program.

U.S. relations with Latin American states have been clouded by the refusal of four U.S. allies in Europe to let a plane carrying Bolivia's president home from Moscow use their airspace because of suspicion that Snowden might be on the plane.

U.S. lawmakers were also clashing over the case as the House of Representatives debated the 2014 defense spending bill.

The House on Wednesday rejected a proposed amendment from Michigan Republican Justin Amash that would bar the NSA from collecting telephone call records and other data from people in the United States not specifically under investigation.

Obama opposed Amash's amendment, saying it would "hastily dismantle one of our intelligence community's counterterrorism tools."

(Additional reporting by Alexei Anishchuk, Arshad Mohammed and Gabriel Debenedetti in Washington, Writing by Timothy Heritage; Editing by Angus MacSwan and Peter Cooney)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: burntheships on July 25, 2013, 09:09:10 PM
So now they want passwords too?

Feds tell Web firms to turn over user account passwords
 
Secret demands mark escalation in Internet surveillance by the federal government through gaining access to user passwords, which are typically stored in encrypted form.


http://news.cnet.com/8301-13578_3-57595529-38/feds-tell-web-firms-to-turn-over-user-account-passwords/

 ::)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: deuem on July 26, 2013, 01:51:47 AM
Great, people will now need to change their password every log in. That will keep the world busy.
 
Is there no end to this madness?
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 31, 2013, 08:34:47 AM
 >:(



On the Lookout: New Hacker Threats

By Jason Glassberg, co-founder of Casaba

Published July 31, 2013


Read more: http://www.foxbusiness.com/personal-finance/2013/07/31/7-new-hacker-threats-to-watch-out-for/#ixzz2adaVUCgx

What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas...except when it comes to Black Hat, arguably the world’s most important annual hacking conference. This renowned - and sometimes infamous - hacker con is scheduled to kick off July 31- and it’s an event that every consumer should pay attention to.

So why should you care about a hacker con? This event is where the top new threats to our smartphones and other devices are often first revealed. In many ways, Black Hat sets the course for what hackers around the world will be doing for the next 12 months.

This year’s Black Hat is especially interesting, because it marks an important shift in the hacker community as more attention is being paid to electronic devices not typically thought of as hackable. As manufacturers add Internet connectivity into more ‘things’ - from cars to appliances, TVs, pacemakers, etc. - these objects become vulnerable to cyber attacks.



Here are the top seven hacks coming out at Black Hat that consumers need to know about - some of them can be prevented, but others can’t:



1. HTTPS is in Trouble. If we were to rank the most important things that ever happened to the web, SSL/TLS would certainly be in the top three. What is it? It’s an online security feature - the ‘s’ in HTTPS - that makes it possible to safely log into a bank account, make a purchase or just travel the web without letting other people spy on you.

The problem, however, is that flaws have been discovered in SSL/TLS that could allow a hacker to circumvent this security setting - and steal your information. At this year’s Black Hat, hackers will be showing how to steal a user’s login credentials from a ‘protected‘ HTTPS site - and another talk will show how to retrieve this information from a device. 



What can you do?: Don’t rely solely on HTTPS to keep you safe. Avoid logging into bank accounts or entering credit/debit card information when using a public WiFi network. Also, make sure to thoroughly wipe any device that’s ever used your login credentials (computer, laptop, phone, tablet) before you discard it.



2. Cell Tower Spoofing. Can you hear me now? Actually, the real question should be, who’s doing the listening? Hackers at Black Hat will reveal a frightening attack on cell phones - by using a modified CDMA femtocell (which anyone can buy, by the way), hackers can trick your phone into connecting to them instead of the cell phone tower, eavesdrop on everything (phone calls, text messages, web sites visited, etc.) and even clone your phone! This is similar to what hackers now do with a WiFi network, where they trick you into thinking their WiFi hotspot is a legitimate one.

This is an alarming vulnerability that should concern anyone who owns a CDMA smartphone (Verizon, Sprint, US Cellular, Alltel, etc.).



What can you do?: If you own a CDMA phone, you should really think about adding a VPN (virtual private network) that will encrypt everything you do on the phone.



3. When Your TV Watches You. Smart TVs are the latest trend in entertainment - with new models available from Samsung, Sony and LG, plus upcoming models from Apple and Google. However, connecting TVs to the Internet and giving them an operating system, plus features like webcams and mics, also comes with new risks.

Hackers at Black Hat will be showing how to break into smart TVs to spy on users through the webcam, monitor what you’re doing, even scam you through a TVshing attack (TV phishing).



What can you do?: Right now this is a low-risk threat, but as more homes add smart TVs to the living room it may be something to plan for. Unplugging the TV when not in use, or covering the camera, are some basic precautions that could help.



4. Hijacking Appliances. Another gadget that’s getting ‘smarter’ is the home appliance. WiFi-connected refrigerators, dishwashers, washers/dryers or thermostats will become more common over the years. But they’re also more vulnerable.

Researchers at Black Hat are showing off new ways to remotely eavesdrop and interfere with smart appliances and networked home electronics - which could have serious implications for home security.



What can you do?: Nothing.



5 Remote Controlling Cars. Manufacturers are increasingly adding new features to automotive computers (ECUs) to expand entertainment offerings and safety controls. But the ECU could also let a hacker gain control of certain automotive functions.

A well-known security researcher will be showing how to hack the ECU to affect a car’s breaking and steering at Black Hat’s sister conference, DefCon.



What can you do?: Nothing.



6. SpyPhone. Security pros have long worried about the danger of mobile apps - specifically, their ability to sneak viruses and malware onto your phone.

A researcher at Black Hat this year will be showing how infected apps can turn your phone into a full-blown surveillance tool - monitoring you via video and mic, as well as intercepting all of your calls, texts, emails and other activity.



What can you do?: Don’t download apps from third-party websites. Stick to well-known apps that have been around for a while. Limit the total number of apps you download. Check the permissions before approving them (i.e., why does a game need to access my contacts?).



7. Hacking the Human Body. Implantable medical devices - including pacemakers, defibrillitors, insulin pumps, etc. - now come with wireless connections but only rudimentary security.

Hackers say the devices can be remotely controlled to harm or kill the patient



What can you do?: Nothing.

 

Jason Glassberg, co-founder of Casaba, LLC provides cybersecurity consulting to Fortune 50s, banks, energy firms and government agencies.  The company’s areas of expertise include penetration testing, threat modeling, reverse engineering, malware analysis and software security. Casaba is part of Microsoft’s SDL Pro Network.



Read more: http://www.foxbusiness.com/personal-finance/2013/07/31/7-new-hacker-threats-to-watch-out-for/#ixzz2adacamUP
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 31, 2013, 04:05:29 PM

very long and detailed article with diagrams
.. only posted a small part here
go to the link

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/jul/31/nsa-top-secret-program-online-data
Series: Glenn Greenwald on security and liberty
Previous | Index
XKeyscore: NSA tool collects 'nearly everything a user does on the internet'
• XKeyscore gives 'widest-reaching' collection of online data
• NSA analysts require no prior authorization for searches
• Sweeps up emails, social media activity and browsing history
• NSA's XKeyscore program – read one of the presentations

Glenn Greenwald
theguardian.com, Wednesday 31 July 2013 08.56 EDT
A top secret National Security Agency program allows analysts to search with no prior authorization through vast databases containing emails, online chats and the browsing histories of millions of individuals, according to documents provided by whistleblower Edward Snowden.

The NSA boasts in training materials that the program, called XKeyscore, is its "widest-reaching" system for developing intelligence from the internet.

The latest revelations will add to the intense public and congressional debate around the extent of NSA surveillance programs. They come as senior intelligence officials testify to the Senate judiciary committee on Wednesday, releasing classified documents in response to the Guardian's earlier stories on bulk collection of phone records and Fisa surveillance court oversight.

The files shed light on one of Snowden's most controversial statements, made in his first video interview published by the Guardian on June 10.

"I, sitting at my desk," said Snowden, could "wiretap anyone, from you or your accountant, to a federal judge or even the president, if I had a personal email".

US officials vehemently denied this specific claim. Mike Rogers, the Republican chairman of the House intelligence committee, said of Snowden's assertion: "He's lying. It's impossible for him to do what he was saying he could do."

But training materials for XKeyscore detail how analysts can use it and other systems to mine enormous agency databases by filling in a simple on-screen form giving only a broad justification for the search. The request is not reviewed by a court or any NSA personnel before it is processed.

XKeyscore, the documents boast, is the NSA's "widest reaching" system developing intelligence from computer networks – what the agency calls Digital Network Intelligence (DNI). One presentation claims the program covers "nearly everything a typical user does on the internet", including the content of emails, websites visited and searches, as well as their metadata.

Analysts can also use XKeyscore and other NSA systems to obtain ongoing "real-time" interception of an individual's internet activity.

Under US law, the NSA is required to obtain an individualized Fisa warrant only if the target of their surveillance is a 'US person', though no such warrant is required for intercepting the communications of Americans with foreign targets. But XKeyscore provides the technological capability, if not the legal authority, to target even US persons for extensive electronic surveillance without a warrant provided that some identifying information, such as their email or IP address, is known to the analyst.

One training slide illustrates the digital activity constantly being collected by XKeyscore and the analyst's ability to query the databases at any time.



The purpose of XKeyscore is to allow analysts to search the metadata as well as the content of emails and other internet activity, such as browser history, even when there is no known email account (a "selector" in NSA parlance) associated with the individual being targeted.

Analysts can also search by name, telephone number, IP address, keywords, the language in which the internet activity was conducted or the type of browser used.

One document notes that this is because "strong selection [search by email address] itself gives us only a very limited capability" because "a large amount of time spent on the web is performing actions that are anonymous."

The NSA documents assert that by 2008, 300 terrorists had been captured using intelligence from XKeyscore.

Analysts are warned that searching the full database for content will yield too many results to sift through. Instead they are advised to use the metadata also stored in the databases to narrow down what to review.

A slide entitled "plug-ins" in a December 2012 document describes the various fields of information that can be searched. It includes "every email address seen in a session by both username and domain", "every phone number seen in a session (eg address book entries or signature block)" and user activity – "the webmail and chat activity to include username, buddylist, machine specific cookies etc".





Email monitoring
In a second Guardian interview in June, Snowden elaborated on his statement about being able to read any individual's email if he had their email address. He said the claim was based in part on the email search capabilities of XKeyscore, which Snowden says he was authorized to use while working as a Booz Allen contractor for the NSA.

One top-secret document describes how the program "searches within bodies of emails, webpages and documents", including the "To, From, CC, BCC lines" and the 'Contact Us' pages on websites".

To search for emails, an analyst using XKS enters the individual's email address into a simple online search form, along with the "justification" for the search and the time period for which the emails are sought.



The analyst then selects which of those returned emails they want to read by opening them in NSA reading software.

The system is similar to the way in which NSA analysts generally can intercept the communications of anyone they select, including, as one NSA document put it, "communications that transit the United States and communications that terminate in the United States".

One document, a top secret 2010 guide describing the training received by NSA analysts for general surveillance under the Fisa Amendments Act of 2008, explains that analysts can begin surveillance on anyone by clicking a few simple pull-down menus designed to provide both legal and targeting justifications. Once options on the pull-down menus are selected, their target is marked for electronic surveillance and the analyst is able to review the content of their communications


Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on July 31, 2013, 09:55:14 PM


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-23522565

31 July 2013 Last updated at 21:48 ET

US declassifies phone-snooping order

The Obama administration has released documents on its phone-snooping, as a Senate panel questions intelligence officials about the programme.

The declassification was made in the "interest of increased transparency", intelligence officials said.

But significant parts of the three released documents were redacted.

Meanwhile the father of Edward Snowden, who leaked information about the surveillance, says the FBI has asked him to go to Moscow to see his son.

Also on Wednesday, the UK's Guardian newspaper published slides leaked by Edward Snowden that detail a secret US surveillance system known as XKeyscore.

It reportedly enables American intelligence to monitor "nearly everything a typical user does on the internet".

The programme includes real-time data and suggests analysts could narrow searches through use of so-called metadata also stored by the National Security Agency (NSA), America's electronic intelligence organisation, the newspaper reports.

Blacked out
 
The official US documents released on Wednesday include a court order describing how the data from the phone-snooping programme would be stored and accessed.

Two reports to US lawmakers on the telephone and email records were also declassified.

But lines in the files, including details on "selection terms" used to search the massive data stores, were blacked out.

Deputy Attorney General James Cole told a Senate judiciary committee hearing on Wednesday that the court order spells out how the government can use call data obtained from telecom giants such as Verizon.

For the first time, the government acknowledged publicly that by using what it calls "hop analysis" it can scour the phone calls of millions of Americans in the hunt for just one suspect.

NSA analysts could use the records of everyone a suspect calls, as well as everyone who contacts the contacts of contacts of the initial suspect.

If the average person calls 40 unique people, such three-hop analysis could allow the government to mine the records of 2.5 million Americans when investigating one suspected terrorist.

Senator Richard Durbin said: "What's being described as a very narrow programme is really a very broad programme."

But the head of the NSA, General Keith Alexander, remained unapologetic about the agency's methods at a hacker conference in Las Vegas on Wednesday, insisting the programme had prevented attacks on the US.

'Find a safe haven'
 
Wednesday's was the first congressional session on the issue since the House narrowly rejected a proposal effectively to shut down the NSA's secret collection of hundreds of millions of Americans' phone records.

During the early parts of the hearing, NSA deputy director John Inglis said "no" when asked if anyone had been fired over the leak.

"No-one has offered to resign," Mr Inglis said. "Everyone is working hard to understand what happened."

Democratic Senator Patrick Leahy, the chairman of the committee, also questioned the deputy director on the number of attacks the agency said had been disrupted by the programmes.

"If this programme is not effective it has to end. So far, I'm not convinced by what I've seen," said Sen Leahy, who cited "massive privacy implications" of keeping phone call records.

Gen Alexander has said phone and internet surveillance disrupted 54 schemes by militants.

Sen Leahy said a list of the relevant plots provided to Congress did not reflect dozens, as he said, "let alone 54 as some have suggested".

Mr Inglis said the phone surveillance helped disrupt or discover attacks 12 times, and the larger number were foiled thanks to both the phone-records snooping and a second programme collecting global internet users' data.

Meanwhile, Edward Snowden's father, Lon, told Russian state TV he does not believe his son would get a fair trial in America and that the fugitive should stay in Russia.

In the interview, the elder Snowden thanked the Russian authorities for keeping his son safe and advised the 29-year-old "to find a safe haven".

Edward Snowden, a former NSA contractor, has been stuck in a transit area at a Moscow airport for more than a month after the US revoked his travel documents.  
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 01, 2013, 07:57:58 AM


http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/08/01/19815210-edward-snowden-granted-temporary-asylum-in-russia?lite

Edward Snowden granted temporary asylum in Russia

By Jim Maceda and Alastair Jamieson, NBC News
MOSCOW, Russia - NSA leaker Edward Snowden has been granted temporary asylum in Russia and has left the Moscow airport where he had been stranded for more than a month, his lawyer said Thursday.

An airport representative told Reuters that the former intelligence contractor had already crossed through the immigration line and left the airport.

Snowden's lawyer, Anatoly Kucherena, said he wouldn't disclose the 30-year-old fugitive's whereabouts for security reasons.

“He is the most wanted man on planet Earth. What do you think he is going to do? He has to think about his personal security. I cannot tell you where he is going,” Kucherena told Reuters.

“I put him in a taxi 15 to 20 minutes ago and gave him his certificate on getting refugee status in the Russian Federation,” he said. “He can live wherever he wants in Russia. It's his personal choice.”

WikiLeaks posted on Twitter that Snowden had been granted asylum in Russia for a year.

"We would like to thank the Russian people and all those others who have helped to protect Mr. Snowden," it said in a tweet.

"We have won the battle -- now the war."

Marie Harf, a State Department deputy spokesperson, told reporters Wednesday that Snowden was “not a human rights activist.”

“He’s not a dissident. He’s been accused of leaking classified information, has been charged with three very serious felony counts, and must be, should be, returned to the United States to face a free and fair trial as soon as possible,” she said at the daily briefing.

“We are working through law enforcement channels with the Russian government to make the point that Mr. Snowden is wanted on serious felony charges and needs to be returned to the United States.”

But Harf added that the U.S. had also “made the point that we don’t want this issue to have a hugely negative impact on our bilateral relationship.”

A senior Kremlin official, Yuri Ushakov, told Reuters that he doubted ties between Russia and the United States would suffer because of the “relatively insignificant” Snowden case.

“Our president has ... expressed hope many times that this will not affect the character of our relations,” he told reporters, saying there was no sign that U.S. President Barack Obama would cancel a planned visit to Moscow in September.

Reuters contributed to this report.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 04, 2013, 07:44:39 PM

ok.. if all the info was public for the last 7 or so years then Snowden isn't a traitor.. and really not even a whistle blower.
so what's the freakin big deal already..? ?   geeeeeeeeeze



Snowden’s ‘secrets’ should not surprise
By Lou Kilzer

Published: Saturday, August 3, 2013, 9:30 p.m.
Updated 5 hours ago


Almost all the information about spying made public by celebrity American intelligence leaker Edward Snowden could have been gathered during the past seven years by any foreign agency, terrorist organization or individual with Internet access. And little about the National Security Agency's information gathering should surprise Americans.

The NSA's programs were so well-publicized in news articles and books that a federal judge in 2010 called the government's spying “common knowledge to most Americans,” a Tribune-Review examination found.

By then, dozens of civil rights lawsuits over NSA snooping had been filed — almost all receiving news coverage. They were dismissed, though appeals are pending.

“One thing that is ‘new' is that there is controversy, where previously there was pretty much none,” John Pike, who directs the national security website GlobalSecurity.org, said of Snowden's disclosures, many of them to The Guardian, a U.K. newspaper.

Retired Air Force Gen. Michael Hayden, former head of the NSA and subsequently, the CIA, told the Trib that Snowden added little to what had been publicly reported.

His primary concern, he said, is that Snowden took computers that could contain strategic information when he fled the United States.

“I would lose all respect for Chinese State Security or the (Russian) FSB if they hadn't drained Snowden's computers,” Hayden said.

Hayden doubts encryption on the computers could withstand a concerted attack.

“I used to laugh when someone said the encryption on something was unbreakable,” he said.

The Guardian this past week published Snowden's latest “top secret” announcement about the NSA's using the XKEYSCORE program to spy overseas. The program reportedly captures content of foreign emails.

The NSA, established in 1952 specifically to gather foreign electronic intelligence, responded with a statement that any “implication that NSA's collection is arbitrary and unconstrained is false.”

As of 2008, XKEYSCORE had led to the capture of more than 300 terrorists, the NSA said.

Marc Ambinder, who co-authored a book that discussed XKEYSCORE, pointed out online that searching LinkedIn profiles for national security information will yield hundreds of individuals who worked for NSA and list fluency in XKEYSCORE as a skill.

“I quibble with The Guardian's description of the program as ‘top secret.' The word is not secret; its association with the NSA is not secret. That the NSA collects bulk data on foreign targets is, well, probably classified, but (not) at the secret level,” Ambinder said.

Public disclosure in 2005

Snowden's supporters contend he revealed to an unknowing public two critical parts of the snooping program: that Verizon released “metadata” on customers' calls to the NSA, giving their origin, destination and duration, and that the NSA can examine the content of emails and phone calls.

None of this, however, appears to be new, although names of the programs and mechanics evolved over the years.

In December 2005, The New York Times — after waiting for more than a year at the Bush administration's request — revealed the essence of what would evolve into the capture of telephone and Internet content. Based on interviews with more than 10 sources, the newspaper said the government intercepted certain calls and emails to or from the United States in which the originator or recipient were foreigners.

Hundreds, even thousands, of American communications were intercepted involving citizens, the Times said.

In response to some public outcry, President George W. Bush acknowledged authorizing that but said the disclosure was improper: “As a result, our enemies have learned information they should not have, and the unauthorized disclosure of this effort damages our national security and puts our citizens at risk.”

The Justice Department began a widely publicized search for leakers.

Six months later, USA Today laid out the metadata aspect: “The National Security Agency has been secretly collecting the phone records of tens of millions of Americans, using data provided by AT&T, Verizon and BellSouth.”

The newspaper quoted a source saying the agency's goal was “to create a database of every call ever made within the United States.”

Access initially restricted

“Warrantless wiretap programs,” then and now, seemed to be fused in many people's minds.

Yet initial warrantless spying on U.S. citizens was restricted and limited, Bush reported, an assertion supported by an Inspector General report released by The Washington Post and The Guardian.

The IG's report shows that between Oct. 4, 2001, when Bush authorized the program, and Jan. 17, 2007, when the warrantless program ended, the government read content from 406 email addresses and intercepted conversations between U.S. citizens and foreigners from 2,612 phone numbers. Ninety-two percent of data intercepted was foreign.

The three American telecoms providing data collectively supply 81 percent of international telephone access in the Unites States. The IG noted that in 2002, nearly all of the world's Internet traffic traveled through the United States.

Snowden claimed that nine Internet companies such as Google, Yahoo and Microsoft later gave NSA direct access to their servers — an assertion each company disputes.

Before American communications were intercepted, such requests went through rigorous review, the inspector general reported.

Alan Freedman of the Washington-based nonprofit Brookings Institution said many people wrongly believe the government recorded content of most telephone calls or emails. “This is not the case,” he said.

However, Freedman said the NSA never before intercepted calls to or from the United States. The gravity of that depends on one's stance on privacy, he said.

Amplified awareness

Under Bush, the President's Surveillance Program, as it was called, bypassed seeking warrants from a court established to handle matters of national security after the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978 (commonly referred to as FISA court). After 9/11, Bush said it was necessary to act speedily, and he authorized snooping for 30 days. In 2002, an appeals court ruled he had the power to do so.

President Obama campaigned in 2008 with a pledge to end warrantless wiretaps. But by then, the program had ended; the FISA court took it under its wing. As a senator in 2008, Obama voted to amend the FISA legislation to require warrants for such spying. The legislation immunized companies that participated in Bush's warrantless program. As president, Obama has fought to retain the 2008 changes.

Experts believe social media may be one reason that people are more aware of domestic spying. Twitter, for example, did not exist when the 9/11 attacks occurred, nor did Facebook, smartphones and rampant texting.

Joshua Benton, director of the Nieman Journalism Lab at Harvard University, said social media enable people with similar views to align. If groups of people find a story interesting, he said, it can instantly burgeon — within and outside those groups.

Snowden gives the spying story a narrative and a face, said Benton, a former reporter. It became not an abstract story about intelligence but one about a young man scrambling around the world to escape the clutches of authorities.

“The Web and social media do make it much easier for news junkies to sink their teeth into a story and amplify it across their networks,” Benton said. “But I think this story would have blown up big even if we still only had newspapers and television. It's just a good old-fashioned, juicy, dramatic story.”

Lou Kilzer is a Trib Total Media staff writer. Reach him  lkilzer@tribweb.com.

 


Read more: http://triblive.com/news/editorspicks/4408043-74/nsa-snowden-program#ixzz2b3h7UQRq
Follow us: @triblive on Twitter | triblive on Facebook
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Amaterasu on August 04, 2013, 08:07:17 PM
Snowden is a psyop, I tell You.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 05, 2013, 08:28:00 AM


video at link

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/05/dea-surveillance-cover-up_n_3706207.html

DEA Special Operations Division Covers Up Surveillance Used To Investigate Americans: Report
Reuters  |  Posted: 08/05/2013 4:59 am EDT  |  Updated: 08/05/2013 9:34 am EDT






By John Shiffman and Kristina Cooke

WASHINGTON, Aug 5 (Reuters) - A secretive U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration unit is funneling information from intelligence intercepts, wiretaps, informants and a massive database of telephone records to authorities across the nation to help them launch criminal investigations of Americans.

Although these cases rarely involve national security issues, documents reviewed by Reuters show that law enforcement agents have been directed to conceal how such investigations truly begin - not only from defense lawyers but also sometimes from prosecutors and judges.

The undated documents show that federal agents are trained to "recreate" the investigative trail to effectively cover up where the information originated, a practice that some experts say violates a defendant's Constitutional right to a fair trial. If defendants don't know how an investigation began, they cannot know to ask to review potential sources of exculpatory evidence - information that could reveal entrapment, mistakes or biased witnesses.

"I have never heard of anything like this at all," said Nancy Gertner, a Harvard Law School professor who served as a federal judge from 1994 to 2011. Gertner and other legal experts said the program sounds more troubling than recent disclosures that the National Security Agency has been collecting domestic phone records. The NSA effort is geared toward stopping terrorists; the DEA program targets common criminals, primarily drug dealers.

"It is one thing to create special rules for national security," Gertner said. "Ordinary crime is entirely different. It sounds like they are phonying up investigations."

THE SPECIAL OPERATIONS DIVISION

The unit of the DEA that distributes the information is called the Special Operations Division, or SOD. Two dozen partner agencies comprise the unit, including the FBI, CIA, NSA, Internal Revenue Service and the Department of Homeland Security. It was created in 1994 to combat Latin American drug cartels and has grown from several dozen employees to several hundred.

Today, much of the SOD's work is classified, and officials asked that its precise location in Virginia not be revealed. The documents reviewed by Reuters are marked "Law Enforcement Sensitive," a government categorization that is meant to keep them confidential.

"Remember that the utilization of SOD cannot be revealed or discussed in any investigative function," a document presented to agents reads. The document specifically directs agents to omit the SOD's involvement from investigative reports, affidavits, discussions with prosecutors and courtroom testimony. Agents are instructed to then use "normal investigative techniques to recreate the information provided by SOD."

A spokesman with the Department of Justice, which oversees the DEA, declined to comment.

But two senior DEA officials defended the program, and said trying to "recreate" an investigative trail is not only legal but a technique that is used almost daily.

A former federal agent in the northeastern United States who received such tips from SOD described the process. "You'd be told only, 'Be at a certain truck stop at a certain time and look for a certain vehicle.' And so we'd alert the state police to find an excuse to stop that vehicle, and then have a drug dog search it," the agent said.

"PARALLEL CONSTRUCTION"

After an arrest was made, agents then pretended that their investigation began with the traffic stop, not with the SOD tip, the former agent said. The training document reviewed by Reuters refers to this process as "parallel construction."

The two senior DEA officials, who spoke on behalf of the agency but only on condition of anonymity, said the process is kept secret to protect sources and investigative methods. "Parallel construction is a law enforcement technique we use every day," one official said. "It's decades old, a bedrock concept."

A dozen current or former federal agents interviewed by Reuters confirmed they had used parallel construction during their careers. Most defended the practice; some said they understood why those outside law enforcement might be concerned.

"It's just like laundering money - you work it backwards to make it clean," said Finn Selander, a DEA agent from 1991 to 2008 and now a member of a group called Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, which advocates legalizing and regulating narcotics.

Some defense lawyers and former prosecutors said that using "parallel construction" may be legal to establish probable cause for an arrest. But they said employing the practice as a means of disguising how an investigation began may violate pretrial discovery rules by burying evidence that could prove useful to criminal defendants.

A QUESTION OF CONSTITUTIONALITY

"That's outrageous," said Tampa attorney James Felman, a vice chairman of the criminal justice section of the American Bar Association. "It strikes me as indefensible."

Lawrence Lustberg, a New Jersey defense lawyer, said any systematic government effort to conceal the circumstances under which cases begin "would not only be alarming but pretty blatantly unconstitutional."

Lustberg and others said the government's use of the SOD program skirts established court procedures by which judges privately examine sensitive information, such as an informant's identity or classified evidence, to determine whether the information is relevant to the defense.

"You can't game the system," said former federal prosecutor Henry E. Hockeimer Jr. "You can't create this subterfuge. These are drug crimes, not national security cases. If you don't draw the line here, where do you draw it?"

Some lawyers say there can be legitimate reasons for not revealing sources. Robert Spelke, a former prosecutor who spent seven years as a senior DEA lawyer, said some sources are classified. But he also said there are few reasons why unclassified evidence should be concealed at trial.

"It's a balancing act, and they've doing it this way for years," Spelke said. "Do I think it's a good way to do it? No, because now that I'm a defense lawyer, I see how difficult it is to challenge."

CONCEALING A TIP

One current federal prosecutor learned how agents were using SOD tips after a drug agent misled him, the prosecutor told Reuters. In a Florida drug case he was handling, the prosecutor said, a DEA agent told him the investigation of a U.S. citizen began with a tip from an informant. When the prosecutor pressed for more information, he said, a DEA supervisor intervened and revealed that the tip had actually come through the SOD and from an NSA intercept.

"I was pissed," the prosecutor said. "Lying about where the information came from is a bad start if you're trying to comply with the law because it can lead to all kinds of problems with discovery and candor to the court." The prosecutor never filed charges in the case because he lost confidence in the investigation, he said.

A senior DEA official said he was not aware of the case but said the agent should not have misled the prosecutor. How often such misdirection occurs is unknown, even to the government; the DEA official said the agency does not track what happens with tips after the SOD sends them to agents in the field.

The SOD's role providing information to agents isn't itself a secret. It is briefly mentioned by the DEA in budget documents, albeit without any reference to how that information is used or represented when cases go to court.

The DEA has long publicly touted the SOD's role in multi-jurisdictional and international investigations, connecting agents in separate cities who may be unwittingly investigating the same target and making sure undercover agents don't accidentally try to arrest each other.

SOD'S BIG SUCCESSES

The unit also played a major role in a 2008 DEA sting in Thailand against Russian arms dealer Viktor Bout; he was sentenced in 2011 to 25 years in prison on charges of conspiring to sell weapons to the Colombian rebel group FARC. The SOD also recently coordinated Project Synergy, a crackdown against manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers of synthetic designer drugs that spanned 35 states and resulted in 227 arrests.

Since its inception, the SOD's mandate has expanded to include narco-terrorism, organized crime and gangs. A DEA spokesman declined to comment on the unit's annual budget. A recent LinkedIn posting on the personal page of a senior SOD official estimated it to be $125 million.

Today, the SOD offers at least three services to federal, state and local law enforcement agents: coordinating international investigations such as the Bout case; distributing tips from overseas NSA intercepts, informants, foreign law enforcement partners and domestic wiretaps; and circulating tips from a massive database known as DICE.

The DICE database contains about 1 billion records, the senior DEA officials said. The majority of the records consist of phone log and Internet data gathered legally by the DEA through subpoenas, arrests and search warrants nationwide. Records are kept for about a year and then purged, the DEA officials said.

About 10,000 federal, state and local law enforcement agents have access to the DICE database, records show. They can query it to try to link otherwise disparate clues. Recently, one of the DEA officials said, DICE linked a man who tried to smuggle $100,000 over the U.S. southwest border to a major drug case on the East Coast.

"We use it to connect the dots," the official said.

"AN AMAZING TOOL"

Wiretap tips forwarded by the SOD usually come from foreign governments, U.S. intelligence agencies or court-authorized domestic phone recordings. Because warrantless eavesdropping on Americans is illegal, tips from intelligence agencies are generally not forwarded to the SOD until a caller's citizenship can be verified, according to one senior law enforcement official and one former U.S. military intelligence analyst.

"They do a pretty good job of screening, but it can be a struggle to know for sure whether the person on a wiretap is American," the senior law enforcement official said.

Tips from domestic wiretaps typically occur when agents use information gleaned from a court-ordered wiretap in one case to start a second investigation.

As a practical matter, law enforcement agents said they usually don't worry that SOD's involvement will be exposed in court. That's because most drug-trafficking defendants plead guilty before trial and therefore never request to see the evidence against them. If cases did go to trial, current and former agents said, charges were sometimes dropped to avoid the risk of exposing SOD involvement.

Current and former federal agents said SOD tips aren't always helpful - one estimated their accuracy at 60 percent. But current and former agents said tips have enabled them to catch drug smugglers who might have gotten away.

"It was an amazing tool," said one recently retired federal agent. "Our big fear was that it wouldn't stay secret."

DEA officials said that the SOD process has been reviewed internally. They declined to provide Reuters with a copy of their most recent review. (Edited by Blake Morrison)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 08, 2013, 06:47:26 AM


http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/08/us/broader-sifting-of-data-abroad-is-seen-by-nsa.html?pagewanted=1&_r=0

N.S.A. Sifting Broader Set of Data Crossing U.S. Border

By CHARLIE SAVAGE
Published: August 8, 2013


WASHINGTON — The National Security Agencyhttp://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/n/national_security_agency/index.html?inline=nyt-org

is searching the contents of vast amounts of Americans’ e-mail and text communications into and out of the country, hunting for people who mention information about foreigners under surveillance, according to intelligence officials.

The N.S.A. is not just intercepting the communications of Americans who are in direct contact with foreigners targeted overseas, a practice that government officials have openly acknowledged. It is also casting a far wider net for people who cite information linked to those foreigners, like a little used e-mail address, according to a senior intelligence official.

While it has long been known that the agency conducts extensive computer searches of data it vacuums up overseas, that it is systematically searching — without warrants — through the contents of Americans’ communications that cross the border reveals more about the scale of its secret operations.

It also adds another element to the unfolding debate, provoked by the disclosures of Edward J. Snowden, the former N.S.A. contractor, about whether the agency has infringed on Americans’ privacy as it scoops up e-mails and phone data in its quest to ferret out foreign intelligence.

Government officials say the cross-border surveillance was authorized by a 2008 law, the FISA Amendments Act, in which Congress approved eavesdropping on domestic soil without warrants as long as the “target” was a noncitizen abroad. Voice communications are not included in that surveillance, the senior official said.

Asked to comment, Judith A. Emmel, an N.S.A. spokeswoman, did not directly address surveillance of cross-border communications. But she said the agency’s activities were lawful and intended to gather intelligence not about Americans but about “foreign powers and their agents, foreign organizations, foreign persons or international terrorists.”

“In carrying out its signals intelligence mission, N.S.A. collects only what it is explicitly authorized to collect,” she said. “Moreover, the agency’s activities are deployed only in response to requirements for information to protect the country and its interests.”

Hints of the surveillance appeared in a set of rules, http://www.documentcloud.org/documents/727943-exhibit-a.html

 leaked by Mr. Snowden, for how the N.S.A. may carry out the 2008 FISA law. One paragraph mentions that the agency “seeks to acquire communications about the target that are not to or from the target.” The pages were posted online by the newspaper The Guardian on June 20,

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/jun/20/fisa-court-nsa-without-warrant

but the telltale paragraph, the only rule marked “Top Secret” amid 18 pages of restrictions, went largely overlooked amid other disclosures.

To conduct the surveillance, the N.S.A. is temporarily copying and then sifting through the contents of what is apparently most e-mails and other text-based communications that cross the border. The senior intelligence official, who, like other former and current government officials, spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the topic, said the N.S.A. makes a “clone of selected communication links” to gather the communications, but declined to specify details, like the volume of the data that passes through them.

Computer scientists said that it would be difficult to systematically search the contents of the communications without first gathering nearly all cross-border text-based data; fiber-optic networks work by breaking messages into tiny packets that flow at the speed of light over different pathways to their shared destination, so they would need to be captured and reassembled.

The official said that a computer searches the data for the identifying keywords or other “selectors” and stores those that match so that human analysts could later examine them. The remaining communications, the official said, are deleted; the entire process takes “a small number of seconds,” and the system has no ability to perform “retrospective searching.”

The official said the keyword and other terms were “very precise” to minimize the number of innocent American communications that were flagged by the program. At the same time, the official acknowledged that there had been times when changes by telecommunications providers or in the technology had led to inadvertent overcollection. The N.S.A. monitors for these problems, fixes them and reports such incidents to its overseers in the government, the official said.

The disclosure sheds additional light on statements intelligence officials have made recently, reassuring the public that they do not “target” Americans for surveillance without warrants.

At a House Intelligence Committee oversight hearing in June, for example, a lawmaker pressed the deputy director of the N.S.A., John Inglis,

http://www.c-spanvideo.org/clip/4461523

to say whether the agency listened to the phone calls or read the e-mails and text messages of American citizens. Mr. Inglis replied, “We do not target the content of U.S. person communications without a specific warrant anywhere on the earth.”


Timothy Edgar, a former intelligence official in the Bush and Obama administrations, said that the rule concerning collection “about” a person targeted for surveillance rather than directed at that person had provoked significant internal discussion.
“There is an ambiguity in the law about what it means to ‘target’ someone,” Mr. Edgar, now a visiting professor at Brown, said. “You can never intentionally target someone inside the United States. Those are the words we were looking at. We were most concerned about making sure the procedures only target communications that have one party outside the United States.”



The rule they ended up writing, which was secretly approved by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, says that the N.S.A. must ensure that one of the participants in any conversation that is acquired when it is searching for conversations about a targeted foreigner must be outside the United States, so that the surveillance is technically directed at the foreign end.



Americans’ communications singled out for further analysis are handled in accordance with “minimization” rules to protect privacy approved by the surveillance court. If private information is not relevant to understanding foreign intelligence, it is deleted; if it is relevant, the agency can retain it and disseminate it to other agencies, the rules show.

While the paragraph hinting at the surveillance has attracted little attention, the American Civil Liberties Union did take note of the “about the target” language in a June 21 post analyzing the larger set of rules, arguing that the language could be interpreted as allowing “bulk” collection of international communications, including of those of Americans.



Jameel Jaffer, a senior lawyer at the A.C.L.U., said Wednesday that such “dragnet surveillance will be poisonous to the freedoms of inquiry and association” because people who know that their communications will be searched will change their behavior.

“They’ll hesitate before visiting controversial Web sites, discussing controversial topics or investigating politically sensitive questions,” Mr. Jaffer said. “Individually, these hesitations might appear to be inconsequential, but the accumulation of them over time will change citizens’ relationship to one another and to the government.”



The senior intelligence official argued, however, that it would be inaccurate to portray the N.S.A. as engaging in “bulk collection” of the contents of communications. “ ‘Bulk collection’ is when we collect and retain for some period of time that lets us do retrospective analysis,” the official said. “In this case, we do not do that, so we do not consider this ‘bulk collection.’ ”

Stewart Baker, a former general counsel for the N.S.A., said that such surveillance could be valuable in identifying previously unknown terrorists or spies inside the United States who unwittingly reveal themselves to the agency by discussing a foreign-intelligence “indicator.” He cited a situation in which officials learn that Al Qaeda was planning to use a particular phone number on the day of an attack.

“If someone is sending that number out, chances are they are on the inside of the plot, and I want to find the people who are on the inside of the plot,” he said.



The senior intelligence official said that the “about the target” surveillance had been valuable, but said it was difficult to point to any particular terrorist plot that would have been carried out if the surveillance had not taken place. He said it was one tool among many used to assemble a “mosaic” of information in such investigations. He also pointed out that the surveillance was used for other types of foreign-intelligence collection, not just terrorism, the official said.



There has been no public disclosure of any ruling by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court explaining its legal analysis of the 2008 FISA law and the Fourth Amendment as allowing “about the target” searches of Americans’ cross-border communications. But in 2009, the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel signed off on a similar process for searching federal employees’ communications without a warrant to make sure none contain malicious computer code.



That opinion, by Steven G. Bradbury, who led the office in the Bush administration, may echo the still-secret legal analysis. He wrote that because that system, called EINSTEIN 2.0,
pdf file go to link for connection to this
scanned communications traffic “only for particular malicious computer code” and there was no authorization to acquire the content for unrelated purposes, it “imposes, at worst, a minimal burden upon legitimate privacy rights.”  
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Amaterasu on August 08, 2013, 10:30:40 AM
Given that Al Q(however it's spelt) is a CIA construct, the reading of:

Quote
He cited a situation in which officials learn that Al Qaeda was planning to use a particular phone number on the day of an attack.

“If someone is sending that number out, chances are they are on the inside of the plot, and I want to find the people who are on the inside of the plot,” he said.

had Me in stitches!
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 08, 2013, 10:49:06 AM


yeah the whole bunch of these articles
(which i am only putting here to watch the evolution of the spin)

makes me want to laugh and cry at the same time

i keep asking
who believes this stuff?
and sadly the answer is
millions
but most folk ~ that wonderous silent majority ~ aren't even paying attention

 :'( ;D    ???
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 11, 2013, 03:47:48 PM


wellllll this headline certainly clears up a few other headlines making the news..
gotta watch the peoples more closely  to save them
yep...
what a crock  >:(

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/11/michael-hayden-nsa_n_3739610.html
 
Ryan Grim Become a fan
ryan@huffingtonpost.com

  Michael Hayden, Former NSA Chief: After A Major Attack, U.S. Likely To Seize More Surveillance Powers

Posted: 08/11/2013 12:06 pm EDT  |  Updated: 08/11/2013 3:43 pm EDT



WASHINGTON -- Former National Security Agency chief Gen. Michael Hayden hinted Sunday at how the NSA's eavesdropping and data collection program is likely to evolve over time. Critics of the project have warned that by building the capacity to track the electronic communications of all American citizens, the government will inevitably be tempted to employ every tool it has at its disposal and scuttle whatever constitutional safeguards stand in the way. Not to do so eventually would in fact be more surprising, goes the argument.

In an appearance on CBS' "Face The Nation," Hayden -- also the former head of the CIA -- unintentionally opened a window into just how that evolution will likely unfold.

Asked by host Bob Schieffer about the president's proposal for a civil liberties advocate to argue on behalf of the Constitution in the secret court that oversees the NSA, Hayden said that such a setup would be inappropriate for fast-moving investigations. But he did float a hypothetical scenario in which such a safeguard might be appropriate: After an attack, he said, the NSA would want to use the vast store of information it has been collecting in more aggressive ways.

Hayden said that in general he was opposed to a civil liberties advocate's involvement in the process, and warned that slowing it down would lead to criticism.

"When you're looking in your rearview mirror after the next successful attack, this runs the danger of looking like bureaucratic layering," he said. "And, so, you need to be careful about how many processes you put in there even though I freely admit, you don't get to do this at all unless the American people feel comfortable about it."

He continued, adding that an advocate might be appropriate after an attack, when the temptation to overreach is greatest.

"This is no one's proposal," he cautioned, before unveiling his hypothetical. "You've got this metadata. It's now [currently] queried under very, very narrow circumstances. If the nation suffers an attack, there are other things you could do with that metadata. There are other tools. So in that kind of emergency perhaps you would go to the court and say, 'In addition to these very limited queries we're allowed to do, we actually want to launch some complex algorithms against it.'"

"That's the kind of argument that frankly, even I could accept you might wanna have an advocate there," he said.

In Hayden's hypothetical, the NSA would want to use an advanced algorithm to search through the information it had collected on American citizens. Such an algorithm could, for instance, read the email of every American, the type of search that is strictly prohibited by the Fourth Amendment.

"The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized," the amendment reads.

Edward Snowden and the debate over privacy and national security dominated the Sunday shows in the wake of President Obama's Friday news conference in which he unveiled a series of proposed reforms.

The president suggested increasing the transparency of the eavesdropping and data collection project, and creating an advocate for civil liberties who would contest government requests for information before the secret court.

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) told Fox News Sunday's Chris Wallace that he could get behind the president. "I don't disagree with any of those proposals of the president," he said.

McCain, for his part, said he was concerned that younger people were losing trust in the government, and that many seemed to view Snowden as "some kind of Jason Bourne."

Hayden was asked his opinion of Snowden. "I've actually thought about this," he said. "He didn't inform [the debate], he made it more emotional."

He compared Snowden's revelations to Hurricane Katrina. The disaster, Hayden said, had led to the construction of much stronger levies, which is a good thing, but, "Katrina was still a bad thing."

"He wasn't a whistleblower, he was a defector," Hayden determined.

Asked specifically if he considered Snowden a traitor, he said, "Traitor is narrowly defined in the Constitution. I'll stick with defector."

Hayden was also asked about members of Congress, who have criticized the NSA for being less than transparent, even in its classified briefings. "Let me apologize to members of Congress," he said, before adding that, "this is just incredibly complicated."

"The agency's been tremendously candid," he promised, pointing to a previous classified letter that informed Congress that "we are gathering the metadata of all calls in the United States."

After apologizing, he pinned the blame on members of Congress. "If you don't have time" to sufficiently study the intelligence community, he said, "then you shouldn't be a member of the [intelligence] committee."

This story has been updated to include full quotes from Hayden's interview.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on August 12, 2013, 02:17:27 AM
POINT ONE

They have over 120 spy agencies on the public payroll

They have ECHELON and MUOS listening posts all over the world

They have every internet network being recorded

They monitor every email and cell phone call

They have satellites (hundreds) that can read a newspaper over your shoulder...

HOW MUCH MORE CAN THEY POSSIBLE SPY ON????

POINT TWO

90% of people on Facebook and Twitter ( as well as on the rest of the web...) do little more than post pictures and add endless comment like 'pretty pic or share false news stories or the latest gossip....

WHY do these people think that the SPOOKS give a rats ass about what they are up to?

Now me for example... been spending years exposing whatever I can... and yes THEY have visited the house and spent three days chatting. At the end of that visit my .mil access increased and today bout NASA and the Military run a few ads on the Living Moon :D

So STOP WORRYING you are not important enough :P If you were they would already have knocked on your door :D
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Sinny on August 12, 2013, 03:23:57 AM
Ha.

I had to get my laptop serviced yesterday, as there appeared to be something eating my system from the inside out - and I couldn't locate the damned thing.

The guy who worked on it said it apeared 'somebody' was in there 'having a good nose around'.

Hmm.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 12, 2013, 07:09:48 AM

So STOP WORRYING you are not important enough  If you were they would already have knocked on your door  

no worries on my end..see reply #247

bwhahahahahahahahahahah
















Reply #247
yeah the whole bunch of these articles
(which i am only putting here to watch the evolution of the spin)

makes me want to laugh and cry at the same time

i keep asking
who believes this stuff?
and sadly the answer is
millions
but most folk ~ that wonderous silent majority ~ aren't even paying attention
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: stealthyaroura on August 12, 2013, 03:27:35 PM
POINT ONE

They have over 120 spy agencies on the public payroll

They have ECHELON and MUOS listening posts all over the world

They have every internet network being recorded

They monitor every email and cell phone call

They have satellites (hundreds) that can read a newspaper over your shoulder...

HOW MUCH MORE CAN THEY POSSIBLE SPY ON????

POINT TWO

90% of people on Facebook and Twitter ( as well as on the rest of the web...) do little more than post pictures and add endless comment like 'pretty pic or share false news stories or the latest gossip....

WHY do these people think that the SPOOKS give a rats ass about what they are up to?

Now me for example... been spending years exposing whatever I can... and yes THEY have visited the house and spent three days chatting. At the end of that visit my .mil access increased and today bout NASA and the Military run a few ads on the Living Moon :D

So STOP WORRYING you are not important enough :P If you were they would already have knocked on your door :D

EXACTLY ECHELON and my country the UK does most the work THIS IS OLD NEWS!!!!!
I don't care.I'm not shocked! if you are then you have dropped the ball.menwith hill anybody??
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 12, 2013, 08:49:04 PM


ah just another data base..
what's the harm >:(



http://www.today.com/money/serial-returners-beware-retailers-are-tracking-you-6C10900265#money/serial-returners-retailers-are-tracking-you-6C10900265

Your money
Serial returners, beware: Retailers are tracking you
 
Jennifer C. Kerr The Associated Press
10 hours ago

It's not just the government that might be keeping tabs on you. Many retailers are tracking you, too — or at least your merchandise returns.

The companies say it's all in the name of security and fighting fraud. They want to be able to identify chronic returners or gangs of thieves trying to make off with high-end products that are returned later for store credit.

Consumer advocates are raising transparency issues about the practice of having companies collect information on consumers and create "return profiles" of customers at big-name stores such as Best Buy, J.C. Penney, Victoria's Secret, Home Depot and Nike.

The practice led to a privacy lawsuit against Best Buy that eventually was tossed out.

Each year, consumers return about $264 billion worth of merchandise, or almost 9 percent of total sales, according to industry estimates.

Many buyers aren't aware that some returns, with and without receipts, are being monitored at stores that outsource that information to a third-party company, which creates a "return profile" that catalogs and analyzes the customer's returns at the store.

"I had absolutely no idea they were doing that," said Mari Torres of Springfield, Va., during a shopping trip with her daughter at the Pentagon City Mall in Arlington, Va. "I honestly think it's an invasion of privacy."

Torres, 39, says she's a responsible shopper and she'd like to know what kind of information retailers keep on her, with whom they may be sharing it, and how long they keep it.

One company that offers return tracking services, The Retail Equation in Irvine, Calif., says it doesn't share information in the profiles it creates with outside parties or with other stores.

For example, if TRE logs and analyzes returns from a Victoria's Secret customer, The Retail Equation only reports back to Victoria's Secret about the return activity. It does not then also share that information with J.C. Penney or other retailers that use TRE.

Even so, consumer advocates don't like it.

"There should be no secret databases. That's a basic rule of privacy practices," says Ed Mierzwinski, consumer program director at the U.S. Public Interest Research Group. "Consumers should know that information is being collected about them."

The retail industry says it's not about monitoring the majority of its shoppers, but fighting theft.

Lisa LaBruno, senior vice president of retail operations at the Retail Industry Leaders Association, says organized retail crime is costing retailers tens of billions of dollars each year.

LaBruno says the problem goes beyond the small-time shoplifter and involves organized groups of criminals who make a living from the large-scale theft of merchandise. For example, they might switch the UPC code on a $600 faucet with a lower-cost code that rings up at $50. They buy the faucet, then replace the fake UPC tag with the original, higher-priced code, and return the faucet to the store without the receipt for a $600 store credit, which can later be sold online.

"It's not to invade the privacy of legitimate customers at all," LaBruno said in an interview. "It's one of many, many, creative solutions out there to help combat a really big problem that affects retailers, honest customers, the entire industry and the public at-large."

The problem, says government privacy experts, is disclosure, or lack of it in many cases.

People need to be aware when they make a purchase that if they return it, some information from the transaction may be stored, according to the experts.

"Most people think when they hand over a driver's license that it's just to confirm identity and not to be kept to be used for future transactions," says the Federal Trade Commission's Bob Schoshinski, assistant director at the agency's division of privacy and identity protection. "It shouldn't be that a third party is keeping a profile on someone without them being informed what's going to happen when they hand over their driver's license or some other information to a retailer."

In some cases, the disclosure by retailers is conspicuous. In others, not so much.

At Best Buy, a sign at each cash register states the return policy, and it's also on the back of the receipt, telling consumers that returns are tracked and an ID is required. The disclosure adds: "Based on return/exchange patterns, some customers will be warned that subsequent returns and exchanges will not be eligible for returns or exchanges for 90 days. Customers who are warned or have been denied an exchange/return may request a copy of their 'Return Activity Report'" from The Retail Equation by contacting the company.

At Victoria's Secret and Bath and Body Works, disclosures at the cash register said nothing about The Retail Equation's tracking returns.

Home Depot spokesman Stephen Holmes says the return tracking isn't just about money.

"This isn't only about protecting our bottom line," Holmes said in an interview. "It's about protecting our communities, too. We know from working with law enforcement at the state and federal levels that organized retail crime is feeding other crimes, such as drug trafficking and even terrorism, in some cases."

The Retail Equation says more than 27,000 stores use its services. Best Buy, Home Depot, J.C. Penney, Victoria's Secret, Bath and Body Works, and Nike are among its clients. TRE would not say how long the profiles on consumers are kept in its database; it varies from retailer to retailer. But a recent "return activity report" obtained by one consumer turned up returns to The Sports Authority dating to 2004.

Here's how the tracking works.

—A consumer buys an item at Best Buy and later returns it. Even if the shopper has the original receipt and is within the time frame when returns are permitted, store policy requires that Smith provide a photo ID, such as a driver's license. Other stores, such as Home Depot, only require the ID if there's no receipt or if the item was purchased with a store credit.

—The ID is swiped and then some information from the transaction is sent by the store to The Retail Equation. The company says the information captured from the ID typically includes the identification number, name, address, date of birth and expiration date.

—The Retail Equation catalogs return activity by the shopper and creates a "return activity report" on him with his returns at the store. If The Retail Equation determines that there's a pattern of questionable returns that suggests potential fraud, it would notify Best Buy, which could then deny returns by that shopper at the store for a period of time.

The threshold for too many returns is determined by each retailer. The Retail Equation says the vast majority of returns — about 99 percent — are accepted.

In a 2011 lawsuit in Florida against Best Buy, Steven Siegler complained after the magnetic strip on his driver's license was swiped for a return. He wanted the manager to delete the information. His suit said Best Buy refused. He alleged that Best Buy violated privacy law when it swiped the license. But a federal appeals court agreed with a lower court ruling that the Driver's Privacy Protection Act didn't apply in the case.

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: robomont on August 13, 2013, 05:31:29 AM
i totally forgot about this surveilence thread and posted a link about the nsa over on gigas thread .sorry.
alot of good info your posting sky.thankyou.i think all the snooping  is going to cause a backlash to the gov.maybe in november.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 13, 2013, 06:36:09 AM


hey Robo...no problem
but they are already working on the next election
coming to a state near you...sigh




North Carolina Voter ID Bill Signed Into Law By Gov. Pat McCrory, Sparking Lawsuits
The Huffington Post  |  By Luke Johnson Posted: 08/12/2013 6:03 pm EDT  |  Updated: 08/12/2013 7:01 pm EDT

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/12/north-carolina-voter-id_n_3745253.html
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 13, 2013, 08:36:07 PM

customers want what? ? ?

obviously lines have been added so you don't copy the entire artice..OPPS




http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/13/gmail-privacy_n_3751971.html

Google: Gmail Users Can't Legitimately Expect Privacy

The Huffington Post  |  By Braden Goyette
Posted: 08/13/2013 9:16 pm EDT  |  Updated: 08/13/2013 9:41 pm EDT


Google doesn't believe that people can reasonably expect their emails to stay private.

At least, that's what the internet giant articulated in a brief that was filed last month in federal court and recently surfaced by Consumer Watchdog. The document was written in response to a class-action lawsuit accusing Google of violating wiretap law when it scans emails to serve up targeted ads.

Plantiffs accuse Google of violating the privacy of its users by mining their personal messages for information that it uses to inform which targeted ads it displays. The suit calls for Google to fully disclose exactly what information it's taking from emails, and to pay damages for these alleged violations of privacy. (You can read a redacted version of the complaint here).

The company argued in its motion to dismiss the lawsuit that "all users of email must necessarily expect that their emails will be subject to automated processing." (You can read the full motion here).

Google asserts that, in principle, if you entrust your personal messages to a third party, you can't expect that the third party won't touch any of that information:

Just as a sender of a letter to a business colleague cannot be surprised that the recipient’s assistant opens the letter, people who use web-based email today cannot be surprised if their communications are processed by the recipient’s ECS provider in the course of delivery. Indeed, “a person has no legitimate expectation of privacy in information he voluntarily turns over to third parties.” Smith v. Maryland, 442 U.S. 735, 743-44 (1979). In particular, the Court noted that persons communicating through a service provided by an intermediary (in the Smith case, a telephone call routed through a telephone company) must necessarily expect that the communication will be subject to the intermediary’s systems. For example, the Court explained that in using the telephone, a person “voluntarily convey numerical information to the telephone company and ‘expose’ that information to its equipment in the ordinary course of business.”
Google also argued that restricting how email providers are permitted to process the data they receive could "criminalize" features like spam filtering and inbox searches:

Last, Plaintiffs’ claims should be rejected because they would lead to anomalous results with far-ranging consequences beyond the allegations in the Complaint. Plaintiffs’ theory–that any scanning of email content by ECS providers is illegal–would effectively criminalize routine practices that are an everyday aspect of using email. Indeed, Plaintiffs’ effort to carve out spam filtering and virus detection from their claims underscores the fact that their theory of liability would otherwise encompass these common services that email users depend on.
This isn't the first time Google has gotten into trouble over privacy issues. In 2011, the company settled with the Federal Trade Commission after the regulator accused Google of employing "deceptive" privacy practices during the 2010 launch of Google Buzz.

Google was also named by the Guardian newspaper in June as one of the companies that gives the NSA "direct access to its systems" as part of a surveillance program called PRISM. Google has denied the allegations; the company's Chief Legal Officer David Drummond told the Guardian that the company is "not in cahoots with the NSA and there's no government program that Google participates in that allows the kind of access that the media originally reported."

Google also argued that restricting how email providers are permitted to process the data they receive could "criminalize" features like spam filtering and inbox searches:





?7 Gmail Questions You Were Afraid To Ask
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 14, 2013, 02:24:47 PM

i read this yesterday and it really bothered me..the update makes it more explainable but not any more reassuring




http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/13/hacked-baby-monitor-houston-texas-parents_n_3750675.html?utm_hp_ref=parents&ir=Parents

Hacked Baby Monitor Caught Spying On 2-Year-Old Girl In Texas (UPDATE)
The Huffington Post  |  By Ryan Grenoble Posted: 08/13/2013 7:19 pm EDT  |  Updated: 08/14/2013 11:18

you need another reason to make sure your networks are secure and up to date, here it is: hacked baby monitors.

In a true nightmare story, two Texas parents say they woke up this past weekend to hear a stranger's voice coming from the room of their 2-year-old girl.

"It felt like somebody broke into our house," Marc Gilbert told ABC affiliate KTRK.

As Gilbert walked down the hall and entered the room, he says he heard the voice say, "Wake up Allyson, you little [expletive]." The camera on their trusted baby monitor then rotated to watch Marc walk into the room as he rushed to unplug it.

Marc said Allyson has impaired hearing and apparently slept through the entire baby monitor incident. Regardless, it has left the family shaken.

"I don't think it ever will be connected again ... I think we are going to go without the baby monitor now," Gilbert told ABC News.

Hackers targeting webcams on laptops and other computers is nothing new. The uber-creepy (not to mention illegal) practice, known as "ratting," was well documented in an Ars Technica article published in March. But baby monitors? That's enough to make us fear the boogeyman again.

UPDATE: Aug. 14 -- Forbes believes the device Gilbert installed as a baby monitor was a Foscam wireless camera, which boasts "remote internet monitoring from anywhere in the world" as one of its top features. The camera has a known firmware vulnerability that can be exploited via a number of methods. A firmware update has been released to address the problem.

In a comment posted to the original ABC story, Gilbert says he had a firewall enabled and both the camera and routers were password protected.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Somamech on August 14, 2013, 02:45:17 PM
Otter this is what got my beef up when so called normal people joined the web in the form's of Facespock and what have you.

Basically most people always suspected the web was monitored in the circle's of web prior to facespock.  The web was about joining a forum run by an individual, making friends with people within a mutual group of people and then maybe chatting on IRC or what have you. 

Oddly people complain about Facebook yet what happend is that people gave up their choice of platform to mega company's.  In the old day's you chose who you want to chat with,  you chose the forum's you have interst in , and in some case's you use a chat program to choose to keep in touch with people you may meet in these endeavour's. 

See where it's gone now ?  People don't choose their software to engage with one another.  Twitter is only a chat program and nothing else.  Facebook is another level of chat program / website.  It's way easier to monitoer that sort of activity when it's centralised than metric's elsewhere.   

I've often wondered why I have never heard a good rant piece on twitter and facebook regarding this matter !!! 

   
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on August 15, 2013, 02:55:17 AM
It's way easier to monitoer that sort of activity when it's centralised than metric's elsewhere. 

I've often wondered why I have never heard a good rant piece on twitter and facebook regarding this matter !!!
And what about Facebook's "Friend Finder"? I find that particularly interesting, as they present the email address we used to join Facebook and then ask for the email account password, so they can look at our emails and contacts and look for those people on Facebook.

That's only to help us, obviously.  ::)

The other day I noticed that Facebook was asking me to use Friend Finder and said my sister had used it. As I found that highly unlikely I asked my sister about it and she confirmed that she never used it, she wasn't even aware that such thing existed.

So, not only do they want access to our email, they also lie about who used the system to try to convince us of using it.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: stealthyaroura on August 17, 2013, 02:06:29 PM
SKY it's an epic thread my friend and please keep it up PEOPLE NEED TO KNOW THE TRUTH!
I just don't find any of this surprising, as stated the UK have been listening for decades so
it's been common knowledge here for years.yes I would like it to end but i just don't let them
get to me.and as for snowdon MEH! he's a plant  ::) simply for the sheep imo.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 18, 2013, 03:13:21 PM
hi stealthy
yeah kinda epic..hahahah..got more below..and this is not good




http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/aug/18/david-miranda-detained-uk-nsa

Detaining my partner: a failed attempt at intimidation
The detention of my partner, David Miranda, by UK authorities will have the opposite effect of the one intended



Glenn Greenwald
theguardian.com, Sunday 18 August 2013 14.44 EDT

At 6:30 am this morning my time - 5:30 am on the East Coast of the US - I received a telephone call from someone who identified himself as a "security official at Heathrow airport." He told me that my partner, David Miranda, had been "detained" at the London airport "under Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act of 2000."

David had spent the last week in Berlin, where he stayed with Laura Poitras, the US filmmaker who has worked with me extensively on the NSA stories. A Brazilian citizen, he was returning to our home in Rio de Janeiro this morning on British Airways, flying first to London and then on to Rio. When he arrived in London this morning, he was detained.

At the time the "security official" called me, David had been detained for 3 hours. The security official told me that they had the right to detain him for up to 9 hours in order to question him, at which point they could either arrest and charge him or ask a court to extend the question time. The official - who refused to give his name but would only identify himself by his number: 203654 - said David was not allowed to have a lawyer present, nor would they allow me to talk to him.

I immediately contacted the Guardian, which sent lawyers to the airport, as well various Brazilian officials I know. Within the hour, several senior Brazilian officials were engaged and expressing indignation over what was being done. The Guardian has the full story here.(see below)
Despite all that, five more hours went by and neither the Guardian's lawyers nor Brazilian officials, including the Ambassador to the UK in London, were able to obtain any information about David. We spent most of that time contemplating the charges he would likely face once the 9-hour period elapsed.

According to a document published by the UK government about Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act, "fewer than 3 people in every 10,000 are examined as they pass through UK borders" (David was not entering the UK but only transiting through to Rio). Moreover, "most examinations, over 97%, last under an hour." An appendix to that document states that only .06% of all people detained are kept for more than 6 hours.

The stated purpose of this law, as the name suggests, is to question people about terrorism. The detention power, claims the UK government, is used "to determine whether that person is or has been involved in the commission, preparation or instigation of acts of terrorism."

But they obviously had zero suspicion that David was associated with a terrorist organization or involved in any terrorist plot. Instead, they spent their time interrogating him about the NSA reporting which Laura Poitras, the Guardian and I are doing, as well the content of the electronic products he was carrying. They completely abused their own terrorism law for reasons having nothing whatsoever to do with terrorism: a potent reminder of how often governments lie when they claim that they need powers to stop "the terrorists", and how dangerous it is to vest unchecked power with political officials in its name.

Worse, they kept David detained right up until the last minute: for the full 9 hours, something they very rarely do. Only at the last minute did they finally release him. We spent all day - as every hour passed - worried that he would be arrested and charged under a terrorism statute. This was obviously designed to send a message of intimidation to those of us working journalistically on reporting on the NSA and its British counterpart, the GCHQ.

Before letting him go, they seized numerous possessions of his, including his laptop, his cellphone, various video game consoles, DVDs, USB sticks, and other materials. They did not say when they would return any of it, or if they would.

This is obviously a rather profound escalation of their attacks on the news-gathering process and journalism. It's bad enough to prosecute and imprison sources. It's worse still to imprison journalists who report the truth. But to start detaining the family members and loved ones of journalists is simply despotic. Even the Mafia had ethical rules against targeting the family members of people they felt threatened by. But the UK puppets and their owners in the US national security state obviously are unconstrained by even those minimal scruples.

If the UK and US governments believe that tactics like this are going to deter or intimidate us in any way from continuing to report aggressively on what these documents reveal, they are beyond deluded. If anything, it will have only the opposite effect: to embolden us even further. Beyond that, every time the US and UK governments show their true character to the world - when they prevent the Bolivian President's plane from flying safely home, when they threaten journalists with prosecution, when they engage in behavior like what they did today - all they do is helpfully underscore why it's so dangerous to allow them to exercise vast, unchecked spying power in the dark.

David was unable to call me because his phone and laptop are now with UK authorities. So I don't yet know what they told him. But the Guardian's lawyer was able to speak with him immediately upon his release, and told me that, while a bit distressed from the ordeal, he was in very good spirits and quite defiant, and he asked the lawyer to convey that defiance to me. I already share it, as I'm certain US and UK authorities will soon see..

..........................





http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/aug/18/glenn-greenwald-guardian-partner-detained-heathrow



Glenn Greenwald's partner detained at Heathrow airport for nine hoursDavid Miranda, partner of Guardian interviewer of whistleblower Edward Snowden, questioned under Terrorism Act

Glenn Greenwald: a failed attempt at intimidation

Glenn Greenwald (right) and his partner David Miranda, who was held by UK authorities at Heathrow airport. Photograph: Janine Gibson
The partner of the Guardian journalist who has written a series of stories revealing mass surveillance programmes by the US National Security Agency was held for almost nine hours on Sunday by UK authorities as he passed through London's Heathrow airport on his way home to Rio de Janeiro.

David Miranda, who lives with Glenn Greenwald, was returning from a trip to Berlin when he was stopped by officers at 8.05am and informed that he was to be questioned under schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act 2000. The controversial law, which applies only at airports, ports and border areas, allows officers to stop, search, question and detain individuals.

The 28-year-old was held for nine hours, the maximum the law allows before officers must release or formally arrest the individual. According to official figures, most examinations under schedule 7 – over 97% – last under an hour, and only one in 2,000 people detained are kept for more than six hours.

Miranda was released, but officials confiscated electronics equipment including his mobile phone, laptop, camera, memory sticks, DVDs and games consoles.

Since 5 June, Greenwald has written a series of stories revealing the NSA's electronic surveillance programmes, detailed in thousands of files passed to him by whistleblower Edward Snowden. The Guardian has also published a number of stories about blanket electronic surveillance by Britain's GCHQ, also based on documents from Snowden.

While in Berlin, Miranda had visited Laura Poitras, the US film-maker who has also been working on the Snowden files with Greenwald and the Guardian. The Guardian paid for Miranda's flights.

"This is a profound attack on press freedoms and the news gathering process," Greenwald said. "To detain my partner for a full nine hours while denying him a lawyer, and then seize large amounts of his possessions, is clearly intended to send a message of intimidation to those of us who have been reporting on the NSA and GCHQ. The actions of the UK pose a serious threat to journalists everywhere.

"But the last thing it will do is intimidate or deter us in any way from doing our job as journalists. Quite the contrary: it will only embolden us more to continue to report aggressively."

A spokesperson for the Guardian said: "We were dismayed that the partner of a Guardian journalist who has been writing about the security services was detained for nearly nine hours while passing through Heathrow airport. We are urgently seeking clarification from the British authorities."

A spokesperson for Scotland Yard said: "At 08:05 on Sunday, 18 August a 28-year-old man was detained at Heathrow airport under schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act 2000. He was not arrested. He was subsequently released at 17:00."

Scotland Yard refused to be drawn on why Miranda was stopped using powers which enable police officers to stop and question travellers at UK ports and airports.

There was no comment from the Home Office in relation to the detention. However, there was surprise in political circles and elsewhere. Labour MP Tom Watson said that he was shocked at the news and called for it to be made clear if any ministers were involved in authorising the detention.

He said: "It's almost impossible, even without full knowledge of the case, to conclude that Glenn Greenwald's partner was a terrorist suspect.

"I think that we need to know if any ministers knew about this decision, and exactly who authorised it."

"The clause in this act is not meant to be used as a catch-all that can be used in this way."

Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act has been widely criticised for giving police broad powers under the guise of anti-terror legislation to stop and search individuals without prior authorisation or reasonable suspicion – setting it apart from other police powers.

Those stopped have no automatic right to legal advice and it is a criminal offence to refuse to co-operate with questioning under schedule 7, which critics say is a curtailment of the right to silence.

Last month the UK government said it would reduce the maximum period of detention to six hours and promised a review of the operation on schedule 7 amid concerns it unfairly targets minority groups and gives individuals fewer legal protections than they would have if detained at a police station
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 19, 2013, 08:02:17 PM




http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/19/guardian-hard-drives_n_3782382.html

Guardian Editor: U.K. 'Security Experts' Entered Offices And Destroyed Hard Drives
The Huffington Post  |  By Adam Goldberg
Posted: 08/19/2013 8:42 pm EDT  |  Updated: 08/19/2013 10:06 pm EDT


Alan Rusbridger, editor of The Guardian, wrote on Monday about an unsettling encounter http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/aug/19/david-miranda-schedule7-danger-reporters with "security experts" from the U.K.'s GCHQ intelligence agency.

According to Rusbridger, "a very senior government official" contacted him about two months ago demanding the surrender or destruction of all materials in the publication's possession relating to the surveillance operations uncovered by Edward Snowden.

About a month later, Rusbridger recalls receiving a phone call "from the centre of government" in which he was told, "You've had your fun. Now we want the stuff back." He goes on to explain:

There followed further meetings with shadowy Whitehall figures. The demand was the same: hand the Snowden material back or destroy it. I explained that we could not research and report on this subject if we complied with this request. The man from Whitehall looked mystified. "You've had your debate. There's no need to write any more."
During one meeting, Rusbridger explained to an official that if the British government were to take legal steps in order to roadblock the paper's reporting, the work could simply be done outside of the country. That's when things took a disturbing turn:

The man was unmoved. And so one of the more bizarre moments in the Guardian's long history occurred – with two GCHQ security experts overseeing the destruction of hard drives in the Guardian's basement just to make sure there was nothing in the mangled bits of metal which could possibly be of any interest to passing Chinese agents. "We can call off the black helicopters," joked one as we swept up the remains of a MacBook Pro.
Despite this apparent attempt at intimidation, as well as the previously reported nine-hour detention http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/18/glenn-greenwald-partner-detained-david-miranda-airport_n_3776825.htmlof Glenn Greenwald's partner David Miranda at London's Heathrow airport, Rusbridger explained that The Guardian "will continue to do patient, painstaking reporting on the Snowden documents, we just won't do it in London."

Greenwald has been similarly undeterred http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/19/glenn-greenwald-uk-secrets-britain-detains-partner_n_3779667.html by recent events. Following the detention of Miranda under the controversial schedule 7 portion of Britain's Terrorism Act, http://www.theguardian.com/law/2013/aug/19/david-miranda-detention-schedule-7-terrorism-act

Greenwald stated, "I will be far more aggressive in my reporting from now. I am going to publish many more documents. I am going to publish things on England too. I have many documents on England's spy system. I think they will be sorry for what they did."

Rusbridger's full column can be read here.http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/aug/19/david-miranda-schedule7-danger-reporters
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 21, 2013, 10:42:32 AM


you tech guys might be interested in this



http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-23768810




Groklaw news website abandoned over US surveillance
By Pia Gadkari Technology reporter
20 August 2013 Last updated at 14:32 ET



 Groklaw publishes information on technology and patent legal cases An award-winning legal news website has stopped work, saying it cannot operate under current US surveillance policies.

Pamela Jones, Groklaw's founder, cited the alleged US practice of screening emails from abroad and storing messages "enciphered or otherwise thought to contain secret meaning" for five years.

Groklaw had promised its sources anonymity, but said it could not now ensure contributors would stay secret.

Experts said they were worried that a site like Groklaw was closing.

The US National Security Agency's operations came under the spotlight following a series of leaks to the Guardian newspaper by former intelligence analyst Edward Snowden.

The NSA has since confirmed that it collected and analysed emails and other "select communications" from non-US persons, and that messages from US citizens were "sometimes incidentally acquired" as part of its operations.

In the wake of the disclosures, two encrypted email services - designed so that no-one other than the recipient could read the messages - have also closed.

One of those services, Lavabit, alluded to harassment by the US government in a statement to its customers when it shut down.

'Impunity for journalists'
 
"There is no way to continue doing Groklaw, not long term, which is incredibly sad," Ms Jones wrote, adding: "There is now no shield from forced exposure."

Ms Jones suggested that the anonymity of Groklaw's contributors could be at risk, since emails were screened by the US government.

"I can't do Groklaw without your input," she said. "There is now no private way, evidently, to collaborate."

She added: "What kind of world are we living in if the governments of the world think total surveillance is an appropriate thing?"

The website gave no prior indication that it might close, and legal experts have said the development is unfortunate.

"I'm saddened to hear about the demise of Groklaw," said Michael Meurer, a professor of law at Boston University.

"It has been a great source for information about the latest developments in technology law and policy. Several of my students launched their research projects based on what they learned reading Groklaw."

London-based patent lawyer Andrew Alton, of Urquhart-Dykes and Lord, said: "It's been a great resource because it brings together all the available documents, instead of reading second or third hand analysis.

"I understand why Ms Jones has decided it cannot continue.

"There is a danger that, by encouraging people to contribute, those individuals might be incriminating themselves."

Heather Blake, of Reporters Without Borders, said it was an issue of great concern if journalists in the US and UK began to feel intimidated by their governments.

"This has been going on in countries where there have been high levels of impunity for journalists both online and offline," she said.

"Humans have a right to freedom of expression, and freedom of information."

Andrea Matwyshyn, a law professor at Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, added: "The final Groklaw post debunked the argument that if one has nothing to hide, one should not be concerned with internet privacy, comparing digital surveillance to the type of dignitary violation committed by a burglar who touches undergarments in a home.

"This comparison will likely strike a chord with many internet users who feel unable to understand who is collecting information about them and for what purpose."

Prominent patents blogger, Florian Mueller, who has been the subject of criticism by Groklaw, noted the website announced it would close in 2011.

"We've had our differences in the past," he said. "But I think it likely that Groklaw will be back."

The site, which was founded in 2003, has focused on technology and patent cases, most recently reporting on a battle between Apple and Samsung.

More on This Story
Related StoriesAnalysis: Will web 'snoop' plans work? 02 APRIL 2012, TECHNOLOGY
Inside the minds of the 'hacktivists' 26 NOVEMBER 2012, TECHNOLOGY
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 21, 2013, 10:50:32 AM


http://m.theatlanticwire.com/national/2013/08/nsa-overwhelmed-their-snowden-damage-assessment/68554/


An 'Overwhelmed' NSA Still Doesn't Know What Snowden Took

By Abby Ohlheiser   |   Aug 20, 2013
Despite the NSA's statements to the contrary, it looks like the intelligence agency doesn't know everything that whistleblower Edward Snowden took from them after all. Intelligence officials told NBC News that the NSA was still “overwhelmed” with the work of finding out what else Snowden has. The news comes just two days after British authorities detained journalist Glenn Greenwald's partner David Miranda for nearly 9 hours.

Here's why the agency hasn't yet caught up to Snowden's leaks, according to NBC:

The NSA had poor data compartmentalization, said the sources, allowing Snowden, who was a system administrator, to roam freely across wide areas. By using a “thin client” computer he remotely accessed the NSA data from his base in Hawaii. One U.S. intelligence official said government officials “are overwhelmed" trying to account for what Snowden took. Another said that the NSA has a poor audit capability, which is frustrating efforts to complete a damage assessment.

NBC's report fits right into a PR war over what the government knows about Snowden's secret stash. Here's the recap: in early June, investigators figured out that Snowden probably took information from the NSA's servers using a thumb drive, leading one official to say that they "know how many documents he downloaded and what server he took them from," implying that the government was well on its way to getting a handle on the damage. But later that month, Deputy National Security Advisor Ben Rhodes told reporters that the White House still didn't know what Snowden took. Then, an anonymously-sourced story at CNN confidently claimed that Snowden didn't have the "instruction manual" to the NSA's surveillance programs, in response to a comment from Greenwald indicating that Snowden had something like a "blueprint" to the agency in his hands. But the most overtly omniscient statement on the NSA's capacity to figure out what Snowden has comes from the agency's director Keith Alexander:

We have tremendous oversight over these programs. We can audit the actions of our people 100 percent, and we do that.

The Atlantic previously raised some doubts over that claim. For one thing, Alexander said in June that the agency was "now putting in place actions that would give us the ability to track our system administrators." Alexander has since said that he was going to just replace almost all of the system administrators working for the NSA with machines.

NSA followers won't be terribly surprised at the discrepancy between public and private statements from the agency. Just last week, an internal audit obtained by Snowden and leaked to the Washington Post revealed that the agency has very little oversight from the secret court designed to keep it legal. That report was, if not the last, one of the final nails in the coffin for the agency's "oversight" rebuttal to criticism of their secret data collection programs.

The detention of Greenwald's partner Miranda, and the ensuing reports of apparent intimidation from British officials towards the Guardian over their reporting on Snowden's leaks, indicates that some authorities might be taking harder tactic towards the whole damage control problem. According to the Guardian's editor, British intelligence officials even forced the paper to destroy hard drives containing encrypted versions of the leaks. British intelligence officials could be worried about potential reports in the future on some of the information authorities are pretty sure Snowden took: details of the data collection programs in the U.K., Canada, Australia and New Zealand, who work closely with the NSA. But don't worry: the White House is ready to assure Americans that such tactics wouldn't happen in the U.S. of A.: Deputy Press Secretary Josh Earnest told reporters today in a press briefing that it was "very difficult to imagine a scenario in which" destroying the hard drive of a journalist "would be appropriate."
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on August 21, 2013, 12:26:09 PM
An 'Overwhelmed' NSA Still Doesn't Know What Snowden Took
I suppose that means that they do not know what everyone is doing. :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: stealthyaroura on August 21, 2013, 12:42:44 PM
Quote
But don't worry: the White House is ready to assure Americans that such tactics wouldn't happen in the U.S. of A.: Deputy Press Secretary Josh Earnest told reporters today in a press briefing that it was "very difficult to imagine a scenario in which" destroying the hard drive of a journalist "would be appropriate."

BWHAHAHAHAHA yeah rite ::) BULL poop
LOL if it wasn't so serious.

Hmmmm 2 words killer drones! "you won't see them coming"
"YOU THINK I'M JOKING?" obama the hypocrite/nobel peace prize winner ::)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 21, 2013, 03:21:06 PM


hey stealthy (and the rest)  you missed this



http://www.thelivingmoon.com/forum1/index.php?topic=5093.0

Quote

dang.. i had to come back and point this out..
i was really expecting someone to pick up on this..it's hysterical




Deer Trail, Colo.
Earlier this month, the town board split on an ordinance that would allow Deer Trail residents to
 shoot down drones in exchange for a $100 cash reward.
Residents will now vote on the measure in a special election on Oct. 7.




proves no body reads anything longer than two sentences'' 
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on August 21, 2013, 05:26:24 PM

hey stealthy (and the rest)  you missed this
Yes, on purpose, I'm not interested in drones. :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on August 21, 2013, 05:31:05 PM
Yes, on purpose, I'm not interested in drones. :)

She meant THIS

would allow Deer Trail residents to  shoot down drones in exchange for a $100 cash reward.

 ::)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on August 21, 2013, 05:48:59 PM
She meant THIS

would allow Deer Trail residents to  shoot down drones in exchange for a $100 cash reward.

 ::)
That's two weeks old news. :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 22, 2013, 05:42:07 AM

as i read this i can hear ozzie in my head singin
goin down the road in a crazy train...


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/21/nsa-lawsuit_n_3792485.html

Lawsuit Prompts Release Of Some NSA Surveillance Documents


By KIMBERLY DOZIER and STEPHEN BRAUN 08/22/13 03:12 AM ET EDT 



WASHINGTON -- The Obama administration has given up more of its surveillance secrets, acknowledging that it was ordered to stop scooping up thousands of Internet communications from Americans with no connection to terrorism – a practice it says was an unintended consequence when it gathered bundles of Internet traffic connected to terror suspects.

One of the documents that intelligence officials released Wednesday came because a court ordered the National Security Agency to do so. But it's also part of the administration's response to the leaks by analyst-turned-fugitive Edward Snowden, who revealed that the NSA's spying programs went further and gathered millions more communications than most Americans realized.

The NSA declassified three secret court opinions showing how it revealed to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court that one of its surveillance programs may have collected and stored as many as 56,000 emails and other communications by ordinary Americans annually over three years. The court ruled the NSA actions unconstitutional and ordered the agency to fix the problem, which it did by creating new technology to filter out buckets of data most likely to contain U.S. emails, and then limit the access to that data.

The director of national intelligence, James Clapper, released the information Wednesday "in the interest of increased transparency," and as directed by President Barack Obama in June, according to a statement accompanying the online documents.

But it wasn't until the Electronic Freedom Foundation, an Internet civil liberties group that sued for the release of one of the documents, disclosed the court order that Obama administration officials also acknowledged that the release was prodded by the group's 2012 lawsuit.

The court opinions show that when the NSA reported its inadvertent gathering of American-based Internet traffic in September 2011, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court ordered the agency to find ways to limit what it collects and how long it keeps the material.

In an 85-page declassified FISA court ruling from October 2011, U.S. District Judge James D. Bates rebuked government lawyers for repeatedly misrepresenting the operations of the NSA's surveillance programs.

Bates wrote that the NSA had advised the court that "the volume and nature of the information it had been collecting is fundamentally different than what the court had been led to believe," and went on to say the court must consider "whether targeting and minimization procedures comport with the Fourth Amendment" prohibition against unreasonable search and seizure.

"This court is troubled that the government's revelations regarding NSA's acquisition of Internet transactions mark the third instance in less than three years in which the government has disclosed a substantial misrepresentation regarding the scope of a major collection program," Bates added in a footnoted passage that had portions heavily blacked out.

Bates also complained that the government's submissions make clear that the NSA was gathering Internet data years before it was authorized by the USA Patriot Act's Section 702 in 2008.

The NSA had moved to revise its Internet surveillance in an effort to separate out domestic data from its foreign targeted metadata – which includes email addresses and subject lines. But in his October 2011 ruling, Bates said the government's "upstream" collection of data – taken from internal U.S. data sources – was unconstitutional.

Three senior U.S. intelligence officials said Wednesday that national security officials realized the extent of the NSA's inadvertent collection of Americans' data from fiber optic cables in September 2011. One of the officials said the problem became apparent during internal discussions between the NSA and Justice Department officials about the program's technical operation.

The problem, according to the officials, was that the top secret Internet-sweeping operation, which was targeting metadata contained in the emails of foreign users, was also amassing thousands of emails that were bundled up with the targeted materials. Because many web mail services use such bundled transmissions, the official said, it was impossible to collect the targeted materials without also sweeping up data from innocent domestic U.S. users.

Officials said that when they realized they had an American communication, the communication was destroyed. But it was not clear how they determined to whom an email belonged and whether any NSA analyst had actually read the content of the email. The officials said the bulk of the information was never accessed or analyzed.

As soon as the extent of the problem became clear, the officials said, the Obama administration provided classified briefings to both Senate and House intelligence committees within days. At the same time, officials also informed the FISA court, which later issued the three 2011 rulings released Wednesday – with sections blacked out – as part of the government's latest disclosure of documents.

The officials briefed reporters on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to do so by name.

The documents were declassified to help the Obama administration explain some of the most recent disclosures made by The Washington Post after it published classified documents provided by Snowden, the former NSA systems analyst.

But the FISA court's classified rulings have also been at issue in a year-old lawsuit filed against the government by the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

The release Wednesday of the FISA opinion, two other 2011 rulings and a secret "white paper" on the NSA's surveillance came less than two weeks after a federal judge in Washington gave government lawyers a time extension in order to decide which materials to declassify. The EFF had been pressing for a summary judgment that would have compelled the government to release the secret FISA rulings, and the government's most recent extension expired Wednesday, the day it released the once-secret FISA court rulings.

"This was all released in response to the court's orders," said Mark Rumold, an EFF attorney involved in the litigation.

A senior administration official acknowledged Wednesday that some of the documents released were in response to the lawsuit, while others were released voluntarily. The official insisted on anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the release with a reporter by name.

The documents were posted later in the day on a new website that went live Wednesday afternoon. The front page of the site said it was "created at the direction of the president of the United States (and) provides immediate, ongoing and direct access to factual information related to the lawful foreign surveillance activities carried out by the U.S. intelligence community."

These interceptions of innocent Americans' communications were happening when the NSA accessed Internet information "upstream," meaning off fiber optic cables or other channels where Internet traffic traverses the U.S. telecommunications system.

The NSA disclosed that it gathers some 250 million Internet communications each year, with some 9 percent from these "upstream" channels, amounting to 20 million to 25 million emails a year. The agency used statistical analysis to estimate that of those, possibly as many as 56,000 Internet communications collected were sent by Americans or people in the U.S. with no connection to terrorism.

Under court order, the NSA resolved the problem by creating new ways to detect when emails by people within the U.S. were being intercepted and separated those batches of communications. It also developed new ways to limit how that data could be accessed or used. The agency also agreed to only keep these bundled communications for possible later analysis for a two-year period, instead of the usual five-year retention period.

The agency also, under court order, destroyed all the bundled data gathered between 2008, when the FISA court first authorized the collection under Section 702 of the Patriot Act, and 2011, when the new procedures were put in place.

The court signed off on the new procedures.

White House spokesman Josh Earnest said the program is specifically to gather foreign intelligence, not spy on Americans.

"The reason that we're talking about it right now is because there are very strict compliance standards in place at the NSA that monitor for compliance issues, that tabulate them, that document them and that put in place measures to correct them when they occur," Earnest said.

___

Documents available at: http://icontherecord.tumblr.com



Associated Press writers Julie Pace, Josh Lederman, Richard Lardner and Eileen Sullivan contributed to this report.[/color]
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 22, 2013, 02:30:18 PM


another country joins the list

http://rt.com/news/new-zealand-pass-spy-law-777/

'RIP privacy': New Zealand govt passes NSA-style snooping bill

Published time: August 21, 2013 07:49
Edited time: August 22, 2013 11:07

New Zealand has passed a hotly-disputed bill that radically expands the powers of its spying agency. The legislation was passed 61 votes to 59 in a move that was slammed by the opposition as a death knell for privacy rights in New Zealand.

The new amendment bill gives the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB) – New Zealand’s version of the NSA – powers to support the New Zealand police, Defense Force and the Security Intelligence Service.

Opposition to the legislation has voiced concerns it will open the door to the NSA-style monitoring of New Zealand citizens in violation of their rights. A recent survey by Fairfax Media-Ipsos found that three quarters of New Zealand’s population is “concerned by the law.”

Megauploads founder Kim Dotcom, who has been a vocal critic of the bill, tweeted his condemnation after the legislation went through parliament.

However, Kiwi Prime Minister John Key argues otherwise. In an emphatic defense of the amendment in parliament on Wednesday Key argued it would not give the GCSB sweeping powers to spy.


He said he regretted the fact that the legislation had caused agitation and alarm among Kiwis and attributed it to “conspiracy” and “misinformation” propagated by the opposition. In addition, Key insisted the amendment was necessary because New Zealand is “vulnerable to cyber-threats.”

"There will be times where a serious cyber intrusion is detected against a New Zealander and the GCSB will then need to look at content - that's why the law allows that. But that should be the end point, not the starting point," he said.


Opposition to the bill called its passing through Parliament “a sad day” for New Zealand. Labor leader David Shearer said that nothing had been done to reassure New Zealanders that their rights would be protected.

"This is a sad day, we are passing legislation that is ad hoc, that is Mickey Mouse, that you have to have a third reading of to explain exactly what the Bill will do,” said Shearer.

The legislation has triggered mass debate in New Zealand with thousands rallying against it in a mass protest in July. Opposition to the amendment was headed by MegaUploads founder Kim Dotcom who was a victim of GCSB illegal spying.

"But the overreach, the lack of independent oversight, and the connection to the Five Eyes spy cloud which includes all communications of all New Zealanders are turning this new law into a serious threat to our basic human right to privacy," Mr. Dotcom said.

A New Zealand court ruled that the GCSB overstepped the mark when it spied on the internet tycoon in the run up to the illegal raid on his Auckland mansion in January 2012.




Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on August 22, 2013, 03:41:26 PM
Posted on Pegasus... some odd years ago :P

GCSB Waihopai Echelon Station
New Zealand
Code Name: Flintlock
-41° 34' 36.00", +173° 44' 20.00"


(http://www.thelivingmoon.com/45jack_files/04images/Bases/Spy_Valley_Ian_Brodie_6372593_01.jpg)
"Spy Valley" by Ian Brodie Google Earth community


New Zealand's Government Communications Security Bureau operates what it describes as a satellite communications monitoring facility in the Waihopai Valley. First announced in 1987, the facility has been identified by MP Keith Locke as part of ECHELON, the worldwide network of signals interception facilities run by the UKUSA consortium of intelligence agencies (which shares global electronic and signals intelligence among the Intelligence agencies of the US, UK, Canada, Australia and NZ).

http://www.thelivingmoon.com/45jack_files/03files/ECHELON_Waihopai_NZ.html
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on August 23, 2013, 12:11:50 PM
Indian Springs Drone Control (Nellis Range near area 51)

Drone operators needed :D  There are not enough operators available for the current drone population...

This is a typicla drone control station

(https://sphotos-a-sjc.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/q71/s720x720/226737_194687954041089_52827881_n.jpg)

Capt. Catherine Platt...

(https://sphotos-a-sjc.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/q79/s720x720/534955_194688157374402_858616074_n.jpg)

Ever wonder just what they can see? Have you ever watched NCIS and seen the miracles they do pulling up satellite data instantly?

Well with the drones they will be storing the data indefinitely and can call it up days ago at a touch of a finger...

Here is a declassified video showing the capabilities taken over Quantico.... 

The guy talking about it seems way to zealous to record everything we do though....

[youtube]QGxNyaXfJsA[/youtube]
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: stealthyaroura on August 23, 2013, 12:38:16 PM


Capt. Catherine Platt...

(https://sphotos-a-sjc.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/q79/s720x720/534955_194688157374402_858616074_n.jpg)

That's one odd looking Kitchen?
LULZ :P
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 25, 2013, 07:12:06 AM

you guys are so easily distracted.. ;D ;)


well if you’re going to be stealing info ...this seems to be the way to do it.. don’t leave any finger prints and they don’t know what you have taken till you reveal it...so there’s no proof that you took anything..what a concept



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/24/edward-snowden-electronic-tracks_n_3809491.html

Edward Snowden Covered Electronic Tracks, Government Officials Suspect
By ADAM GOLDMAN and KIMBERLY DOZIER 08/24/13 09:41 AM ET EDT 

WASHINGTON -- The U.S. government's efforts to determine which highly classified materials leaker Edward Snowden took from the National Security Agency have been frustrated by Snowden's sophisticated efforts to cover his digital trail by deleting or bypassing electronic logs, government officials told The Associated Press. Such logs would have showed what information Snowden viewed or downloaded.

The government's forensic investigation is wrestling with Snowden's apparent ability to defeat safeguards established to monitor and deter people looking at information without proper permission, said the officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they weren't authorized to discuss the sensitive developments publicly.

The disclosure undermines the Obama administration's assurances to Congress and the public that the NSA surveillance programs can't be abused because its spying systems are so aggressively monitored and audited for oversight purposes: If Snowden could defeat the NSA's own tripwires and internal burglar alarms, how many other employees or contractors could do the same?

In July, nearly two months after Snowden's earliest disclosures, NSA Director Keith Alexander declined to say whether he had a good idea of what Snowden had downloaded or how many NSA files Snowden had taken with him, noting an ongoing criminal investigation.

NSA spokeswoman Vanee Vines told the AP that Alexander "had a sense of what documents and information had been taken," but "he did not say the comprehensive investigation had been completed." Vines would not say whether Snowden had found a way to view and download the documents he took without the NSA knowing.

In defending the NSA surveillance programs that Snowden revealed, Deputy Attorney General James Cole told Congress last month that the administration effectively monitors the activities of employees using them.

"This program goes under careful audit," Cole said. "Everything that is done under it is documented and reviewed before the decision is made and reviewed again after these decisions are made to make sure that nobody has done the things that you're concerned about happening."

The disclosure of Snowden's hacking prowess inside the NSA also could dramatically increase the perceived value of his knowledge to foreign governments, which would presumably be eager to learn any counter-detection techniques that could be exploited against U.S. government networks.

It also helps explain the recent seizure in Britain of digital files belonging to David Miranda – the partner of Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald – in an effort to help quantify Snowden's leak of classified material to the Guardian newspaper. Authorities there stopped Miranda last weekend as he changed planes at Heathrow Airport while returning home to Brazil from Germany, where Miranda had met with Laura Poitras, a U.S. filmmaker who has worked with Greenwald on the NSA story.

Snowden, a former U.S. intelligence contractor, was employed by Booz Allen Hamilton in Hawaii before leaking classified documents to the Guardian and The Washington Post. As a system administrator, Snowden had the ability to move around data and had access to thumb drives that would have allowed him to transfer information to computers outside the NSA's secure system, Alexander has said.

In his job, Snowden purloined many files, including ones that detailed the U.S. government's programs to collect the metadata of phone calls of U.S. citizens and copy Internet traffic as it enters and leaves the U.S., then routes it to the NSA for analysis.

Officials have said Snowden had access to many documents but didn't know necessarily how the programs functioned. He dipped into compartmentalized files as systems administrator and took what he wanted. He managed to do so for months without getting caught. In May, he flew to Hong Kong and eventually made his way to Russia, where that government has granted him asylum.

NBC News reported Thursday that the NSA was "overwhelmed" in trying to figure what Snowden had stolen and didn't know everything he had downloaded.

Insider threats have troubled the administration and Congress, particularly in the wake of Bradley Manning, a young soldier who decided to leak hundreds of thousands of sensitive documents in late 2009 and early 2010.

Congress had wanted to address the insider threat problem in the 2010 Intelligence Authorization Act, but the White House asked for the language to be removed because of concerns about successfully meeting a deadline. In the 2013 version, Congress included language urging the creation of an automated, insider-threat detection program.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: stealthyaroura on August 25, 2013, 02:49:34 PM
ARGUS-IS (waps) state of the art bwhahahah.....funny ;D
impressive BUT state of the art? don't think so.

yeah maybe 25 years ago.
you have to remember THIS is what were ALLOWED to see ::)
Imagine what they have that we HAVE YET to see :o
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 26, 2013, 04:10:27 PM


http://investigations.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/08/26/20197183-how-snowden-did-it?lite&ocid=msnhp&pos=1

How Snowden did it
By Richard Esposito and Matthew Cole
NBC News
 

When Edward Snowden stole the crown jewels of the National Security Agency, he didn’t need to use any sophisticated devices or software or go around any computer firewall.

All he needed, said multiple intelligence community sources, was a few thumb drives and the willingness to exploit a gaping hole in an antiquated security system to rummage at will through the NSA’s servers and take 20,000 documents without leaving a trace.

“It’s 2013 and the NSA is stuck in 2003 technology,” said an intelligence official.

Jason Healey, a former cyber-security official in the Bush Administration, said the Defense Department and the NSA have “frittered away years” trying to catch up to the security technology and practices used in private industry.  “The DoD and especially NSA are known for awesome cyber security, but this seems somewhat misplaced,” said Healey, now a cyber expert at the Atlantic Council. “They are great at some sophisticated tasks but oddly bad at many of the simplest.”

As a Honolulu-based employee of Booz Allen Hamilton doing contract work for the NSA, Snowden had access to the NSA servers via "thin client" computer. The outdated set-up meant that he had direct access to the NSA servers at headquarters in Ft. Meade, Md., 5,000 miles away.

In a “thin client” system, each remote computer is essentially a glorified monitor, with most of the computing power in the central server. The individual computers tend to be assigned to specific individuals, and access for most users can be limited to specific types of files based on a user profile.

But Snowden was not most users. A typical NSA worker has a “top secret” security clearance, which gives access to most, but not all, classified information. Snowden also had the enhanced privileges of a “system administrator.” The NSA, which has as many as 40,000 employees, has 1,000 system administrators, most of them contractors.

As a system administrator, Snowden was allowed to look at any file he wanted, and his actions were largely unaudited. “At certain levels, you are the audit,” said an intelligence official.

He was also able to access NSAnet, the agency’s intranet, without leaving any signature, said a person briefed on the postmortem of Snowden’s theft. He was essentially a “ghost user,” said the source, making it difficult to trace when he signed on or what files he accessed.

If he wanted, he would even have been able to pose as any other user with access to NSAnet, said the source.

The “thin client” system and system administrator job description also provided Snowden with a possible cover for using thumb drives.

The system is intentionally closed off from the outside world, and most users are not allowed to remove information from the server and copy it onto any kind of storage device. This physical isolation – which creates a so-called “air gap" between the NSA intranet and the public internet -- is supposed to ensure that classified information is not taken off premises.

But a system administrator has the right to copy, to take information from one computer and move it to another. If his supervisor had caught him downloading files, Snowden could, for example, have claimed he was using a thumb drive to move information to correct a corrupted user profile.

“He was an authorized air gap,” said an intelligence official.

Finally, Snowden’s physical location worked to his advantage. In a contractor’s office 5,000 miles and six time zones from headquarters, he was free from prying eyes. Much of his workday occurred after the masses at Ft. Meade had already gone home for dinner. Had he been in Maryland, someone who couldn’t audit his activities electronically still might have noticed his use of thumb drives.

It’s not yet certain when Snowden began exploiting the gaps in NSA security. Snowden worked for Booz Allen Hamilton for less than three months, and says he took the job in order to have access to documents. But he may have begun taking documents many months before that, while working with the NSA via a different firm. According to Reuters, U.S. officials said he downloaded documents in April 2012, while working for Dell.

Snowden is thought to have made his initial attempt to offer documents to the media in late 2012, while at Dell.  According to published accounts, he tried to contact Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald in December and started talking to filmmaker Laura Poitras in January.

He began working for Booz Allen in March. In May, he told his supervisor he needed to take time off to deal with a health issue, and then flew to Hong Kong, where he met with Poitras and Greenwald, on May 20. He later told the Guardian that he was downloading documents on his last day at work. The revelations based on his documents started appearing in the Guardian and the Washington Post within weeks.

Snowden is currently living in Russia, where he’s been granted temporary asylum. The U.S. government has charged him with theft and violations of the Espionage Act.

U.S. intelligence officials said recently that they plan to significantly reduce the number of individuals with system administrator privileges.

“U.S. intelligence has invited so many people into the secret realm,” said an intelligence official. “There are potentially tons of Edward Snowdens. But most people aren’t willing to vacuum everything up and break the law.”

The NSA did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Richard Esposito is the Senior Executive Producer for Investigations at NBC News. Matthew Cole is an investigative reporter at NBC News. He can be reached at matthew.cole@nbcuni.com.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on August 26, 2013, 04:46:41 PM
If things are like that, I'm surprised there aren't more leaks (as far as we know). :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: The Matrix Traveller on August 26, 2013, 04:55:30 PM
(http://www.thelivingmoon.com/45jack_files/04images/Bases/Waihopai_dome_collapsed_719917.jpg)

Some naught activist punctured one of the Gov. balloons protecting a dish against weather conditions....  LOL.

It apparently cost a lot of $$$$ to repair...  or did it ?
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Amaterasu on August 26, 2013, 05:09:52 PM
If things are like that, I'm surprised there aren't more leaks (as far as we know). :)

Snowden was a controlled "leak," in that He was presented as a leaker, but leaked nothing much new.  Psyop.

I did hear rumors of another leaker that was getting NO press.  Bet HIS stuff was FAR more interesting...
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 29, 2013, 04:18:48 PM
for someone who is not sharing any more secrets..hummmmmmmmm :P



vid at link

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/29/nsa-black-budget_n_3838563.html

NSA 'Black Budget' Provides New Details On Surveillance Agency

 By STEPHEN BRAUN 08/29/13 03:51 PM ET EDT 

WASHINGTON -- Secret intelligence budget files provided by National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden show that the surveillance agency warned in 2012 that it planned to investigate up to 4,000 reports of possible internal security breaches, according to a new disclosure published Thursday.

The Washington Post, citing documents it said were provided by Snowden, said the NSA's concerns about insider threats were aimed at "anomalous behavior" of agency employees with access to top secret data. The account cited NSA concerns about "trusted insiders who seek to exploit their authorized access to sensitive information to harm U.S. interests."

The NSA concerns were outlined in top-secret documents provided to the Senate and House intelligence committees in February 2012, well before Snowden emerged this summer as the sole source of massive new disclosures about the agency's surveillance operations. The Post released only 17 pages of the entire 178-page budget document, citing conversations with Obama administration officials who voiced alarms about disclosures that could compromise intelligence sources and methods.

Shawn Turner, director of public affairs for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, who has taken the lead in responding to the Snowden disclosures, did not immediately respond to a request to discuss the budget figures.

It was not clear from the Post's reporting how many of the 4,000 potential insider threats were ultimately investigated or how many posed serious breaches of security. Steven Aftergood, head of a project on government secrecy at the Federation of American Scientists in Washington, questioned whether many of the reported 4,000 possible leaks were credible cases.

Referring to previous reports that the NSA's classified work force totals nearly 40,000, Aftergood said, "It would be hard to believe that one in every 10 NSA employees is a possible threat." He suggested that many cases might be caused by internal warnings arising from minor internal protocol errors or mistakenly accessed documents.

But aggressive high-profile Justice Department prosecutions in recent years of several former NSA staffers have shown the agency taking a toughened stance in cracking down on possible leaks. "In any case, a number that large is striking," Aftergood said.

The latest revelations also disclosed limited details about the highly classified 2013 intelligence "black budget," which previously only provided a topline of nearly $53 billion. The $52.6 billion intelligence budget described by the Post discloses that the NSA's portion was $10.5 billion in 2013 – outstripped only by the CIA's $14.7 billion.

Aftergood said the CIA's budget growth from $3 billion in the 1990s to nearly $15 billion likely reflects its post-9/11 push into drone warfare and paramilitary operations overseas.

 

.....................................................



 http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/to-hunt-osama-bin-laden-satellites-watched-over-abbottabad-pakistan-and-navy-seals/2013/08/29/8d32c1d6-10d5-11e3-b4cb-fd7ce041d814_story.html

To hunt Osama bin Laden, satellites watched over Abbottabad, Pakistan, and Navy SEALs

By Craig Whitlock and Barton Gellman, Thursday, August 29, 2:53 PME-mail the writer
The U.S. commando raid that killed Osama bin Laden was guided from space by a fleet of satellites, which aimed dozens of separate receivers over Pakistan to collect a torrent of electronic and signals intelligence as the mission unfolded, according to a top-secret U.S. intelligence document.

The National Security Agency was also able to penetrate guarded communications among al-Qaeda operatives by tracking calls from mobile phones identified by specific calling patterns, the document shows. Analysts from the Central Intelligence Agency pinpointed the geographic location of one of the phones and tied it to the compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, where an accumulation of other evidence suggested bin Laden was hiding.

The new disclosures about the hunt for bin Laden are contained in classified documents that detail this year’s “black budget” for U.S. intelligence agencies, including the NSA and CIA. The documents, provided to The Washington Post by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, make only brief references to the bin Laden operation. But the mission is portrayed as a singular example of counter-terrorism cooperation among the U.S. government’s numerous intelligence agencies.

Eight hours after the raid, according to the documents, a forensic intelligence laboratory run by the Defense Intelligence Agency in Afghanistan had analyzed DNA from bin Laden’s corpse and “provided a conclusive match” confirming his identity. The budget further reveals that satellites operated by the National Reconnaissance Office performed over 387 “collects” of high-resolution and infrared images of the Abbottabad compound in the month prior to the raid — intelligence that was “critical to prepare for the mission and contributed to the decision to approve execution.”

Also playing a role in the search for bin Laden was an arm of the NSA known as the Tailored Access Operations group. Among other functions, Tailored Access Operations specializes in surreptitiously installing spyware and tracking devices on targeted computers and mobile phone networks.

Although the budget does not provide detail, it reports that Tailored Access Operations “implants” enabled the NSA to collect intelligence from mobile phones that were used by al-Qaeda operatives and other “persons of interest” in the bin Laden hunt.

Separately, Tailored Access Operations were used in April 2011, the month before bin Laden was killed, when U.S. Forces in Afghanistan relied on signals intelligence from implants to capture 40 low- and mid-level Taliban fighters and other insurgents in that country, according to the documents.

The new details about the bin Laden raid fill out an already rich public account of how the U.S. government employed virtually every tool in its enormous surveillance apparatus to locate the elusive founder of al-Qaeda. For more than a decade, bin Laden stymied all efforts to find him by making certain he did not leave a direct electronic trail. He steadfastly avoided phones and e-mail, relying on face-to-face communications with a small number of couriers and middlemen.

In addition to the satellites, the government flew an advanced stealth drone, the RQ-170, over Pakistan to eavesdrop on electronic transmissions. The CIA also recruited a Pakistani doctor and other public health workers to try to obtain blood samples from people living in the Abbottabad compound as part of a vaccination program to determine if the residents might be related to bin Laden.

For all their technological prowess, U.S. spy agencies failed to identify its target with confidence inside the Abbottabad compound. By the time President Obama ordered a team of Navy SEALs to storm the site in May 2011, U.S. intelligence officials told the president that, according to their best guesses, the odds that bin Laden was present were between 40 and 60 percent.

Even after bin Laden’s death, however, the U.S. government kept up its relentless high-tech campaign to unlock his secrets.

Budget documents show that intelligence agencies scraped together $2.5 million in emergency funds in September 2011 to sift through a backlog of computer files and other evidence recovered from bin Laden’s hideout. The money went to buy 36 computer workstations and pay overtime to forensic examiners, linguists and “triage personnel” involved in the project


Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 30, 2013, 11:15:15 AM


http://investigations.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/08/30/20200659-how-much-did-snowden-take-at-least-three-times-number-reported?lite&ocid=msnhp&pos=1

How much did Snowden take? At least three times number reported

By Matthew Cole and Robert Windrem
NBC News
British authorities revealed Friday that NSA leaker Edward Snowden took at least three times as many highly sensitive documents as previously reported, and possibly far more.

At a court hearing in London the government told a judge that David Miranda, the partner of Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald, was carrying 58,000 documents related to British intelligence on electronic devices when he was stopped and searched at Heathrow airport on August 18. The government also said it believed the documents had been “stolen” from Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ), the British counterpart of the NSA.

Greenwald, who has been helping Snowden disseminate the documents he took from U.S. government computers, had previously said that Snowden had downloaded 20,000 documents. As previously reported by NBC News, the U.S. government has not yet been able to determine the scope of what Snowden took.

In a signed statement revealed at Friday’s hearing, a detective superintendent with the Counter-Terrorism  branch of the Metropolitan Police said that the material on an “external hard drive” seized from him “discloses approximately 58,000 UK documents of the highest level of classification.”

The government was able to decrypt some of the files using a code found on a piece of paper carried by Miranda, but is struggling to decrypt the rest.

“So far only 75 documents have been reconstructed” into a legible format, said the statement. “This represents only a tiny fraction of what was seized.”

The statement, dated Tuesday, said that the drive contains approximately 60 gigabytes of data, of which only 20 gigabytes have been so far been “accessed.”

“The remainder is encrypted,” said the statement, using a form of encryption known as True Crypt, “which renders the material extremely difficult to access. …

In a separate statement to the court, Oliver Robbins, Britain's deputy national security advisor for intelligence, chided Miranda for carrying a password on a piece of paper. "The fact that ... claimant was carrying on his person a handwritten piece of paper containing the password for one of the encrypted files," said Robbins, "is a sign of very poor information security practice."

Robbins also said that the information seized from Miranda was "highly likely to describe techniques which have been crucial in life-saving counter-terrorist operations, and other intelligence activities vital to UK national security."

A former U.S. official familiar with the case said "significant amounts" of intelligence documents from U.S. allies -- particularly the UK and Australia -- were taken by Snowden from the NSA.

Miranda had challenged the right of British authorities to retain the material seized from him, but at Friday’s hearing the judge agreed to let the government continue examining the files. Scotland Yard has launched a criminal investigation of Miranda.

Miranda’s lawyers said they considered it a partial victory that the judge said the government has seven days to establish there is a threat to national security.

British authorities detained Miranda when he stopped in Heathrow while traveling from Berlin back to Rio de Janeiro, where he and Greenwald live. Miranda had been in Berlin visiting filmmaker Laura Poitras, who has been working with Greenwald to publicize Snowden’s leaked documents. Miranda was delivering documents to Poitras and retrieving documents for Greenwald, according to Greenwald.

Miranda was detained and questioned for eight hours under Section 7 of the U.K.’s Terrorism Act. British authorities seized multiple electronic devices from Miranda.



Alexander Smith contributing reporting to this story. Matthew Cole is an investigative reporter at NBC News. He can be reached at matthew.cole@nbcuni.com. Robert Windrem is an investigative reporter at NBC News. He can be reached at robert.windrem@nbcuni.com.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 30, 2013, 04:50:34 PM


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/30/uk-new-york-times-destroy-snowden_n_3844706.html

UK Asked New York Times To Destroy Edward Snowden Documents

Reuters  |  Posted: 08/30/2013 1:51 pm EDT  |  Updated: 08/30/2013 7:12 pm EDT 




By Mark Hosenball

WASHINGTON, Aug 30 (Reuters) - The British government has asked the New York Times to destroy copies of documents leaked by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden related to the operations of the U.S. spy agency and its British partner, Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ), people familiar with the matter said.

The British request, made to Times executive editor Jill Abramson by a senior official at the British Embassy in Washington D.C., was greeted by Abramson with silence, according to the sources. British officials indicated they intended to follow up on their request later with the Times, but never did, one of the sources said.

On Friday, in a public statement, Alan Rusbridger, editor of the Guardian, said his newspaper, which had faced threats of possible legal action from British authorities, on July 20 had destroyed copies of leaked documents which it had received from Snowden.

Rusbridger said that two days later, on July 22, the Guardian informed British authorities that materials related to GCHQ had made their way to the New York Times and the independent investigative journalism group ProPublica.

Rusbridger said in his statement that it then took British authorities "more than three weeks before anyone from the British government contacted the New York Times.

"We understand the British Embassy in Washington met with the New York Times in mid-August - over three weeks after the Guardian's material was destroyed in London. To date, no-one has contacted ProPublica, and there has been two weeks of further silence towards the New York Times from the government," Rusbridger said.

Rusbridger added that, "This five week period in which nothing has happened tells a different story from the alarmist claims made" by the British government in a witness statement it submitted on Friday to a London court hearing regarding an investigation by British authorities into whether the handling of Snowden's leaks violated British anti-terrorism and official secrets laws.

A spokesman for the British Embassy in Washington told Reuters: "We are not going to get into the specifics about our efforts but it should come as no surprise if we approach a person who is in possession of some or all of this material."

The spokesman added: "We have presented a witness statement to the court in Britain which explains why we are trying to secure copies of over 58,000 stolen intelligence documents - to protect public safety and our national security."

A spokeswoman for the New York Times said the paper had no comment.

The British investigation was opened after authorities at London's Heathrow Airport earlier this month used an anti-terrorism law to detain David Miranda, the domestic partner of Glenn Greenwald, a Guardian writer who has met with Snowden and has played a lead role in writing about material the former NSA contractor leaked.

Miranda was held and questioned for nine hours before being allowed to resume his trip from Berlin to Rio de Janeiro, where he and Greenwald live. Greenwald has said that Miranda had carried Snowden related material from him in Brazil to Laura Poitras in Berlin, an American film-maker who has also met with Snowden, and that Miranda was carrying Snowden-related materials which Poitras gave to him back to Greenwald.

In her witness statement submitted to the British court on Friday, Detective Superintendent Caroline Goode, who said she was in charge of Scotland Yard's Snowden-related investigation, said that among materials officials had seized from Miranda while detaining him was an "external hard drive" containing data encrypted by a system called "True Crypt," which Goode said "renders the material extremely difficult to access."

Goode said the hard drive contained around 60 gigabytes of data, "of which only 20 have been accessed to date." She said that she had been advised that the hard drive contains "approximately 58,000 UK documents which are highly classified in nature, to the highest level."

Goode said the process to decode the material was complex and that "so far only 75 documents have been reconstructed since the property was initially received."

Goode also said that its was "likely" that Scotland Yard "is investigating a conspiracy with a global dimension. It is necessary to ascertain if this stolen, classified material has been disseminated to others in order to prevent further disclosure which would prove valuable to terrorists, thereby preventing further offences and protecting public safety."

She also said that "Disclosure of any information contained within those documents would be gravely injurious to UK interests, would directly put lives at risk and would pose a risk to public safety and diminish the ability to counter terrorism."


Related on HuffPost:

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 30, 2013, 09:01:04 PM


http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/us-spy-agencies-mounted-231-offensive-cyber-operations-in-2011-documents-show/2013/08/30/d090a6ae-119e-11e3-b4cb-fd7ce041d814_story.html?wpisrc=al_excl

U.S. spy agencies mounted 231 offensive cyber-operations in 2011, documents show

By Barton Gellman and Ellen Nakashima, Friday, August 30, 9:00 PM E-mail the writers


go to link to see a the 52.6 billion budget breakdown


U.S. intelligence services carried out 231 offensive cyber-operations in 2011, the leading edge of a clandestine campaign that embraces the Internet as a theater of spying, sabotage and war, according to top-secret documents obtained by The Washington Post.

That disclosure, in a classified intelligence budget provided by NSA leaker Edward Snowden, provides new evidence that the Obama administration’s growing ranks of cyberwarriors infiltrate and disrupt foreign computer networks.

Additionally, under an extensive effort code-named GENIE, U.S. computer specialists break into foreign networks so that they can be put under surreptitious U.S. control. Budget documents say the $652 million project has placed “covert implants,” sophisticated malware transmitted from far away, in computers, routers and firewalls on tens of thousands of machines every year, with plans to expand those numbers into the millions.

The documents provided by Snowden and interviews with former U.S. officials describe a campaign of computer intrusions that is far broader and more aggressive than previously understood. The Obama administration treats all such cyber-operations as clandestine and declines to acknowledge them.

The scope and scale of offensive operations represent an evolution in policy, which in the past sought to preserve an international norm against acts of aggression in cyberspace, in part because U.S. economic and military power depend so heavily on computers.



long and in depth article go to link to finish it..many pages

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on August 31, 2013, 05:42:38 AM


same old..they can watch us but we don't get to watch them..



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/30/white-house-visitor-list_n_3844819.html

White House Visitor List: Court Rules Against Disclosure Of Records

By PETE YOST 08/30/13 04:29 PM ET EDT 

WASHINGTON — A federal appeals court ruled Friday that White House visitor logs for the president and most of his staff are not public information subject to disclosure requirements of the Freedom of Information Act.

The 3-0 decision would keep the visitor records confidential for up to 12 years after President Barack Obama leaves office.

The appeals court ruling dealt a defeat to a private group that asked the Secret Service for all White House visitor logs from Obama's first seven months in office.

"Congress made clear that it did not want documents like the appointment calendars of the president and his close advisers to be subject to disclosure" under the Freedom of Information Act, wrote Merrick Garland, chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

Judicial Watch, a conservative-oriented watchdog group that sued in an effort to get the records, said it is considering an appeal.

"Decisions like this turn the Freedom of Information Act from a transparency law to a secrecy law," said the group's president, Tom Fitton.

Disclosure battles over White House visitor logs have been a staple of both Democratic and Republican administrations.

In May 2006, the White House and the Secret Service asserted that the visitor records were presidential records, as opposed to agency records belonging to the Secret Service. Under federal law, presidential records can remain confidential for up to 12 years. As an executive branch agency, the Secret Service is subject to the Freedom of Information Act, which requires public release of material unless one of nine exemptions applies.

In Friday's ruling, the chief judge said that construing the term "agency records" to extend to White House visitor logs could substantially affect the president's ability to meet confidentially with foreign leaders, agency officials, or members of the public, which could make FOIA a potentially serious congressional intrusion into the conduct of the president's daily operations.

Garland is an appointee of President Bill Clinton. The other two appeals judges on the case were David Sentelle and Stephen Williams, both appointees of President Ronald Reagan.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on September 03, 2013, 06:39:27 AM

i think they are re inventing the old party line..more people listening thatn you know...


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/02/drug-agents-call-records_n_3857194.html

Drug Agents Plumb Vast Database Of Call Records

 
By GENE JOHNSON and EILEEN SULLIVAN 09/02/13 07:10 PM ET EDT 



SEATTLE — For at least six years, federal drug and other agents have had near-immediate access to billions of phone call records dating back decades in a collaboration with AT&T that officials have taken pains to keep secret, newly released documents show.

The program, previously reported by ABC News and The New York Times, is called the Hemisphere Project. It's paid for by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration and the Office of National Drug Control Policy, and it allows investigators armed with subpoenas to quickly mine the company's vast database to help track down drug traffickers or other suspects who switch cellphones to avoid detection.

The details of the Hemisphere Project come amid a national debate about the federal government's access to phone records, particularly the bulk collection of phone records for national security purposes. Hemisphere, however, takes a different approach from that of the National Security Agency, which maintains a database of call records handed over by phone companies as authorized by the USA Patriot Act.

"Subpoenaing drug dealers' phone records is a bread-and-butter tactic in the course of criminal investigations," Justice Department spokesman Brian Fallon said in an email. "The records are maintained at all times by the phone company, not the government. This program simply streamlines the process of serving the subpoena to the phone company so law enforcement can quickly keep up with drug dealers when they switch phone numbers to try to avoid detection."

The Associated Press independently obtained a series of slides detailing Hemisphere. They show the database includes not just records of AT&T customers, but of any call that passes through an AT&T switch.

The federal government pays the salaries of four AT&T employees who work in three federal anti-drug offices around the country to expedite subpoena requests, an Obama administration official told the AP on Monday. The official spoke on the condition of anonymity because he or she was not authorized to discuss the program, and said that two of the AT&T employees are based at the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area office in Atlanta, one at the HIDTA office in Houston, and one at the office in Los Angeles.

The Hemisphere database includes records that date back to 1987, the official said, but typical narcotics investigations focus on records no older than 18 months.

To keep the program secret, investigators who request searches of the database are instructed to "never refer to Hemisphere in any official document," one of the slides noted. Agents are told that when they obtain information through a Hemisphere program subpoena, they should "wall off" the program by filing a duplicative subpoena directly to target's phone company or by simply writing that the information was obtained through an AT&T subpoena.

It wasn't immediately clear what percentage of U.S. calls are routed through AT&T switches and thus have records captured in Hemisphere. One slide says the program includes records "for a tremendous amount of international numbers that place calls through or roam on the AT&T network."

"While we cannot comment on any particular matter, we, like all other companies, must respond to valid subpoenas issued by law enforcement," AT&T spokesman Mark Siegel said in an email.

According to the slides, the program is useful for investigators trying to track down drug traffickers or other criminals who frequently change phones or use multiple phones. If agents become aware of a phone number previously used by a suspect, they can write an administrative subpoena, with no judicial oversight required, for records about that number.

Hemisphere analysts can track the number's call history or other characteristics and compare it to the history and characteristics of phones still in use – thus winnowing down a list of possible current phone numbers for the suspect, along with their location.

"Hemisphere results can be returned via email within an hour of the subpoenaed request and include (call detail records) that are less than one hour old at the time of the search," one slide said.

Marc Rotenberg, executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, said the program raises several privacy concerns, including that if a query returns call records that are similar to, but not, those of the suspect, agents could be reviewing call records of people who haven't done anything wrong.

"One of the points that occurred to me immediately is the very strong suspicion that there's been very little judicial oversight of this program," Rotenberg said. "The obvious question is: Who is determining whether these authorities have been properly used?"

A Washington state peace activist named Drew Hendricks provided the slides to the AP on Monday. He said he obtained them in response to a series of public records requests he filed with West Coast police agencies, initially seeking information about a law enforcement conference that had been held in Spokane.

In the Northwest, the DEA and Department of Homeland Security make most of the Hemisphere requests through administrative subpoenas, one slide noted. Since late last year, AT&T has also accepted requests by court orders from local police agencies in Washington state.

As of June, Hemisphere had processed 679 requests from the Northwest High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area. And since 2007, the Los Angeles Hemisphere program had processed more than 4,400 requests.

In connection with the controversy over the NSA's sweeping up of call records, some lawmakers have suggested that phone companies store the records instead, and allow federal agents or analysts to request specific data when necessary.

"This way each query would require a specific government warrant before the FISA Court, and Americans would have more confidence that their privacy is being protected, while achieving the same national security results," Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said in a July 31 statement.

___

Sullivan reported from Washington, D.C. Johnson can be reached at https://twitter.com/GeneAPseattle
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on September 05, 2013, 05:04:03 PM


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/05/nsa-internet-security_n_3876309.html

NSA Winning Internet Security War, Reports Show

 By JACK GILLUM 09/05/13 07:43 PM ET EDT 

WASHINGTON — The National Security Agency, working with the British government, has secretly been unraveling encryption technology that billions of Internet users rely upon to keep their electronic messages and confidential data safe from prying eyes, according to published reports Thursday based on internal U.S. government documents.

The NSA has bypassed or altogether cracked much of the digital encryption used by businesses and everyday Web users, according to reports in The New York Times, Britain's Guardian newspaper and the nonprofit news website ProPublica. The reports describe how the NSA invested billions of dollars since 2000 to make nearly everyone's secrets available for government consumption.

In doing so, the NSA built powerful supercomputers to break encryption codes and partnered with unnamed technology companies to insert "back doors" into their software, the reports said. Such a practice would give the government access to users' digital information before it was encrypted and sent over the Internet.

"For the past decade, NSA has led an aggressive, multipronged effort to break widely used Internet encryption technologies," according to a 2010 briefing document about the NSA's accomplishments meant for its UK counterpart, Government Communications Headquarters, or GCHQ. Security experts told the news organizations such a code-breaking practice would ultimately undermine Internet security and leave everyday Web users vulnerable to hackers.

The revelations stem from documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, who sought asylum in Russia this summer. His leaks, first published by the Guardian, revealed a massive effort by the U.S. government to collect and analyze all sorts of digital data that Americans send at home and around the world.

Those revelations prompted a renewed debate in the United States about the proper balance between civil liberties and keeping the country safe from terrorists. President Barack Obama said he welcomed the debate and called it "healthy for our democracy" but meanwhile criticized the leaks; the Justice Department charged Snowden under the federal Espionage Act.

Thursday's reports described how some of the NSA's "most intensive efforts" focused on Secure Sockets Layer, a type of encryption widely used on the Web by online retailers and corporate networks to secure their Internet traffic. One document said GCHQ had been trying for years to exploit traffic from popular companies like Google, Yahoo, Microsoft and Facebook.

GCHQ, they said, developed "new access opportunities" into Google's computers by 2012 but said the newly released documents didn't elaborate on how extensive the project was or what kind of data it could access.

Even though the latest document disclosures suggest the NSA is able to compromise many encryption programs, Snowden himself touted using encryption software when he first surfaced with his media revelations in June.

During a Web chat organized by the Guardian on June 17, Snowden told one questioner that "encryption works." Snowden said that "properly implemented strong crypto systems" were reliable, but he then alluded to the NSA's capability to crack tough encryption systems. "Unfortunately, endpoint security is so terrifically weak that NSA can frequently find ways around it," Snowden said.

It was unclear if Snowden drew a distinction between everyday encryption used on the Internet – the kind described in Thursday's reports – versus more-secure encryption algorithms used to store data on hard drives and often requires more processing power to break or decode. Snowden used an encrypted email account from a now-closed private email company, Lavabit, when he sent out invitations to a mid-July meeting at Moscow's Sheremetyevo International Airport.

The operator of Lavabit LLC, Ladar Levison, suspended operations of the encrypted mail service in August, citing a pending "fight in the 4th (U.S.) Circuit Court of Appeals." Levison did not explain the pressures that forced him to shut the firm down but added that "a favorable decision would allow me to resurrect Lavabit as an American company."

The government asked the news organizations not to publish their stories, saying foreign enemies would switch to new forms of communication and make it harder for the NSA to break. The organizations removed some specific details but still published the story, they said, because of the "value of a public debate regarding government actions that weaken the most powerful tools for protecting the privacy of Americans and others."

Such tensions between government officials and journalists, while not new, have become more apparent since Snowden's leaks. Last month, Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger said that British government officials came by his newspaper's London offices to destroy hard drives containing leaked information. "You've had your debate," one UK official told him. "There's no need to write any more."

___

Associated Press writer Stephen Braun contributed to this report.

___

Follow Jack Gillum on Twitter: http://twitter.com/jackgillum
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Ellirium113 on September 05, 2013, 05:14:12 PM
Here's a good one...

Court: Federal Law Allows Lying in TSA-Related FOIA Requests


Quote
Jonathan Corbett
TSA Out Of Our Pants
September 4, 2013

Moments ago, the remaining claims in my lawsuit stemming from being illegally detained at FLL airport and then lied to about the existence of CCTV video of the incident, were dismissed.

The questions before the court were as follows:

Can the TSA (or local governments as directed by the TSA) lie in response to a FOIA request?Sure, no problem! Even the NSA responds that they “can’t confirm or deny the existence” of classifiedthings for which admitting or denying existence would (allegedly, of course) damage national security. But the TSA? U.S. District Judge Joan A. Lenard granted the TSA the special privilege of not needing to go that route, rubber-stamping the decision of the TSA and the airport authority to write to me that no CCTV footage of the incident existed when, in fact, it did. This footage is non-classified and its existence is admitted by over a dozen visible camera domes and even signage that the area is being recorded. Beyond that, the TSA regularly releases checkpoint video when it doesn’t show them doing something wrong (for example, here’s CCTV of me beating their body scanners). But if it shows evidence of misconduct? Just go ahead and lie.

Can the TSA hide the names and faces of its public-facing employees (and any local law enforcement coming to their aid) who are accused of misconduct?You bet! Despite the fact that they all wore name tags and I could have legally taken photos of them, Judge Lenard feels that the public servants who illegally searched and detained me deserve “privacy,” and upheld the TSA’s decision to redact their names from every document sent to me and to blur the entirety of every video sent to me. This is the same TSA that cares so much about privacy that they “accidentally” published a copy of my driver’s license in court filings.
 
Can the TSA frustrate court review of whether or not a document is releasable under FOIA simply by “ordering” it secret?Why not?! Judge Lenard ruled that once a document is labeled “Sensitive Security Information” (which the TSA does by merely waiving a magic wand and writing “SSI” on the cover of a document) the U.S. District Court loses its power to review that determination, and the U.S. Court of Appeals is the proper forum. But wait, the Court of Appeals doesn’t evaluate FOIA claims, so now, in order to get a document you want, you must petition 2 courts and pay over $800 in filing fees alone. Yes, clearly this is how Congress intended public records laws — designed to allow transparency in government — to work.

http://www.prisonplanet.com/court-federal-law-allows-lying-in-tsa-related-foia-requests.html (http://www.prisonplanet.com/court-federal-law-allows-lying-in-tsa-related-foia-requests.html)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on September 06, 2013, 09:23:28 AM


ok here’s my little being watched story for today and becoming just another bit in the computer

background
we have a grocery store chain here called giant eagle and they have the usual ‘special’ member card to get their sale prices
and in addition to that  for every 50 bucks in purchases (gift cards to other merchants  are included in this) you get 10 cents
per gallon off on their gas..which is located in the same parking lot as the grocery store (in most cases)
with the fields to mow this works for me..they do have a limit of 30 gallons per redemption

so
they have on record everything you buy cause it obviously goes thur the register computer system
and yes I do know they are keeping track of what I buy and when

the other week I purchased some swanson broth ..
yesterday I got a  dollar coupon..to my name and address...not to occupant
from swanson to buy their broth

I’m pissed that they are making money selling my info ....but not real surprised

and I’m torn in weather it would make any difference at all if I cut their card in half and only paid cash from now on
yeah I know would be cutting off my nose to spite my face sort of thing
the last 30 gallons I bought only cost me 1.26 per.. cause I had bought gift cards for a remodel project
but darn this is just one more way the system gets you

the hook to giving away your info is obvious and  piece by piece any idea of privacy is gone
right now the only non traceable purchase is cash and they are slowly pushing to no cash and all cards

I’m an older age and I can probably live the rest of my life by not complying but soo many aren’t going to have a choice
and i wonder if they even care  :(

goin out to kick the can and think on it
grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: robomont on September 06, 2013, 09:39:54 AM
six months ago when i was searching lasers through google search.every site that i went to that had adds.guess what the adds were for.and when i got dish last month and i was searching.about it.i got like twenty dish adds in the mail.its very pervasive now.
when im in the market for a new set of boots at walmart.i just say outloud in front of the boots i want.my boot size.the next month that size will be there.now thats convenience.i know it sounds crazy but it works.just try it.my guess security picks up my voice and puts in the order.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on September 06, 2013, 10:32:40 AM

robo..that is funny scary...about the boot request
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: andolin on September 06, 2013, 11:11:43 AM
Yes, all the Web-Commerce sites are now using Google analytics...Every time I purchase something from a Google linked or embedded site, or from Amazon (which I use a lot), I get emails and adverts in my Firefox browser with "Suggested " items for me to purchase..I gave up trying to stop this crap (Used several Firefox add-ons and cache and cookie cleaners), but they seem to find a way around them..The have even showed up on my Facebook page....If I was younger, I would employ more brainpower to stop this poop..but my GAFF is diminishing with age.

Andy
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on September 06, 2013, 11:55:31 AM
It is actually silly really. If I just bought something at Amazon... sending me repeated ads for that item is a waste of time. I am not likely to buy another one, certainly not from someone else

Showing me related items would make more sense

But its a tool we can use too :D

I sell stuff on Etsy Amazon and Ebay...  by linking my FB account and allowing them to 'post on my behalf"  they automaticaly post random items for sale for me
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on September 07, 2013, 08:28:35 AM



who needs psy-ops when they just track everything you do via electronics and then funnel you into a slot they can manage..eventually everything about you is so well known..you are just a number in a category :(
 


http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/technology/google-encrypts-data-amid-backlash-against-nsa-spying/2013/09/06/9acc3c20-1722-11e3-a2ec-b47e45e6f8ef_story.html?Post+generic=%3Ftid%3Dsm_twitter_washingtonpost

Google encrypts data amid backlash against NSA spying

By Craig Timberg, Published: September 6 E-mail the writers

Google is racing to encrypt the torrents of information that flow among its data centers around the world in a bid to thwart snooping by the NSA and the intelligence agencies of foreign governments, company officials said Friday.

The move by Google is among the most concrete signs yet that recent revelations about the National Security Agency’s sweeping surveillance efforts have provoked significant backlash within an American technology industry that U.S. government officials long courted as a potential partner in spying programs.

Google’s encryption initiative, initially approved last year, was accelerated in June as the tech giant struggled to guard its reputation as a reliable steward of user information amid controversy about the NSA’s PRISM program, first reported in The Washington Post and the Guardian that month. PRISM obtains data from American technology companies, including Google, under various legal authorities.

Encrypting information flowing among data centers will not make it impossible for intelligence agencies to snoop on individual users of Google services, nor will it have any effect on legal requirements that the company comply with court orders or valid national security requests for data. But company officials and independent security experts said that increasingly widespread use of encryption technology makes mass surveillance more difficult — whether conducted by governments or other sophisticated hackers.

“It’s an arms race,” said Eric Grosse, vice president for security engineering at Google, based in Mountain View, Calif. “We see these government agencies as among the most skilled players in this game.”

Experts say that, aside from the U.S. government, sophisticated government hacking efforts emanate from China, Russia, Britain and Israel.

The NSA seeks to defeat encryption through a variety of means, including by obtaining encryption “keys” to decode communications, by using super-computers to break codes, and by influencing encryption standards to make them more vulnerable to outside attack, according to reports Thursday by the New York Times, the Guardian and ProPublica, based on documents provided by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

But those reports made clear that encryption — essentially converting data into what appears to be gibberish when intercepted by outsiders — complicates government surveillance efforts, requiring that resources be devoted to decoding or otherwise defeating the systems. Among the most common tactics, experts say, is to hack into individual computers or other devices used by people targeted for surveillance, making what amounts to an end run around coded communications.

Security experts say the time and energy required to defeat encryption forces surveillance efforts to be targeted more narrowly on the highest-priority targets — such as terrorism suspects — and limits the ability of governments to simply cast a net into the huge rivers of data flowing across the Internet.

“If the NSA wants to get into your system, they are going to get in .?.?. . Most of the people in my community are realistic about that,” said Christopher Soghoian, a computer security expert at the American Civil Liberties Union. “This is all about making dragnet surveillance impossible.”

The NSA declined to comment for this article. The Office of the Director of National Intelligence issued a statement Thursday saying: “Throughout history, nations have used encryption to protect their secrets, and today terrorists, cybercriminals, human traffickers and others also use code to hide their activities. Our intelligence community would not be doing its job if we did not try to counter that.”

The U.S. intelligence community has been reeling since news reports based on Snowden’s documents began revealing remarkable new detail about how the government collects, analyzes and disseminates information — including, in some circumstances, the e-mails, video chats and phone communications of American citizens.

Many of the documents portray U.S. companies as pliant “Corporate Partners” or “Providers” of information. While telecommunications companies have generally declined to comment on their relationships with government surveillance, some technology companies have reacted with outrage at the depictions in the NSA documents released by Snowden. They have joined civil liberties groups in demanding more transparency and insisting that information is turned over to the government only when required by law, often in the form of a court order.

In June, Google and Microsoft asked the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court to allow them greater latitude in reporting how much information they must turn over to the government. On Friday, Yahoo issued its first “government transparency report,” saying it had received 12,444 requests for data from the U.S. government this year, covering the accounts of 40,322 users.

Google has long been more aggressive than its peers within the U.S. technology industry in deploying encryption technology. It turned on encryption in its popular Gmail service in 2010, and since then has added similar protections for Google searches for most users.

Yet even as it encrypted much of the data flowing between Google and its users, the information traveling between its data centers offered rare points of vulnerability to potential intruders, especially government surveillance agencies, security officials said. User information — including copies of e-mails, search queries, videos and Web browsing history — typically is stored in several data centers that transmit information to each other on high-speed fiber-optic lines.

Several other companies, including Microsoft, Apple and Facebook, increasingly have begun using encryption for some of their services, though the quality varies by company. Communications between services — when an e-mail, for example, is sent from a user of Gmail to a user of Microsoft’s Outlook mail — are not generally encrypted, appearing to surveillance systems as what experts call “clear text.”

Google officials declined to provide details on the cost of its new encryption efforts, the numbers of data centers involved, or the exact technology used. Officials did say that it will be what experts call “end-to-end,” meaning that both the servers in the data centers and the information on the fiber-optic lines connecting them will be encrypted using “very strong” technology. The project is expected to be completed soon, months ahead of the original schedule.

Grosse echoed comments from other Google officials, saying that the company resists government surveillance and has never weakened its encryption systems to make snooping easier — as some companies reportedly have, according to the Snowden documents detailed by the Times and the Guardian on Thursday.

“This is a just a point of personal honor,” Grosse said. “It will not happen here.”

Security experts said news reports detailing the extent of NSA efforts to defeat encryption were startling. It was widely presumed that the agency was working to gain access to protected information, but the efforts were far more extensive than understood and reportedly contributed to the creation of vulnerabilities that other hackers, including foreign governments, could exploit.

Matthew Green, a Johns Hopkins cryptography expert, applauded Google’s move to harden its defenses against government surveillance, but said recent revelations make clear the many weaknesses of commonly used encryption technology, much of which dates back to the 1990s or earlier. He called for renewed efforts among companies and independent researchers to update systems — the hardware, the software and the algorithms.

“The idea that humans can communicate safely is something we should fight for,” Green said.

But he said he wasn’t sure that would happen: “A lot of people in the next week are going to say, this is too hard. Let’s forget about the NSA.”


Haylet Tsukayama contributed to this report.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on September 07, 2013, 06:50:01 PM
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-23984814
6 September 2013 Last updated at 05:58 ET Share this pageEmail Print Share this page

Cyber-thieves blamed for leap in Tor dark net use

Cyber-thieves are behind a big leap in the number of computers connecting to the Tor anonymous web browsing system, a security company has said.

The number of connections to Tor almost doubled in late August.

Some thought the rise was caused by people in repressive regimes using Tor to escape official scrutiny.

But Dutch security company Fox-IT said it had evidence it had been caused by cybercriminals using Tor to control legions of hijacked home PCs.

Hidden network
 
The sharp leap in Tor numbers began on 19 August.

Before that date about 500,000 connections a day were being made to the network.

Within a week, the number of connections had hit 1.5 million and has continued to grow.

The latest update from Tor suggests about three million connections are now being made on a daily basis.

Tor (The Onion Router) attempts to hide who is using the web by routing their data through a series of computers each one of which encrypts the data passing through it.

It is widely used by people living in nations that monitor what citizens say online, to avoid official attention.

Many people on the Tor admin mailing list suggested the growth in use had been caused by more people turning to the network as many different governments cracked down on what can be said and done online.

But Fox-IT said it had traced the growing number of connections to a botnet - a network of home computers hijacked by malicious computer programs.

Botnets are the favoured tools of cybercriminals, who use them as a resource to plunder for saleable information or as a way to send spam or launch attacks on other sites.

In a blog post Fox-IT said there was growing evidence a group of criminals who ran the Mevade.A or Sefnit botnet had turned to Tor to control their army of hijacked computers.

The geographic spread of compromised computers on Sefnit was very similar to those recently seen to have joined Tor, it said.

And a closer look at the code being run by some individual PCs on Sefnit showed they had the latest version of Tor installed and regularly checked in with a Tor site for instructions about what to do.

So far, said the blog, it was not entirely clear what the botnet was being used for.

"It does however originate from a Russian-spoken region, and is likely motivated by direct or indirect financial-related crime," wrote Fox-IT analysts.

The rise in Tor connections has caused problems for operators of the browsing network.

In a blog post, Tor said it was looking into ways to stop botnet controllers using the network to co-ordinate criminal activity.

In addition, it added, Tor was not a great way to control millions of infected machines.

"If you have a multi-million node botnet, it's silly to try to hide it behind the 4,000-relay Tor network," said the blog.

"These people should be using their botnet as a peer-to-peer anonymity system for itself."
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on September 07, 2013, 06:51:05 PM


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-23981291


leaks: US and UK 'crack online encryption'



September 2013 Last updated at 07:34 ET
US and UK intelligence have reportedly cracked the encryption codes protecting the emails, banking and medical records of hundreds of millions of people.

Disclosures by leaker Edward Snowden allege the US National Security Agency (NSA) and the UK's GCHQ successfully decoded key online security protocols.

They suggest some internet companies provided the agencies backdoor access to their security systems.

The NSA is said to spend $250m (£160m) a year on the top-secret operation

It is codenamed Bullrun, an American civil-war battle, according to the documents published by the Guardian in conjunction with the New York Times and ProPublica.

The British counterpart scheme run by GCHQ is called Edgehill, after the first major engagement of the English civil war, say the documents.

'Behind-the-scenes persuasion'
 
The reports say the UK and US intelligence agencies are focusing on the encryption used in 4G smartphones, email, online shopping and remote business communication networks.

The encryption techniques are used by internet services such as Google, Facebook and Yahoo.

Under Bullrun, it is said that the NSA has built powerful supercomputers to try to crack the technology that scrambles and encrypts personal information when internet users log on to access various services.

The NSA also collaborated with unnamed technology companies to build so-called back doors into their software - something that would give the government access to information before it is encrypted and sent over the internet, it is reported.

As well as supercomputers, methods used include "technical trickery, court orders and behind-the-scenes persuasion to undermine the major tools protecting the privacy of everyday communications", the New York Times reports.



The US reportedly began investing billions of dollars in the operation in 2000 after its initial efforts to install a "back door" in all encryption systems were thwarted.

'Gobsmacked'
 
During the next decade, it is said the NSA employed code-breaking computers and began collaborating with technology companies at home and abroad to build entry points into their products.

The documents provided to the Guardian by Mr Snowden do not specify which companies participated.

The NSA also hacked into computers to capture messages prior to encryption, and used broad influence to introduce weaknesses into encryption standards followed by software developers the world over, the New York Times reports.

When British analysts were first told of the extent of the scheme they were "gobsmacked", according to one memo among more than 50,000 documents shared by the Guardian.

NSA officials continue to defend the agency's actions, claiming it will put the US at considerable risk if messages from terrorists and spies cannot be deciphered.

But some experts argue that such efforts could actually undermine national security, noting that any back doors inserted into encryption programs can be exploited by those outside the government.

It is the latest in a series of intelligence leaks by Mr Snowden, a former NSA contractor, who began providing caches of sensitive government documents to media outlets three months ago.

In June, the 30-year-old fled his home in Hawaii, where he worked at a small NSA installation, to Hong Kong, and subsequently to Russia after making revelations about a secret US data-gathering programme.

A US federal court has since filed espionage charges against Mr Snowden and is seeking his extradition.

Mr Snowden, however, remains in Russia where he has been granted temporary asylum.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on September 09, 2013, 03:48:03 PM


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/09/nsa-steve-jobs_n_3895375.html?utm_hp_ref=technology
iPhone Users Are 'Zombies' And Steve Jobs Was 'Big Brother,' According To The NSA: Report
The Huffington Post  |  By Alexis Kleinman
Posted: 09/09/2013 4:30 pm EDT  |  Updated: 09/09/2013 5:33 pm EDT

In a classic case of the pot calling the kettle black, the NSA reportedly called Apple co-founder Steve Jobs "Big Brother," while also describing iPhone users as "zombies."

In documents leaked by the German news magazine Der Spiegel on Sunday, the National Security Agency suggests that Apple and Steve Jobs are controlling and observing the public.

In fact, the NSA has been spying on Americans' email data and phone data for years. In its story Der Spiegel revealed that the NSA accesses data from all major types of smartphones. The NSA also seems to have access to iPhone geolocation tools and other data, Der Spiegel reports.

Der Spiegel obtained slides from what looks to be an internal NSA presentation. One of the slides obtained by Der Spiegel actually uses images from Apple's "1984" commercial, which played during the 1984 Super Bowl. The whole purpose of that commercial, of course, was to show how Apple would help people avoid an oppressive society, not to start an oppressive society.

"Who knew in 1984... that this would be big brother... and the zombies would be paying customers?" the slides ask. On the slide referring to "Big Brother," there's a photo of Steve Jobs, and on the slide about zombies there's photos of over-excited Apple fans with their new iPhones. You can see the slides below:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/09/nsa-steve-jobs_n_3895375.html?utm_hp_ref=technology
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on September 10, 2013, 06:25:58 PM


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/10/nsa-surveillance-documents_n_3902208.html

BUSTED.!!
NSA Surveillance Documents Released By Officials Show Misuse Of Domestic Spying Program


AP  |  Posted: 09/10/2013 4:46 pm EDT  |  Updated: 09/10/2013 5:15 pm EDT
BY PAUL ELIAS, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — Federal officials on Tuesday released previously classified documents showing misuse of a domestic spying program in 2009.

The Obama administration has been facing mounting pressure to reveal more details about the government's domestic surveillance program since a former intelligence contractor released documents showing massive National Security Agency trawling of domestic data.

The information included domestic telephone numbers, calling patterns and the agency's collection of Americans' Internet user names, IP addresses and other metadata swept up in surveillance of foreign terror suspects.

The documents released Tuesday relate to a time in 2009 when U.S. spies went too far in collecting domestic phone data and then mislead a secret spy court about their activities.

The documents came in response to a lawsuit filed by the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

A federal judge in 2011 said in a declassified order that he was troubled by at least three incidents over three years where government officials admitted to mistaken collection of domestic data.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: robomont on September 10, 2013, 09:33:27 PM
sky you have done a great job of maintaining this thread.thumbs up.
i just want to say about that behind the scene persuasion.ive had dish network for three months it also comes with wifi.my sleep has more steady and regular since i got it.almost like it is controlling my sleep habits.its still in the theory stage but im putting it out there for us to consider.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: burntheships on September 10, 2013, 09:46:27 PM
@ Sky, really good work documenting the play out,
as Robo said, good job lady!

And @ Robo, I unplug my Wi Fi at night....
and I sniff Lavender!

 ;D
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: robomont on September 10, 2013, 09:59:13 PM
oh im not complaining.but im usually up at three in the morn but here lately ive been on a 1-8am sleep cycle.it may be a seasonal thing but just wanted see if others habits changed because of wifi.

who knows the nsa may be hacking voting machines.they could be manipulating intelligence the other agencies get.the skies the limit.they could mwnipulating the flow of money.controling well production so that fuel prices fluctuate at there bidding.on a world wide scale.
i dont know if you know about this sight.its kinda creepy.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: robomont on September 10, 2013, 10:01:50 PM
 http://cryptome.org/  (http://cryptome.org/)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: burntheships on September 10, 2013, 10:06:19 PM
http://cryptome.org/  (http://cryptome.org/)

IMO, great site. I do not recall ever a frivolous write up
from them. They do have some serious heavy duty stuff,
if I recall correctly the man who runs Cryptome had
interaction at one time with Assange.

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/older-quieter-wikileaks-cryptome-perseveres
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: burntheships on September 10, 2013, 10:41:16 PM
Just a little amusement....

[youtube]anLfoy2XsFw[/youtube]
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on September 11, 2013, 05:02:46 AM

hi guys.. i just find this whole thing un-freakin-believeable..and sad and a sign of worse to come if
it continues down the road of machines...it isn't sy-fi anymore..and it isn't run by those who know how to do it or even what to do with it..they can't analysis it - it's too big so they have to relie on the machines ..not good   -  not good...NOT GOOD  :(
i used to think the rise of the machines was just impossible.. now i don't and i have to work so that it doesn'tsit in my brain and  bother me...the last two lines are telling.

robo..i don't have wi-fi but can see how, if you were sensitive,  it could get to you..
bts..funny song...?  ;)
gotta check out those links..thanks


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/huff-wires/20130911/us-nsa-surveillance/?utm_hp_ref=homepage&ir=homepage

The NSA machine: Too big for anyone to understand
MATT APUZZO | September 11, 2013 07:00 AM EST



WASHINGTON — The surveillance machine grew too big for anyone to understand.

The National Security Agency set it in motion in 2006 and the vast network of supercomputers, switches and wiretaps began gathering Americans' phone and Internet records by the millions, looking for signs of terrorism.

But every day, NSA analysts snooped on more American phone records than they were allowed to. Some officials searched databases of phone records without even realizing it. Others shared the results of their searches with people who weren't authorized to see them.

It took nearly three years before the government figured out that so much had gone wrong. It took even longer to figure out why.

Newly declassified documents released Tuesday tell a story of a surveillance apparatus so unwieldy and complex that nobody fully comprehended it, even as the government pointed it at the American people in the name of protecting them.

"There was no single person who had a complete technical understanding," government lawyers explained to a federal judge in 2009.

During a summer in which former NSA systems analyst Edward Snowden released America's surveillance secrets to the world, the Obama administration has repeatedly tried to reassure people that the NSA's powers were kept in check by Congress and the courts. The mistakes discovered in 2009 have been fixed, the president said, a reflection of that oversight.

But the documents from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court show that, in developing the world's most sophisticated surveillance network, even senior lawyers and officials weren't sure how the system worked and didn't understand what they were told.

"It appears there was never a complete understanding among the key personnel . regarding what each individual meant by the terminology," lawyers wrote in March 2009 as the scope of the problems came into focus.

As a result, the judges on the surveillance court, who rely on the NSA to explain the surveillance program, approved a program that was far more intrusive than they believed.

"Given the executive branch's responsibility for and expertise in determining how best to protect our national security, and in light of the scale of this bulk collection program, the court must rely heavily on the government to monitor this program," Judge Reggie B. Walton wrote in a 2009 order that found the NSA had repeatedly misrepresented its programs.

In Congress, meanwhile, only some lawmakers fully understand the programs they have repeatedly authorized and are supposed to be overseeing. For instance, Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., one of the sponsors of the USA Patriot Act, has said he never intended it to be used to collect and store the phone records of every American.

And when Director of National Intelligence James Clapper was asked whether the government was doing that, he testified, "No." Yet Snowden's revelations, published in Britain's Guardian newspaper, show that is what happened.

There is no evidence in the new documents suggesting the NSA used its surveillance powers to spy on Americans for political purposes, a fear of many critics who recall the FBI's intrusive monitoring of civil rights leaders and anti-war protesters in the 1960s. Instead, the documents blame the years of government overreaching on technical mistakes, misunderstandings and lack of training.

From 2006 through early 2009, for instance, the NSA's computers reached into the database of phone records and compared them with thousands of others without "reasonable, articulable suspicion," the required legal standard.

By the time the problems were discovered, only about 10 percent of the 17,835 phone numbers on the government's watch list in early 2009 met the legal standard.

By then, Walton said he'd "lost confidence" in the NSA's ability to legally operate the program. He ordered a full review of the surveillance.

In its long report to the surveillance court in August 2009, the Obama administration blamed its mistakes on the complexity of the system and "a lack of shared understanding among the key stakeholders" about the scope of the surveillance.

"The documents released today are a testament to the government's strong commitment to detecting, correcting and reporting mistakes that occur in implementing technologically complex intelligence collection activities, and to continually improving its oversight and compliance processes," Clapper said in a statement Tuesday.

The surveillance court was satisfied by those improvements; it allowed the NSA to continue collecting phone records every day, a practice that continues today.

Now, the Obama administration is fending off lawsuits and a push in Congress to rein in the surveillance.

An unusual coalition of liberal Democrats and Republican civil libertarians has proposed several bills that would either scrap the phone surveillance entirely or require more oversight.

President Barack Obama has said he's open to more oversight but says the surveillance is essential to keep the country safe.

Obama and Clapper have said the changes made in 2009 resulted in tightened controls. American data is still collected but only seldom looked at, officials said. And it is kept on secure computer servers equipped with special software to protect it from analysts looking to illegally snoop.

"There are checks at multiple levels," NSA Deputy Director John Inglis told Congress in July. "There are checks in terms of what an individual might be doing at any moment in time."

The same checks that protect Americans' personal data were also supposed to protect the NSA's information. Yet Snowden, a 29-year-old contractor, managed to walk out with flash drives full of the nation's most highly classified documents.

The NSA is still trying to figure out, in such a complex system, exactly how Snowden defeated those checks.

"I think we can say that they failed," Inglis said. "But we don't yet know where."

___

Associated Press writers Stephan Braun, Adam Goldman, Kimberly Dozier, Eileen Sullivan, Ted Bridis, Jim Drinkard and Paul Elias in San Francisco contributed to this report.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: burntheships on September 11, 2013, 08:30:54 AM

bts..funny song...?  ;)


Well, to be more accurate, I should have said "theme music"...
and had specifically in mind those guys and gals in the NSA that spy
on their wives, spouses, love interests, etc.

 ;)

Indeed, the race is on...to the finish line for the Rise of The Machines.

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on September 12, 2013, 07:21:08 AM
wow..now here's are real shocker.. stuff shared with the overlords.. hummmmmmmmm..how surprised am i....NOT



http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/11/nsa-americans-personal-data-israel-documents
NSA shares raw intelligence including Americans' data with Israel
• Secret deal places no legal limits on use of data by Israelis
• Only official US government communications protected
• Agency insists it complies with rules governing privacy


entire doc at link
• Read the NSA and Israel's 'memorandum of understanding'

http://www.theguardian.com/world/interactive/2013/sep/11/nsa-israel-intelligence-memorandum-understanding-document

NSA and Israeli intelligence: memorandum of understanding – full document
Top-secret document shows how intelligence being shared with Israel would not be filtered in advance by NSA analysts to remove US communications


Glenn Greenwald, Laura Poitras and Ewen MacAskill
The Guardian, Wednesday 11 September 2013 10.40 EDT

 
The agreement for the US to provide raw intelligence data to Israel was reached in principle in March 2009, the document shows.
The National Security Agency routinely shares raw intelligence data with Israel without first sifting it to remove information about US citizens, a top-secret document provided to the Guardian by whistleblower Edward Snowden reveals.

Details of the intelligence-sharing agreement are laid out in a memorandum of understanding between the NSA and its Israeli counterpart that shows the US government handed over intercepted communications likely to contain phone calls and emails of American citizens. The agreement places no legally binding limits on the use of the data by the Israelis.

The disclosure that the NSA agreed to provide raw intelligence data to a foreign country contrasts with assurances from the Obama administration that there are rigorous safeguards to protect the privacy of US citizens caught in the dragnet. The intelligence community calls this process "minimization", but the memorandum makes clear that the information shared with the Israelis would be in its pre-minimized state.

The deal was reached in principle in March 2009, according to the undated memorandum, which lays out the ground rules for the intelligence sharing.

The five-page memorandum, termed an agreement between the US and Israeli intelligence agencies "pertaining to the protection of US persons", repeatedly stresses the constitutional rights of Americans to privacy and the need for Israeli intelligence staff to respect these rights.

But this is undermined by the disclosure that Israel is allowed to receive "raw Sigint" – signal intelligence. The memorandum says: "Raw Sigint includes, but is not limited to, unevaluated and unminimized transcripts, gists, facsimiles, telex, voice and Digital Network Intelligence metadata and content."

According to the agreement, the intelligence being shared would not be filtered in advance by NSA analysts to remove US communications. "NSA routinely sends ISNU [the Israeli Sigint National Unit] minimized and unminimized raw collection", it says.

Although the memorandum is explicit in saying the material had to be handled in accordance with US law, and that the Israelis agreed not to deliberately target Americans identified in the data, these rules are not backed up by legal obligations.

"This agreement is not intended to create any legally enforceable rights and shall not be construed to be either an international agreement or a legally binding instrument according to international law," the document says.

In a statement to the Guardian, an NSA spokesperson did not deny that personal data about Americans was included in raw intelligence data shared with the Israelis. But the agency insisted that the shared intelligence complied with all rules governing privacy.

"Any US person information that is acquired as a result of NSA's surveillance activities is handled under procedures that are designed to protect privacy rights," the spokesperson said.

The NSA declined to answer specific questions about the agreement, including whether permission had been sought from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance (Fisa) court for handing over such material.

The memorandum of understanding, which the Guardian is publishing in full, allows Israel to retain "any files containing the identities of US persons" for up to a year. The agreement requests only that the Israelis should consult the NSA's special liaison adviser when such data is found.

Notably, a much stricter rule was set for US government communications found in the raw intelligence. The Israelis were required to "destroy upon recognition" any communication "that is either to or from an official of the US government". Such communications included those of "officials of the executive branch (including the White House, cabinet departments, and independent agencies), the US House of Representatives and Senate (member and staff) and the US federal court system (including, but not limited to, the supreme court)".

It is not clear whether any communications involving members of US Congress or the federal courts have been included in the raw data provided by the NSA, nor is it clear how or why the NSA would be in possession of such communications. In 2009, however, the New York Times reported on "the agency's attempt to wiretap a member of Congress, without court approval, on an overseas trip".

The NSA is required by law to target only non-US persons without an individual warrant, but it can collect the content and metadata of Americans' emails and calls without a warrant when such communication is with a foreign target. US persons are defined in surveillance legislation as US citizens, permanent residents and anyone located on US soil at the time of the interception, unless it has been positively established that they are not a citizen or permanent resident.

Moreover, with much of the world's internet traffic passing through US networks, large numbers of purely domestic communications also get scooped up incidentally by the agency's surveillance programs.

The document mentions only one check carried out by the NSA on the raw intelligence, saying the agency will "regularly review a sample of files transferred to ISNU to validate the absence of US persons' identities". It also requests that the Israelis limit access only to personnel with a "strict need to know".

Israeli intelligence is allowed "to disseminate foreign intelligence information concerning US persons derived from raw Sigint by NSA" on condition that it does so "in a manner that does not identify the US person". The agreement also allows Israel to release US person identities to "outside parties, including all INSU customers" with the NSA's written permission.

Although Israel is one of America's closest allies, it is not one of the inner core of countries involved in surveillance sharing with the US - Britain, Australia, Canada and New Zealand. This group is collectively known as Five Eyes.

The relationship between the US and Israel has been strained at times, both diplomatically and in terms of intelligence. In the top-secret 2013 intelligence community budget request, details of which were disclosed by the Washington Post, Israel is identified alongside Iran and China as a target for US cyberattacks.

While NSA documents tout the mutually beneficial relationship of Sigint sharing, another report, marked top secret and dated September 2007, states that the relationship, while central to US strategy, has become overwhelmingly one-sided in favor of Israel.

"Balancing the Sigint exchange equally between US and Israeli needs has been a constant challenge," states the report, titled 'History of the US – Israel Sigint Relationship, Post-1992'. "In the last decade, it arguably tilted heavily in favor of Israeli security concerns. 9/11 came, and went, with NSA's only true Third Party [counter-terrorism] relationship being driven almost totally by the needs of the partner."

 

In another top-secret document seen by the Guardian, dated 2008, a senior NSA official points out that Israel aggressively spies on the US. "On the one hand, the Israelis are extraordinarily good Sigint partners for us, but on the other, they target us to learn our positions on Middle East problems," the official says. "A NIE [National Intelligence Estimate] ranked them as the third most aggressive intelligence service against the US."

Later in the document, the official is quoted as saying: "One of NSA's biggest threats is actually from friendly intelligence services, like Israel. There are parameters on what NSA shares with them, but the exchange is so robust, we sometimes share more than we intended."

 

The memorandum of understanding also contains hints that there had been tensions in the intelligence-sharing relationship with Israel. At a meeting in March 2009 between the two agencies, according to the document, it was agreed that the sharing of raw data required a new framework and further training for Israeli personnel to protect US person information.

It is not clear whether or not this was because there had been problems up to that point in the handling of intelligence that was found to contain Americans' data.

However, an earlier US document obtained by Snowden, which discusses co-operating on a military intelligence program, bluntly lists under the cons: "Trust issues which revolve around previous ISR [Israel] operations."

 

The Guardian asked the Obama administration how many times US data had been found in the raw intelligence, either by the Israelis or when the NSA reviewed a sample of the files, but officials declined to provide this information. Nor would they disclose how many other countries the NSA shared raw data with, or whether the Fisa court, which is meant to oversee NSA surveillance programs and the procedures to handle US information, had signed off the agreement with Israel.

In its statement, the NSA said: "We are not going to comment on any specific information sharing arrangements, or the authority under which any such information is collected. The fact that intelligence services work together under specific and regulated conditions mutually strengthens the security of both nations.

"NSA cannot, however, use these relationships to circumvent US legal restrictions. Whenever we share intelligence information, we comply with all applicable rules, including the rules to protect US person information."
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on September 12, 2013, 09:02:06 PM


parts of a 2008 secret court order ..in 2013..it just gets better, doesn't it..





http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/12/yahoo-court-order_n_3917295.html

Parts Of Secret Yahoo Court Order Will Be Declassified, Justice Department Says

By FREDERIC J. FROMMER 09/12/13 08:18 PM ET EDT 



WASHINGTON -- The federal government says it will declassify parts of a 2008 secret court order that required Yahoo to turn over customer data under the National Security Agency's PRISM data-gathering program.

In a filing Thursday with the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, the Justice Department said that the declassification would make possible the publication of "much of the court's opinion and order." But the department said that some of the information in the opinion must remain classified and would be redacted.

Thursday's ruling came after the presiding judge on the court ordered the government to conduct a "declassification review" of the 2008 order and legal briefs in the case.

Yahoo was among several U.S. Internet businesses identified as giving the National Security Agency access to customer data under the PRISM program. In a filing with the FISA Court in June, Yahoo asked that the 2008 opinion be released, along with legal briefs in the case. In a subsequent filing the next month, Yahoo said that the disclosure of the opinion and briefs would allow the company to "demonstrate that it objected strenuously to the directives that are now the subject of debate, and objected at every stage of the proceeding," but that its objections were overruled.

Revelations about the PRISM program by former NSA systems analyst Edward Snowden have prompted a broader debate about government monitoring and the privacy of Americans' communications.

The case is separate from another one Yahoo has pending that urges the FISA Court to allow the company to disclose data on national security orders it received under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. Facebook, Google and Microsoft have similar motions pending with the court.

Neither Yahoo nor the Justice Department had any comment on Thursday's filing.

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on September 14, 2013, 08:04:38 PM


NSA Surveillance Documents Released By Officials


http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2013-09-10/world/41931852_1_nsa-national-security-agency-surveillance-program



Declassified court documents highlight NSA violations in data collection for surveillance
By Ellen Nakashima, Julie Tate and Carol Leonnig,September 10, 2013


The National Security Agency for almost three years searched a massive database of Americans’ phone call records attempting to identify potential terrorists in violation of court-approved privacy rules, and the problem went unfixed because no one at the agency had a full technical understanding of how its system worked, according to new documents and senior government officials.

Moreover, it was Justice Department officials who discovered the problem and reported it to the court that oversees surveillance programs, the documents show, undermining assertions by the NSA that self-reporting is part of its culture.

The improper activity went on from May 2006 to January 2009, according to a March 2009 opinion by Judge Reggie B. Walton, who serves on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.

It was one of more than a dozen documents declassified and released Tuesday in response to lawsuits by civil liberties groups and at the direction of President Obama in the wake of the June disclosure by former NSA contractor Edward J. Snowden of the massive phone records collection.

“The documents released today are a testament to the government’s strong commitment to detecting, correcting and reporting mistakes that occur in implementing technologically complex intelligence collection activities, and to continually improving its oversight and compliance processes,” said James R. Clapper, the director of national intelligence.

A strong rebuke of the NSA by the court comes less than a month after the Office of the Director of National Intelligence released a highly critical FISA court opinion that took the agency to task for its operation of a separate surveillance program. Taken together, the documents released by the office over the past month paint a troubling picture of an agency that has sought and won far-reaching surveillance powers to run complex domestic data collection without anyone having full technical understanding of the efforts, and that has repeatedly misrepresented the programs’ scope to its court overseer.

Such revelations call into question the effectiveness of an oversight program that depends on accurate disclosure by the NSA to a court that acts in secret and says it lacks the resources to verify independently the agency’s assertions.

“It has finally come to light that the FISC’s authorizations of this vast collection program have been premised on a flawed depiction of how the NSA uses” the phone data, Walton wrote.

“This misperception by the FISC existed from the inception of its authorized collection in May 2006, buttressed by repeated inaccurate statements made in the government’s submissions,” he continued.

Privacy procedures “have been so frequently and systemically violated that it can fairly be said that this critical element of the overall [phone records] regime has never fully functioned effectively,” he said.

The “bulk records” program began without any court or congressional approval shortly after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks but was put under court supervision in May 2006 when American phone companies balked at providing the data solely at the request of the executive branch.

Under the program, the NSA receives daily transfers of all customer records from the nation’s phone companies. Those records include numbers called, the calls’ time and duration, but not the content of conversations.

Beginning in late January 2009, Justice Department officials began notifying the court of problems, in particular that the NSA had been running an automated “alert list” on selected phone numbers without meeting the court-required standard of “reasonable and articulable suspicion” that those numbers were tied to terrorists.

Justice Department officials notified the court that the NSA had been searching the business records “in a manner directly contrary” to the court’s orders “and directly contrary to the sworn attestations of several Executive Branch officials,” Walton wrote in a Jan. 29, 2009, order.

NSA Director Keith B. Alexander suggested to the court that the violations stemmed from a belief by NSA personnel that not all the databases were covered by the same privacy rules, Walton wrote in his March opinion.

“That interpretation of the court’s orders strains credulity,” Walton said.

Walton also suggested that the NSA’s Office of General Counsel deliberately chose to approve the use of phone numbers that did not meet the court standards because such procedures were in keeping with other NSA collection activities.

In March 2009, the court took the unusual step of ordering the government to seek approval to query the database on a case-by-case basis “except where necessary to protect against an imminent threat to human life.”




go to this link (below) and click on the document to read it..sadly but no real surprise
 there are still blacked out parts



http://apps.washingtonpost.com/g/page/world/declassified-fisa-court-documents-on-intelligence-collection/447/

Declassified FISA court documents on intelligence collection
Director of National Intelligence James Clapper declassified documents about intelligence collection under Section 501 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act on Sept. 10, 2013.

» Declassified court documents highlight NSA violations

FISA court documents
 

Pub August 19 2009 Report of the US With Attachments 20130910
Pub Dec 12 2008 Supplemental Opinions From the FISC
Pub Feb 12 2009 Memorandum of US
Pub Feb 26 2009 Notification of Compliance Incident
Pub Jan 28 2009 Order Regarding Prelim Notice of Compliance
Pub Jun 22 2009 Order
Pub Mar 5 2009 Cover Letter to Chairman of Intel and Judiciary Committees
Pub March 2 2009 Order From FISC
Pub May 24 2006 Order From FISC
Pub Nov 5 2009 Supplemental Opinion and Order
Pub NSA Business Records FISA Review 20130909
Pub Sep 3 2009 Cover Letter to Chairman of the Intelligence and Judiciary Committees
Pub Sep 3 2009 Primary Order From FISC
Pub Sept 25 2009 Order Regarding Further Compliance Incidents
14 documents
SOURCE: Office of the Director of National Intelligence. Published Sept. 10, 2013.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on September 17, 2013, 03:23:25 PM

well i am sure to be left behind in the technology department...may go back to the two tin cans and string...read that first link..


 :(


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/17/google-wifi-passwords-android_n_3936809.html?utm_hp_ref=technology


Google Knows The WiFi Passwords Of Every Android User: Report
The Huffington Post  |  Posted: 09/17/2013 7:26 am EDT  |  Updated: 09/17/2013 4:51 pm EDT


Google might have access to WiFi passwords used by every single Android user, a new report suggests. That is a whole lot of WiFi passwords -- maybe most of them in the world.

“If an Android device (phone or tablet) has ever logged on to a particular Wi-Fi network, then Google probably knows the Wi-Fi password,” Computer World's Michael Horowitz wrote last week. http://blogs.computerworld.com/android/22806/google-knows-nearly-every-wi-fi-password-world

“Considering how many Android devices there are, it is likely that Google can access most Wi-Fi passwords worldwide.” In the April-June period of 2013, Android had accounted for 79 percent of phones shipped worldwide.http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/07/android-iphone_n_3721105.html

Privacy advocates claim that Google's Android mobile operating system has backup tools that indicate a copy of everyone's WiFi passwords are saved onto Google servers. New Android devices can "suck in" old passwords,http://www.techspot.com/news/54016-google-knows-every-single-android-users-wifi-password.html

login data and device settings once Android owners have set up their Gmail address and password. Though users can switch off this backup functionality, doing so causes them to lose other helpful features such as bookmarks.

"At any point, you can disable this feature, which will cause data to be erased," Google commented in an article at TalkAndroid.com. "

http://www.talkandroid.com/175416-does-google-know-your-wi-fi-password/

This data is encrypted in transit, accessible only when the user has an authenticated connection to Google and stored at Google data centers, which have strong protections against digital and physical attacks."

The news comes at a time when Internet users are becoming unusually sensitive about the privacy of their personal data. In April, a Google transparency reporthttp://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/26/google-transparency-report-2013_n_3163138.html

said the government is asking the company for more data than ever before. This latest development leaves a key question without a clear answer: Would Google need to hand over these passwords if the government came calling?

Eric Schmidt, executive chairman of Google, recently asked for more transparency from the government about their mining for data on the Internet, but insisted that government spying is the "nature of our society." The news on Google's WiFi password storage comes after a report by Der Spiegel that found the NSA can access most smartphone data.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/08/nsa-smartphone-der-spiegel_n_3889713.html
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Fruitbat on September 17, 2013, 03:33:25 PM
Haven't really read the thread, am just responding to the title.

If it concerns you just be like me.

I don't know what I am doing half the time, so I figure they'll have even more trouble working it out...

Fruuitbat!
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on September 19, 2013, 01:24:51 PM

McCarthy would be very happy.
..i can't read or watch the news anymore and will probably not post anything else in here..
it's making it too hard to maintain  an equal and happy  attititude

sad sad day  :(

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/19/aclu-spying_n_3956596.html


 
ACLU: Papers Show Domestic Spying Goes Too Far


By PAUL ELIAS 09/19/13 02:38 PM ET EDT 

SAN FRANCISCO -- Civil liberties groups released newly obtained documents Thursday that they say show innocent Americans being swept into a broad nationwide counterterrorism program.

The American Civil Liberties Union and several other organizations released 1,800 so-called suspicious activity reports that local law enforcement officials and others submitted to two California intelligence-gathering repositories called fusion centers.

The documents, nearly all of which were obtained by the ACLU through a public records request, do not appear to show valuable counterterrorism intelligence.

"An off-duty supervising dispatcher with Sacramento P.D. noticed a female subject taking pictures of the outside of the post office in Folsom on Riley Street this morning," reads one suspicious activity report created June 4, 2010, and released Thursday. "The female departed as a passenger in a silver Mazda."

Another reports a Lodi Police Department sergeant "reporting on a suspicious individual in his neighborhood." The sergeant, whose name is redacted from the document released Thursday, said he "has been long concerned about a residence in his neighborhood occupied by a Middle Eastern male adult physician who is very unfriendly."

The fusion center program was a target of a blistering Congressional report last year complaining that too many innocent Americans engaging in routine and harmless behavior have become ensnared in the program.

The ACLU and others are calling on the Obama administration to overhaul the program so that only activities with legitimate links to terrorism investigations are reported.

"We want the administration to stop targeting racial and religious minorities," ACLU lawyer Linda Lye said. She said they are calling on the Obama administration "to stop targeting people engaging in Constitutionally protected behavior like taking photographs."

A Senate report last year concluded that the multibillion-dollar information-sharing program created in the aftermath of 9/11 has improperly collected information about innocent Americans and produced little valuable intelligence on terrorism. The report suggested the program's intent ballooned far beyond anyone's ability to control.

What began as an attempt to put local, state and federal officials in the same room analyzing the same intelligence has instead cost huge amounts of money for data-mining software, flat screen televisions and, in Arizona, two fully equipped Chevrolet Tahoes that are used for commuting, investigators found.

The lengthy, bipartisan report was a scathing evaluation of what the Department of Homeland Security has held up as a crown jewel of its security efforts, which has created 72 fusion centers across the country to collect reports from local law enforcement and others. Some 1,700 of the reports released Thursday came from the fusion center in Sacramento.

A Senate Homeland Security subcommittee reviewed more than 600 unclassified reports over a one-year period and concluded that most had nothing to do with terrorism.

Homeland Security Department spokesman Matthew Chandler at the time called the senate report "out of date, inaccurate and misleading." He said that it focused entirely on information being produced by fusion centers and did not consider the benefit the involved officials got receiving intelligence from the federal government.


........................................



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/18/dea-agents-raid_n_3942731.html?ir=Politics


Nameless And Shameless:
 Masked DEA Agents Raid Innocent Women, Refuse To Reveal Their Identities



Posted: 09/18/2013 2:57 pm EDT  |  Updated: 09/18/2013 3:32 pm EDT

 Radley Balko Become a fan
Radley.Balko@huffingtonpost.com



Over a three-day period in June 2007, heavily armed SWAT teams, supported by tanks and helicopters, descended on Detroit's Eight Mile Road. The massive operation involved police and agents from 21 different local, state and federal branches of law enforcement, and was intended to rid the notoriously crime-ridden area of drug houses, prostitutes and wanted fugitives.

After conducting hundreds of raids, the authorities made 122 arrests, according to The Detroit News, and seized about 50 ounces of marijuana, 6.5 ounces of cocaine and 19 guns.

When Caroline Burley, now 51, first heard the boom around 5:30 on the evening of June 13, it sounded like it had come from outside her bedroom window. She rushed to investigate, and as she came out of the room, a man with a gun confronted her, threw her into a wall and then hurled her to the floor. A SWAT team had burst through her front door. Wearing only her nightgown, she asked for mercy. She recently had back surgery, she explained. Instead, one officer, then another kept her close to the floor by putting a boot in her back, according to court filings.

Caroline's mother, Geraldine Burley, was sitting at her computer in the basement when she heard a loud thud overhead, followed by a scream from her daughter and a man's voice ordering Caroline Burley to the floor. When she ascended the stairs, she too found a gun pointed at her head, and a man ordered her to get on the floor as well. She thought at first that she was being robbed.

Geraldine, now 70, pleaded with the man to let her move to the floor slowly, explaining to him that she'd had both of her knees replaced. Instead, another officer approached, grabbed her by the face, demanded that she "get the frig on the floor," then threw her into a table. She tumbled to the ground. At that point, she said later in a deposition, everything turned to "a fire, white and ringing in my ear." Another officer came up from the basement with her grandson, stepping on her knees in the process. She cried out again in pain.

The officers searched the home but found no drugs, weapons or any other contraband. (They arrested Geraldine's grandson on an unrelated misdemeanor warrant.)

Since the 1980s, SWAT teams have become an increasingly common tool in the war on crime. By one estimate, more than 100 times per day in America, police teams break down doors to serve search warrants on people suspected of drug crimes. Innocent citizens like the Burleys often become the victims of violent law enforcement tactics.

In the wake of the raid on their home, the two women have tried to navigate a disorienting labyrinth of police bureaucracies and court filings to secure damages for the injuries they sustained during the raid and for violations of their Fourth Amendment rights. More than six years later, however, the government agencies involved still won't tell the women the names of the officers and agents who raided their home -- a key piece of information necessary in lawsuits like this one. It isn't enough merely to show that the government violated the plaintiffs' rights; by federal law, the victims must be able to show that a specific officer or group of officers was responsible. This burden is something of a double standard, given that individual officers are rarely required to pay damages. The government pays the award.

As the drug war continues to encourage the use of aggressive police tactics, the Burleys' frustrations with the court system punctuate just how difficult it can be for innocent victims, who become collateral damage in the war against drugs, to get redress for the harm done to them.

***
According to the Burleys' accounts, the officers who raided their home were clad in black. Some wore balaclava masks or face shields that hid all but their eyes. Others pulled their hats down low to shield their identities. They had also obscured their names and badge numbers. Once the Burleys' house had been thoroughly searched, both women asked the officers for their names. After holding an impromptu meeting, the officers told the Burleys that they wouldn't divulge any information that could identify them individually. Instead, they told the women that they had just been raided by "Team 11." The women weren't given a search warrant.

"Team 11 appears to have been a name given just for that operation," Stanley Okoli, an attorney for the Burleys, told The Huffington Post. "Or just a name to confuse them. It wasn't a designation that gave them any meaningful way to obtain the officers' identities."

Joe Key, a retired police officer with 24 years of experience, founded the SWAT team in Baltimore, and now consults for police agencies and testifies as an expert witness. He criticized the idea of officers refusing to identify themselves. "Accountability of the police officer to the public is absolute," he told The Huffington Post.

"If there are undercover officers whose identities need to be protected -- and I don't know that that was the case here -- then you send different officers in to conduct the raid. If this is really what happened, there's no excuse for it."

According to press accounts, Operation Eight Mile was coordinated by the Wayne County Sheriff's Office, but in response to the Burleys' initial requests for information, Wayne County claimed to have no record of the raid. Instead, the county directed the women to the federal Drug Enforcement Administration.

That, too, proved fruitless. The DEA told the Burleys that the agency was "experiencing a transition," and promised to provide information on the raid at a later date. That never happened. It wasn't until the Burleys filed a lawsuit in state court that Wayne County finally released documents related to the raid, which included a DEA report with the names of the agents.

Neither the Wayne County Sheriff's Office, nor the DEA, would comment for this article.

According to the report, the agents who conducted the raid at the Burleys belonged to a DEA team called Group 6. For Operation Eight Mile, members of Group 6 were paired with officers from state and local agencies, and renamed Team 11, the name the officers gave the Burleys.

In response to questionnaires from the Burleys' attorneys, the officers involved in the raid denied violating the Burleys' civil rights. But none of them at the time denied being on the team that raided the house.

During depositions of the defendants, however, attorneys for the Burleys were in for a surprise. The DEA agents denied they were ever in the Burley home. They claimed that Group 6 had been split in two, with half the agents raiding the Burleys' house, and the other half raiding a nearby house at the same time.

Each of the agents named in the DEA report claimed that they were in the other home, not the Burleys'. Each told a story about one officer's erroneous deployment of an explosive distraction device during that raid. The vivid memory, each of them claimed, explained why they were able to recall their whereabouts so specifically. They testified that the fact that they were named in the DEA report must have been a clerical error.

Attorneys for the Burleys then deposed other members of Group 6 not named in the DEA report. If indeed the raids had been conducted simultaneously, and a clerical error had misidentified which team went where, then these other members of the team must have been the ones in the Burleys' home. But they too denied ever being there.

There's no question that the Burleys were raided. But every officer who could have plausibly been involved claimed to be somewhere else at the time. Deputies from Wayne County were also part of the raid team, but each of them claimed to have been outside of the house, guarding the perimeter. None could recall which agents were with them, however, or where their fellow officers were when the raid took place.

"It's one of the most bizarre things I've ever seen," Okoli said. "I asked, 'which amongst you went to one address?' and they said they couldn't remember. So I asked, 'which amongst you went to the other address?' and they said they couldn't remember."

***
Because they waited until they gave depositions to deny their presence at the raid, the DEA agents made things difficult for the Burleys. Assuming the agents were telling the truth, the Burleys would need to start all over in identifying the agents who raided their house. And that's assuming they could get a waiver on the statute of limitations, which had by then expired.

In June 2012, U.S. District Court Judge Bernard Friedman first dismissed the Burleys' claims against Wayne County, then preempted a jury verdict in the trial against the federal agents. He ruled that, given the evidence, no reasonable jury could find in the plaintiffs' favor, and in addition ordered the Burleys to pay the DEA agents $5,000 to compensate them for court costs.

"These women are destitute," Okoli told HuffPost. "That was completely discretionary. He didn't have to do that." Because the women couldn't pay, the government moved to garnish their Social Security disability checks to cover the fine.

The Burleys appealed, and earlier this month, a panel from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit upheld the dismissal of Wayne County officials from the lawsuit, but reinstated the suit against the federal agents. The court found that "the agents' intent to conceal contributed to the plaintiffs' impaired ability to identify them." The court also vacated the order for the Burleys to pay court costs.

But the court still stopped short of ordering the government to produce the names of the agents who conducted the raid. The Burleys and their attorneys will need to fight the government's lawyers and Friedman, who will preside over the new trial as well.

Okoli welcomes the Sixth Circuit's decision. But he said that, in addition to having to go before Friedman -- who appeared hostile to his clients' case -- again, the Burleys are at even more of a disadvantage than they were in the first trial. The agents and their attorneys are now aware of inconsistencies the first trial exposed in their stories, and can attempt to explain them away. "We lost that element of surprise," Okoli said.

The Burleys' failure to win compensation for the raid on their home is hardly unusual. And while this case may be particularly egregious, the tendency of police agencies to be stingy with information following a mistaken raid is also common. Police officers enjoy qualified immunity, so it isn't enough to show that police made a clear mistake, or even that they were negligent, no matter how much harm has been done.

But wading into the legal weeds about what police agencies can and can't do in these cases overlooks the fact that what they can do isn't necessarily what they ought to do. When confronted with these cases, political leaders and police officials could choose one of two routes. They can show some contrition, admit they made mistakes, move to make the victims whole again and look to ensure that the same mistakes don't happen again. Or they can hunker down, cut off the flow of information and engage in every bit of bureaucratic chicanery and legal maneuvering they can in order to escape accountability.

"What happened in the house, whether the women were violated or whether their account is overblown, that's up to a jury to decide," Joe Key says. "But the government must make itself accountable and transparent. This kind of stonewalling goes against everything the Fourth Amendment is supposed to represent."

HuffPost writer and investigative reporter Radley Balko is also the author of the new book, Rise of the Warrior Cop: The Militarization of America's Police Forces.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Ellirium113 on September 19, 2013, 02:01:34 PM
I found this informative clip on Magnetic Media...Anyone running around with sensitive info on a USB stick or solid state drive may want to listen up on this to raise awareness on how you may THINK your erased data is gone...

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4SSSMi4X_mA#t=514[/youtube]
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on September 19, 2013, 03:59:46 PM
McCarthy would be very happy.
..i can't read or watch the news anymore and will probably not post anything else in here..
it's making it too hard to maintain  an equal and happy  attititude
That is too close to the mentality of the people during the fascist dictatorship here in Portugal. The political police's work was made easier by the people that were to eager to help in finding (or even creating) any suspicious behaviour, so they could look like being on the "good side" while the "subversive people" were obviously enemies.

That's really worrying. :(
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on September 28, 2013, 01:31:33 PM


this was too good NOT to add..typical employee stuff





http://www.cnn.com/2013/09/27/politics/nsa-snooping/index.html?hpt=hp_bn1

NSA: Some used spying power to snoop on lovers
By Evan Perez, CNN Justice Reporter
updated 7:58 PM EDT, Fri September 27, 2013

(CNN) -- The National Security Agency's internal watchdog detailed a dozen instances in the past decade in which its employees intentionally misused the agency's surveillance power, in some cases to snoop on their love interests.

A letter from the NSA's inspector general responding to a request by Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, lists the dozen incidents where the NSA's foreign intelligence collection systems were abused. The letter also says there are two additional incidents now under investigation and another allegation pending that may require an investigation.

At least six of the incidents were referred to the Justice Department for possible prosecution or additional action; none appear to have resulted in charges. The letter doesn't identify the employees.

Several of the cases involve so-called "Loveint" violations

In one case, detailed by the NSA's watchdog, a civilian intelligence employee assigned overseas was found to have used the NSA's signals intelligence collection system to listen to the phone conversations on nine phone numbers belonging to foreign women from 1998 to 2003 without any valid reason. The signals intelligence system is used to spy on foreign targets for national security reasons.

Yahoo and Facebook ask for more NSA transparency

The case began because a woman, a foreign national employed by the U.S. government, told another employee she suspected the man with whom she was in a sexual relationship was listening to her calls. The employee who misused the NSA's systems also incidentally collected the communications of a U.S. resident on two occasions, a move that requires a court warrant.

The NSA's vast surveillance powers are under fire after the disclosure of internal documents by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden. Intelligence officials have sought to defend the NSA's surveillance activities by saying the agency doesn't misuse its authority.

Grassley wrote to the NSA last month seeking to find out how often the NSA's authorities are misused.

"I appreciate the transparency that the Inspector General has provided to the American people," Grassley said in a statement. "We shouldn't tolerate even one instance of misuse of this program. Robust oversight of the program must be completed to ensure that both national security and the Constitution are protected."

NSA violated phone rules, misinformed secret court

In many cases the employees who intentionally abused the NSA's spying systems resigned before they could be punished. Several were demoted in rank or otherwise sanctioned.

In one 2004 case, a civilian employee told NSA security that she had spied on a foreign phone number because she found it on her husband's cell phone and suspected he was being unfaithful. She collected his phone calls. The employee's infraction was referred to the Justice Department, but she resigned before she could be fired.

Some of the violations appear to have been uncovered by the NSA's own auditing systems.Others were self-reported, including one during a polygraph of an employee.

One employee violated NSA's rules on the first day he had access to the agency's signals intelligence collection system.

He queried six e-mail addresses belonging to a former girlfriend. He told investigators he wanted "to practice on the system" using his former girlfriend's e-mail addresses and that he received no information, and hadn't read any emails. He was demoted and his pay was reduced, and the NSA's inspector general recommended he not be given a security clearance.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on September 29, 2013, 07:18:57 AM

like i have said before.. who needs mind control


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/28/nsa-social-connections-new-york-times_n_4010838.html

NSA Maps Social Connections Of Some Americans, New York Times Reports
09/28/13 09:53 PM ET EDT 

WASHINGTON -- For almost three years the National Security Agency has been tapping the data it collects to map out some Americans' social connections, allowing the government to identify their associates, their locations at certain times, their traveling companions and other personal information, The New York times reported.

Citing documents provided by former NSA systems analyst Edward Snowden, the Times reported that the NSA began allowing the analysis of phone call and e-mail logs in November 2010 to examine some Americans' networks of associations for foreign intelligence purposes after NSA officials lifted restrictions on the practice. The newspaper posted the report on its website Saturday.

A January 2011 memorandum from the spy agency indicated that the policy shift was intended to help the agency "discover and track" connections between intelligence targets overseas and people in the United States, the Times reported.

The documents Snowden provided indicated that the NSA can augment the communications data with material from public, commercial and other sources, including bank codes, insurance information, Facebook profiles, passenger manifests, voter registration rolls and GPS location information, as well as property records and unspecified tax data, the paper reported.

NSA officials declined to say how many Americans have been caught up in the effort, including people involved in no wrongdoing, the Times reported. The documents do not describe what has resulted from the scrutiny, which links phone numbers and e-mails in a "contact chain" tied directly or indirectly to a person or organization overseas that is of foreign intelligence interest, the paper reported.

The documents provided by Snowden don't specify which phone and e-mail databases are used to create the social network diagrams, the Times reported, and NSA officials wouldn't identify them. However, NSA officials said the large database of Americans' domestic phone call records revealed in June was not used, the paper reported.

Disclosures from documents leaked by Snowden earlier this year have sparked debate over the government's surveillance activities and concerns that Americans' civil liberties have been violated by the data collection. Russia has granted temporary asylum to Snowden, considered a fugitive from justice in the U.S., and his whereabouts remain secret.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on October 06, 2013, 08:43:42 PM


i am beginning to think there are more folks monitoring than being monitored..yikes


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-china-24396957

4 October 2013 Last updated at 12:46 ET

China employs two million microblog monitors state media says.

Sina Weibo, launched in 2010, has more than 500 million registered users with 100 million More than two million people in China are employed by the government to monitor web activity, state media say, providing a rare glimpse into how the state tries to control the internet.

The Beijing News says the monitors, described as internet opinion analysts, are on state and commercial payrolls.

China's hundreds of millions of web users increasingly use microblogs to criticise the state or vent anger.

Recent research suggested Chinese censors actively target social media.

The report by the Beijing News said that these monitors were not required to delete postings.

They are "strictly to gather and analyse public opinions on microblog sites and compile reports for decision-makers", it said. It also added details about how some of these monitors work.

Tang Xiaotao has been working as a monitor for less than six months, the report says, without revealing where he works.

"He sits in front of a PC every day, and opening up an application, he types in key words which are specified by clients.

"He then monitors negative opinions related to the clients, and gathers (them) and compile reports and send them to the clients," it says.

The reports says the software used in the office is even more advanced and supported by thousands of servers. It also monitors websites outside China.

China rarely reveals any details concerning the scale and sophistication of its internet police force.

It is believed that the two million internet monitors are part of a huge army which the government relies on to control the internet.

The government is also to organise training classes for them for the first time from 14 to 18 October, the paper says.

But it is not clear whether the training will be for existing monitors or for new recruits.

The training will have eight modules, and teach participants how to analyse and judge online postings and deal with crisis situations, it says.

The most popular microblogging site Sina Weibo, launched in 2010, now has more than 500 million registered users with 100 million messages posted daily.

Topics cover a wide range - from personal hobbies, health to celebrity gossip and food safety but they talso include politically sensitive issues like official corruption.

Postings deemed to be politically incorrect are routinely deleted



More on This Story
Related StoriesThe astonishing speed of Chinese censorship 26 MARCH 2013, CHINA
Has Weibo really changed China? 31 JULY 2012, MAGAZINE
Beijing orders microblog controls 16 DECEMBER 2011, CHINA

Analysis
Dong Le
 
BBC Chinese Service
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

China's internet is one of the most controlled and censored in the world.

Websites deemed to be subversive are blocked. Politically sensitive postings are routinely deleted . Even the name of the former Prime Minister Wen Jiabao was censored when rumours were circulating on the internet that his family had amassed a fortune while he was in power.

But with the rapid growth of internet users, the ruling Communist Party has found itself fighting an uphill battle.

The Beijing News, while reporting the story of microblog monitors, has admitted that it is impossible for the government to delete all "undesirable" postings.

The more postings deleted, the more they appear, it says.

China seldom reveals details about how it monitors and controls the internet. The government even does not acknowledge that it blocks web sites.

But the report does offer a rare glimpse into this opaque world.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: deuem on October 07, 2013, 06:07:28 PM
And I've said this how many times? They love Peggy or I would be cut off again.....
 
If everyone in the world does not know by know that we are all being tracked, then you must wake up.
If my connection goes across Europe then every country looks at it. Trace your pings and then go in and detail each location.
 
One ping went right to CIA head quarters DC. Not hiding much there. Trace the pings location and you will see...
 
The interenet is free, free to give them your info.  lol
 
And a shout out to the other peeps from the internet who are watching every thing we do,  Hi !
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Amaterasu on October 07, 2013, 06:55:57 PM
Oh, I don't doubt that a few are watching, but not having access to the site figures, nor how to find pings - let alone how to go about tracing them - I have little clue and could put that number anywhere on the number line in the positive range based on all *I* know. LOL!
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on October 07, 2013, 08:27:06 PM


lol
Deuem..funny saying HI to those guys
but i do the same with security cameras..i make eye contact smile and wave at em..

why not... ;D ;)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on October 07, 2013, 08:51:14 PM
And I've said this how many times? They love Peggy or I would be cut off again.....

You know WHY they like us?

...because we walk the middle line... just enough real material leaking out and just the right amount of lunacy...
 

 ::)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: deuem on October 07, 2013, 11:19:27 PM
You can download many free ping trace programs. Just enter the web site you want and watch it bounce from server to server. At each server you can then find its location. then google earth it. wa la    free and easy. You can do it.
I ran this trace until they caught up with me and blocked the pinged servers. They bounce through them but I just get all blanks now.
 
Sky, I wave at the camers all the time. In my elevator therre is one and I say Hi. The lady on the other end saw me do this and told me she looked forward to the next time and she would wave back. What a boring job she has. They have well over 10 cameras and the office looks like something in the movies. Over 100 large monitors on a curved wall all on all the time. Smile ( cheese )
 
Z; sometimes more of one than the other..........lol
They are still trying to figure out Deuem....By now they have hundreds of them. I guess it is my off line art center.
 
I wish they would just let us all use all that storage out there as back up and then they would not need to easedro,p just look. I have nothing to hide, we are the good guys.
 
No where is that Cia file on z, just had it......
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on October 08, 2013, 04:45:03 AM


well ! well !  well!..now isn't this interesting. ::)




http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-24443266


8 October 2013 Last updated at 06:19 ET

.Power surges 'cripple NSA data centre'

Electrical supply problems at a National Security Agency data centre have delayed its opening by a year, reports the Wall Street Journal.

Power surges at the giant Utah centre had ruined equipment costing almost a million dollars, it said.

The technical problems had also led to lengthy investigations that had meant its opening date had been pushed back.

The Utah plant is one of three the NSA is building to boost its data gathering and surveillance capabilities.

Over the past 13 months, 10 separate electrical surges have occurred at the data centre in Bluffdale, Utah, according to the Wall Street Journal (WSJ), which is reported to have cost $1.4bn (£872m) to build.

Each surge had burnt out and wrecked about $100,000 worth of computers and other equipment, it said.

The Bluffdale facility is more than one million sq ft (93,000 sq m) in size and its power costs are expected to top $1m (£622,000) a month, according to the WSJ.

The NSA had been supposed to start using the data storage and analysis centre in October 2012, it said, but this had been delayed by the damage caused by the power surges and a six-month investigation into their cause.

The WSJ added it had seen technical documents indicating experts called in to find out the cause had rowed over whether the problem had been fixed.

It said civil contractors were confident the problem had been solved but a special US Army engineer investigation team had said the cause was "not yet sufficiently understood" to be sure that it would not happen again.

The amount of surveillance that the NSA carries out has come under scrutiny in recent months thanks to whistleblower Edward Snowden.

He leaked documents allegedly detailing its activities including the Prism programme that garners data from web firms including Google, Facebook, Microsoft and Yahoo.

In addition, the NSA has been found to be gathering data on phone calls made by US citizens.



More on This Story
Related StoriesNSA targeted Tor via Firefox flaw 07 OCTOBER 2013, TECHNOLOGY
RSA in NSA algorithm link warning 23 SEPTEMBER 2013, TECHNOLOGY
Brazil moves to shield data from US 18 SEPTEMBER 2013, TECHNOLOGY
Germany: Email providers 'seen as surveillance safe haven' 27 AUGUST 2013,


NEWS FROM ELSEWHERE
Related Internet linksMeltdowns Hobble NSA Data Center - WSJ.com
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: 1Worldwatcher on October 08, 2013, 05:06:00 AM

well ! well !  well!..now isn't this interesting. ::)




http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-24443266


8 October 2013 Last updated at 06:19 ET

.Power surges 'cripple NSA data centre'

Electrical supply problems at a National Security Agency data centre have delayed its opening by a year, reports the Wall Street Journal.

Power surges at the giant Utah centre had ruined equipment costing almost a million dollars, it said.

The technical problems had also led to lengthy investigations that had meant its opening date had been pushed back.

The Utah plant is one of three the NSA is building to boost its data gathering and surveillance capabilities.

Over the past 13 months, 10 separate electrical surges have occurred at the data centre in Bluffdale, Utah, according to the Wall Street Journal (WSJ), which is reported to have cost $1.4bn (£872m) to build.

Each surge had burnt out and wrecked about $100,000 worth of computers and other equipment, it said.

The Bluffdale facility is more than one million sq ft (93,000 sq m) in size and its power costs are expected to top $1m (£622,000) a month, according to the WSJ.

The NSA had been supposed to start using the data storage and analysis centre in October 2012, it said, but this had been delayed by the damage caused by the power surges and a six-month investigation into their cause.

The WSJ added it had seen technical documents indicating experts called in to find out the cause had rowed over whether the problem had been fixed.

It said civil contractors were confident the problem had been solved but a special US Army engineer investigation team had said the cause was "not yet sufficiently understood" to be sure that it would not happen again.

The amount of surveillance that the NSA carries out has come under scrutiny in recent months thanks to whistleblower Edward Snowden.

He leaked documents allegedly detailing its activities including the Prism programme that garners data from web firms including Google, Facebook, Microsoft and Yahoo.

In addition, the NSA has been found to be gathering data on phone calls made by US citizens.



More on This Story
Related StoriesNSA targeted Tor via Firefox flaw 07 OCTOBER 2013, TECHNOLOGY
RSA in NSA algorithm link warning 23 SEPTEMBER 2013, TECHNOLOGY
Brazil moves to shield data from US 18 SEPTEMBER 2013, TECHNOLOGY
Germany: Email providers 'seen as surveillance safe haven' 27 AUGUST 2013,


NEWS FROM ELSEWHERE
Related Internet linksMeltdowns Hobble NSA Data Center - WSJ.com

I find this too be a rather "Convenient Time" too have 'Outside Issues' take out the N$A hardware and data? How much you want to make a bet that it is going to be data associated with a few things very vital? Wait and see I guess.

Strange political games being played, this could just as easily be one of them .

Disband the N$A and save us trillion's, there has to  be a cheaper way, No? ???

1WW
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on October 08, 2013, 06:03:29 AM
I find this too be a rather "Convenient Time" too have 'Outside Issues' take out the N$A hardware and data?
I thought it was hardware, as they are not yet using that data centre.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on October 08, 2013, 11:43:31 AM
Disband the N$A and save us trillion's, there has to  be a cheaper way, No? ???

Fvcking STOOPID gubment SPOOKS

NSA Fort Meade,  Maryland

(http://images.bwbx.io/cms/2013-06-06/0606-nsa-630x420.jpg)

NSA Ft. Gordon Georgia

(http://aug-cdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/superphoto/10862684.jpg)

NSA SIGINT station at Sugar Grove, West Virginia

(http://motherboard-assets.s3.amazonaws.com/content-images/article/hello-nsa/2b19686ba426f9933ce8ab853cb74a54_vice_630x420.jpg)

National Security Operations Center Floor, 2012.

(http://assets2.motherboard.tv/content-images/contentimage/no-slug/ba50bf5690cdc6274484090098fa500a.jpg)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on October 08, 2013, 12:01:46 PM
There are well over 120 SPOOK AGENCIES in the USA alone.  One has to wonder why we need so many doing the same job...

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Pimander on October 08, 2013, 02:31:08 PM
There are well over 120 SPOOK AGENCIES in the USA alone.  One has to wonder why we need so many doing the same job...
Mostly jobs for ex forces peeps.   Largely a waste of money but some of them very important.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on October 08, 2013, 05:01:26 PM
Fvcking STOOPID gubment SPOOKS

NSA Fort Meade,  Maryland

(http://images.bwbx.io/cms/2013-06-06/0606-nsa-630x420.jpg)
Doesn't that have too many parking spaces for the size of the buildings?
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on October 09, 2013, 07:53:10 AM


probably has some floors underground
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on October 14, 2013, 08:19:40 PM

http://news.msn.com/us/report-nsa-collecting-millions-of-contact-lists

Report: NSA collecting millions of contact lists


The Washington Post reported that the NSA has been searching through millions of contact lists from personal email and instant messaging accounts.

WASHINGTON — The National Security Agency has been sifting through millions of contact lists from personal email and instant messaging accounts around the world — including those of Americans — in its effort to find possible links to terrorism or other criminal activity, according to a published report.

The Washington Post reported late Monday that the spy agency intercepts hundreds of thousands of email address books every day from private accounts on Yahoo, Gmail, Facebook and Hotmail that move though global data links. The NSA also collects about a half million buddy lists from live chat services and email accounts.

The Post said it learned about the collection tactics from secret documents provided by NSA leaker Edward Snowden and confirmed by senior intelligence officials. It was the latest revelation of the spy agency's practices to be disclosed by Snowden, the former NSA systems analyst who fled the U.S. and now resides in Russia.

The newspaper said the NSA analyzes the contacts to map relationships and connections among various foreign intelligence targets. During a typical day last year, the NSA's Special Source Operations branch collected more than 440,000 email address books, the Post said. That would correspond to a rate of more than 250 million a year.

A spokesman for the national intelligence director's office, which oversees the NSA, told the Post that the agency was seeking intelligence on valid targets and was not interested in personal information from ordinary Americans.

Spokesman Shawn Turner said the NSA was guided by rules that require the agency to "minimize the acquisition, use and dissemination" of information that identifies U.S. citizens or permanent residents.

While the collection was taking place overseas, the Post said it encompassed the contact lists of many American users. The spy agency obtains the contact lists through secret arrangements with foreign telecommunications companies or other services that control Internet traffic, the Post reported.

Earlier this year, Snowden gave documents to the Post and Britain's Guardian newspaper disclosing U.S. surveillance programs that collect vast amounts of phone records and online data in the name of foreign intelligence, often sweeping up information on American citizens.

The collection of contact lists in bulk would be illegal if done in the United States, but the Post said the agency can get around that restriction by intercepting lists from access points around the world.

The newspaper quoted a senior intelligence official as saying NSA analysts may not search or distribute information from the contacts database unless they can "make the case that something in there is a valid foreign intelligence target in and of itself."
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on October 14, 2013, 09:02:41 PM
Doesn't that have too many parking spaces for the size of the buildings?

probably has some floors underground


Located on the grounds of Fort Meade, the headquarters for the nation's premier covert intelligence gathering organization are housed in two high-rise office structures, built and dedicated by Ronald Reagan in 1986, and in other structures on the base, including an estimated 10 acres of which are underground. At least 20,000 employees work for the NSA at Fort Meade, making it the largest employer in the county, one of the largest employers in Maryland, and the largest employer of mathematicians in the country. While the extent of NSA's technical facilities is guarded as a national security measure, the NSA's headquarters is believed to house the second most powerful supercomputer in the world. The NSA operates other computer labs, offices, and satellite interception posts around the world.


http://clui.org/ludb/site/national-security-agency-nsa-headquarters
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Amaterasu on October 14, 2013, 10:17:33 PM
Pull the money rug out from under Them.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on October 14, 2013, 10:31:38 PM
They don't have rugs :P Liquid cooled floors to keep the super computers running smooth :D


[youtube]BH8X8w8a4f4[/youtube]
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on October 16, 2013, 03:35:39 PM

you should never ask if it can get  worse..you’ll get an answer you may not want...like O picking the next guys...sigh





http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/16/keith-alexander-nsa_n_4110810.html


Keith Alexander, John C. Inglis Expected To Depart NSA Soon


Reuters  |  Posted: 10/16/2013 4:42 pm EDT
By Warren Strobel and Mark Hosenball

WASHINGTON Oct 16 (Reuters) - The director of the U.S. National Security Agency and his deputy are expected to depart in the coming months, U.S. officials said on Wednesday, in a development that could give President Barack Obama a chance to reshape the eavesdropping agency.

Army General Keith Alexander's eight-year tenure was rocked this year by revelations contained in documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden about the agency's widespread scooping up of telephone, e-mail and social media data.

Alexander has formalized plans to leave by next March or April, while his civilian deputy, John "Chris" Inglis, is due to retire by year's end, according to U.S. officials who spoke on condition of anonymity.

One leading candidate to replace Alexander is Vice Admiral Michael Rogers, currently commander of the U.S. Navy's 10th Fleet and U.S. Fleet Cyber Command, officials told Reuters. The 10th Fleet and Fleet Cyber Command both have their headquarters at Fort Meade, Maryland, between Washington and Baltimore. The NSA is also headquartered at Fort Meade.

There has been no final decision on selecting Rogers to succeed Alexander, and other candidates may be considered, the officials said.

An NSA spokeswoman had no comment on the leadership changes.

Alexander has served as NSA director since August 2005, making him its longest-serving chief. He also serves as commander of a related military unit, the U.S. Cyber Command.

Alexander, who has vigorously defended the NSA's activities as lawful and necessary to detect and disrupt terrorist plots, has previously said he planned to leave in the spring.

Inglis, who began his NSA career as a computer security scientist, has been the NSA's second-ranking official since 2006.

While both men are leaving voluntarily, the dual vacancies give Obama an opportunity both to install new leadership following Snowden's revelations and to decide whether the NSA and Cyber Command should have separate leaders.

Cyber Command, which has grown significantly in recent years, has the authority to engage in both defensive and offensive operations in cyberspace. Many NSA veterans argue that having the same person lead the spy agency and Cyber Command diminishes the emphasis on the NSA's work and its unique capabilities.

Rogers has been the Navy's top cyber commander since September 2011. Prior to that, he was director of intelligence for the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff and for the U.S. Pacific Command.

Rogers is "a good leader, very insightful and well thought of within the community," said a U.S. defense official who was not authorized to speak publicly on the matter.

Rogers has worked hard to ensure that the Navy has sufficient sailors trained to take on added cyber responsibilities for U.S. Cyber Command, the official said.

The NSA - which spies on electronic communications of all kinds and protects U.S. government communications - has been one of the most secretive of all U.S. intelligence outfits. Its employees used to joke that NSA stood for either "No Such Agency" or "Never Say Anything."

But the agency became the focus of controversy this year when Snowden leaked to the media tens of thousands of highly classified documents from the NSA and its British eavesdropping partner. Alexander vigorously defended the agency's actions in congressional testimony and other public appearances.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on October 16, 2013, 08:10:17 PM


http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/documents-reveal-nsas-extensive-involvement-in-targeted-killing-program/2013/10/16/29775278-3674-11e3-8a0e-4e2cf80831fc_story.html

Documents reveal NSA’s extensive involvement in targeted killing program
Video: In June, President Obama said the NSA’s programs “help us prevent terrorist attacks.”


By Greg Miller, Julie Tate and Barton Gellman, Updated: Wednesday, October 16, 9:57 PM E-mail the writers
It was an innocuous e-mail, one of millions sent every day by spouses with updates on the situation at home. But this one was of particular interest to the National Security Agency, and contained clues that put the sender’s husband in the cross hairs of a CIA drone.

Days later, Hassan Ghul — an associate of Osama bin Laden who provided a critical piece of intelligence that helped the CIA find the al-Qaeda leader — was killed by a drone strike in Pakistan’s tribal belt.

The U.S. government has never publicly acknowledged killing Ghul. But documents provided to The Washington Post by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden confirm his demise in October 2012 and reveal the agency’s extensive involvement in the targeted killing program that has served as a centerpiece of President Obama’s counterterrorism strategy.

An al-Qaeda operative who had a knack for surfacing at dramatic moments in the post-Sept. 11 story line, Ghul was an emissary to Iraq for the terrorist group at the height of that war. He was captured in 2004 and helped expose bin Laden’s courier network before spending two years at a secret CIA prison. Then, in 2006, the United States delivered him to his native Pakistan, where he was released and returned to the al-Qaeda fold.

But beyond filling in gaps about Ghul, the documents provide the most detailed account of the intricate collaboration between the CIA and the NSA in the drone campaign.

The Post is withholding many details about those missions, at the request of U.S. intelligence officials who cited potential damage to ongoing operations and national security.

The NSA is “focused on discovering and developing intelligence about valid foreign intelligence targets,” an NSA spokeswoman said in a statement provided to The Post on Wednesday, adding that the agency’s operations “protect the nation and its interests from threats such as terrorism and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.”

In the search for targets, the NSA has draped a surveillance blanket over dozens of square miles of northwest Pakistan. In Ghul’s case, the agency deployed an arsenal of cyber-espionage tools, secretly seizing control of laptops, siphoning audio files and other messages, and tracking radio transmissions to determine where Ghul might “bed down.”

The e-mail from Ghul’s wife “about her current living conditions” contained enough detail to confirm the coordinates of that household, according to a document summarizing the mission. “This information enabled a capture/kill operation against an individual believed to be Hassan Ghul on October 1,” it said.

The file is part of a collection of records in the Snowden trove that make clear that the drone campaign — often depicted as the CIA’s exclusive domain — relies heavily on the NSA’s ability to vacuum up enormous quantities of e-mail, phone calls and other fragments of signals intelligence, or SIGINT.

To handle the expanding workload, the NSA created a secret unit known as the Counter-Terrorism Mission Aligned Cell, or CT MAC, to concentrate the agency’s vast resources on hard-to-find terrorism targets. The unit spent a year tracking Ghul and his courier network, tunneling into an array of systems and devices, before he was killed. Without those penetrations, the document concluded, “this opportunity would not have been possible.”

1At a time when the NSA is facing intense criticism for gathering data on Americans, the drone files may bolster the agency’s case that its resources are focused on fighting terrorism and supporting U.S. operations overseas.

“Ours is a noble cause,” NSA Director Keith B. Alexander said during a public event last month. “Our job is to defend this nation and to protect our civil liberties and privacy.”



this is only page one of four.. got to the above  link to read it all  
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on October 18, 2013, 11:39:49 AM



[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHrZgS-Gvi4[/youtube]



Published on Jan 31, 2013

Rise Of The Drones: http://video.pbs.org/video/2326108547

A new camera developed by the Pentagon's research arm was highlighted in a recent special on PBS' "Nova" in an episode called "Rise of the Drones." It's a camera system so detailed it can discern specific movements and even what a subject is wearing.
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA's) Autonomous Real-Time Ground Ubiquitous Surveillance Imaging System (ARGUS) has 1.8 billion pixels (1.8 gigapixels), making it the world' highest resolution camera. The sensors on the camera are so precise, PBS stated it is the equivalent to the capabilities of 100 Predator drones in a medium city.
In the clip from PBS, it is said this is the first time the government has allowed information to be shared about these capabilities.
"It is important for the public to know that some of these capabilities exist," Yiannis Antonaides with contractor BAE Systems said in the clip, but noted the sensor itself cannot be revealed. "Because we are not allowed to expose some of the pieces that make up this sensor, so you get to look a pretty plastic curtains."

The technology allows the user to open up a specific windows of interest in the camera's view while still keeping up an image of the larger picture (sort of like split screen). Antonaides explained that the colored boxes in the image show that the sensor recognized moving objects. "You can see individuals crossing the street. You can see individuals walking in parking lots. There's actually enough resolution to see the people waving their arms or walking around or what kind of clothes they wear," he said. PBS noted that ARGUS can actually see much more details than just attire. It can see objects as small as six inches. At 2:23 in the clip, Antonaides points out that from 17,500 feet, a white object in the field of view is a bird flying. PBS pointed out that DARPA put a time crunch on creating the camera, which lead Antonaides to look into technology that you probably have in your purse or pocket at this very moment. Taking similar imaging systems used in smartphones and putting 368 together, is essentially how Antonaides and other engineers at BAE Systems created ARGUS. It is this "mosaic" of cameras that allows the system to zoom in on specific sections in extreme detail. As for data, the system stores up to 1 million terabytes a day. Putting this into perspective, PBS notes this is equal to 5,000 hours of HD footage.

"You can go back and say 'I would like to know what happened at this particular location three days, two hours, four minutes ago' and it would actually show you what happened as if you were watching it live," Antonaides said.

It is still classified information whether ARGUS has been used in the field yet.

"If we had our choice, we would like ARGUS to be over the same area 24 hours a day, seven days a week. That's not very achievable with manned platforms. This is where UAVs come in and they're absolutely the perfect platform," Antonaides said.
President Barack Obama's authorization of military aid to the Syrian rebels "dramatically" increases U.S. support for the opposition, the White House said Friday, while acknowledging that it will take time for the supplies to reach fighters struggling in their clashes with Syrian President Bashar Assad.

U.S. officials said the new aid would include weapons and ammunition and comes in response to firmer evidence from the White House of chemical weapons use by Assad's regime.

"There's already material that's been flowing to the opposition and that will continue in the weeks to come," said Ben Rhodes, Obama's deputy national security adviser.

Obama has said the use of chemical weapons would cross a "red line," suggesting greater American intervention. While a small percentage of the 93,000 people reportedly killed in Syria are said to have died from chemical weapons — U.S. intelligence puts the number at 100 to 150 — the White House views the deployment of the deadly agents as a flouting of international norms.

Rhodes said Obama made the decision to authorize military aid to the rebels over the past few weeks. He also defended the president's caution on the issue, saying "these are not steps the president takes lightly."


AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais
President Barack Obama gestures as he answers... View Full Size

The History of Syria in 60 Seconds Watch Video

White House Confirms Syria's Use of Chemical Weapons Watch Video

Category News & Politics

LicenseStandard YouTube License
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on October 23, 2013, 11:49:50 AM


yeah like this is news.. :(


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/23/media-nsa-coverage-study-columbia_n_4148499.html?utm_hp_ref=media


Big Newspapers Tilted In Favor Of The NSA, Study Finds


 The Huffington Post  |  By Jack Mirkinson
Posted: 10/23/2013 8:43 am EDT  |  Updated: 10/23/2013 8:43 am EDT


A new study released on Wednesday found that much of the coverage of the National Security Agency spying controversy has been weighted in favor of the surveillance agencies.

The Columbia Journalism Review study  http://www.cjr.org/the_kicker/news_media_pro_surveillance_bi.php?page=all

examined stories from USA Today, the New York Times, the Washington Post and the Los Angeles Times over a two-month period. The results were consistent:

Of the 30 traditionally pro- or anti-surveillance terms we examined...in all four newspapers, key words generally used to justify increased surveillance, such as security or terrorism, were used much more frequently than terms that tend to invoke opposition to mass surveillance, such as privacy or liberty.
USA Today led the pack, using pro-surveillance terms 36 percent more frequently than anti-surveillance terms. The LA Times followed at 24 percent, while The New York Times was at 14.1 percent. Even the Washington Post, where Barton Gellman was the first US journalist to break the news of the NSA's surveillance, exhibited a net pro-surveillance bias in its coverage of 11.1 percent. Although keyword frequency analysis on its own is not always conclusive, large, consistent discrepancies of the kind observed here strongly suggest a net media bias in favor of the US and UK governments' pro-surveillance position.


The study also noted that the coverage flew in the face of the American public's consistent opposition to many NSA spying programs. Other recent studies have shown similar gaps; a survey   http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/17/cable-news-syria-pew_n_3940141.html

of cable news coverage of the conflict in Syria, for instance, found that news networks were far more hawkish on the issue than the public at large.

Read the full findings here.     http://www.cjr.org/the_kicker/news_media_pro_surveillance_bi.php?page=all
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Elvis Hendrix on October 23, 2013, 01:51:45 PM
(http://i1284.photobucket.com/albums/a572/paparumbo/9c364d51fb20e01e144695dd6bae3984_zps889b4a8a.jpg)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on October 23, 2013, 03:22:50 PM
i truly don't think there is anyone left to offend :(






http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/23/merkel-phone-tapped_n_4150812.html

Angela Merkel's Cell Phone Tapped By NSA?
 U.S. Accused Of Spying On German Chancellor

By JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and LORI HINNANT 10/23/13 01:56 PM ET EDT 

BRUSSELS -- BRUSSELS (AP) — The German government says Chancellor Angela Merkel has called President Barack Obama after receiving information that U.S. intelligence may have targeted her mobile phone.

Merkel spokesman Steffen Seibert said Merkel made clear in Wednesday's call that "she views such practices, if the indications are confirmed ... as completely unacceptable" and called for U.S. authorities to clarify the extent of surveillance in Germany.

A statement from Seibert said the German government "has received information that the chancellor's cellphone may be monitored by American intelligence." The government wouldn't elaborate but news magazine Der Spiegel, which has published material from NSA leaker Edward Snowden, said its research triggered the response.





........................................

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/21/nsa-france-spying-report_n_4134690.html

NSA France: U.S. Conducted Large-Scale Spying On French Citizens: Report

By LORI HINNANT 10/21/13 05:55 AM ET EDT 

PARIS -- PARIS (AP) — The U.S. National Security Agency swept up 70.3 million French telephone records in a 30-day period, according to a newspaper report that offered new details of the massive scope of a surveillance operation that has angered some of the country's closest allies. The French government on Monday summoned the U.S. ambassador for an explanation.

The report in Le Monde, co-written by Glenn Greenwald who originally revealed the NSA surveillance program, found that when certain numbers were used, the conversations were automatically recorded. The surveillance operation also swept up text messages based on key words, Le Monde reported, based on records from Dec. 10 to Jan 7.

The Le Monde reporting emerged as U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry arrived in Paris for diplomatic talks Monday about a peace process for Israel and Palestinian authorities.

"This sort of practice between partners that invades privacy is totally unacceptable and we have to make sure, very quickly, that this no longer happens," French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said during a meeting in Luxembourg with his European counterparts. Fabius said the U.S. ambassador had been summoned to the Foreign Ministry.

Similar programs have been revealed in Britain and Germany. In Brazil, the revelations so angered the president that she cancelled a state visit to Washington and publicly denounced the U.S. for "violation of human rights and of civil liberties."

The most recent documents cited by Le Monde, dated to April 2013, also indicated the NSA's interest in email addresses linked to Wanadoo — once part of France Telecom — and Alcatel-Lucent, the French-American telecom company. One of the documents instructed analysts to draw not only from the electronic surveillance program, but also from another initiative dubbed Upstream, which allowed surveillance on undersea communications cables.

Neither the U.S. embassy nor State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki had immediate comment.
..................................................


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/20/nsa-felipe-calderon-mexico-spying-hacked_n_4132889.html



NSA Hacked Mexican Presidents' Email For Years: Report

The Huffington Post  |  By Alana Horowitz
Posted: 10/20/2013 2:34 pm EDT  |  Updated: 10/21/2013 1:52 pm EDT


The National Security Agency hacked the email of former Mexican President Felipe Calderon, according to a report from Der Spiegel.

The report, which stems from documents leaked by Edward Snowden, alleges that a division of the NSA "successfully exploited a key mail server in the Mexican Presidencia domain within the Mexican Presidential network to gain first-ever access to President Felipe Calderon's public email account." Der Speigel also reports that the spying, which began in May 2010, also targeted other top officials in the Mexican government.

The report claims that some of the information retrieved in the surveillance program provided economic benefits to the U.S.

For more on the bombshell allegations, head over to Der Spiegel.

The report comes weeks after news that the NSA had access to current Mexican President Pena Nieto's emails, as well as Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff's.

Rousseff blasted the U.S.'s controversial surveillance program at the U.N. last month.

"Meddling in such a manner in the lives and affairs of other countries is a breach of international law and, as such, it is an affront to the principles that should otherwise govern relations among countries, especially among friendly nations," she said.




..............................................



http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/22/world/europe/france-nsa-spring/index.html?iref=allsearch

 

U.S. spy chief says reports of NSA logging French phone calls are false

By Ed Payne and Alex Felton, CNN

updated 8:59 AM EDT, Wed October 23, 2013
 




London (CNN) -- The director of national intelligence for the United States says the allegation made in a French newspaper that the National Security Agency intercepted more than 70 million phone calls in France over 30 days is false.

A written statement from James Clapper's office on Tuesday said, "Recent articles published in the French newspaper Le Monde contain inaccurate and misleading information regarding U.S. foreign intelligence activities."

The statement added the United States does gather intelligence of "the type gathered by all nations."

The news release comes the same day French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry met to discuss the allegations.

Fabius called the practice unacceptable and told Kerry that it must stop, the French Foreign Ministry said. The pair also discussed the situation in Syria ahead of a "Friends of Syria" meeting that is taking place in London on Tuesday.

The top diplomats huddled a day after the details of the alleged spying appeared in Le Monde.

U.S. President Barack Obama and French President Francois Hollande spoke Monday on the matter, according to a White House statement.

"The President and President Hollande discussed recent disclosures in the press -- some of which have distorted our activities and some of which raise legitimate questions for our friends and allies about how these capabilities are employed," the statement said. "The President made clear that the United States has begun to review the way that we gather intelligence, so that we properly balance the legitimate security concerns of our citizens and allies with the privacy concerns that all people share."

A news release from Hollande's office said he expressed his "deep disapproval with regard to these practices" to Obama and that such alleged activities would be unacceptable between allies and friends.

The two presidents agreed that French and American intelligence services will cooperate on investigating the report.

Intercepting millions of calls

The NSA monitored the phone calls made in France, Le Monde reported Monday, citing documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

The intercepts took place from December 10, 2012, to January 8, 2013, the article reported. An NSA graph shows an average of 3 million data intercepts a day.

Report: U.S. intercepts French phone calls on a 'massive scale'

According to Le Monde, this is how the system worked: "When a telephone number is used in France, it activates a signal which automatically triggers the recording of the call. Apparently this surveillance system also picks up SMS (text) messages and their content using key words. Finally, the NSA apparently stores the history of the connections of each target -- or the meta-data."

It wasn't immediately clear from the article if the conversations were recorded or just the data surrounding each call.

Mexico lashes out against report of U.S. spying

Other spying allegations

The report comes after a weekend article in the German news magazine Der Spiegel that said the NSA "systematically" eavesdropped on the Mexican government. It hacked the public e-mail account of former Mexican President Felipe Calderon, which was also used by Cabinet members, according to Der Spiegel.

The magazine also quoted documents leaked by Snowden.

"This practice is unacceptable, illegitimate and against Mexican and international law," Mexico's Foreign Ministry said.

It added that it would push for a speedy investigation.

"In a relationship between neighbors and partners, there is no room for the practices alleged to have taken place," the ministry said.

A senior U.S. State Department official told CNN that the Mexican government reached out about the report and that the two governments will be discussing it via diplomatic channels.

In September, Mexico and Brazil summoned U.S. ambassadors after media reports that the United States had spied on their countries' presidents. Those reports were also based on documents leaked by Snowden.

Mexico to summon U.S. ambassador over spying allegations




 :(
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Pimander on October 24, 2013, 08:11:16 AM
Merkel can't be surprised by any of this.  They all spy on each other.  What bothers the Germans is that it is now public knowledge that we can listen in to them easily.

If we knew about PRISM on PRC Forum a long time ago then so did foreign governments.  I find the PR stuff amusing and entertaining still.  Thanks for posting Sky.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on October 24, 2013, 08:29:46 PM


http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/10/24/21124561-report-us-monitored-the-phone-calls-of-35-world-leaders?lite=

Report: US monitored the phone calls of 35 world leaders


In response to a new report indicating the NSA monitored phone conversations of 35 world leaders, a senior White House official told NBC News, "We are not going to comment publicly on every specific alleged intelligence activity." NBC's Brian Williams reports


By Costas Pitas, Reuters
LONDON — The United States monitored the phone conversations of 35 world leaders according to classified documents leaked by fugitive whistleblower Edward Snowden, Britain's Guardian newspaper said on Thursday.

Phone numbers were passed on to the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) by an official in another government department, according to the documents, the Guardian said on its website.

It added that staff in the White House, State Department and the Pentagon were urged to share the contact details of foreign politicians.

Reacting to the report, a White House spokeswoman said, "We are not going to comment publicly on every specific alleged intelligence activity, and as a matter of policy we have made clear that the United States gathers foreign intelligence of the type gathered by all nations."

The revelations come a day after Germany demanded answers from Washington over allegations Chancellor Angela Merkel's phone was bugged, the worst spat between the two countries in a decade.

The White House did not deny the bugging, saying only it would not happen in future.

"In one recent case, a U.S. official provided NSA with 200 phone numbers to 35 world leaders," reads an excerpt from a confidential memo dated October 2006 which was quoted by the Guardian.

The identities of the politicians in question were not revealed.

The revelations in the center-left Guardian suggested that the bugging of world leaders could be more widespread than originally thought, with the issue set to overshadow an EU summit in Brussels

Additional reporting by Jeff Mason in Washington
...........................

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/24/nsa-world-leaders_n_4158922.html



....................................

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-24652419

24 October 2013 Last updated at 08:52 ET

MEPs vote to suspend US data sharing

The European Parliament has voted to suspend the sharing of financial data with the US, following allegations that citizens' data was spied on.

The allegation forms part of leaked documents from whistleblower Edward Snowden.

The vote is non-binding but illustrates MEPs' growing unease over how much data was shared with the US.

It comes a day after it was alleged that German Chancellor Angela Merkel's mobile phone calls were monitored.

The European Parliament voted to suspend its Terrorist Finance Tracking Program (TFTP) agreement with the US, in response to the alleged tapping of EU citizens' bank data held by the Belgian company SWIFT.

The agreement granted the US authorities access to bank data for terror-related investigations but leaked documents made public by whistleblower Edward Snowden allege that the global bank transfer network was the target of wider US surveillance.

MEPs also want to launch a full inquiry into the alleged spying.

Merkel phone
 
The row over exactly how much snooping was done on European citizens appears to be escalating.

Germany has summoned the US ambassador in Berlin over the claims that the US monitored Mrs Merkel's mobile phone calls.

Other leaders are also likely to want further clarification from Washington over the activities of its National Security Agency (NSA) in Europe.

Meanwhile student group, europe v facebook, is launching a fresh attack on how deeply the social network was involved in the US spying programme.

It has won the right for a review of why the Irish data protection commissioner is not investigating the amount of European data shared with the US.

Commissioner Billy Hawkes has previously claimed that there "is nothing to investigate" over Facebook's role in the PRISM programme.

Max Schrem, who heads the group, remains unconvinced.

"When it comes to the fundamental rights of millions of users and the biggest surveillance scandal in years, he will have to take responsibility and do something about it," he said
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Pimander on October 25, 2013, 05:10:43 AM
Lets face it, it isn't like they would monitor conspiracy theorists phones but not bother with world leaders.  Everybody knew that they were, I think it is a bit uncomfortable it being discussed in public though.

I reckon that the Germans want access to PRISM data on request before they shut up about this.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on October 25, 2013, 06:18:37 AM


yeah P
you have it right..they have watched each other for a long time..but talking about it out in the open and in newsprint and such is probably not to their liking

but i am beginning to wonder just WHO was behind what's -his-name strirring the pot
now this just maybe the real conspiracy...
and WHY
is this a reveal or more smoke and mirrors?

humans or not humans pushing the envelope of no privacy
is it to wake the sleeping or  ?????

i keep coming up with some thoughts i don't want to be thinking... :(

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Pimander on October 25, 2013, 07:06:00 AM
i keep coming up with some thoughts i don't want to be thinking... :(
I keep finding out things that I was better off not knowing.  Worrying.  :(
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on October 25, 2013, 07:52:39 AM

Worrying.   :(

yep..maybe  life jackets and some extra paddles needed  ;) headin for white water
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on October 26, 2013, 08:10:06 AM



NSA Website Offline, Agency Denies Attack (UPDATE)


The Huffington Post  |  Posted: 10/25/2013 6:43 pm EDT  |  Updated: 10/25/2013 10:26 pm EDT

The website for the National Security Agency went offline Friday, with NSA.gov unavailable during the early evening. On Twitter, accounts associated with the hacker group Anonymous implied that the group may have been behind the attack:

a bunch of tweets here



Reports that NSA.gov is down due to a hacker attack are unconfirmed, but the website was offline at press time. Gizmodo pointed out that reports of the outage began on Twitter nearly an hour before accounts believed to be associated with Anonymous began taking credit for it.

@AnonymousOwn3r does have a history of claiming responsibility for cyber attacks, RT noted in its report on the alleged hack. In July, Anonymous claimed it had launched a cyber attack against members of Congress.

As Epoch Times pointed out, the website Isitdownrightnow.com said on Friday evening that NSA.gov is “DOWN for everyone.”

The report comes amid an ongoing debate over the NSA's surveillance methods after former intelligence contractor employee Edward Snowden leaked a large number of national security documents in August.

UPDATE 10 p.m.: The Associated Press reports:

WASHINGTON (AP) — The National Security Agency says its website nsa.gov was inaccessible for several hours during a scheduled update.

The agency says an internal error in the system caused the problem.

There had been speculation on the Internet that the online site had been hit with a denial-of-service attack, but the agency said that was not true.

A denial-of-service attack is an attempt by outsiders to make a network unavailable to its intended users.

The NSA said the problem would be resolved Friday night.



watching you    watching me   watching you....hey anyone have some popcorn..bwhahahahahahah
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on October 26, 2013, 11:03:13 AM


do ya think if they are watching each other they'll leave the little guy alone?
nay..me neither



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/26/nsa-spying-foreign-policy_n_4166076.html

SPY SPAT NSA Spying Threatens U.S. Foreign Policy Efforts



 By DEB RIECHMANN 10/26/13 10:19 AM ET EDT 

WASHINGTON -- WASHINGTON (AP) — Secretary of State John Kerry went to Europe to talk about Mideast peace, Syria and Iran. What he got was an earful of outrage over U.S. snooping abroad.

President Barack Obama has defended America's surveillance dragnet to leaders of Russia, Mexico, Brazil, France and Germany, but the international anger over the disclosures shows no signs of abating in the short run.

Longer term, the revelations by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden about NSA tactics that allegedly include tapping the cellphones of as many as 35 world leaders threaten to undermine U.S. foreign policy in a range of areas.

This vacuum-cleaner approach to data collection has rattled allies.

"The magnitude of the eavesdropping is what shocked us," former French Foreign Minister Bernard Kouchner said in a radio interview. "Let's be honest, we eavesdrop too. Everyone is listening to everyone else. But we don't have the same means as the United States, which makes us jealous."

So where in the world isn't the NSA? That's one big question raised by the disclosures. Whether the tapping of allies is a step too far might be moot.

The British ambassador to Lebanon, Tom Fletcher, tweeted this past week: "I work on assumption that 6+ countries tap my phone. Increasingly rare that diplomats say anything sensitive on calls."

Diplomatic relations are built on trust. If America's credibility is in question, the U.S. will find it harder to maintain alliances, influence world opinion and maybe even close trade deals.

Spying among allies is not new.

Madeleine Albright, secretary of state during the Clinton administration, recalled being at the United Nations and having the French ambassador ask her why she said something in a private conversation apparently intercepted by the French.

The French government protested revelations this past week that the NSA had collected 70.3 million French-based telephone and electronic message records in a 30-day period.

Albright says Snowden's disclosures have hurt U.S. policymakers.

"A lot of the things that have come out, I think are specifically damaging because they are negotiating positions and a variety of ways that we have to go about business," Albright said at a conference hosted by the Center for American Progress in Washington.

"I think it has made life very difficult for Secretary Kerry. ... There has to be a set of private talks that, in fact, precede negotiations and I think it makes it very, very hard."

The spy flap could give the Europeans leverage in talks with the U.S. on a free trade agreement, which would join together nearly half of the global economy.

"If we go to the negotiations and we have the feeling those people with whom we negotiate know everything that we want to deal with in advance, how can we trust each other?" asked Martin Schulz, president of the European Parliament.

Claude Moniquet, a former French counterintelligence officer and now director of Brussels-based European Strategic Intelligence and Security Center, said the controversy came at a good time for Europe "to have a lever, a means of pressure ... in these negotiations."

To Henry Farrell and Martha Finnemore at George Washington University, damage from the NSA disclosures could "undermine Washington's ability to act hypocritically and get away with it."

The danger in the disclosures "lies not in the new information that they reveal but in the documented confirmation they provide of what the United States is actually doing and why," they wrote in Foreign Affairs.

"When these deeds turn out to clash with the government's public rhetoric, as they so often do, it becomes harder for U.S. allies to overlook Washington's covert behavior and easier for U.S. adversaries to justify their own."

They claim the disclosures forced Washington to abandon its "naming-and-shaming campaign against Chinese hacking."

The revelations could undercut Washington's effort to fight terrorism, says Kiron Skinner, director of the Center for International Relations and Politics at Carnegie Mellon University. The broad nature of NSA surveillance goes against the Obama administration's claim that much of U.S. espionage is carried out to combat terrorism, she said.

"If Washington undermines its own leadership or that of its allies, the collective ability of the West to combat terrorism will be compromised," Skinner said. "Allied leaders will have no incentive to put their own militaries at risk if they cannot trust U.S. leadership."

The administration asserts that the U.S. is amassing intelligence of the type gathered by all nations and that it's necessary to protect the U.S. and its allies against security threats.

Kerry discussed the NSA affair in Europe with French and Italian officials this past week.

Most governments have not retaliated, but some countries are pushing back.

Germany and France are demanding that the administration agree by year's end to new rules that could mean an end to reported American eavesdropping on foreign leaders, companies and innocent citizens.

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff canceled her official state visit to the White House. She ordered measures aimed at greater Brazilian online independence and security after learning that the NSA intercepted her communications, hacked into the state-owned Petrobras oil company's network and spied on Brazilians.

Brazil says it is working with other countries to draft a U.N. General Assembly resolution that would guarantee people's privacy in electronic communications.

A European Parliament committee approved rules that would strengthen online privacy and outlaw the kind of data transfers the U.S. is using for its spying program.

European lawmakers have called for the suspension of an agreement that grants U.S. authorities access to bank data needed for terrorism-related investigations.

"We need trust among allies and partners," said German Chancellor Angela Merkel, whose cellphone was allegedly tapped by the NSA. "Such trust now has to be built anew."


Associated Press writers Elaine Ganley in Paris, Josef Federman in Jerusalem, Robert H. Reid in Berlin and Jim Kuhnhenn in Washington contributed to this report.
........................................................


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/26/angela-merkel-phone_n_4165008.html?utm_hp_ref=politics

Americans Think Tracking Merkel's Phone Is Unacceptable, But Tracking Other Leaders Might Be OK

Emily Swanson     
Posted: 10/26/2013 9:33 am EDT  |  Updated: 10/26/2013 12:47 pm EDT



Americans generally frown on the idea of spying on German Chancellor Angela Merkel, according to a new HuffPost/YouGov poll. But many think the idea of spying on other world leaders would be acceptable.

According to the new poll, 49 percent of Americans think it's unacceptable for the U.S. to track Merkel's phone calls, while only 25 percent said it's acceptable. The Guardian reported this week that the U.S. may have tracked calls to and from Merkel's cell phone in the past -- although White House spokesman Jay Carney denied that the country is doing so currently or will in the future.

Aversion to the idea of tracking Merkel appeared to be based mostly on her standing as the leader of a close U.S. ally, while respondents expressed more openness to tracking some other world leaders.

Americans were largely on board with the idea of tracking Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, the poll found. Forty-nine percent said that would be acceptable, while 32 percent said it would be unacceptable. And a 43 percent to 34 percent plurality said it would be acceptable to spy on Chinese President Xi Jinping.

In contrast, respondents said that it would be unacceptable to track another close U.S. ally, British Prime Minister David Cameron, by a 55 percent to 23 percent margin.

Respondents were more divided over the idea of tracking Russian President Vladimir Putin's calls -- 42 percent said it would be acceptable, while 38 percent said it would be unacceptable. Respondents also said it would be unacceptable to track Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto's phone by a 40 percent to 36 margin.

While pluralities of Republicans, Democrats and independents generally agreed on whether or not it was acceptable to track the phone calls of each leader, there were exceptions. Democrats and independents generally agreed that it would not be acceptable to track Mexican President Nieto's phone calls, but by a 47 percent to 29 percent margin more Republicans said it would be acceptable. And while pluralities of both Republicans and Democrats said it would be acceptable to track Putin's phone calls, a plurality of independents said it would be unacceptable.

The HuffPost/YouGov poll was conducted Oct. 23-24 among 1,000 U.S. adults using a sample selected from YouGov's opt-in online panel to match the demographics and other characteristics of the adult U.S. population. Factors considered include age, race, gender, education, employment, income, marital status, number of children, voter registration, time and location of Internet access, interest in politics, religion and church attendance.

The Huffington Post has teamed up with YouGov to conduct daily opinion polls. You can learn more about this project and take part in YouGov's nationally representative opinion polling.
 
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: stealthyaroura on October 26, 2013, 03:44:12 PM
Look at the views little otter :D I bet  "they" are watching this thread.
It's some body of work  8) I don't know where you find the energy!
One busy otter :D and for that I pass you some Gold.
"Otterleaks" hehe.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: stealthyaroura on October 26, 2013, 03:59:50 PM
Quote
"It is important for the public to know that some of these capabilities exist," Yiannis Antonaides with contractor BAE Systems said in the clip, but noted the sensor itself cannot be revealed. "Because we are not allowed to expose some of the pieces that make up this sensor, so you get to look a pretty plastic curtains."

TWO CAN PLAY AT THIS!!!!
It's important that "THEY" or YOU if your snooping to know that I have a laser small enough to conceal yet powerful enough to not only blind your capability to monitor me but also put your camera permanently out of action. :P
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on October 26, 2013, 05:15:33 PM


stealthy

thanks


it started just to collect a few articles..but has somehow turned into a big fat collection
with a few comments tossed in

 :o ::)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Pimander on October 27, 2013, 08:07:54 AM
We should bang a couple of ads on pages like this and pay the key contributor for their efforts.  Then it would be real gold for you Sky. ;)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on October 27, 2013, 10:45:25 AM


lol.. Pimander
i have no objection to you doing that..ads, i mean

 i really don't need more gold..but that is a kind thought so thanks

too much and i become visible to those i would rather not be seen by
or ask for loans by those i would rather not be realted too..lol

i'm warm, dry and have enough to eat and some gold to pay bills
and still buy books and such
so i am a happy camper
any more and i might turn into a raging maniac

bwhahahahahahahahahah
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on October 27, 2013, 11:00:20 AM

 hooray for us  but I’ll bet each of these fine protesting folk are now on some kind of facial recognition or other watch list
I am so sad to be so cynical



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/26/nsa-stop-watching-us_n_4166640.html

NSA 'Stop Watching Us' Protest Draws Thousands In Washington

 Posted: 10/26/2013 7:07 pm EDT  |  Updated: 10/27/2013 9:24 am EDT

 Farah Mohamed Become a fan
farah.mohamed@huffingtonpost.com


WASHINGTON -- Thousands rallied against the National Security Agency's domestic and international surveillance programs Saturday, marching from Union Station to the Capitol to call for an end to mass surveillance.

"We are witnessing an American moment, in which ordinary people -- from high schools to high office -- stand up to oppose a dangerous trend in government," said a statement from Edward Snowden, read aloud at the rally by a participant.

The former NSA employee who leaked information about government surveillance programs to the media ended his statement by saying, "It is time for reform. Elections are coming, and we're watching you."

The march was organized by the Stop Watching Us coalition and drew on the support of more than 100 public advocacy groups. They included the American Civil Liberties Union, Demand Progress and the Council on American–Islamic Relations.

Demonstrators came from across the United States. Some wore tape across their mouths and masks, and dressed up as cameras. Others carried signs plastered with images of Snowden, and a giant blue and white parachute that read "constitutional rights not NSA mass spying." Groups of protesters chanted slogans like, "They say wiretap, we say fight back," and "Hey hey, ho ho, the NSA has got to go." One person dressed up as Obama, held an "Obamacam" and posed in front of a model drone.

David Busey, 69, came from Pennsylvania to support the cause. He's been to many rallies for different causes, but it was his first time with such a large group in Washington.

"'I'm here to join with a lot of other people -- which I'm thankful to be able to do -- saying that the government needs to quit collecting information that is not going to be used to prosecute individuals," Busey said. "The government shouldn't be doing this to us. It should be our friend and not [be] treating us like criminals when we're not criminals."

"I hope that everybody takes note of my sign," he added, hoisting a large placard above his head that read: "National security is the root password of the U.S. Constitution."

Craig Aaron, head of the group Free Press, also pointed out that the fight went beyond partisanship. "This isn't about right and left -- it's about right and wrong."

Elise Power, 62, from Pittsburgh witnessed this firsthand when a man in a tea party hat introduced himself to Power, a self-described progressive, she said.

"I got a picture with him," Power said. "We agreed that we were both here for a similar reason, even though we have drastically different ideas about politics, we both care about this issue. And that was eye-opening to me. I don't think there are too many of his gang here today, but I'm kind of glad that he is."

Others like Debbie Sweet, director of advocacy group The World Can't Wait, were hoping to promote something larger than anti-NSA protesters. She brought a model drone to the rally.

"It's somewhat of a libertarian crowd, and there's some right-wingers here," she said. "And we wanted to bring the message into this crowd that we are against the U.S. spying on everyone -- whole populations -- for the purpose of keeping down dissent and protest ... our main point today is American lives are not more important than anyone else's lives. And it takes mass action by the people to stop these dirty secret wars."

The event, which followed new revelations by Snowden that the U.S. monitored the phone of German Chancellor Angela Merkel and leaders in 35 countries, provided a chance for protesters to express their frustration with all surveillance -- including international surveillance.

Power, who also carried a sign with Merkel mentioned on one side, had this to say about surveillance:

"I quoted Mrs. Merkel because when I heard the story about her, I was shocked and embarrassed for my country," she said. "When Obama was elected, there was a lot of hope in Europe. People thought that he was a really good guy and that things were going to be different, and that he had really good values about things like this. And, I'm so ashamed that it's come to this. It's terrible."



................................................



http://investing.businessweek.com/research/markets/news/article.asp?docKey=600-201310271325UPI_____TOPUTRAK_124244_1513-1



United Press International  10/27/2013 1:25 PM ET

Anti-NSA rally draws thousands to Washington


During a rally in Washington, fugitive secrets-leaker Edward Snowden send a message urging activists to push for greater public awareness of spying violations.

Snowden, the former National Security Agency contractor who leaked information about the agency's massive phone and Internet monitoring, sent his message to the rally Saturday as a statement from Russia, where he lives under temporary asylum, The Christian Science Monitor reported.

He is wanted by the United States.

"Today, no telephone in America makes a call without leaving a record with the NSA. Today, no Internet transaction enters or leaves America without passing through the NSA's hands. Our representatives in Congress tell us this is not surveillance. They're wrong," Snowden said. "Now it's time for the government to learn from us."

Last week, leaks tied to Snowden revealed that the NSA allegedly eavesdropped on cellphone calls by German Chancellor Angela Merkel. The news followed protests by leaders from at least 30 other countries -- most of them U.S. allies -- who said NSA spying is a violation and could seriously hinder their relationship with the United States. The United States officially denied the monitoring.

At the rally at the Capitol Reflecting Pool activists pushed for reforms that would prohibit blanket surveillance of phone and Internet activity of U.S. citizens, the Monitor said. The activists said they also want a special committee to investigate and report domestic spying violations and create regulatory reforms.

The rally was on the 12th anniversary of the signing of the Patriot Act, which allows the FBI to conduct surveillance in terrorism and espionage cases with a federal judge's approval.

Next week, Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., is to introduce a bill that would create more transparency and accountability at the NSA. Sensenbrenner was the main author of the Patriot Act.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: burntheships on October 27, 2013, 11:28:54 AM
What a ruse the NSA pulled here:
The Washington Times is preparing to take legal action in connection with the raid of a reporter’s home by government officials.
 
The warrant was narrowly written to limit the raid to a search for weapons owned by the reporter’s husband. Instead, the raiders carefully picked through the reporter’s files and took those pertaining to her stories about the TSA. The man in charge of this search also happened to be a former TSA employee who apparently had a direct interest in those files.
 
Quote
That her private files were seized, says Mrs. Hudson [the reporter], is particularly disturbing because of interactions that she and her husband had during the search of their home, as well as months afterwards, with Coast Guard investigator Miguel Bosch. According to his profile on the networking site LinkedIn, Mr. Bosch worked at the Federal Air Marshal Service from April 2001 through November 2007.
 
It was Mr. Bosch, Mrs. Hudson says, who asked her during the Aug. 6 search if she was the same Audrey Hudson who had written the air marshal stories. It was also Mr. Bosch, she says, who phoned Mr. Flanagan a month later to say that documents taken during the search had been cleared.
 
During the call, according Mrs. Hudson, Mr. Bosch said the files had been taken to make sure that they contained only “FOIA-able” information and that he had circulated them to the Transportation Security Administration, which oversees the Federal Air Marshal Service, in order to verify that “it was legitimate” for her to possess such information.
 
“Essentially, the files that included the identities of numerous government whistleblowers were turned over to the same government agency and officials who they were exposing for wrongdoing,” Mrs. Hudson said.
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/oct/25/armed-agents-seize-records-reporter-washington-tim/?page=all#pagebreak

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on October 27, 2013, 08:22:26 PM


BTS
i have always hated it when bullies get some power..grrrrrrrrrrrrrrr


this stuff seems endless..i don't think there is anyone who has not been spyed on..idiots.!




http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/27/nsa-spain_n_4168523.html
NSA Collected Data On 60 Million Phone Calls In Spain Over Course Of One Month: Report
Posted: 10/27/2013 9:02 pm EDT  |  Updated: 10/27/2013 9:22 pm EDT

An upcoming story in the Spanish newspaper El Mundo reports that the U.S. National Security Agency swept up data on 60 million phone calls in Spain over the course of one month in 2012.

This latest revelation comes from documents uncovered by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden. The El Mundo story was written by Glenn Greenwald and Germán Aranda.

Earlier on Sunday, Greenwald teased the story in a tweet:

X



He later revealed that the country in question is Spain, and he tweeted a screenshot of the story on El Mundo's front page:

X

This newest surveillance news is likely to further inflame international tensions surrounding the intelligence reach of the U.S. government. It comes on the heels of another story co-written by Greenwald, this one from France's Le Monde newspaper. The Le Monde report indicated that the NSA collected 70 million French telephone records over a 30-day period.

Also this week, a separate story revealed that the U.S. may have bugged the phone of German Chancellor Angela Merkel for over a decade. The NSA has denied reports that Obama was briefed on the matter as far back as 2010 by NSA Director Keith Alexander
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on October 28, 2013, 08:35:32 PM


what are they going to do.. say .. oh yell we cleaned it up ..no more spying..?
do they think anyone will believe them?

the rat smell is getting stronger



http://thecable.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2013/10/28/were_really_screwed_now_nsas_best_friend_just_shivved_the_spies

SPOOKS SPOOKED!   'WE'RE REALLY SCREWED NOW'

'We're Really Screwed Now': NSA's Best Friend Just Shivved The Spies
Posted By Shane Harris, John Hudson  Monday, October 28, 2013 - 7:21 PM


One of the National Security Agency's biggest defenders in Congress is suddenly at odds with the agency and calling for a top-to-bottom review of U.S. spy programs. And her long-time friends and allies are completely mystified by the switch.

"We're really screwed now," one NSA official told The Cable. "You know things are bad when the few friends you've got disappear without a trace in the dead of night and leave no forwarding address."

In a pointed statement issued today, Senate Intelligence Committee chairman Dianne Feinstein said she was "totally opposed" to gathering intelligence on foreign leaders and said it was "a big problem" if President Obama didn't know the NSA was monitoring the phone calls of German Chancellor Angela Merkel. She said the United States should only be spying on foreign leaders with hostile countries, or in an emergency, and even then the president should personally approve the surveillance. 

It was not clear what precipitated Feinstein's condemnation of the NSA. It marks a significant reversal for a lawmaker who not only defended agency surveillance programs -- but is about to introduce a bill expected to protect some of its most controversial activities.

Perhaps most significant is her announcement that the intelligence committee "will initiate a review into all intelligence collection programs." Feinstein did not say the review would be limited only to the NSA. If the review also touched on other intelligence agencies under the committee's jurisdiction, it could be one of the most far-reaching reviews in recent memory, encompassing secret programs of the CIA, the Defense Intelligence Agency, agencies that run imagery and spy satellites, as well as components of the FBI.

A former intelligence agency liaison to Congress said Feinstein's sudden outrage over spying on foreign leaders raised questions about how well informed she was about NSA programs and whether she'd been fully briefed by her staff. "The first question I'd ask is, what have you been doing for oversight? Second, if you've been reviewing this all along what has changed your mind?"

The former official said the intelligence committees receive lengthy and detailed descriptions every year about all NSA programs, including surveillance. "They're not small books. They're about the size of those old family photo albums that were several inches thick. They're hundreds of pages long."

A senior congressional aide said, "It's an absolute joke to think she hasn't been reading the signals intelligence intercepts as Chairman of Senate Intelligence for years."

The former official added that the "bottom line question is where was the Senate Intelligence Committee when it came to their oversight of these programs? And what were they being told by the NSA, because if they didn't know about this surveillance, that would imply they were being lied to."

A spokesperson for Feinstein did not respond to a request for more details in time for publication. And a spokesperson for Sen. Saxby Chambliss, the intelligence committee's vice chairman, said the senator had no comment at this time.

In a tacit acknowledgement of how supportive Feinstein has been of the administration's surveillance practices, the White House issued a lengthy statement about her Monday remarks.

"We consult regularly with Chairman Feinstein as a part of our ongoing engagement with the Congress on national security matters," said National Security Council spokesperson Caitlin Hayden. "We appreciate her continued leadership on these issues as Chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee.  I'm not going to go into the details of those private discussions, nor am I going to comment on assertions made in the Senator's statement today about U.S. foreign intelligence activities." The statement went on to note the administration's current review of surveillance practices worldwide.

The surprise change of tone comes during a crucial week on Capitol Hill as lawmakers on opposing sides of the surveillance debate look to introduce rival bills related to the NSA.

Striking first blood, opponents of expansive NSA surveillance are expected to introduce the "USA Freedom Act" on Tuesday, which would limit the bulk data collection of records under Section 215 of the Patriot Act, install an "office of the special advocate" to appeal FISA court decisions, and give subpoena powers on privacy matters to the Privacy and Civil LIberties Oversight Board. Sponsored by Reps. Jim Sensenbrenner (R-WI) and John Conyers (D-MI), the bill is backed by a strong bipartisan bench of some 60 lawmakers, including Reps. Darrell Issa (R-CA), Mike Quigley (D-IL), and Justin Amash (R-MI) and Sheila Jackson (D-TX).

A draft of the bill was provided to The Cable by a congressional aide and can be viewed in full here.

Unlike many House bills, Freedom Act has some bipartisan support in the Senate in the form of Vermont Democrat Patrick Leahy, who will be introducing a similar bill at the same time.

On the opposing side is Feinstein, who is looking to codify the NSA's controversial phone records program in her bill set for markup this week. According to published reports, the bill would give the agency the authority to vacuum metadata of all U.S. phone calls but not their content, meaning duration, numbers, and time of phone calls are fair game. A spokesperson for Feinstein said that the senator plans to move forward with the bill even in light of today's rhetorical about-face.

While the Feinstein bill could gain support in the Senate, a Congressional aide familiar with the politics in the House say it's likely dead on arrival in the lower chamber. If it went down, however, pro-surveillance lawmakers would still likely put up a fight.

"The fact is, the NSA has done more to save German lives than the German army since World War II," Rep. Peter King (R-NY) said on CNN.

Still, others often in favor of government surveillance have carved out surprising positions. Republican hawk John McCain, for instance, is now calling for a special select committee to investigate U.S. spying. "We have always eavesdropped on people around the world. But the advance of technology has given us enormous capabilities, and I think you might make an argument that some of this capability has been very offensive both to us and to our allies," McCain said.

Over at the Pentagon, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel Monday refused to comment on the NSA's surveillance of world leaders, dismissing questions about what he may or may not have known about intelligence collection. "We have great respect for our partners, our allies, who cooperate with us and we cooperate with them to try to keep the world safe," said Hagel, standing beside New Zealand Minister of Defense Jonathan Coleman during a Pentagon press briefing. "Intelligence is a key part of that. And I think this issue will continue to be explored, as -- as it is now, but that's all I have to say."

Coleman responded to the same question: "New Zealand's not worried at all about this," he said. "We don't believe it would be occurring, and look, quite frankly there'd be nothing that anyone could hear in our private conversations that we wouldn't be prep[ared to share publicly." Coleman then cited a political cartoon in a newspaper in Wellington. It showed an analyst listening to the communiques from New Zealand with a big stream of "ZZZs" next to it. "I don't think New Zealand's got anything to worry about, and we have high trust in our relationships with the U.S."

With additional reporting by Matthew Aid and Gordon Lubold


 ....................................................................

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/28/nsa-spying-allies_n_4172164.html

NSA Spying: U.S. May Order Halt To Surveillance Of Allied Heads Of State

 By JULIE PACE and KIMBERLY DOZIER 10/28/13 10:43 PM ET EDT 

WASHINGTON -- WASHINGTON (AP) — A senior administration official says the United States is weighing ending spying against allied heads of state.

The official said late Monday a final decision has not been made and an internal review is ongoing. The review comes amid the furor in Europe over revelations that the National Security Agency allegedly eavesdropped on German Chancellor Angela Merkel (AHN'-geh-lah MEHR'-kuhl).

The official was not authorized to discuss the ongoing review by name and insisted on anonymity.



............................................



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/28/dianne-feinstein-nsa-spying_n_4171473.html

Sen. Dianne Feinstein Slams NSA Spying
Posted: 10/28/2013 5:17 pm EDT  |  Updated: 10/28/2013 10:07 pm EDT

WASHINGTON -- Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), the chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee, hammered the National Security Agency Monday over reports it spied on foreign leaders and allies, and revealed that President Barack Obama said he would halt such eavesdropping.

A senior administration official denied the White House was stopping programs aimed at allies. A source close to Feinstein insisted the California lawmaker had been informed by Obama that spying on friendly leaders would cease.

Saying that she is "totally opposed" to eavesdropping on the leaders of friendly governments and wants a complete review of U.S. intelligence activities, Feinstein, who had been a staunch defender of the NSA since former agency contractor Edward Snowden began leaking documents detailing its secret activities, came down hard on the spy agency.

In an uncharacteristically harsh statement, Feinstein said new allegations that the agency monitored the phone calls of foreign leaders, including German Chancellor Angela Merkel, are simply out of bounds, and suggested the NSA has failed to fully inform Congress and Obama of its activities.

“It is my understanding that President Obama was not aware Chancellor Merkel’s communications were being collected since 2002. That is a big problem," Feinstein said. “The White House has informed me that collection on our allies will not continue, which I support. But as far as I’m concerned, Congress needs to know exactly what our intelligence community is doing."

The senior administration official said Feinstein's statement that the White House is moving to stop spying on U.S. allies "is not accurate."

"While we have made some individual changes -- which I cannot detail -- we have not made across-the-board changes in policy like, for example, terminating intelligence collection that might be aimed at all allies," the official said.

It was unclear why Feinstein and the White House seemed to have differing interpretations of her conversations with Obama. But a spokeswoman for the president's National Security Council confirmed that the administration was re-evaluating its eavesdropping.

"We appreciate her [Feinstein's] continued leadership on these issues as chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee," said the spokeswoman, Caitlin Hayden. "We are also looking at whether the system that’s been in place for many years, called the National Intelligence Priorities Framework, could be modified to provide better policy guidance for our intelligence activities. The administration's review is ongoing ... but we have already made some decisions through this process and expect to make more as we continue. The review is meant to be completed by the end of the year."

The California senator has argued repeatedly that the NSA's mass collection of Americans' phone records is useful and necessary to protect the nation, and that it is carefully monitored by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court. "It's called protecting America," Feinstein said in June (See video above.)

But the reported U.S. spying on foreign leaders -- and failing to explain such activities to elected officials -- is entirely inappropriate, Feinstein said Monday.

“It is abundantly clear that a total review of all intelligence programs is necessary so that members of the Senate Intelligence Committee are fully informed as to what is actually being carried out by the intelligence community," Feinstein said. “Unlike NSA’s collection of phone records under a court order, it is clear to me that certain surveillance activities have been in effect for more than a decade and that the Senate Intelligence Committee was not satisfactorily informed."

“With respect to NSA collection of intelligence on leaders of U.S. allies -- including France, Spain, Mexico and Germany -- let me state unequivocally: I am totally opposed," Feinstein added, spelling out what may be a rare rift between her and the Obama administration.

"I do not believe the United States should be collecting phone calls or emails of friendly presidents and prime ministers. The president should be required to approve any collection of this sort," she said.

Feinstein placed the blame on former President George W. Bush's administration and officials in the intelligence community who did not later divulge the activities to members of Obama's administration and Congress.

U.S. ambassadors have been summoned by outraged allies to explain the reported actions, and the revelations have sparked a backlash across Europe that may lead to restrictions on U.S. surveillance, as well as rollbacks of other post-9/11 American intelligence activities.

This story has been updated with a statement from a senior administration official and from National Security Council spokeswoman Caitlin Hayden and sources familiar with Feinstein's discussion with the president.

Michael McAuliff covers Congress and politics for The Huffington Post. Talk to him on Facebook.

............................................

http://www.latimes.com/world/la-fg-spying-phones-20131029,0,3235295.story#axzz2j4tuixpK

White House OKd spying on allies, U.S. intelligence officials say

NSA and other U.S. intelligence agency staff members are said to be angry at President Obama for denying knowledge of the spying.

By Ken Dilanian and Janet Stobart
October 28, 2013, 7:25 p.m.
WASHINGTON — The White House and State Department signed off on surveillance targeting phone conversations of friendly foreign leaders, current and former U.S. intelligence officials said Monday, pushing back against assertions that President Obama and his aides were unaware of the high-level eavesdropping.

Professional staff members at the National Security Agency and other U.S. intelligence agencies are angry, these officials say, believing the president has cast them adrift as he tries to distance himself from the disclosures by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden that have strained ties with close allies.

The resistance emerged as the White House said it would curtail foreign intelligence collection in some cases and two senior U.S. senators called for investigations of the practice.

France, Germany, Italy, Mexico and Sweden have all publicly complained about the NSA surveillance operations, which reportedly captured private cellphone conversations by German Chancellor Angela Merkel, among other foreign leaders.

On Monday, as Spain joined the protest, the fallout also spread to Capitol Hill.

Until now, members of Congress have chiefly focused their attention on Snowden's disclosures about the NSA's collection of U.S. telephone and email records under secret court orders.

"With respect to NSA collection of intelligence on leaders of U.S. allies — including France, Spain, Mexico and Germany — let me state unequivocally: I am totally opposed," said Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), who chairs the Senate Intelligence Committee.

"Unless the United States is engaged in hostilities against a country or there is an emergency need for this type of surveillance, I do not believe the United States should be collecting phone calls or emails of friendly presidents and prime ministers," she said in a statement.

Feinstein said the Intelligence Committee had not been told of "certain surveillance activities" for more than a decade, and she said she would initiate a major review of the NSA operation. She added that the White House had informed her that "collection on our allies will not continue," although other officials said most U.S. surveillance overseas would not be affected.

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), ranking minority member of the Armed Services Committee, said Congress should consider creating a special select committee to examine U.S. eavesdropping on foreign leaders.

"Obviously, we're going to want to know exactly what the president knew and when he knew it," McCain told reporters in Chicago. "We have always eavesdropped on people around the world. But the advance of technology has given us enormous capabilities, and I think you might make an argument that some of this capability has been very offensive both to us and to our allies."

In Madrid, Spanish Foreign Ministry officials summoned the U.S. ambassador to object to the alleged NSA communications net in Spain. Citing documents leaked by Snowden, El Mundo, a major Spanish daily, said the U.S. spy agency had collected data on more than 60 million phone calls made in just 30 days, from early December 2012 to early January 2013.

Precisely how the surveillance is conducted is unclear. But if a foreign leader is targeted for eavesdropping, the relevant U.S. ambassador and the National Security Council staffer at the White House who deals with the country are given regular reports, said two former senior intelligence officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity in discussing classified information.

Obama may not have been specifically briefed on NSA operations targeting a foreign leader's cellphone or email communications, one of the officials said. "But certainly the National Security Council and senior people across the intelligence community knew exactly what was going on, and to suggest otherwise is ridiculous."

If U.S. spying on key foreign leaders was news to the White House, current and former officials said, then White House officials have not been reading their briefing books.

Some U.S. intelligence officials said they were being blamed by the White House for conducting surveillance that was authorized under the law and utilized at the White House.

"People are furious," said a senior intelligence official who would not be identified discussing classified information. "This is officially the White House cutting off the intelligence community."

Any decision to spy on friendly foreign leaders is made with input from the State Department, which considers the political risk, the official said. Any useful intelligence is then given to the president's counter-terrorism advisor, Lisa Monaco, among other White House officials.

Jay Carney, the White House press secretary, said Monday that Obama had ordered a review of surveillance capabilities, including those affecting America's closest foreign partners and allies.

"Our review is looking across the board at our intelligence gathering to ensure that as we gather intelligence, we are properly accounting for both the security of our citizens and our allies and the privacy concerns shared by Americans and citizens around the world," Carney said.

Caitlin Hayden, spokeswoman for the National Security Council, said the review would examine "whether we have the appropriate posture when it comes to heads of state, how we coordinate with our closest allies and partners, and what further guiding principles or constraints might be appropriate for our efforts."

She said the review should be completed this year.

Citing documents from Snowden, the German news magazine Der Spiegel reported last week that the NSA's Special Collection Service had monitored Merkel's cellphone since 2002. Obama subsequently called Merkel and told her he was not aware her phone had been hacked, U.S. officials said.

Intelligence officials also disputed a Wall Street Journal article Monday that said the White House had learned only this summer — during a review of surveillance operations that might be exposed by Snowden — about an NSA program to monitor communications of 35 world leaders. Since then, officials said, several of the eavesdropping operations have been stopped because of political sensitivities.

ken.dilanian@latimes.com

Stobart is a news assistant in The Times' London bureau. Chicago Tribune writer Rick Pearson contributed to this report.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on October 29, 2013, 04:15:22 PM

yep..just move along..nothing to see here


He suggested the outrage and surprise expressed by representatives of allies in recent days was naive or disingenuous


http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/10/29/21233196-spy-chief-clapper-weve-been-snooping-on-our-friends-for-years?lite&ocid=msnhp&pos=1


video at link


Spy chief Clapper: We've been snooping on our friends for years


By Tracy Connor, Staff Writer, NBC News
The nation's top intelligence official told Congress on Tuesday that the U.S. has been snooping on friendly foreign leaders for years, and getting spied on by allies in return.

As controversy swirled over reports that the National Security Agency monitored the calls of German Chancellor Angela Merkel and other world leaders, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper gave the impression he didn't know what all the fuss was about.

During a grilling by the House Intelligence Committee, Clapper said understanding "foreign leadership intentions" is one of NSA's basic goals.

"That's a hardy perennial as long as I have been in the intelligence business,” he said, explaining that the U.S. needs to make sure what allies are telling America matches what's going on behind the scenes.

Asked whether allies also spy on the U.S., Clapper was unequivocal: "Absolutely."

He suggested the outrage and surprise expressed by representatives of allies in recent days was naive or disingenuous and reminded him of a line from the movie "Casablanca."

"'My God, there's gambling going on here?' It's the same kind of thing," he said.

President Obama reportedly had to apologize to Merkel and to the presidents of France and Brazil after revelations about U.S. spying — disclosures that stem from former NSA and CIA contractor Edward Snowden's leaks of government documents.

As the White House tries to control the damage, Obama has promised a “complete review” of overseas spying operations and is reportedly considering whether to suspend monitoring of allies.

“What we've seen over the last several years is their capacities continue to develop and expand, and that's why I'm initiating now a review to make sure that what they're able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing," Obama said Monday in a televised interview.

NSA Director Gen. Keith Alexander said overseas reports that the U.S. had collected tens of millions of phone calls in France, Spain and other European nations were "false."

He said the data cited came from foreign service agencies — "collected in defense of our countries and in support of military operations" — and was not culled from European citizens.

Clapper and Alexander appeared before the committee hours after a bipartisan team of Congress members introduced a bill that would sharply curb the NSA's collection of American's phone data, legislation that is expected to face a fight from others who think it goes too far.

Several protesters wearing clown-size sunglasses with the words "Stop Spying" scrawled on the lenses sat behind the two spy bosses.

Both defended the data-sweeping program as lawful, aimed at foreign terrorists and successful in saving lives.

Clapper said he would support declassifying secret intelligence court orders to boost transparency and pointed to plans to hire a director of civil liberties and privacy. Alexander said an independent Senate-confirmed inspector general, one of the proposals the committee is considering, "won't hurt."

But Clapper also warned those looking to reform the NSA's activities that they must avoid “over-correcting.”

“We believe we have been lawful and that the rigorous oversight we’ve operated under has been effective,” Clapper said in his opening remarks.

“We do not spy on anyone except for valid foreign intelligence purposes and we do not violate the law.”

Clapper conceded “we have made mistakes,” blaming them on human error or technical problems and said there has been an “erosion of trust in the in the intelligence community.”

But he urged the lawmakers to be cautious in responding to the errors.

“As Americans, we face an unending array of threats to our way of life. We need to sustain our ability to detect these threats,” he said.

Months of leaks from Snowden are already “affecting our ability to conduct intelligence and keep our country safe,” he said.

Alexander struck a similar note in his testimony.

“It is much more important for this county that we defend this country and take the beating than it for us to give up a program that would prevent this nation from being attacked,” he said.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Sgt.Rocknroll on October 29, 2013, 04:27:59 PM
I really don't se what the big deal is. As stated, we spy, they spy, we all spy. It's been going on since the beginning of time. And will continue!
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on October 30, 2013, 01:50:30 PM


yep..what sgt. said




http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/30/russia-spying-g20-leaders_n_4176716.html


Russia Spying On G20 Leaders? Kremlin Denies Italian Reports Of Skullduggery

Reuters  |  Posted: 10/30/2013 6:52 am EDT  |  Updated: 10/30/2013 8:39 am EDT





ROME/MOSCOW, Oct 30 (Reuters) - Russia has denied reports that its intelligence services spied on hundreds of foreign delegates at a Group of 20 summit in St Petersburg in September using gifts such as teddy bears, diaries and free USB keys.

Quoting a report from the European Council's security office to Italian intelligence services, Italy's Corriere della Sera daily has reported this week that at least 300 such devices were issued at the Sept. 5-6 summit and were revealed to be spy gear during security debriefing sessions last month.

The report fuels controversy over international espionage after reports that U.S. intelligence services had conducted telephone surveillance of allied countries and leaders.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said he did not know what the source of the latest allegations was.

"This is undoubtedly nothing but an attempt to shift the focus from issues that truly exist in relations between European capitals and Washington to unsubstantiated, non-existent issues," he was quoted as saying by RIA news agency.

Tension between the United States and its allies has grown over reports that European leaders including German Chancellor Angela Merkel had been spied on by U.S. intelligence services.

According to Corriere della Sera, a regular debriefing with European Council President Herman Van Rompuy and other EU delegates revealed they had been given souvenir USB keys and cables to connect smartphones with personal computers.

It said EU officials alerted German intelligence services which conducted detailed tests on the devices.

"These are devices adapted to the clandestine interception of data from computers and mobile telephones," the newspaper quoted an initial report as saying.

Daily La Stampa newspaper said the devices showed "anomalies" and signs of "manipulation" but it was not certain how much information had been collected by Russian spies.

The reports appear to show a more traditional pattern of intelligence gathering than the reported U.S. snooping.

The Guardian newspaper reported in July that British intelligence services had spied on G20 delegates at a summit in 2009, tricking some delegates into using free

internet cafes apparently set up for their benefit. (Reporting by James MacKenzie, additional reporting by Gabriela Baczynska; Editing by Alistair Lyon)

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on November 02, 2013, 08:37:56 PM

 :(


http://news.msn.com/world/european-agencies-reportedly-working-on-mass-spying

European agencies reportedly working on mass spying
5 hr ago By Estelle Shirbon of Reuters

The Guardian reported that European spy agencies are collaborating on mass surveillance of the Internet and phone traffic.

LONDON — Spy agencies across Western Europe are working together on mass surveillance of Internet and phone traffic comparable to programs run by their U.S. counterpart denounced by European governments, Britain's Guardian newspaper reported Saturday.

Citing documents leaked by fugitive former U.S. National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden, the Guardian said methods included tapping into fiber optic cables and working covertly with private telecommunications companies.

The Guardian named Germany, France, Spain, Sweden and the Netherlands as countries where intelligence agencies had been developing such methods in cooperation with counterparts including Britain's surveillance agency GCHQ.

The report is potentially embarrassing for governments, especially in Germany and France which have been the most vocal in protesting about U.S. mass surveillance of European communication networks revealed by Snowden since June.

Germany, jointly with Brazil, circulated a draft resolution to a U.N. General Assembly committee on Friday that called for an end to excessive electronic surveillance, data collection and other gross invasions of privacy.

There has been particular anger in Germany, a close ally of the United States, over the revelation that the NSA monitored the mobile phone of Chancellor Angela Merkel.

Snowden has written an open letter to Merkel and other German authorities to say he is counting on international support to stop Washington's "persecution" of him.

Germany's BND federal intelligence service said there had been considerations in 2008 about merging German security services' surveillance of telecommunications, which would have required changes to telecommunication and security laws.

It said it had exchanged experiences with the British services on this in 2008 but these discussions had focused on technical rather than legal issues. The BND added that it regularly held such exchanges on technical developments with other European services.

"It is incorrect that Germany's BND federal intelligence service tried to circumvent legal restrictions to be able to implement British acquisition technology. On this point too the BND complied with the law," a BND spokesman said.

The Guardian said GCHQ files leaked by Snowden showed the British agency taking credit for advising European counterparts on how to get around domestic laws intended to restrict their surveillance powers.

'HUGE TECHNOLOGICAL POTENTIAL'

Citing a 2008 GCHQ country-by-country report, the Guardian said the British spies were particularly impressed with Germany's BND agency, which they said had "huge technological potential and good access to the heart of the Internet".

"We have been assisting the BND ... in making the case for reform or reinterpretation of the very restrictive interception legislation in Germany," the GCHQ document said, according to the Guardian.

The GCHQ had also praised France's DGSE agency and in particular its close ties with an unnamed telecommunications company, a relationship from which GCHQ hoped to benefit.

"We have made contact with the DGSE's main industry partner, who has some innovative approaches to some Internet challenges, raising the potential for GCHQ to make use of this company in the protocol development arena," the report said.

There was similar analysis of the intelligence agencies in Spain, Sweden and the Netherlands, with Spain's CNI praised for its ties with an unnamed British telecommunications firm and Sweden's FRA congratulated over a law passed in 2008 that widened surveillance powers.

Asked about the Guardian's report, Sweden's National Defense Radio Establishment (FRA) said it was natural that it had contacts with similar organizations in other countries.

FRA spokesman Fredrik Wallin said cooperation with foreign intelligence services could include exchanges of intelligence reports. He declined to comment on specific countries but said all activities were strictly controlled by Swedish law.

"There is a clear legal framework which determines how we cooperate with other countries," he said.

Additional reporting by Andreas Rinke in Berlin.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on November 03, 2013, 08:27:03 AM




this is 7 pages long..only page one here..go to link for the rest..interesting stuff








http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/03/world/no-morsel-too-minuscule-for-all-consuming-nsa.html?hp&_r=0



(At the agency’s request, The Times is withholding some details that officials said could compromise intelligence operations.)




No Morsel Too Minuscule for All-Consuming N.S.A.

By SCOTT SHANE
Published: November 2, 2013

When Ban Ki-moon, the United Nations secretary general, sat down with President Obama at the White House in April to discuss Syrian chemical weapons, Israeli-Palestinian peace talks and climate change, it was a cordial, routine exchange.

The National Security Agency nonetheless went to work in advance and intercepted Mr. Ban’s talking points for the meeting, a feat the agency later reported as an “operational highlight” in a weekly internal brag sheet. It is hard to imagine what edge this could have given Mr. Obama in a friendly chat, if he even saw the N.S.A.’s modest scoop. (The White House won’t say.)



But it was emblematic of an agency that for decades has operated on the principle that any eavesdropping that can be done on a foreign target of any conceivable interest — now or in the future — should be done. After all, American intelligence officials reasoned, who’s going to find out?

From thousands of classified documents, the National Security Agency emerges as an electronic omnivore of staggering capabilities, eavesdropping and hacking its way around the world to strip governments and other targets of their secrets, all the while enforcing the utmost secrecy about its own operations. It spies routinely on friends as well as foes, as has become obvious in recent weeks; the agency’s official mission list includes using its surveillance powers to achieve “diplomatic advantage” over such allies as France and Germany and “economic advantage” over Japan and Brazil, among other countries.



Mr. Obama found himself in September standing uncomfortably beside the president of Brazil, Dilma Rousseff, who was furious at being named as a target of N.S.A. eavesdropping. Since then, there has been a parade of such protests, from the European Union, Mexico, France, Germany and Spain. Chagrined American officials joke that soon there will be complaints from foreign leaders feeling slighted because the agency had not targeted them.



James R. Clapper Jr., the director of national intelligence, has repeatedly dismissed such objections as brazen hypocrisy from countries that do their own share of spying. But in a recent interview, he acknowledged that the scale of eavesdropping by the N.S.A., with 35,000 workers and $10.8 billion a year, sets it apart. “There’s no question that from a capability standpoint we probably dwarf everybody on the planet, just about, with perhaps the exception of Russia and China,” he said.



Since Edward J. Snowden began releasing the agency’s documents in June, the unrelenting stream of disclosures has opened the most extended debate on the agency’s mission since its creation in 1952. The scrutiny has ignited a crisis of purpose and legitimacy for the N.S.A., the nation’s largest intelligence agency, and the White House has ordered a review of both its domestic and its foreign intelligence collection. While much of the focus has been on whether the agency violates Americans’ privacy, an issue under examination by Congress and two review panels, the anger expressed around the world about American surveillance has prompted far broader questions.



If secrecy can no longer be taken for granted, when does the political risk of eavesdropping overseas outweigh its intelligence benefits? Should foreign citizens, many of whom now rely on American companies for email and Internet services, have any privacy protections from the N.S.A.? Will the American Internet giants’ collaboration with the agency, voluntary or otherwise, damage them in international markets? And are the agency’s clandestine efforts to weaken encryption making the Internet less secure for everyone?



Matthew M. Aid, an intelligence historian and author of a 2009 book on the N.S.A., said there is no precedent for the hostile questions coming at the agency from all directions.



“From N.S.A.’s point of view, it’s a disaster,” Mr. Aid said. “Every new disclosure reinforces the notion that the agency needs to be reined in. There are political consequences, and there will be operational consequences.”



A review of classified agency documents obtained by Mr. Snowden and shared with The New York Times by The Guardian, offers a rich sampling of the agency’s global operations and culture. (At the agency’s request, The Times is withholding some details that officials said could compromise intelligence operations.) The N.S.A. seems to be listening everywhere in the world, gathering every stray electron that might add, however minutely, to the United States government’s knowledge of the world. To some Americans, that may be a comfort. To others, and to people overseas, that may suggest an agency out of control.

1
2 3
4 5 6 7 Next Page »
A version of this article appears in print on November 3, 2013, on page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: No Morsel Too Minuscule For All-Consuming N.S.A..
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on November 04, 2013, 10:04:46 PM
yeah yeah.. the u s is the bad guy and the only one spying..what a crock
 





http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/04/brazil-spied-embassy-personnel_n_4214010.html


Brazil Spied On Embassy Personnel



By BRADLEY BROOKS 11/04/13 02:36 PM ET EST 



RIO DE JANEIRO -- RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The Brazilian government confirmed Monday that its intelligence service targeted U.S., Russian, Iranian and Iraqi diplomats and property during spy activities carried out about a decade ago in the capital Brasilia.

The relatively low-key surveillance was reported by the Folha de S. Paulo newspaper, based on Brazilian intelligence service documents it obtained from an undisclosed source.

It describes surveillance that pales in comparison to the massive spy programs carried out by the U.S. National Security Agency, efforts detailed in thousands of documents leaked by Edward Snowden.

But the revelation forced the Brazilian government to defend its espionage while remaining the loudest critic of the NSA programs that have aggressively targeted communications in Brazil, including the personal phone and email of President Dilma Rousseff, who cancelled a state visit to Washington in response.

Brazil's Institutional Security Cabinet, which oversees the Abin intelligence service, said in an emailed statement that all the operations cited in the Folha report "follow Brazilian law for the protection of national interests."

The statement added that Abin "develops intelligence activities for the defense" of Brazil and for "national sovereignty, in strict observance of constitutional principles and the laws that guarantee individual rights."

Rousseff has said that the NSA program, which has swept up data on billions of telephone calls and emails flowing through Brazil, is a violation of individual human rights. Brazil has been targeted in part because it serves as an important transit point for trans-Atlantic fiber optic cables carrying much of the globe's traffic.

Last week, Brazil joined Germany in asking the United Nations General Assembly to adopt a resolution calling on all countries to protect the right to privacy guaranteed under international law. The draft emphasizes that illegal surveillance and interception of communications as well as the illegal collection of personal data "constitute a highly intrusive act that violates the right to privacy and freedom of expression and may threaten the foundations of a democratic society."

In Monday's statement, Brazil's Institutional Security Cabinet said it planned to prosecute anyone who may have leaked the documents to the Folha newspaper.

According to daily, Brazil's intelligence service monitored office space rented by the U.S. Embassy in Brasilia, suspecting it of harboring spy equipment. The report said Abin had concluded that the offices held "communications equipment."

"Functioning daily with the doors closed and the lights turned off, and with nobody in the locale," is how the Abin report described the rented U.S. property, according to Folha. "The office is sporadically visited by someone from the embassy."

Dean Cheves, the spokesman for the U.S. Embassy in Brazil, wouldn't comment on Abin's surveillance of the office space. But he said the office served as a relay station for walkie-talkie radios carried by embassy personnel, who carry the radios as back up communications for emergencies or in case cellphone service goes down.

The Folha report detailed at least 10 intelligence operations carried out in Brasilia in 2003-04, just as former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva was settling into office.

Other targets included diplomats from the Russian, Iranian and Iraqi embassies, who were followed and photographed as they came and went from embassies and official residences.

In particular, Abin was interested in Russian officials involved in negotiating arms deals in Brazil, and followed Iran's ambassador to Cuba as he visited Brazil.

___

Associated Press writer Jenny Barchfield contributed to this report.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on November 05, 2013, 09:33:13 PM
 wow ..just imagine..all the time and effort into this...sigh


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-24824633


5 November 2013 Last updated at 11:32 ET

Germany calls in British ambassador over spy claims

The British ambassador in Berlin has been called in to Germany's foreign ministry to respond to spying allegations.

The UK's Independent newspaper says the British embassy in Berlin may house a "top-secret listening post".

It cites leaked US National Security Agency (NSA) documents suggesting the UK could be using hi-tech equipment housed on the embassy roof.

Any such activity would be against international law, Berlin says.

A spokesman for David Cameron said the prime minister had not spoken to Chancellor Angela Merkel about the spying allegations and there were no plans for a conversation, although their relationship was "excellent".

He refused to comment on security issues but said Britain's intelligence services operated under a "strong and clear legal framework".

German Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle had requested the attendance of UK ambassador Simon McDonald to respond to the claims, a ministry spokesman said.

"The head of the European department asked for a response to current reports in the British media, and pointed out that the interception of communications from the premises of a diplomatic mission would be behaviour contrary to international law," he said.

The Independent report, published on Tuesday, was based on NSA documents leaked by US whistleblower Edward Snowden.

The report said the NSA documents, in conjunction with aerial photographs and information about past spying activities in Germany, suggest that Britain is operating a covert listening station close to the Bundestag, Germany's parliament, and Chancellor Angela Merkel's offices.

Aerial photographs of the embassy in Berlin show a white, tent-like structure, which the newspaper says has been in place since the embassy was opened in 2000.

Equipment within the unit "would be capable of intercepting mobile phone calls, wi-fi data and long-distance communications across the German capital," the Independent reported.

It follows revelations that the US has listened to mobile phone calls made by Mrs Merkel since 2002.

The row has led to a serious diplomatic crisis between the two countries.

...........................


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-24753696



NSA leaks helping India become 'Big Brother' state?

While the US and Britain fend off accusations of Big Brother-style spying, other countries are learning lessons from fugitive ex-US intelligence contractor Edward Snowden's leaks and, critics say, developing the same kind of mass-surveillance.

India is one of those in the frame.

Its authorities are bringing in new measures against foreign cyber-snooping, including a plan to move internet traffic inside its borders and banning officials from using Gmail and other external email services.

Simultaneously, campaigners say the Indian government is loosening controls on electronic snooping by its own spies.

It is also stepping up efforts to build its own mass-surveillance system, which critics have dubbed "India's PRISM" - a reference to one of the US spy programmes revealed by Mr Snowden.

This is the downside of Mr Snowden's leaks, says Sunil Abraham of the Centre for Internet and Society, an Indian advocacy group.

"Governments like India are now cherry-picking the worst practices, in a race for the bottom in terms of human rights".

Documents released by Mr Snowden to journalist Glenn Greenwald showed America's National Security Agency (NSA) was hoovering up billions of chunks of Indian data, making the country its fifth most important target worldwide.

'Not actually snooping'
 
But unlike other states that have discovered the US is siphoning off their secrets, India has conspicuously avoided joining the chorus of criticism. That may be because it doesn't want to draw attention to its own activities.

Its foreign minister Salman Khurshid even appeared to excuse American monitoring, saying it "was not actually snooping".

When the German chancellor Angela Merkel erupted over reports the NSA had been bugging her mobile phone, the Indian prime minister's office was untroubled by the possibility he too had been targeted.  


.....................

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-24757968


1 November 2013 Last updated at 03:13 ET

Australia ambassador summoned amid Asia US spying reports

Indonesia has summoned Australia's ambassador amid reports that Australian embassies have been used as part of a US-led spying network in Asia.

The Sydney Morning Herald (SMH) reported that diplomatic posts in Asia were being used to intercept phone calls and data.

China has also demanded an explanation from the US over the allegations.

The reports were based on a US National Security Agency document leaked by whistleblower Edward Snowden.

The document, which was originally published by German newspaper Der Spiegel, describes a signals intelligence programme called Stateroom which involves the interception of radio, telecommunications and internet traffic using equipment in US, British, Australian and Canadian diplomatic missions.

Diplomatic posts involved included those in Jakarta, Bangkok, Hanoi, Beijing and Kuala Lumpur, amongst others, SMH said on Thursday.

A former Australian intelligence officer, who was not named, told SMH that the Australian embassies in Jakarta and Bali were used to collect signals.

In a statement, Indonesian Foreign Minister Marty Natalegawa said: "[The government] cannot accept and strongly protests the news of the existence of wiretapping facilities at the US embassy in Jakarta."

"If confirmed, such action is not only a breach of security, but also a serious breach of diplomatic norms and ethics."

"The reported activities absolutely do not reflect the spirit of a close and friendly relationship between the two neighbours and are considered unacceptable by the government of Indonesia," the foreign ministry added in a statement.

Australian ambassador Greg Moriarty was summoned to the foreign ministry on Friday.

He described the talks, which reportedly took less than half an hour, as "a good meeting".

Australia and Indonesia are key allies and trading partners. Australia requires Indonesia's co-operation on the asylum issue, as many asylum seekers travel via Indonesia to Australia by boat.

'Clarification'
 
Meanwhile, Chinese foreign ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said Beijing was "extremely concerned" about the report.

"[China] demands that the US offer a clarification and explanation," she said. "We demand that foreign embassies in China and their staff respect the Vienna Convention."

Malaysia's foreign ministry, in a statement, said it had sought clarification on the issue from the US envoy in Kuala Lumpur, adding that Malaysia's "security and sovereignty" remained the priority.

Australia's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade declined to comment on the reports. Prime Minister Tony Abbott said: "Every Australian governmental agency, every Australian official... operates in accordance with the law."

The reports are the latest in a series of documents leaked by ex-US intelligence contractor Edward Snowden, who has been granted temporary asylum in Russia and is wanted in the US in connection with the unauthorised disclosures.

The US is facing growing anger over reports it spied on its allies abroad.

However, correspondents say that in reality most governments conduct surveillance or espionage operations against other countries whose activities matter to them.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on November 06, 2013, 08:03:34 PM

spying  is not new..hummmmmmmmmm  :P



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/06/nsa-senate-church-committee_n_4228614.html
 
NSA Spying Sparks Calls For New Senate Church Committee

Posted: 11/06/2013 7:02 pm EST
 
Matt Sledge
 
 

Four decades ago, a special Senate committee exposed what was then the worst of domestic surveillance abuses by the FBI, CIA and National Security Agency, from spying on left-wing counterculture groups to collecting every cable message entering the United States.

The Church Committee, named for Chairman Frank Church (D-Idaho), spawned headlines that still sound fresh today. One, from The New York Times in 1975, read: "National Security Agency Reported Eavesdropping On Most Private Cables; Pentagon Unit Is Said to Use Computers to Sort Out Intelligence Data From Messages; Legality Is Debated."

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) last month called for a new Senate select committee to investigate the NSA. The Electronic Frontier Foundation, battling the Obama administration in court for more transparency around the NSA's actions, has called for a new Church Committee.

Now, a former senator who sat on that legendary committee and a former staff member -- members of a fraternity who see themselves as keepers of the flame in preventing government surveillance abuses -- have spoken to HuffPost about the idea.

"It does make sense," said Loch Johnson, who was Church's top staffer on the committee in 1975. "To quote Harry Truman, the government needs a house-cleaning every now and then." Church died in 1984.

Former Vice President Walter Mondale (D), who sat on the old Church Committee as a senator, said he also believes a new Church Committee is needed. Neither he nor Johnson seemed satisfied with the work of today's Senate and House intelligence committees, which are supposed to provide oversight to the spy agencies' classified work.

The revelations that the NSA had spied on German Chancellor Angela Merkel seemed to go one step too far for Senate Intelligence Committee chair Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.). She has begun what she calls a "major review" of the NSA's operations. Before that revelation, Feinstein was one of the agency's staunchest defenders in Congress, asserting that activities like scooping up records of every American phone call are necessary to prevent terrorism.

"These committees are under tremendous pressure to work with the agencies," Mondale said at a Georgetown University event in September. "But the committee has a unique and different function, in addition to working with the agencies, to keep the Congress informed and, if necessary, the public … and I'm not comfortable that that part of the committee's work is being pursued."

Another Church Committee member -- former Sen. Gary Hart (D-Colo.) -- told HuffPost he did not think much of McCain's call for a new select committee.

"It seems to me that Senator McCain is in a way scoring political points here," Hart said. "He's poking the Senate Intelligence Committee in the eye.

"If established committees are not doing there job for whatever reason … you don't layer on top another committee, that is to compound the problems of congressional oversight," Hart said. Instead, he suggested reforms like "reconstituting" the committees with new members and imposing term limits on committee memberships to prevent so-called agency capture.

So far, said Trevor Timm of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, there has been little momentum in Congress for a new Church Committee.

"Unfortunately, we haven't seen much legislative movement," Timm wrote in an email to HuffPost. "Better late than never though, and it seems with each revelation more and more are calling for one."

Hart said he believes that instead of a new committee, it is time for President Barack Obama to rebuild the President's Intelligence Advisory Board, which is supposed to act as an independent advisory body within the White House. That board has just four members today, down from 14 in 2012.

Obama has set up a special review panel to look into the NSA revelations. But critics charge it is stocked with administration loyalists.

For Johnson, that panel's very existence is one more reason to set up a new Church Committee. It would "rivet attention" on NSA practices, and "when Obama's report comes out in December, be prepared to give that a complete scrubbing and critique."

What findings these various committees may come to is still very much uncertain. Months of revelations from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden's files have revealed startling surveillance activities by the NSA. So far, however, concrete examples of domestic surveillance abuses, like those exposed by the Church Committee, have not been forthcoming.

For Hart, comparing Snowden's leaks to the Church Committee's report is "apples and oranges." Hart and Mondale have added their names to an amicus court brief in the American Civil Liberties Union's federal lawsuit against the NSA calling for an end to the bulk collection of American phone call records. But nobody should be surprised, Hart said, that the NSA spies on wireless communications or foreigners.

Johnson, meanwhile, said he just doesn't know -- yet.

"Right know, I'm not sure we know exactly how serious this is, because so much of it is still shrouded in ambiguities and different points of view," Johnson said. "There's a lot to be done here, but it's all within the bailiwick of apparent abuses or overreaches."
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Sinny on November 07, 2013, 02:59:34 AM
I really don't se what the big deal is. As stated, we spy, they spy, we all spy. It's been going on since the beginning of time. And will continue!

Agreed.

The nature of the situation is wrong - however, that's the nature of the situation. 

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: The Matrix Traveller on November 07, 2013, 03:06:56 AM
The human species is inherently Paranoid due to the "Double Logic" Algorithms, in our Genome...

So yes this is why we spy on each other... It's primate thingy.....  LOl.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Sinny on November 07, 2013, 03:14:49 AM
The human species is inherently Paranoid due to the "Double Logic" Algorithms, in our Genome...

Oh, I read what you just said above twice this week. The same is stated within the contact notes of Billy Meier, and the work of Frits Springmeier.

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: The Matrix Traveller on November 07, 2013, 03:28:03 AM
Interesting.....  Sorry I've never read their books or work, so I must confess I am ignorant regarding these two.   :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Sinny on November 09, 2013, 05:40:52 AM
Interesting.....  Sorry I've never read their books or work, so I must confess I am ignorant regarding these two.   :)

They are relatively knew to me also, I'll return with more info at a later date...However, it does seem like you share the same opinions  :)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on November 13, 2013, 10:47:42 AM
 this is the bad part:
American writers have even started to self-censor their work,

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/13/nsa-writers_n_4267716.html

NSA 'Chilling' Effect Feared By Writers


The Huffington Post  |  By Matt Sledge
Posted: 11/13/2013 11:50 am EST  |  Updated: 11/13/2013 12:06 pm EST


American writers are increasingly fearful of government surveillance in the wake of Edward Snowden's revelations about the National Security Agency and have even started to self-censor their work, a survey released by the writers' group PEN on Tuesday found.

Eighty-five percent of PEN's American members are worried about government surveillance, the group's report found. PEN is best known for standing up for the rights of writers internationally, championing imprisoned Nigerian playwright Wole Soyinka in the 1960s and Salman Rushdie when he was threatened with death for his book The Satanic Verses.

"We have long known that aggressive surveillance regimes in places like the Soviet Bloc, China, Iran, and elsewhere have cramped discourse and narrowed the flow of information and ideas," Suzanne Nossel, executive director of PEN American Center, said in a statement. "Recently disclosed U.S. surveillance practices are having a tangible and chilling effect on writers here at home."

Twenty-eight percent of PEN's members have curbed their social media use, 24 percent are avoiding certain topics in phone and email conversations, and 16 percent have avoided writing or speaking about issues, the survey found.

Now those concerns are coming home to America, PEN said. The report said writers are well aware of the NSA's surveillance practices like logging records of every American phone call and accessing the servers of major internet companies. Many now assume the government is listening in at will.

Writers reported being fearful about discussing military affairs, the Middle East North Africa region, mass incarceration, drug policies, pornography, the Occupy movement, the study of certain languages, and criticism of the U.S. government.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: ArMaP on November 13, 2013, 04:32:49 PM
I always thought that there was too much self-censoring in the US, now things get even worse. :(
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: burntheships on November 14, 2013, 08:48:40 AM
Well, this one is really bad, now its "Buy a book, expect to
be investigated".

Holy cow batman!

Americans' Personal Data Shared With CIA,
 IRS In Security Investigation: 


Quote
WASHINGTON — U.S. agencies collected and shared the personal information of thousands of Americans in an attempt to root out untrustworthy federal workers that ended up scrutinizing people who had no direct ties to the U.S. government and simply had purchased certain books.

http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2013/11/14/208438/americans-personal-data-shared.html

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on November 14, 2013, 05:53:33 PM

well that is just another reason i canceled all the cards but one..and pay cash for everything

went and got a haircut at one of those sign in places and when i went to pay the girl says
can i have your last name..as she sat at the computer..i said no.. just type in susie smith
she smiled and says.. oh that's better than jane doe..we had one of those this morning.
totally unreal.
.stopped at the k mart to pick up a water jug filter that was on sale
the check out rang it up 5 bucks higher
i said that's not the sale price and the girl says
you have to have a rewards card to get that price
i said never mind
 >:(

so far they aren't finger printing if you have cash
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on November 16, 2013, 05:28:01 AM


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/16/anonymous-hackers_n_4284799.html

Anonymous-Linked Hackers Accessed U.S. Government Computers, FBI Reportedly Warns

Reuters  |  By Jim Finkle and Joseph Menn
Posted: 11/15/2013 5:42 pm EST



By Jim Finkle and Joseph Menn

BOSTON/SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Activist hackers linked to the collective known as Anonymous have secretly accessed U.S. government computers in multiple agencies and stolen sensitive information in a campaign that began almost a year ago, the FBI warned this week.

The hackers exploited a flaw in Adobe Systems Inc's software to launch a rash of electronic break-ins that began last December, then left "back doors" to return to many of the machines as recently as last month, the Federal Bureau of Investigation said in a memo seen by Reuters.

The memo, distributed on Thursday, described the attacks as "a widespread problem that should be addressed." It said the breach affected the U.S. Army, Department of Energy, Department of Health and Human Services, and perhaps many more agencies.

Investigators are still gathering information on the scope of the cyber campaign, which the authorities believe is continuing. The FBI document tells system administrators what to look for to determine if their systems are compromised.

An FBI spokeswoman declined to elaborate.

According to an internal email from Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz' chief of staff, Kevin Knobloch, the stolen data included personal information on at least 104,000 employees, contractors, family members and others associated with the Department of Energy, along with information on almost 2,0000 bank accounts.

The email, dated October 11, said officials were "very concerned" that loss of the banking information could lead to thieving attempts.

Officials said the hacking was linked to the case of Lauri Love, a British resident indicted on October 28 for allegedly hacking into computers at the Department of Energy, Army, Department of Health and Human Services, the U.S. Sentencing Commission and elsewhere.

Investigators believe the attacks began when Love and others took advantage of a security flaw in Adobe's ColdFusion software, which is used to build websites.

Adobe spokeswoman Heather Edell said she was not familiar with the FBI report. She added that the company has found that the majority of attacks involving its software have exploited programs that were not updated with the latest security patches.

The Anonymous group is an amorphous collective that conducts multiple hacking campaigns at any time, some with a few participants and some with hundreds. In the past, its members have disrupted eBay's Inc PayPal after it stopped processing donations to the anti-secrecy site Wikileaks. Anonymous has also launched technically more sophisticated attacks against Sony Corp and security firm HBGary Federal.

Some of the breaches and pilfered data in the latest campaign had previously been publicized by people who identify with Anonymous, as part of what the group dubbed "Operation Last Resort."

Among other things, the campaigners said the operation was in retaliation for overzealous prosecution of hackers, including the lengthy penalties sought for Aaron Swartz, a well-known computer programmer and Internet activist who killed himself before a trial over charges that he illegally downloaded academic journal articles from a digital library known as JSTOR.

Despite the earlier disclosures, "the majority of the intrusions have not yet been made publicly known," the FBI wrote. "It is unknown exactly how many systems have been compromised, but it is a widespread problem that should be addressed."

(Reporting by Joseph Menn in San Francisco and Jim Finkle in Boston; Additional reporting by Valerie Volcovici and Alina Selyukh; Editing by Tiffany Wu and Tim Dobbyn)


...............................



Jeremy Hammond Sentenced To 10 Years In Prison
Posted: 11/15/2013 12:23 pm EST  |  Updated: 11/15/2013 2:37 pm EST


NEW YORK -- Convicted hacker Jeremy Hammond was sentenced Friday to 10 years in prison for stealing internal emails from the global intelligence firm Stratfor.

Shuffling into courtroom with long, wavy hair and a wide smile, Hammond shouted "what's up, my brothers" to a courtroom packed with scores of supporters. When it was his turn to speak to the court, he claimed in a defiant sentencing statement that his acts were meant to expose the truth and that he hacked foreign government websites at the behest of an FBI informant.

"The acts of civil disobedience and direct action that I am being sentenced for today are in line with the principles of community and equality that have guided my life," Hammond said in a prepared statement provided to HuffPost Live. "I took responsibility for my actions, by pleading guilty, but when will the government be made to answer for its crimes?"

rest here:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/15/jeremy-hammond-sentenced_n_4280738.html?ref=topbar
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Sgt.Rocknroll on November 16, 2013, 06:07:04 AM
I know this too well, having been a victim of the above hackers. My info was compromised by this incident.

they can rot in hell....
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on November 20, 2013, 02:42:57 PM

it's really getting hard to stay positive and think kindly of your fellow wo/man



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/18/yahoo-data_n_4297619.html?utm_hp_ref=technology

Marissa Mayer Takes Big Step To Protect People From NSA
AP  |  Posted: 11/18/2013 2:43 pm EST  |  Updated: 11/18/2013 2:48 pm EST

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Yahoo is expanding its efforts to protect its users' online activities from prying eyes by encrypting all the communications and other information flowing into the Internet company's data centers around the world.

The commitment announced Monday by Yahoo Inc. CEO Marissa Mayer follows a recent Washington Post report that the National Security Agency has been hacking into the communications lines of the data centers run by Yahoo and Google Inc. to intercept information about what people do and say online.

Yahoo had previously promised to encrypt its email service by early January. Now, the Sunnyvale, California, company plans to have all data encrypted by the end of March to make it more difficult for unauthorized parties to decipher the information.

Google began to encrypt its Gmail service in 2010 and has since introduced the security measure on many other services. The Mountain View, California, company has promised to encrypt the links to its data centers, too. A Google engineer said that task had been completed in a post on his Google Plus account earlier this month, but the company hasn't yet confirmed all the encryption work is done.

Other documents leaked to various media outlets by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden this year have revealed that Yahoo, Google and several other prominent technology companies, including Microsoft Corp., Facebook Inc. and Apple Inc., have been feeding the U.S. government some information about their international users under a court-monitored program called PRISM. The companies maintain they have only surrendered data about a very small number of users, and have only cooperated when legally required.

The NSA says its online surveillance programs have played an instrumental role in thwarting terrorism.

The increased use of encryption technology is aimed at stymieing government surveillance that may be occurring without the companies' knowledge. Even when it's encrypted, online data can still be heisted, but the information looks like gibberish without the decoding keys.

"I want to reiterate what we have said in the past: Yahoo has never given access to our data centers to the NSA or to any other government agency," Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer wrote in a Monday post on the company's Tumblr blog.

Facebook also has said it's cloaking its social networking network with greater encryption, but hasn't publicly set a timetable for getting all the added protection in place.

Debunking the perception that the NSA and other U.S. government agencies can easily vacuum up potentially sensitive information about people's online lives is important to Yahoo, Google and other Internet companies because they need Web surfers to regularly use their services so they can sell more of the digital ads that bring in most of their revenue.

The companies fear the government spying revelations eventually will drive some people away from their services and make it more difficult to attract more users outside the U.S. If that were to happen, it could slow the companies' financial growth and undercut their stock prices.

Yahoo has been struggling to boost its revenue for years, making it even more important for the company to reassure its 800 million users worldwide about the sanctity of their personal information.


..............................



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/18/google-safari-privacy_n_4296867.html?utm_hp_ref=technology

Google To Pay $17 Million Fine For Secretly Following You Online

 Posted: 11/18/2013 1:51 pm EST

Gerry Smith

Google has agreed to pay $17 million to settle charges that it secretly tracked some consumers' activities on the Web, even after promising such tracking had been blocked, New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said Monday.

Attorneys general in 28 states had alleged that Google violated state consumer protection laws and computer privacy laws by not telling users of Apple's Safari browser that it was bypassing privacy settings in order to show them targeted advertisements.

"Consumers should be able to know whether there are other eyes surfing the web with them,” Schneiderman said in a statement. “By tracking millions of people without their knowledge, Google violated not only their privacy, but also their trust.”

The case stems from Google’s method of displaying targeted ads by using "cookies," or small files installed on web browsers that create invisible records of online browsing habits. Google had said on its website that Safari's privacy settings could prevent Google from tracking these cookies. But a story in the Wall Street Journal last year revealed that Google was able to go around those settings by exploiting a loophole in Safari's browser, and then track users across websites in the company's DoubleClick ad network. For example, a Safari user who visited websites on how to get out of debt could then be served Google ads on other sites offering them debt relief services.

"We work hard to get privacy right at Google and have taken steps to remove the ad cookies, which collected no personal information, from Apple’s browsers," the company said in a statement. "We're pleased to have worked with the state attorneys general to reach this agreement."

In a separate case brought last year by the Federal Trade Commission, Google agreed to pay a $22.5 million fine over similar charges that it bypassed privacy settings in the Safari browser. That fine was the largest settlement ever obtained by the commission.

Google did not admit to wrongdoing in the FTC case, and said the tracking was accidental.

The $40 million in fines that Google has agreed to pay to settle charges in both cases is but a small fraction of the search giant's total revenue, which was $50 billion last year.

Meanwhile, Google is still fighting other charges of privacy violations. In September, a federal appeals court ruled that a suit accusing Google of illegal wiretapping could proceed. The suit involves the company's controversial Street View vehicles, which secretly gathered data from private computers via Wi-Fi as they created detailed maps of the world.

.....................................

What Your Cell Phone Company Doesn't Want You To Know

Wireless Carriers Block Simple Solution To Phone Theft To Protect Profits, Prosecutor Says


Posted: 11/20/2013 3:07 pm EST  |  Updated: 11/20/2013 3:11 pm EST



As cell phone robberies have soared nationwide, phone companies have found a lucrative side business offering insurance to customers who are anxious their devices may be lost or stolen.

The top four wireless carriers will earn more than $7.8 billion this year in insurance premiums from their customers, according to an estimate by Warranty Week, an industry trade publication. Asurion, a phone insurance company that pays the wireless carriers for each policy they sell, made an estimated $98 million in profit in 2010, according to Businessweek.

“If you do the math, the phone companies are making out like bandits," said Richard Doherty, a director for Envisioneering Group, a market research firm.

Now, a top prosecutor is claiming that phone companies looking to preserve their profits from selling phone insurance are standing in the way of a solution that could protect consumers from violent robberies.

rest of article herehttp://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/20/iphone-kill-switch_n_4308924.html
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Amaterasu on November 20, 2013, 05:09:11 PM
Quote
Google To Pay $17 Million Fine For Secretly Following You Online

The question is.....

WHO ARE THEY PAYING THIS MONEY TO???
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on November 20, 2013, 05:29:47 PM


it's a fine so  my guess was to whoever made the rule..
not the consumers though...sigh
here's what i found




http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2013/11/18/google-will-pay-u-s-17-million-in-privacy-settlement/

Google last year paid a $22.5 million fine to the US Federal Trade Commission on the same issue.
The latest settlement includes 37 states and the federal District of Columbia. New York will receive $899,580, Schneiderman said.





http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/google-agrees-pay-17-million-settlement-20926939

Google to Pay $17M to Settle Safari Privacy Case
Google is paying $17 million to 37 states and the District of Columbia to make amends for the Internet search leader's snooping on millions of people using Safari Web browsers in 2011 and 2012.



http://www.dailytech.com/Google+Agrees+to+17+Million+Fine+Over+Unauthorized+Tracking/article33777.htm
The $17 million fine comes months after Google agreed to pay $22.5 million to the FTC for the same practice of placing unauthorized tracking cookies.




http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/19/technology/google-to-pay-17-million-to-settle-privacy-case.html?hpw&rref=technology&_r=0
SAN FRANCISCO — Google agreed on Monday to pay $17 million to 37 states and the District of Columbia in a wide-reaching settlement over tracking consumers online without their knowledge.





Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Amaterasu on November 20, 2013, 06:38:54 PM
So We the Humans, the wronged, don't get a part of any of it, it would seem.  Hmmmm.

Thanks for the research, sky! GFY!
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: zorgon on November 20, 2013, 10:27:14 PM
So We the Humans, the wronged, don't get a part of any of it, it would seem.  Hmmmm.

You expected different in this Paradigm?  :P

But the important issue here is...

SOMEONE nailed google for spying on us...

That means there is some light at the end of the tunnel that doesn't have the train in it

And SOMEONE naile JP Morgan for billions of dollars for crooked trading.

May be drops in the bucket but a bucket can be filled by drops :D
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on November 21, 2013, 07:09:49 AM


ahhhhhhhh ..how the masses are herded...ads..



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/16/facebook-privacy-policy_n_4288916.html?utm_hp_ref=technology


Facebook Launches New Privacy Policies And You Still Can Be Used For Ads

The Huffington Post  |  By Drew Guarini Posted: 11/16/2013 7:10 pm EST  |  Updated: 11/16/2013 7:14 pm EST



Are you sitting down? Doesn't matter, this isn't going to surprise you.

Facebook reaffirmed its position on Friday that it's able to use the postings and personal information of 1.2 billion accounts on the service for advertising purposes. The social media website announced the new privacy policies in a blog post on the site.

Facebook initially included, then removed, a line about how minors who join the site needed a parent or guardian to give consent before they are used in ads. Facebook now says that this permission is granted once the teen signs up for the site.

The changes were first proposed by Facebook in August, then drew the attention of the Federal Trade Commission after privacy groups complained in September that Facebook was exploiting minors. The changes followed Facebook's $20 million settlement in August of a class action lawsuit that claimed the company's "Sponsored Stories" platform had shared users' "likes" without paying them or allowing them to opt out.

In 2011, Facebook and the FTC had reached a separate settlement over alleged privacy violations by the site. Facebook agreed to scheduled checkups by "independent, third-party auditors" over the next 20 years to ensure that the company's privacy policies and practices do not violate users' rights.

In the blog post Friday explaining the policy, Facebook Chief Privacy Officer Erin Egan said the sentence regarding minors did not grant the company any additional rights over user content. After receiving feedback, the company agreed "that the language was confusing" and "removed the sentence."

Despite Facebook's clarification, many members of the site remain confused about their privacy options. In the August settlement, Facebook was ordered to implement provisions to make its user privacy policy more transparent. One part of the policy says the company will give parents the chance to prevent their children's information from being used in ads, and that the site will let users know if any comments they made on the site were turned into a "Sponsored Stories" ad, giving them the chance to opt out.

“The innovative controls we agreed to in connection with the settlement take time to build,” Jodi Seth, a Facebook spokeswoman told The New York Times in a Friday story. She offered no timetable for introducing them.
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on November 26, 2013, 08:12:15 AM


http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/26/technology/a-peephole-for-the-nsa.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1&hp&

N.S.A. May Have Hit Internet Companies at a Weak Spot
By NICOLE PERLROTH and JOHN MARKOFF
Published: November 25, 2013

SAN FRANCISCO — The recent revelation that the National Security Agency was able to eavesdrop on the communications of Google and Yahoo users without breaking into either companies’ data centers sounded like something pulled from a Robert Ludlum spy thriller.

How on earth, the companies asked, did the N.S.A. get their data without them knowing about it?

The most likely answer is a modern spin on a century-old eavesdropping tradition.



People knowledgeable about Google and Yahoo’s infrastructure say they believe that government spies bypassed the big Internet companies and hit them at a weak spot — the fiber-optic cables that connect data centers around the world that are owned by companies like Verizon Communications, the BT Group, the Vodafone Group and Level 3 Communications. In particular, fingers have been pointed at Level 3, the world’s largest so-called Internet backbone provider, whose cables are used by Google and Yahoo.



The Internet companies’ data centers are locked down with full-time security and state-of-the-art surveillance, including heat sensors and iris scanners. But between the data centers — on Level 3’s fiber-optic cables that connected those massive computer farms — information was unencrypted and an easier target for government intercept efforts, according to three people with knowledge of Google’s and Yahoo’s systems who spoke on the condition of anonymity.



It is impossible to say for certain how the N.S.A. managed to get Google and Yahoo’s data without the companies’ knowledge. But both companies, in response to concerns over those vulnerabilities, recently said they were now encrypting data that runs on the cables between their data centers. Microsoft is considering a similar move.



“Everyone was so focused on the N.S.A. secretly getting access to the front door that there was an assumption they weren’t going behind the companies’ backs and tapping data through the back door, too,” said Kevin Werbach, an associate professor at the Wharton School.

Data transmission lines have a long history of being tapped.



As far back as the days of the telegraph, spy agencies have located their operations in proximity to communications companies. Indeed, before the advent of the Internet, the N.S.A. and its predecessors for decades operated listening posts next to the long-distance lines of phone companies to monitor all international voice traffic.



Beginning in the 1960s, a spy operation code-named Echelon targeted the Soviet Union and its allies’ voice, fax and data traffic via satellite, microwave and fiber-optic cables.

In the 1990s, the emergence of the Internet both complicated the task of the intelligence agencies and presented powerful new spying opportunities based on the ability to process vast amounts of computer data.

In 2002, John M. Poindexter, former national security adviser under President Ronald Reagan, proposed the Total Information Awareness plan, an effort to scan the world’s electronic information — including phone calls, emails and financial and travel records. That effort was scrapped in 2003 after a public outcry over potential privacy violations.



The technologies Mr. Poindexter proposed are similar to what became reality years later in N.S.A. surveillance programs like Prism and Bullrun.

The Internet effectively mingled domestic and international communications, erasing the bright line that had been erected to protect against domestic surveillance. Although the Internet is designed to be a highly decentralized system, in practice a small group of backbone providers carry almost all of the network’s data.



The consequences of the centralization and its value for surveillance was revealed in 2006 by Mark Klein, an AT&T technician who described an N.S.A. listening post inside a room at an AT&T switching facility.

The agency was capturing a copy of all the data passing over the telecommunications links and then filtering it in AT&T facilities that housed systems that were able to filter data packets at high speed.



Documents taken by Edward J. Snowden and reported by The Washington Post indicate that, seven years after Mr. Klein first described the N.S.A.’s surveillance technologies, they have been refined and modernized.



“From Echelon to Total Information Awareness to Prism, all these programs have gone under different names, but in essence do the same thing,” said Chip Pitts, a law lecturer at Stanford University School of Law.



Based in the Denver suburbs, Level 3 is not a household name like Verizon or AT&T, but in terms of its ability to carry traffic, it is bigger than the other two carriers combined. Its networking equipment is found in 200 data centers in the United States, more than 100 centers in Europe and 14 in Latin America.



Level 3 did not directly respond to an inquiry about whether it had given the N.S.A., or the agency’s foreign intelligence partners, access to Google and Yahoo’s data. In a statement, Level 3 said: “It is our policy and our practice to comply with laws in every country where we operate, and to provide government agencies access to customer data only when we are compelled to do so by the laws in the country where the data is located.”

Also, in a financial filing, Level 3 noted that, “We are party to an agreement with the U.S. Departments of Homeland Security, Justice and Defense addressing the U.S. government’s national security and law enforcement concerns. This agreement imposes significant requirements on us related to information storage and management; traffic management; physical, logical and network security arrangements; personnel screening and training; and other matters.”



Security experts say that regardless of whether Level 3’s participation is voluntary or not, recent N.S.A. disclosures make clear that even when Internet giants like Google and Yahoo do not hand over data, the N.S.A. and its intelligence partners can simply gather their data downstream.



That much was true last summer when United States authorities first began tracking Mr. Snowden’s movements after he left Hawaii for Hong Kong with thousands of classified documents. In May, authorities contacted Ladar Levison, who ran Lavabit, Mr. Snowden’s email provider, to install a tap on Mr. Snowden’s email account. When Mr. Levison did not move quickly enough to facilitate the tap on Lavabit’s network, the Federal Bureau of Investigation did so without him.



Mr. Levison said it was unclear how that tap was installed, whether through Level 3, which sold bandwidth to Lavabit, or at the Dallas facility where his servers and networking equipment are stored. When Mr. Levison asked the facility’s manager about the tap, he was told the manager could not speak with him. A spokesman for TierPoint, which owns the Dallas facility, did not return a call seeking a comment.

Mr. Pitts said that while working as the chief legal officer at Nokia in the 1990s, he successfully fended off an effort by intelligence agencies to get backdoor access into Nokia’s computer networking equipment.



Nearly 20 years later, Verizon has said that it and other carriers are forced to comply with government requests in every country in which they operate, and are limited in what they can say about their arrangements.

“At the end of the day, if the Justice Department shows up at your door, you have to comply,” Lowell C. McAdam, Verizon’s chief executive, said in an interview in September. “We have gag orders on what we can say and can’t defend ourselves, but we were told they do this with every carrier.”

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Elvis Hendrix on November 27, 2013, 03:26:36 AM
NSA 'infected' 50,000 networks with malware
(http://i1284.photobucket.com/albums/a572/paparumbo/_71326080_019321402-1_zpsa51d11c3.jpg)

The NSA and GCHQ are alleged to have installed malware on the networks of targets including the Belgian telecoms firm Belgacom



The US National Security Agency (NSA) infected 50,000 networks with malware, Dutch newspaper NRC has reported.

The Tailored Access Operations department used it to steal sensitive information, according to a censored slide leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

NRC said 20,000 networks had been hit in 2008, with the program recently expanded to include others in Rome, Berlin, Pristina, Kinshasa, Rangoon.

The NSA declined to comment.

The malware could be put in a "sleeper" mode and activated with a click of a button, the paper said.

"Clearly, conventional criminal gangs aren't the only people interested in breaking into computer networks anymore," wrote computer security expert Graham Cluley in a blogpost.

"All organisations need to ask themselves the question of whether they could be at risk."

The reports come as Twitter introduces technology it says will help protect people's messages from unwanted scrutiny.

It has employed a system known as "forward secrecy" that makes it harder for eavesdroppers to access the keys used to encrypt data passing between Twitter's servers and users' phones, tablets and PCs.



http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-25087627
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on November 27, 2013, 08:59:34 AM


Elvis... thanks for adding this.. i hope others will add what they see...
kinda keepin a rocord of all the bs   ::)
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Somamech on November 27, 2013, 09:54:20 AM
From techincal viewpoint regarding tagerted advert's you have to give some credit as thats some pretty nailed down info gathering.  Just at work the other day I noticed an Advert for an Arab Single's Dating Agency.  The first I have ever seen of such a site, and it's due to working with someone born here in OZ with a Lebanese Background USING the WEB at WORK.  Obviously work has a strict web policy like anywhere else on this planet where web access is considered a staple.  IE the PERSON at work is not looking up ARAB pron or what have you in their spare time. 

Also coming from a techical viewpoint and marketing it's also quite easy to see how the technology is not that quite good, and Marketing Dept's for the most part have no idea how to pull their easy money drip feed out of "the old pardigm" as some would say, and get with the program.  If you watch any Google Video and you don't have some ad blocking program its clear to see Marketing People snort too much coke and have no idea how to convey a message before viewer click's the skip button one the timeout occur's.

Having said all that I don't agree with all these Google's and this and that, but at the same time we must realise they are also not censoring anyone to any major degree.  You can still make it in this world using the web, the game is lopsided thats for sure... But is was also lopsided until the Ewoks figured out how to ride The best Sci-Fi rendition of two wheels going ;)

And also remember that prior to the last few years we all were born and had signed doc's handed over to our gov officials stating our name and birth date etc.  That has happened for a long time well before the web. And honestly when you think about privacy that's probably the craziest info to give away along with getting married and signing gov documents.

People fight though and thats GOOD. This world we live aint right, aint fair and what have you, but the platform still allow's for change, and the smart people always figure out how to manipulate it! 

   

   

 

Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: Somamech on November 27, 2013, 10:08:30 AM
It could also be argued that Google have created the world's most Interactive TV platform in the form of Youtube that people can make money from and quit their day jobs purley from from spouting message's that are anti Illuminati.  Go ask the people that are making good buck's doing just that on youtube ;)

 

 
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on November 29, 2013, 11:21:41 PM

adding to  what Elvis  shared




http://www.sci-tech-today.com/story.xhtml?story_id=12300DQHRUPF

Report: NSA Has Infected 50,000 Networks with Spyware

By Seth Fitzgerald
November 25, 2013 10:54AM

"[A] presentation shows that the intelligence service uses 'Computer Network Exploitation' (CNE) in more than 50,000 locations," said the Dutch newspaper NRC Handelsblad, which broke the story with information from former NSA contract employee Edward Snowden. "CNE is the secret infiltration of computer systems achieved by installing malware."

 It appears the National Security Agency will stop at nothing to gain information on as many people as possible. This comes after a new report that the U.S. government organization infected 50,000 networks with malware in order to directly steal data.
This malware, according to the report, can lay dormant for as long as the NSA wants it to, before the agency turns the software  on to begin collecting information. By keeping the virus hidden and using various tactics to keep it hidden, network administrators are unlikely to know whether their network has been compromised.

Only Getting Worse

If the report ends up being correct the NSA has been infecting computers for some time and has been increasing the scope of the program. This sort of data-gathering is coming from just one part of the agency, called TAO (Tailored Access Operations). For the most part, this sector of the NSA is rarely talked about and is one of the more secretive areas of the organization.

As of 2008, the NSA had infected 20,000 networks around the world, including in Europe and the United States. However, the agency has been stepping up its network infiltration program to include 50,000 networks in numerous other areas, including in Rome; Berlin; Pristina, Kosovo; Kinshasa, the Congo; and Rangoon, Myanmar.

"[A] presentation shows that the intelligence  service uses 'Computer Network Exploitation' (CNE) in more than 50,000 locations," said the Dutch newspaper NRC Handelsblad, which broke the story with information provided by former NSA contract employee Edward Snowden. "CNE is the secret infiltration of computer systems achieved by installing malware, malicious software."

Unlike some of its other spying programs, the NSA does not have any intention of ramping down its infiltration practices any time soon. Within the next couple of years, the agency would like to have as many as 80,000 networks infiltrated with the elusive malware, according to the report.

Stepping Down

With the Snowden revelations ruining the NSA's reputation and causing the vast majority of U.S. citizens to criticize the agency's practices, NSA Director Keith Alexander is stepping down next year. Alexander's decision to remove himself from the NSA has been known since October, but a new report shows that the director may have been trying to resign since the first Snowden leaks came out.

According to a Wall Street Journal report, Alexander has been trying to get away from the NSA for a while in order to save whatever reputation he can. Even though he offered to resign, the Obama administration apparently chose to deny his offer, forcing him to wait it out.

"The offer, which hasn't previously been reported, was declined by the Obama administration," the Journal said. "But it shows the degree to which Mr. Snowden's revelations have shaken the NSA's foundations -- unlike any event in its six-decade history, including the blowback against domestic spying in the 1970s."
 


.....................

http://www.pcworld.com/article/2066840/nsa-reportedly-compromised-more-than-50000-networks-worldwide.html

NSA infected 50,000 networks with specialized malware
Lucian Constantin, IDG News Service
Nov 25, 2013 5:34 AM

Lucian Constantin, IDG News ServiceReporter, IDG News Service, IDG News Service
Lucian Constantin writes about information security, privacy and data protection.
More by Lucian Constantin, IDG News Service



The U.S. National Security Agency reportedly hacked into over 50,000 computer networks around the world as part of its global intelligence gathering efforts, and also taps into large fiber optic cables that transport Internet traffic between continents at 20 different major points.

The agency installed specialized malware referred to as "implants" on over 50,000 devices in order to perform Computer Network Exploitation (CNE), Dutch newspaper NRC Handelsblad reported Saturday based on documents it said were leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

The information is reportedly taken from a 2012 top secret presentation about the NSA's worldwide signals intelligence gathering capabilities that was shared with the intelligence services of Australia, Canada, the U.K. and New Zealand that form the Five Eyes partnership.

CNE is one of three types of Computer Network Operations that NSA computer specialists perform. It "includes enabling actions and intelligence collection via computer networks that exploit data gathered from target or enemy information systems or networks," the NSA says on its careers website.

According to a presentation slide published by NRC, the NSA deployed over 50,000 CNE "implants" world-wide.

The Washington Post reported in August that the attack tools used for these implants are developed by a specialized NSA team called Tailored Access Operations (TAO) and are designed to compromise routers, switches and firewalls to monitor entire networks.

The implants persist through software and equipment upgrades and can be used to harvest communications, copy stored data and tunnel into the compromised networks from outside, according to the Washington Post. Their number is expected to reach over 85,000 by the end of 2013.

The slide leaked by NRC also reveals that, aside from CNEs, NSA has access to large Internet cables at 20 different locations, most of them outside the U.S.; runs over 80 regional Special Collection Service (SCS) installations that are part of a joint CIA-NSA program used for close surveillance operations and wiretapping; maintains liaison with 30 third-party countries outside of the Five Eyes; and has access to 52 regional facilities dedicated to intercepting foreign satellite communications (FORNSAT).
 
Title: Re: they know what you are doing
Post by: sky otter on December 01, 2013, 08:15:30 AM


everybody wants to know what you're doing... >:(

did you know that
when you shop some of the little magnetic tags in and on merchandise that makes the door security go off..
some of them now can  follow you home so they can see where you live..
i get into my car and pull them all off and out of the boxes and walk back to the store and toss them in the garbage can in front of the store

if i nee