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Author Topic: they know what you are doing  (Read 129406 times)

Offline ArMaP

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #840 on: April 05, 2018, 04:48:12 AM »
Google may read the files BUT if you block OUTGOING apps   nothing will happen
If you block Chrome from sending information then you cannot use it to access web sites, as it will not be able to initiate outgoing communications.
I suppose that's why that cleanup tool uses the Chrome process, as they are sure that is already allowed to send data to the Internet.

Offline space otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #841 on: April 15, 2018, 07:39:45 AM »

holy heck..id'd from a photo on line and then arrested..WOW
 you hafta watch the vid at the link..really
they do know what you are doing


http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-43711477

WhatsApp photo drug dealer caught by 'groundbreaking' work
By Chris Wood
BBC News
6 hours ago

A pioneering fingerprint technique used to convict a drugs gang from a WhatsApp message "is the future" of how police approach evidence to catch criminals.

An image of a man holding ecstasy tablets in his palm was found on the mobile of someone arrested in Bridgend.

It was sent to South Wales Police's scientific support unit and helped to secure 11 convictions.

These are believed to be the first convictions in Wales from fingerprints taken from a photograph.

The unit's Dave Thomas described its use as "groundbreaking" and said officers are now looking more closely at photographs on phones seized for potential evidence.

'Ecstasy pills for sale' in WhatsApp message
Teens found selling drugs on Snapchat and Instagram
How drugs are offered on Instagram
He said: "It is an old-fashioned technique [fingerprinting], not new.

"Ultimately, beyond everything else, we took a phone and looked at everything on it - we knew it had a hand with drugs on it.

"These guys [the dealers] are using the technology not to get caught and we need to keep up with advancements."

The photograph came to light after a tip-off drugs were being sold from a house in the Kenfig Hill area of Bridgend.

pic of folks
It was raided and large quantities of Gorilla Glue - a type of cannabis - was recovered.

Mr Thomas praised the officer that spotted a photograph among a stream of WhatsApp messages going back months as potentially carrying significant evidence.

"It had a number of texts such as 'what do you want to buy?' on it," he said.

"There was then the photograph of the hand holding pills that seemed like it was sent to potential customers saying 'these are my wares, I'm selling these'.

"But he was not thinking it showed part of his hand and there was potentially a fingerprint."

The scientific support unit - a joint venture between the Gwent and south Wales forces, based in Bridgend - was able to scan the image into its system.

However, there were just parts of the middle and bottom of a finger visible - records only keep the top part.

This meant the image did not find a match on national databases.

pic of drugs
Drug dealer Elliott Morris sent this photograph out on a Whatsapp message to potential customers in Bridgend




However, other evidence meant officers had an idea who they believed was behind the drugs operation.

"While the scale and quality of the photograph proved a challenge, the small bits were enough to prove he was the dealer," added Mr Thomas.

"It has now opened the floodgates and when there is part of a hand on a photograph, officers are sending them in."

He believes it is the first time someone's fingerprint has been identified by a photograph in Wales and shows the potential of a forensic unit with a small piece of evidence.

Mr Thomas pointed to how about 80% of people now have mobile phones and use them to record incidents such as fights and car crashes.

"We can download and enhance (footage)," he said.

"These are all advancements in the digital world - they provide lots of questions we need to provide answers for."

Making greater use of social media messages is just one area being developed.

"We want to be in a position where there is a burglary at 20:30, we can scan evidence and by 20:45 be waiting at the offender's front door and arrest them arriving home with the swag," he added.

"That will work through remote transmission - scanning evidence at the scene and sending it back quickly for a match.

"It's the future. We are not there yet but it could significantly enhance the ability of the local bobbies to arrest people very quickly."


Offline space otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #842 on: April 15, 2018, 03:22:20 PM »


if you really want to get pissed about your info being used by farce book when you never joined..read this
AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH >:(


https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/facebook-tracking-of-non-users-sparks-broader-privacy-concerns_us_5ad34f10e4b016a07e9d5871

TECH 04/15/2018 09:19 am ET Updated 6 hours ago
Facebook’s Tracking Of Non-Users Sparks Broader Privacy Concerns
CEO Mark Zuckerberg said that, for security reasons, the company collects “data of people who have not signed up for Facebook.”

By David Ingram

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Concern about Facebook Inc’s respect for data privacy is widening to include the information it collects about non-users, after Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg said the world’s largest social network tracks people whether they have accounts or not.

Privacy concerns have swamped Facebook since it acknowledged last month that information about millions of users wrongly ended up in the hands of political consultancy Cambridge Analytica, a firm that has counted U.S. President Donald Trump’s 2016 electoral campaign among its clients.

Zuckerberg said on Wednesday under questioning by U.S. Representative Ben Luján that, for security reasons, Facebook also collects “data of people who have not signed up for Facebook.”

Lawmakers and privacy advocates immediately protested the practice, with many saying Facebook needed to develop a way for non-users to find out what the company knows about them.

“We’ve got to fix that,” Representative Luján, a Democrat, told Zuckerberg, calling for such disclosure, a move that would have unclear effects on the company’s ability to target ads. Zuckerberg did not respond. On Friday Facebook said it had no plans to build such a tool.

Critics said that Zuckerberg has not said enough about the extent and use of the data. “It’s not clear what Facebook is doing with that information,” said Chris Calabrese, vice president for policy at the Center for Democracy & Technology, a Washington advocacy group.

COOKIES EVERYWHERE
Facebook gets some data on non-users from people on its network, such as when a user uploads email addresses of friends. Other information comes from “cookies,” small files stored via a browser and used by Facebook and others to track people on the internet, sometimes to target them with ads.

“This kind of data collection is fundamental to how the internet works,” Facebook said in a statement to Reuters.

Asked if people could opt out, Facebook added, “There are basic things you can do to limit the use of this information for advertising, like using browser or device settings to delete cookies. This would apply to other services beyond Facebook because, as mentioned, it is standard to how the internet works.”

Facebook often installs cookies on non-users’ browsers if they visit sites with Facebook”like” and “share” buttons, whether or not a person pushes a button. Facebook said it uses browsing data to create analytics reports, including about traffic to a site.

The company said it does not use the data to target ads, except those inviting people to join Facebook.

TARGETING FACEBOOK
Advocates and lawmakers say they are singling out Facebook because of its size, rivaled outside China only by Alphabet Inc’s Google, and because they allege Zuckerberg was not forthcoming about the extent and reasons for the tracking.

“He’s either deliberately misunderstanding some of the questions, or he’s not clear about what’s actually happening inside Facebook’s operation,” said Daniel Kahn Gillmor, a senior staff technologist at the American Civil Liberties Union.

Zuckerberg, for instance, said the collection was done for security purposes, without explaining further or saying whether it was also used for measurement or analytics, Gillmor said, adding that Facebook had a business incentive to use the non-user data to target ads.

Facebook declined to comment on why Zuckerberg referred to security only.

Gillmor said Facebook could build databases on non-users by combining web browsing history with uploaded contacts. Facebook said on Friday that it does not do so.

The ACLU is pushing U.S. lawmakers to enact broad privacy legislation including a requirement for consent prior to data collection.

The first regulatory challenge to Facebook’s practices for non-users may come next month when a new European Union law, known as the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), takes effect and requires notice and consent prior to data collection.

At a minimum, “Facebook is going to have to think about ways to structure their technology to give that proper notice,” said Woodrow Hartzog, a Northeastern University professor of law and computer science.

Facebook said in its statement on Friday, “Our products and services comply with applicable law and will comply with GDPR.”

The social network would be wise to recognize at least a right to know, said Michael Froomkin, a University of Miami law professor.

“If I’m not a Facebook user, I ought to have a right to know what data Facebook has about me,” Froomkin said.

(Reporting by David Ingram; Editing by Peter Henderson and Richard Chang)


really ready to toss this machine..

Offline ArMaP

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #843 on: April 15, 2018, 04:05:07 PM »
The first regulatory challenge to Facebook’s practices for non-users may come next month when a new European Union law, known as the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), takes effect and requires notice and consent prior to data collection.
Not only that, it says that those doing data processing (collection is also considered processing) should say, in clear language, what they use the data for, and that any "data holder" (in this case anyone that visits Facebook) has the right of knowing what data about them is stored and ask for the removal of the data. They should also say who uses that data besides facebook. If the data is used for something not shown in the consent form then they may be penalised. The GDPR also has penalties for data breaches, and for any serious breach of the GDPR they have fines that may go up to 20,000,000 Euros or 4% of the worldwide annual turnover, whichever is higher.

If this Cambridge Analytica case had happened after May 25th facebook could be in serious trouble with the EU.

Offline ArMaP

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #844 on: April 15, 2018, 04:08:10 PM »
But one thing is certain, facebook is not the only one doing that, just look at the right side of this forum's pages and you will see two other cases, Amazon and Walmart. Those images are hosted on their own servers, so they get information about who visits these pages.

Offline space otter

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #845 on: April 15, 2018, 05:18:49 PM »


yeah
 this is one of the very few places i stop at where NOT SECURE in right in the address

Offline ArMaP

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Re: they know what you are doing
« Reply #846 on: April 15, 2018, 05:44:17 PM »

yeah
 this is one of the very few places i stop at where NOT SECURE in right in the address
That "not secure" means only that the connection is not established with encryption, so it's relatively easy to intercept the communications between the server and the clients.

 


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