ANUNNAKI CONNECTION
Persia - Assyria
Winged Flying Craft or Angels?
Faravahar
Faravahar, believed to be a depiction of a Fravashi.

The Faravahar (Avestan), Farohar (middle Persian), Foroohar or Forouhar is one of the best known symbols of the Zoroastrian religion.

What the figure symbolizes is disputed. While it is currently thought to represent a Fravashi (c. an individual's guardian angel), what it represented in the minds of those who adapted it from earlier Mesopotamian and Egyptian reliefs is unclear. Historically, the symbol is influenced by the "winged sun" hieroglyph appearing on Bronze Age royal seals (Luwian SOL SUUS, symbolizing royal power in particular).

In Zoroastrian angelology, a fravashi (Farvadin) is a Yazata, responsible to the archangel Haurvatat (Khordad Amesha Spenta), whose special domain is water.

The principal source of information on the fravarshi is Yasht 13, where they appear as beings who inhabit the stratosphere, and aid and protect those who worship them. In the Farvardin Yasht, the farvarshi are described as a vast host of "many hundreds, many thousands, many tens of thousands" aiding Ahura Mazda in the creation of the universe.
 

The Faravahar in the Seal of Darius I
Prior to the reign of Darius I, pictorial representations of a Faravahar did not have a human form above the wings.

Webmaster's Note: This is a very important fact as it relates to the Anunnaki
 

The Faravahar in the Behistun Inscription

Faravahar Source

Fravashi Source
 
 

Darius The Great

Darius I, Darrioush in Persian, also known as Darayarahush
Darius I Hystaspes, or Darius the Great, king of Persia [522-486 BCE]. 

Source for More Reading - Iran Chamber Society
 

Numerous palace architectural ornaments were uncovered which are -- soldiers, guardian figures, and mythical images. The solder images depict Daruis' "immortal guard," a unit of elite high ranking warriors in charge of protecting him and his empire.
Zoroaster


Zoroaster, in a popular Parsi Zoroastrian depiction. This personified image of Zoroaster emerged in the 18th century, the result of an Indian Parsi Zoroastrian artist's imaginings; it quickly became a popular icon, and is now regarded by many Zoroastrians as being historically based.

Zoroaster, in a popular Parsi Zoroastrian depiction. This personified image of Zoroaster emerged in the 18th century, the result of an Indian Parsi Zoroastrian artist's imaginings; it quickly became a popular icon, and is now regarded by many Zoroastrians as being historically based.

Zarathushtra (Avestan: ZaratØuštra), usually known in English as Zoroaster (after the Greek version) was an ancient Iranian prophet, and the founder of Zoroastrianism, which was the national religion of the Sassanian Empire of Persia, and played an important role in the earlier Achaemenean and Parthian regimes. In Persian, the name takes the form Zartosht.

Zoroaster is generally accepted as a historical figure, but efforts to date Zoroaster vary widely. Scholarly estimates are usually roughly near 1200 BC, making him a candidate as the founder of the earliest religion based on revealed scripture, while others place him anywhere between the 18th and the 6th centuries BC.

Mythological

Zoroaster was famous in classical antiquity as the founder of the religion of the Magi. His name is cited by Xanthus, and in the Alcibiades of Plato as well as by Plutarch, Pliny the Elder and Diogenes Laertius. Ancient Greek estimates are dependent upon Persian mythology, and give dates as early as the 7th millennium BC. These are the dates to which Parsis subscribe.

Persian mythology, mainly the Shahnama of Ferdowsi, and oral tradition place Zoroaster quite early. Manly Palmer Hall in his book, Twelve World Teachers, arrives at a rough estimate ranging from 10000 BCE to 1000 BCE.

Source

Other Reading
Zoroaster.Net - Zoroastrian faith and philosophy - Parsis - by Dr. Bahram Varza
Stanford University - Zoroasterism

Histories of Herodotus
A history source of Persian Empire of Achaemenian era
By: Herodotus (c. 484 - 425 BCE); Translated by: George Rawlinson 

Source Iran Chamber Society - Complete Volume

~ MENU ~
Copyright Notice

All pictures and photos on this page, unless otherwise noted, have been gathered from pubic domain sources or are available under GNU License. Further documentation is available on our Copyright Page and our Legal Department.

Article Quotes all have links to their appropriate source and are noted. All other text not so noted is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License

All information on this page is used only for non profit educational purposes. All reasonable attempts have been made that no credits are missed, but with a work of this size omissions may occur. If you see anything of yours that has not been properly credited or wish to have removed please contact the Webmaster


 
Menu

Webpages  © 2001-2006 
Blue Knight Productions